TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®  •  TODAYINSCI ®
Celebrating 24 Years on the Web
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent�issue �”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index N > Category: Never

Never Quotes (1089 quotes)

… certain conditions under which the observable thing is perceived are tacitly assumed ... for the possibility that we deal with hallucinations or a dream can never be excluded.
In The Language of Modern Physics (1956).
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (557)  |  Condition (362)  |  Deal (192)  |  Dream (222)  |  Hallucination (4)  |  Observable (21)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Thing (1914)

... If I let myself believe anything on insufficient evidence, there may be no great harm done by the mere belief; it may be true after all, or I may never have occasion to exhibit it in outward acts. But I cannot help doing this great wrong towards Man, that I make myself credulous. The danger to society is not merely that it should believe wrong things, though that is great enough; but that it should become credulous, and lose the habit of testing things and inquiring into them; for then it must sink back into savagery.
The Scientific Basis of Morals (1884), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Back (395)  |  Become (821)  |  Belief (615)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Danger (127)  |  Doing (277)  |  Enough (341)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Great (1610)  |  Habit (174)  |  Lose (165)  |  Man (2252)  |  Merely (315)  |  Must (1525)  |  Myself (211)  |  Occasion (87)  |  Sink (38)  |  Society (350)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Wrong (246)

…I distinguish two parts of it, which I call respectively the brighter and the darker. The brighter seems to surround and pervade the whole hemisphere; but the darker part, like a sort of cloud, discolours the Moon’s surface and makes it appear covered with spots. Now these spots, as they are somewhat dark and of considerable size, are plain to everyone and every age has seen them, wherefore I will call them great or ancient spots, to distinguish them from other spots, smaller in size, but so thickly scattered that they sprinkle the whole surface of the Moon, but especially the brighter portion of it. These spots have never been observed by anyone before me; and from my observations of them, often repeated, I have been led to the opinion which I have expressed, namely, that I feel sure that the surface of the Moon is not perfectly smooth, free from inequalities and exactly spherical… but that, on the contrary, it is full of inequalities, uneven, full of hollows and protuberances, just like the surface of the Earth itself, which is varied everywhere by lofty mountains and deep valleys.
Describing his pioneering telescope observations of the Moon made from Jan 1610. In The Starry Messenger (Mar 1610). Quoted in Patrick Moore, Patrick Moore on the Moon (2006), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Ancient (198)  |  Call (781)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Crater (8)  |  Dark (145)  |  Deep (241)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Everywhere (98)  |  Express (192)  |  Feel (371)  |  Free (239)  |  Great (1610)  |  Moon (252)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Other (2233)  |  Portion (86)  |  Protuberance (3)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Smooth (34)  |  Surface (223)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Two (936)  |  Valley (37)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)

...they have never affirm'd any thing, concerning the Cause, till the Trial was past: whereas, to do it before, is a most venomous thing in the making of Sciences; for whoever has fix'd on his Cause, before he experimented; can hardly avoid fitting his Experiment to his Observations, to his own Cause, which he had before imagin'd; rather than the Cause to the Truth of the Experiment itself.
Referring to experiments of the Aristotelian mode, whereby a preconceived truth would be illustrated merely to convince people of the validity of the original thought.
Thomas Sprat, Abraham Cowley, History of the Royal Society (1667, 1734), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (179)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Bias (22)  |  Cause (561)  |  Convince (43)  |  Do (1905)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Making (300)  |  Merely (315)  |  Most (1728)  |  Observation (593)  |  Past (355)  |  People (1031)  |  Preconceive (3)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thought (995)  |  Trial (59)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Validity (50)  |  Venom (2)  |  Whoever (42)

...while science gives us implements to use, science alone does not determine for what ends they will be employed. Radio is an amazing invention. Yet now that it is here, one suspects that Hitler never could have consolidated his totalitarian control over Germany without its use. One never can tell what hands will reach out to lay hold on scientific gifts, or to what employment they will be put. Ever the old barbarian emerges, destructively using the new civilization.
In 'The Real Point of Conflict between Science and Religion', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Barbarian (2)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Control (182)  |  Determine (152)  |  Emerge (24)  |  Employ (115)  |  Employment (34)  |  End (603)  |  Germany (16)  |  Gift (105)  |  Hand (149)  |  Adolf Hitler (20)  |  Hold (96)  |  Implement (13)  |  Invention (400)  |  New (1273)  |  Old (499)  |  Radio (60)  |  Reach (286)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Suspect (18)  |  Tell (344)  |  Totalitarian (6)  |  Use (771)  |  Will (2350)

“Of course they answer to their names?” the Gnat remarked carelessly.
“I never knew them to do it,” [said Alice.]
“What’s the use of them having names,” said the Gnat, “if they won’t answer to them?”
“No use to them,” said Alice; “but it’s useful to the people that name them, I suppose.”
In Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1871, 1897), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Course (413)  |  Day (43)  |  Do (1905)  |  Moon (252)  |  Name (359)  |  Night (133)  |  Nomenclature (159)  |  People (1031)  |  Sun (407)  |  Suppose (158)  |  Use (771)  |  Useful (260)

“That’s another thing we’ve learned from your Nation,” said Mein Herr, “map-making. But we’ve carried it much further than you. What do you consider the largest map that would be really useful?”
“About six inches to the mile.”
“Only six inches!” exclaimed Mein Herr. “We very soon got to six yards to the mile. Then we tried a hundred yards to the mile. And then came the grandest idea of all! We actually made a map of the country, on the scale of a mile to the mile!
“Have you used it much?” I enquired.
“It has never been spread out, yet,” said Mein Herr: “the farmers objected: they said it would cover the whole country, and shut out the sunlight! So we now use the country itself, as its own map, and I assure you it does nearly as well.”
From Sylvie and Bruno Concluded (1893), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (118)  |  Assure (16)  |  Cartography (3)  |  Consider (428)  |  Country (269)  |  Cover (40)  |  Do (1905)  |  Enquire (4)  |  Exclaim (15)  |  Farmer (35)  |  Grand (29)  |  Grandest (10)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Idea (881)  |  Inch (10)  |  Large (398)  |  Largest (39)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Making (300)  |  Map (50)  |  Mile (43)  |  Model (106)  |  Nation (208)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Object (438)  |  Scale (122)  |  Shut (41)  |  Soon (187)  |  Spread (86)  |  Sunlight (29)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Use (771)  |  Useful (260)  |  Whole (756)  |  Yard (10)

[1157] The man who blames the supreme certainty of mathematics feeds on confusion, and can never silence the contradictions of sophistical sciences which lead to an eternal quackery.
W. An. III. 241 a. From the original Italian: “Chi biasima la soma certezza della matematica, si pasce di confusione mai porrà silentio alle contraditioni delle soffistiche sciētie, colle quali s’inpara vno eterno gridore.” English and Italian in Jean Paul Richter (trans.), 'Philosophical Maxims: Of Mechanics', The Literary Works of Leonardo da Vinci (1883), Vol. 1, Part 2, 289, Aphorism 1157. [Note: Da Vinci writes ē=en.] Also translated beginning, “Those who condemn…”. Also seen translated as “Whoever despises the high wisdom of mathematics nourishes himself on delusion and will never still the sophistic sciences whose only product is an eternal uproar,” in Nicholas J. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims (1988).
Science quotes on:  |  Blame (31)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Contradiction (69)  |  Eternal (113)  |  Feed (31)  |  Lead (391)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Quackery (4)  |  Silence (62)  |  Sophism (2)  |  Supreme (73)

[1665-10-16] But Lord, how empty the streets are, and melancholy, so many poor sick people in the streets, full of sores, and so many sad stories overheard as I walk, everybody talking of this dead, and that man sick, and so many in this place, and so many in that. And they tell me that in Westminster there is never a physitian, and but one apothecary left, all being dead - but that there are great hopes of a great decrease this week. God send it.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (16 Oct 1665)
Science quotes on:  |  Apothecary (10)  |  Being (1276)  |  Empty (82)  |  Everybody (72)  |  God (776)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hope (321)  |  Lord (97)  |  Man (2252)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  People (1031)  |  Plague (42)  |  Poor (139)  |  Sick (83)  |  Talking (76)  |  Tell (344)  |  Walk (138)  |  Week (73)

[A] quality of an inventor is imagination, because invention is a leap of the imagination from what is known to what has never been before.
As quoted in French Strother, 'The Modern Profession of Inventing', World's Work and Play (Jul 1905), 6, No. 32, 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Imagination (349)  |  Invention (400)  |  Inventor (79)  |  Know (1538)  |  Known (453)  |  Leap (57)  |  Quality (139)

[A]ll the ingenious men, and all the scientific men, and all the fanciful men, in the world,... could never invent, if all their wits were boiled into one, anything so curious and so ridiculous as a lobster.
The Water-babies (1886), 161.
Science quotes on:  |  Boil (24)  |  Curious (95)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Invention (400)  |  Lobster (5)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Wit (61)  |  World (1850)

[Before the time of Benjamin Peirce it never occurred to anyone that mathematical research] was one of the things for which a mathematical department existed. Today it is a commonplace in all the leading universities. Peirce stood alone—a mountain peak whose absolute height might be hard to measure, but which towered above all the surrounding country.
In 'The Story of Mathematics at Harvard', Harvard Alumni Bulletin (3 Jan 1924), 26, 376. Cited by R. C. Archibald in 'Benjamin Peirce: V. Biographical Sketch', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Alone (324)  |  Commonplace (24)  |  Country (269)  |  Department (93)  |  Exist (458)  |  Hard (246)  |  Height (33)  |  Leading (17)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Measure (241)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Occurred (2)  |  Peak (20)  |  Benjamin Peirce (11)  |  Research (753)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Time (1911)  |  Today (321)  |  Tower (45)  |  University (130)

[Benjamin Peirce's] lectures were not easy to follow. They were never carefully prepared. The work with which he rapidly covered the blackboard was very illegible, marred with frequent erasures, and not infrequent mistakes (he worked too fast for accuracy). He was always ready to digress from the straight path and explore some sidetrack that had suddenly attracted his attention, but which was likely to have led nowhere when the college bell announced the close of the hour and we filed out, leaving him abstractedly staring at his work, still with chalk and eraser in his hands, entirely oblivious of his departing class.
Writing as a Professor Emeritus at Harvard University, a former student of Peirce, in 'Benjamin Peirce: II. Reminiscences', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Attention (196)  |  Attracted (3)  |  Bell (35)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Chalk (9)  |  Class (168)  |  Close (77)  |  College (71)  |  Covered (5)  |  Departing (2)  |  Easy (213)  |  Eraser (2)  |  Fast (49)  |  Follow (389)  |  Frequent (26)  |  Hour (192)  |  Infrequent (2)  |  Lecture (111)  |  Marred (3)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Oblivious (9)  |  Path (159)  |  Prepared (5)  |  Rapidly (67)  |  Staring (3)  |  Still (614)  |  Straight (75)  |  Suddenly (91)  |  Work (1402)

[Civilization] is a highly complicated invention which has probably been made only once. If it perished it might never be made again. … But it is a poor thing. And if it to be improved there is no hope save in science.
In The Inequality of Man: And Other Essays (1937), 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (220)  |  Complicated (117)  |  Hope (321)  |  Improve (64)  |  Invention (400)  |  Perish (56)  |  Poor (139)  |  Save (126)  |  Thing (1914)

[Concerning] mr Kirwan’s charming treatise on manures. Science never appears so beautiful as when applied to the uses of human life, nor any use of it so engaging as agriculture & domestic economy.
Letter (23 Mar 1798) from Jefferson in Philadelphia to William Strickland. In The Papers of Thomas Jefferson: 1 January 1798 to 31 January 1799 (2003), 211. Jefferson was thanking Strickland, who had sent him a copy of Kirwan’s treatise.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (78)  |  Appear (122)  |  Applied (176)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Charming (4)  |  Concern (239)  |  Domestic (27)  |  Economy (59)  |  Human (1512)  |  Richard Kirwan (3)  |  Life (1870)  |  Manure (8)  |  Treatise (46)  |  Use (771)

[Concerning] the usual contempt with which an orthodox analytic group treats all outsiders and strangers ... I urge you to think of the young psychoanalysts as your colleagues, collaborators and partners and not as spies, traitors and wayward children. You can never develop a science that way, only an orthodox church.
Letter to a colleague (Nov 1960). In Colin Wilson, New Pathways in Psychology: Maslow and the Post-Freudian Revolution (1972, 2001), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Analytic (11)  |  Child (333)  |  Children (201)  |  Church (64)  |  Collaborator (2)  |  Colleague (51)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Develop (278)  |  Development (441)  |  Orthodox (4)  |  Outsider (7)  |  Partner (5)  |  Psychoanalyst (4)  |  Spy (9)  |  Stranger (16)  |  Think (1122)  |  Traitor (3)  |  Treatment (135)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wayward (3)  |  Young (253)

[Dubious attribution] I was wise enough never to grow up, while fooling most people into believing that I had.
Although seen widely circulated on the web, Webmaster has so far been unable to verify any primary source. Found in few books, but without any citation, for example as early as Joel Goodman, Laffirmations: 1001 Ways to Add Humor to Your Life and Work (1995), 305.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Enough (341)  |  Grow (247)  |  Most (1728)  |  People (1031)  |  Wise (143)

[For the] increase of knowledge and … the useful application of the knowledge gained, … there never is a sudden beginning; even the cloud change which portends the thunderstorm begins slowly.
From address, 'A Medical Retrospect'. Published in Yale Medical Journal (Oct 1910), 17, No. 2, 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (257)  |  Begin (275)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Change (639)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Gain (146)  |  Increase (225)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Portend (2)  |  Progress (492)  |  Slow (108)  |  Sudden (70)  |  Thunderstorm (7)  |  Useful (260)

[I was advised] to read Jordan's 'Cours d'analyse'; and I shall never forget the astonishment with which I read that remarkable work, the first inspiration for so many mathematicians of my generation, and learnt for the first time as I read it what mathematics really meant.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishment (30)  |  First (1302)  |  Forget (125)  |  Generation (256)  |  Inspiration (80)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Read (308)  |  Time (1911)  |  Work (1402)

[I]magine you want to know the sex of your unborn child. There are several approaches. You could, for example, do what the late film star ... Cary Grant did before he was an actor: In a carnival or fair or consulting room, you suspend a watch or a plumb bob above the abdomen of the expectant mother; if it swings left-right it's a boy, and if it swings forward-back it's a girl. The method works one time in two. Of course he was out of there before the baby was born, so he never heard from customers who complained he got it wrong. ... But if you really want to know, then you go to amniocentesis, or to sonograms; and there your chance of being right is 99 out of 100. ... If you really want to know, you go to science.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abdomen (6)  |  Actor (9)  |  Approach (112)  |  Baby (29)  |  Back (395)  |  Being (1276)  |  Birth (154)  |  Boy (100)  |  Carnival (2)  |  Chance (244)  |  Child (333)  |  Complaint (13)  |  Consulting (13)  |  Course (413)  |  Customer (8)  |  Do (1905)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fair (16)  |  Forward (104)  |  Girl (38)  |  Grant (76)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Late (119)  |  Method (531)  |  Mother (116)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Right (473)  |  Sex (68)  |  Star (460)  |  Swing (12)  |  Time (1911)  |  Two (936)  |  Unborn (5)  |  Want (504)  |  Watch (118)  |  Work (1402)  |  Wrong (246)

[In childhood, to overcome fear, the] need took me back again and again to a sycamore tree rising from the earth at the edge of a ravine. It was a big, old tree that had grown out over the ravine, so that when you climbed it, you looked straight down fifty feet or more. Every time I climbed that tree, I forced myself to climb to the last possible safe limb and then look down. Every time I did it, I told myself I’d never do it again. But I kept going back because it scared me and I had to know I could overcome that.
In John Glenn and Nick Taylor, John Glenn: A Memoir (2000), 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (395)  |  Childhood (42)  |  Climb (39)  |  Do (1905)  |  Down (455)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Edge (51)  |  Fear (212)  |  Force (497)  |  Know (1538)  |  Last (425)  |  Limb (9)  |  Look (584)  |  More (2558)  |  Myself (211)  |  Need (320)  |  Old (499)  |  Overcome (40)  |  Possible (560)  |  Ravine (5)  |  Rising (44)  |  Safe (61)  |  Scared (2)  |  Straight (75)  |  Tell (344)  |  Time (1911)  |  Tree (269)

[In the case of research director, Willis R. Whitney, whose style was to give talented investigators as much freedom as possible, you may define “serendipity” as] the art of profiting from unexpected occurrences. When you do things in that way you get unexpected results. Then you do something else and you get unexpected results in another line, and you do that on a third line and then all of a sudden you see that one of these lines has something to do with the other. Then you make a discovery that you never could have made by going on a direct road.
Quoted in Guy Suits, 'Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 355.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (680)  |  Direct (228)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Do (1905)  |  Freedom (145)  |  Investigator (71)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Other (2233)  |  Possible (560)  |  Profit (56)  |  Research (753)  |  Result (700)  |  See (1094)  |  Serendipity (17)  |  Something (718)  |  Sudden (70)  |  Talent (99)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Unexpected (55)  |  Way (1214)  |  Willis R. Whitney (17)

[J.J.] Sylvester’s methods! He had none. “Three lectures will be delivered on a New Universal Algebra,” he would say; then, “The course must be extended to twelve.” It did last all the rest of that year. The following year the course was to be Substitutions-Théorie, by Netto. We all got the text. He lectured about three times, following the text closely and stopping sharp at the end of the hour. Then he began to think about matrices again. “I must give one lecture a week on those,” he said. He could not confine himself to the hour, nor to the one lecture a week. Two weeks were passed, and Netto was forgotten entirely and never mentioned again. Statements like the following were not unfrequent in his lectures: “I haven’t proved this, but I am as sure as I can be of anything that it must be so. From this it will follow, etc.” At the next lecture it turned out that what he was so sure of was false. Never mind, he kept on forever guessing and trying, and presently a wonderful discovery followed, then another and another. Afterward he would go back and work it all over again, and surprise us with all sorts of side lights. He then made another leap in the dark, more treasures were discovered, and so on forever.
As quoted by Florian Cajori, in Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 265-266.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (117)  |  Back (395)  |  Confine (26)  |  Course (413)  |  Dark (145)  |  Deliver (30)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  End (603)  |  Extend (129)  |  False (105)  |  Follow (389)  |  Forever (111)  |  Forget (125)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Frequent (26)  |  Go Back (4)  |  Guess (67)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hour (192)  |  Keep (104)  |  Last (425)  |  Leap (57)  |  Lecture (111)  |  Light (635)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Mention (84)  |  Mentioned (3)  |  Method (531)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Must (1525)  |  New (1273)  |  Next (238)  |  Pass (241)  |  Prove (261)  |  Rest (287)  |  Say (989)  |  Side (236)  |  Statement (148)  |  Surprise (91)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Think (1122)  |  Time (1911)  |  Treasure (59)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (454)  |  Turn Out (9)  |  Two (936)  |  Universal (198)  |  Week (73)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wonderful (155)  |  Work (1402)  |  Year (963)

[L]et us not overlook the further great fact, that not only does science underlie sculpture, painting, music, poetry, but that science is itself poetic. The current opinion that science and poetry are opposed is a delusion. … On the contrary science opens up realms of poetry where to the unscientific all is a blank. Those engaged in scientific researches constantly show us that they realize not less vividly, but more vividly, than others, the poetry of their subjects. Whoever will dip into Hugh Miller’s works on geology, or read Mr. Lewes's “Seaside Studies,” will perceive that science excites poetry rather than extinguishes it. And whoever will contemplate the life of Goethe will see that the poet and the man of science can co-exist in equal activity. Is it not, indeed, an absurd and almost a sacrilegious belief that the more a man studies Nature the less he reveres it? Think you that a drop of water, which to the vulgar eye is but a drop of water, loses anything in the eye of the physicist who knows that its elements are held together by a force which, if suddenly liberated, would produce a flash of lightning? Think you that what is carelessly looked upon by the uninitiated as a mere snow-flake, does not suggest higher associations to one who has seen through a microscope the wondrously varied and elegant forms of snow-crystals? Think you that the rounded rock marked with parallel scratches calls up as much poetry in an ignorant mind as in the mind of a geologist, who knows that over this rock a glacier slid a million years ago? The truth is, that those who have never entered upon scientific pursuits know not a tithe of the poetry by which they are surrounded. Whoever has not in youth collected plants and insects, knows not half the halo of interest which lanes and hedge-rows can assume. Whoever has not sought for fossils, has little idea of the poetical associations that surround the places where imbedded treasures were found. Whoever at the seaside has not had a microscope and aquarium, has yet to learn what the highest pleasures of the seaside are. Sad, indeed, is it to see how men occupy themselves with trivialities, and are indifferent to the grandest phenomena—care not to understand the architecture of the Heavens, but are deeply interested in some contemptible controversy about the intrigues of Mary Queen of Scots!—are learnedly critical over a Greek ode, and pass by without a glance that grand epic written by the finger of God upon the strata of the Earth!
In Education: Intellectual, Moral, and Physical (1889), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (60)  |  Absurdity (34)  |  Activity (218)  |  Aquarium (2)  |  Architecture (50)  |  Association (49)  |  Belief (615)  |  Blank (14)  |  Call (781)  |  Care (203)  |  Collection (68)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Controversy (30)  |  Critical (73)  |  Crystal (71)  |  Current (122)  |  Delusion (26)  |  Drop (77)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Elegant (37)  |  Element (322)  |  Enter (145)  |  Epic (12)  |  Excitation (9)  |  Exist (458)  |  Eye (440)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Flash (49)  |  Force (497)  |  Form (976)  |  Fossil (143)  |  Geologist (82)  |  Geology (240)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Glance (36)  |  God (776)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (150)  |  Grandest (10)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greek (109)  |  Halo (7)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hedgerow (2)  |  Idea (881)  |  Ignorant (91)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Insect (89)  |  Interest (416)  |  Know (1538)  |  Learn (672)  |  George Henry Lewes (22)  |  Life (1870)  |  Lightning (49)  |  Little (717)  |  Look (584)  |  Lose (165)  |  Man (2252)  |  Marked (55)  |  Microscope (85)  |  Hugh Miller (18)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Music (133)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Ode (3)  |  Open (277)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Opposition (49)  |  Other (2233)  |  Overlook (33)  |  Painting (46)  |  Parallel (46)  |  Pass (241)  |  Physicist (270)  |  Plant (320)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Poetry (150)  |  Pursuit (128)  |  Read (308)  |  Realize (157)  |  Realm (87)  |  Research (753)  |  Rock (176)  |  Science And Art (195)  |  Science And Poetry (17)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Seaside (2)  |  See (1094)  |  Show (353)  |  Snow (39)  |  Snowflake (15)  |  Strata (37)  |  Subject (543)  |  Suddenly (91)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1122)  |  Through (846)  |  Together (392)  |  Treasure (59)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Underlie (19)  |  Understand (648)  |  Unscientific (13)  |  Vividly (11)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Water (503)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Work (1402)  |  Year (963)  |  Youth (109)

[My Book] will endeavour to establish the principle[s] of reasoning in ... [geology]; and all my geology will come in as illustration of my views of those principles, and as evidence strengthening the system necessarily arising out of the admission of such principles, which... are neither more nor less than that no causes whatever have from the earliest time to which we can look back, to the present, ever acted, but those now acting; and that they never acted with different degrees of energy from that which they now exert.
Letter to Roderick Murchison Esq. (15 Jan 1829). In Mrs Lyell (ed.), The Life, Letters and Journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart (1881), Vol. 1, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Admission (17)  |  Arising (22)  |  Back (395)  |  Book (413)  |  Cause (561)  |  Degree (277)  |  Different (595)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Energy (373)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Exert (40)  |  Geology (240)  |  Illustration (51)  |  Look (584)  |  More (2558)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Present (630)  |  Principle (530)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  System (545)  |  Time (1911)  |  Uniformitarianism (9)  |  View (496)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2350)

[My] numberless observations... made on the Strata... [have] made me confident of their uniformity throughout this Country & [have] led me to conclude that the same regularity... will be found to extend to every part of the Globe for Nature has done nothing by piecemeal. [T]here is no inconsistency in her productions. [T]he Horse never becomes an Ass nor the Crab an Apple by any intermixture or artificial combination whatever[. N]or will the Oak ever degenerate into an Ash or an Ash into an Elm. [H]owever varied by Soil or Climate the species will still be distinct on this ground. [T]hen I argue that what is found here may be found elsewhere[.] When proper allowances are made for such irregularities as often occur and the proper situation and natural agreement is well understood I am satisfied there will be no more difficulty in ascertaining the true quality of the Strata and the place of its possition [sic] than there is now in finding the true Class and Character of Plants by the Linean [sic] System.
Natural Order of the Strata in England and Wales Accurately Delineated and Described, unpublished manuscript, Department of Geology, University of Oxford, 1801, f. 7v.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (55)  |  Allowance (6)  |  Apple (46)  |  Artificial (38)  |  Ash (21)  |  Ass (5)  |  Become (821)  |  Character (259)  |  Class (168)  |  Climate (102)  |  Combination (150)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Confidence (75)  |  Confident (25)  |  Country (269)  |  Crab (6)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Elm (4)  |  Extend (129)  |  Ground (222)  |  Horse (78)  |  Irregularity (12)  |  More (2558)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Oak (16)  |  Observation (593)  |  Occur (151)  |  Piecemeal (3)  |  Plant (320)  |  Production (190)  |  Proper (150)  |  Quality (139)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Situation (117)  |  Soil (98)  |  Species (435)  |  Still (614)  |  Strata (37)  |  System (545)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Understood (155)  |  Uniformity (38)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2350)

[Nature] is complete, but never finished.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (209)  |  Finish (62)  |  Nature (2017)

[On mediocrity] What we have today is a retreat into low-level goodness. Men are all working hard building barbecues, being devoted to their wives and spending time with their children. Many of us feel, “We never had it so good!” After three wars and a depression, we’re impressed by the rising curve. All we want is it not to blow up.
As quoted in interview with Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Barbecue (2)  |  Being (1276)  |  Blow (45)  |  Blow Up (8)  |  Building (158)  |  Child (333)  |  Children (201)  |  Curve (49)  |  Depression (26)  |  Devote (45)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Feel (371)  |  Good (906)  |  Goodness (26)  |  Hard (246)  |  Impress (66)  |  Impressed (39)  |  Low (86)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Retreat (13)  |  Rising (44)  |  Spend (97)  |  Spending (24)  |  Time (1911)  |  Today (321)  |  Want (504)  |  War (233)  |  Wife (41)

[On the 11th day of November 1572], in the evening, after sunset, when, according to my habit, I was contemplating the stars in a clear sky, I noticed that a new and unusual star, surpassing all others in brilliancy, was shining almost directly over my head; and since I had, almost from boyhood, known all the stars of the heavens perfectly (there is no great difficulty in gaining that knowledge), it was quite evident to me that there had never before been any star in that place in the sky, even the smallest, to say nothing of a star so conspicuously bright as this. I was so astonished at this sight that I was not ashamed to doubt the trustworthiness of my own eyes. But when I observed that others, too, on having the place pointed out to them, could see that there was a star there, I had no further doubts. A miracle indeed, either the greatest of all that have occurred in the whole range of nature since the beginning of the world, or one certainly that is to be classed with those attested by the Holy Oracles.
De Stello. Nova (On the New Star) (1573). Quoted in H. Shapley and A. E. Howarth (eds.), Source Book in Astronomy (1929), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Astonish (39)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Bright (81)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Class (168)  |  Contemplate (29)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Evident (92)  |  Eye (440)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Habit (174)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Holy (35)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Known (453)  |  Miracle (85)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Nova (7)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2233)  |  Point (584)  |  Range (104)  |  Say (989)  |  See (1094)  |  Shining (35)  |  Sight (135)  |  Sky (174)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sunset (27)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Whole (756)  |  World (1850)

[Otto Struve] made the remark once that he never looked at the spectrum of a star, any star, where he didn’t find something important to work on.
'Oral History Transcript: Dr. William Wilson Morgan' (8 Aug 1978) in the Niels Bohr Library & Archives.
Science quotes on:  |  Find (1014)  |  Importance (299)  |  Look (584)  |  Remark (28)  |  Research (753)  |  Something (718)  |  Spectrum (35)  |  Star (460)  |  Work (1402)

[Pure mathematics is] good to give chills in the spine to a certain number of people, me included. I don’t know what else it is good for, and I don’t care. But … like von Neumann said, one never knows whether someone is going to find another use for it.
In The Beauty of Doing Mathematics: Three Public Dialogues (1985), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (203)  |  Certain (557)  |  Chill (10)  |  Find (1014)  |  Good (906)  |  Know (1538)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Number (710)  |  People (1031)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pure Mathematics (72)  |  Spine (9)  |  Use (771)  |  John von Neumann (29)

[Saint-Gaudens and Matthew Arnold] felt a railway train as power; yet they, and all other artists, constantly complained that the power embodied in a railway train could never be embodied in art. All the steam in the world could not, like the Virgin, build Chartres.
After viewing the Palace of Electricity at the 1900 Trocadero Exposition in Paris. In The Education of Henry Brooks Adams: An Autobiography (1918), 388.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (680)  |  Artist (97)  |  Build (211)  |  Energy (373)  |  Other (2233)  |  Power (771)  |  Railway (19)  |  Saint (17)  |  Steam (81)  |  Train (118)  |  Virgin (11)  |  World (1850)

[The Elements] are mutually bound together, the lighter being restrained by the heavier, so that they cannot fly off; while, on the contrary, from the lighter tending upwards, the heavier are so suspended, that they cannot fall down. Thus, by an equal tendency in an opposite direction, each of them remains in its appropriate place, bound together by the never-ceasing revolution of the world.
In The Natural History of Pliny (1855), Vol. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Being (1276)  |  Bound (120)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Direction (185)  |  Down (455)  |  Element (322)  |  Fall (243)  |  Fly (153)  |  Heavier (2)  |  Lighter (2)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Remain (355)  |  Revolution (133)  |  Suspended (5)  |  Tendency (110)  |  Together (392)  |  Upward (44)  |  Upwards (6)  |  World (1850)

[The new term] Physicist is both to my mouth and ears so awkward that I think I shall never use it. The equivalent of three separate sounds of i in one word is too much.
Quoted in Sydney Ross, Nineteenth-Century Attitudes: Men of Science (1991), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Awkward (11)  |  Biography (254)  |  Both (496)  |  Ear (69)  |  Equivalent (46)  |  Michael Faraday (91)  |  Mouth (54)  |  New (1273)  |  Nomenclature (159)  |  Physicist (270)  |  Separate (151)  |  Sound (187)  |  Term (357)  |  Think (1122)  |  Use (771)  |  Word (650)

[The screw machine] was on the principle of the guage or sliding lathe now in every workshop throughout the world; the perfection of which consists in that most faithful agent gravity, making the joint, and that almighty perfect number three, which is in harmony itself. I was young when I learned that principle. I had never seen my grandmother putting a chip under a three-legged milking-stool; but she always had to put a chip under a four-legged table, to keep it steady. I cut screws of all dimensions by this machine, and did them perfectly. (1846)
Quoted in ASME International and Heritage Committee, Landmarks in Mechanical Engineering.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (73)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cut (116)  |  Dimension (64)  |  Gravity (140)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Joint (31)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Machine (271)  |  Making (300)  |  Most (1728)  |  Number (710)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Perfect Number (6)  |  Perfection (131)  |  Principle (530)  |  Screw (17)  |  Steady (45)  |  Table (105)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Workshop (14)  |  World (1850)  |  Young (253)

[The] great fairy Science, who is likely to be queen of all the fairies for many a year to come, can only do you good, and never do you harm…
The Water-babies (1886), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1905)  |  Good (906)  |  Great (1610)  |  Year (963)

[The] second fundamental rule of historical science may be thus simply expressed:—we should not wish to explain every thing. Historical tradition must never be abandoned in the philosophy of history—otherwise we lose all firm ground and footing. But historical tradition, ever so accurately conceived and carefully sifted, doth not always, especially in the early and primitive ages, bring with it a full and demonstrative certainty.
In Friedrich von Schlegel and James Burton Robertson (trans.), The Philosophy of History (1835), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Age (509)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Demonstrative (14)  |  Early (196)  |  Everything (489)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Express (192)  |  Firm (47)  |  Footing (2)  |  Fundamental (264)  |  Ground (222)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Science (80)  |  Lose (165)  |  Must (1525)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Rule (307)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Tradition (76)  |  Wish (216)

[The] seminary spirit of minerals hath its proper wombs where it resides, and is like a Prince or Emperour, whose prescripts both Elements and matter must obey; and it is never idle, but always in action, producing and maintaining natural substances, untill they have fulfilled their destiny.
A Discourse of Natural Bathes, and Mineral Waters (1669), 104.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (342)  |  Both (496)  |  Destiny (54)  |  Element (322)  |  Idle (34)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mineral (66)  |  Must (1525)  |  Natural (810)  |  Obey (46)  |  Proper (150)  |  Reside (25)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Substance (253)  |  Womb (25)

[The] structural theory is of extreme simplicity. It assumes that the molecule is held together by links between one atom and the next: that every kind of atom can form a definite small number of such links: that these can be single, double or triple: that the groups may take up any position possible by rotation round the line of a single but not round that of a double link: finally that with all the elements of the first short period [of the periodic table], and with many others as well, the angles between the valencies are approximately those formed by joining the centre of a regular tetrahedron to its angular points. No assumption whatever is made as to the mechanism of the linkage. Through the whole development of organic chemistry this theory has always proved capable of providing a different structure for every different compound that can be isolated. Among the hundreds of thousands of known substances, there are never more isomeric forms than the theory permits.
Presidential Address to the Chemical Society (16 Apr 1936), Journal of the Chemical Society (1936), 533.
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (25)  |  Assumption (96)  |  Atom (381)  |  Capability (44)  |  Capable (174)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Compound (117)  |  Definite (114)  |  Development (441)  |  Different (595)  |  Double (18)  |  Element (322)  |  Extreme (78)  |  First (1302)  |  Form (976)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Isolated (15)  |  Isomer (6)  |  Joining (11)  |  Kind (564)  |  Known (453)  |  Link (48)  |  Linkage (5)  |  Mechanism (102)  |  Molecule (185)  |  More (2558)  |  Next (238)  |  Number (710)  |  Organic (161)  |  Organic Chemistry (41)  |  Other (2233)  |  Period (200)  |  Periodic Table (19)  |  Permit (61)  |  Point (584)  |  Possible (560)  |  Regular (48)  |  Rotation (13)  |  Short (200)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Single (365)  |  Small (489)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (365)  |  Substance (253)  |  Table (105)  |  Tetrahedron (4)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Through (846)  |  Together (392)  |  Valency (4)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (756)

[Thomas Henry] Huxley, I believe, was the greatest Englishman of the Nineteenth Century—perhaps the greatest Englishman of all time. When one thinks of him, one thinks inevitably of such men as Goethe and Aristotle. For in him there was that rich, incomparable blend of intelligence and character, of colossal knowledge and high adventurousness, of instinctive honesty and indomitable courage which appears in mankind only once in a blue moon. There have been far greater scientists, even in England, but there has never been a scientist who was a greater man.
'Thomas Henry Huxley.' In the Baltimore Evening Sun (4 May 1925). Reprinted in A Second Mencken Chrestomathy: A New Selection from the Writings of America's Legendary Editor, Critic, and Wit (2006), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (179)  |  Century (319)  |  Character (259)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Courage (82)  |  England (43)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (150)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (330)  |  High (370)  |  Honesty (29)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (132)  |  Indomitable (4)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Moon (252)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Think (1122)  |  Time (1911)

[When nature appears complicated:] The moment we contemplate it as it is, and attain a position from which we can take a commanding view, though but of a small part of its plan, we never fail to recognize that sublime simplicity on which the mind rests satisfied that it has attained the truth.
Concluding remark in Dionysius Lardner (ed.), Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Vol 1, Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831), 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (126)  |  Attainment (48)  |  Complicated (117)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Fail (191)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Moment (260)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Plan (122)  |  Recognition (93)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Rest (287)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Small (489)  |  Sublime (50)  |  Truth (1109)  |  View (496)

[As Chief Scientific Adviser to the British Ministry of Defence] We persist in regarding ourselves as a Great Power, capable of everything and only temporarily handicapped by economic difficulties. We are not a great power and never will be again. We are a great nation, but if we continue to behave like a Great Power we shall soon cease to be a great nation. Let us take warning from the fate of the Great Powers of the past and not burst ourselves with pride (see Aesop’s fable of the frog). (1949)
As quoted by Peter Hennessy, Whitehall (1989), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Behave (18)  |  British (42)  |  Burst (41)  |  Capable (174)  |  Cease (81)  |  Chief (99)  |  Continue (179)  |  Defence (16)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Economic (84)  |  Economy (59)  |  Everything (489)  |  Fable (12)  |  Fate (76)  |  Frog (44)  |  Great (1610)  |  Handicap (7)  |  Handicapped (7)  |  Nation (208)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Past (355)  |  Persist (13)  |  Power (771)  |  Pride (84)  |  Scientific (955)  |  See (1094)  |  Soon (187)  |  Warning (18)  |  Will (2350)

Forging differs from hoaxing, inasmuch as in the later the deceit is intended to last for a time, and then be discovered, to the ridicule of those who have credited it; whereas the forger is one who, wishing to acquire a reputation for science, records observations which he has never made.
Reflections on the Decline of Science in England (1830). In Calyampudi Radhakrishna Rao, Statistics and Truth (1997), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Deceit (7)  |  Differ (88)  |  Discover (571)  |  Forgery (3)  |  Last (425)  |  Observation (593)  |  Record (161)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Time (1911)

Il est impossible de contempler le spectacle de l’univers étoilé sans se demander comment il s’est formé: nous devions peut-être attendre pour chercher une solution que nous ayons patiemment rassemblé les éléments …mais si nous étions si raisonnables, si nous étions curieux sans impatience, il est probable que nous n’avions jamais créé la Science et que nous nous serions toujours contentés de vivre notre petite vie. Notre esprit a donc reclamé impérieusement cette solution bien avant qu’elle fut mûre, et alors qu’il ne possédait que de vagues lueurs, lui permettant de la deviner plutôt que de l’attendre.
It is impossible to contemplate the spectacle of the starry universe without wondering how it was formed: perhaps we ought to wait, and not look for a solution until have patiently assembled the elements … but if we were so reasonable, if we were curious without impatience, it is probable we would never have created Science and we would always have been content with a trivial existence. Thus the mind has imperiously laid claim to this solution long before it was ripe, even while perceived in only faint glimmers—allowing us to guess a solution rather than wait for it.
From Leçons sur les Hypothèses Consmogoniques (1913) as cited in D. Ter Haar and A.G.W. Cameron, 'Historical Review of Theories of the Origin of the Solar System', collected in Robert Jastrow and A. G. W. Cameron (eds.), Origin of the Solar System: Proceedings of a Conference Held at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, January 23-24, 1962, (1963), 3. 'Cosmogonical Hypotheses' (1913), collected in Harlow Shapley, Source Book in Astronomy, 1900-1950 (1960), 347.
Science quotes on:  |  Assemble (14)  |  Claim (154)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Content (75)  |  Created (6)  |  Curious (95)  |  Element (322)  |  Existence (481)  |  Faint (10)  |  Form (976)  |  Formation (100)  |  Glimmer (5)  |  Guess (67)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Long (778)  |  Look (584)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Origin Of The Universe (20)  |  Patience (58)  |  Perceived (4)  |  Reasonable (29)  |  Ripe (5)  |  Solution (282)  |  Spectacle (35)  |  Star (460)  |  Trivial (59)  |  Universe (900)  |  Vague (50)  |  Wait (66)  |  Wonder (251)

Il ne fallait jamais faire des expériences pour confirmer ses idées, mais simplement pour les contrôler.
We must never make experiments to confirm our ideas, but simply to control them.
From Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale (1865), 67-68. Translation from Henry Copley Green, An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1957), 38. Bernard footnoted that he had expressed this idea earlier in Leçons sur les propriétés et les altérations des liquides de l’organisme (1859), Première leçon.
Science quotes on:  |  Confirm (58)  |  Control (182)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Idea (881)  |  Must (1525)

Indiana Jones: Archaeology is the search for fact… not truth. If it’s truth you're looking for, Dr. Tyree’s philosophy class is right down the hall. … So forget any ideas you've got about lost cities, exotic travel, and digging up the world. We do not follow maps to buried treasure, and “X” never, ever marks the spot. Seventy percent of all archaeology is done in the library. Research. Reading.
Spoken by actor Harrison Ford as character Indiana Jones in movie, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeology (51)  |  Class (168)  |  Digging (11)  |  Do (1905)  |  Down (455)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Follow (389)  |  Forget (125)  |  Idea (881)  |  Library (53)  |  Looking (191)  |  Map (50)  |  Movie (21)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Reading (136)  |  Research (753)  |  Right (473)  |  Search (175)  |  Travel (125)  |  Treasure (59)  |  Truth (1109)  |  World (1850)

La nature veut que dans certains temps les hommes se succèdent les uns aux autres par le moyen de la mort; il leur est permis de se défendre contr’elle jusqu’à un certain point; mais passé cela, on aura beau faire de nouvelles découvertes dans l’Anatomie, on aura beau pénétrer de plus en plus dans les secrets de la structure du corps humain, on ne prendra point la Nature pour dupe, on mourra comme à l’ordinaire.
Nature intends that at fixed periods men should succeed each other by the instrumentality of death. They are allowed to keep it at bay up to a certain point; but when that is passed, it will be of no use to make new discoveries in anatomy, or to penetrate more and more into the secrets of the structure of the human body; we shall never outwit nature, we shall die as usual.
In 'Dialogue 5: Dialogues De Morts Anciens', Nouveaux Dialogues des Morts (2nd Ed., 1683), Vol. 1, 154-155. As translated in Craufurd Tait Ramage, Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (75)  |  Body (557)  |  Certain (557)  |  Death (406)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Dupe (5)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Intend (18)  |  More (2558)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outwit (6)  |  Pass (241)  |  Penetrate (68)  |  Period (200)  |  Plus (43)  |  Point (584)  |  Secret (216)  |  Structure (365)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Use (771)  |  Will (2350)

Les mathématiciens parviennent à la solution d’un problême par le simple arrangement des données, & en réduisant le raisonnement à des opérations si simples, à des jugemens si courts, qu’ils ne perdent jamais de vue l’évidence qui leur sert de guide.
Mathematicians come to the solution of a problem by the simple arrangement of the data, and reducing the reasoning to such simple operations, to judgments so brief, that they never lose sight of the evidence that serves as their guide.
From a paper read to the Académie Royales des Sciences (18 Apr 1787), printed in Méthode de Nomenclature Chimique (1787), 12. Translation from the French by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Brief (37)  |  Court (35)  |  Data (162)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Guide (107)  |  Judgment (140)  |  Lose (165)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Operation (221)  |  Operations (107)  |  Problem (731)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Reduction (52)  |  Sight (135)  |  Simple (426)  |  Solution (282)

Mahomet’s tombe at Mecha is said strangely to hang up, attracted by some invisible Loadstone, but the Memory of this Doctor will never fall to the ground, which his incomparable Book ‘De Magnete’ will support to Eternity.
In The History of the The Worthies of England (1662, 1840), Vol. 1, 515.
Science quotes on:  |  Attract (25)  |  Book (413)  |  Doctor (191)  |  Eternity (64)  |  Fall (243)  |  William Gilbert (10)  |  Ground (222)  |  Hang (46)  |  Incomparable (14)  |  Invisible (66)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Mecca (3)  |  Memory (144)  |  Strange (160)  |  Support (151)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Will (2350)

Nature is curious, and such worke may make,
That our dull sense can never finde, but scape.
For Creatures, small as Atomes, may be there,
If every Atome a Creatures Figure beare.
If foure Atomes a World can make, then see
What severall Worlds might in an Eare--ring bee:
For Millions of these Atomes may bee in
The Head of one Small, little, Single Pin.
And if thus Small, then Ladies may well weare
A World of Worlds, as Pendents in each Eare.
From 'Of Many Worlds in this World', in Poems and Fancies (1653), 44-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Bee (44)  |  Creature (242)  |  Curious (95)  |  Dull (58)  |  Figure (162)  |  Little (717)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Pin (20)  |  Poetry (150)  |  See (1094)  |  Sense (785)  |  Single (365)  |  Small (489)  |  World (1850)

Question: If you walk on a dry path between two walls a few feet apart, you hear a musical note or “ring” at each footstep. Whence comes this?
Answer: This is similar to phosphorescent paint. Once any sound gets between two parallel reflectors or walls, it bounds from one to the other and never stops for a long time. Hence it is persistent, and when you walk between the walls you hear the sounds made by those who walked there before you. By following a muffin man down the passage within a short time you can hear most distinctly a musical note, or, as it is more properly termed in the question, a “ring” at every (other) step.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 175-6, Question 2. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Before (8)  |  Bound (120)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Down (455)  |  Dry (65)  |  Examination (102)  |  Following (16)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Hear (144)  |  Howler (15)  |  Long (778)  |  Man (2252)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Music (133)  |  Note (39)  |  Other (2233)  |  Paint (22)  |  Parallel (46)  |  Passage (52)  |  Path (159)  |  Persistence (25)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Phosphorescent (3)  |  Question (649)  |  Reflector (4)  |  Short (200)  |  Similarity (32)  |  Sound (187)  |  Step (234)  |  Stop (89)  |  Term (357)  |  Time (1911)  |  Two (936)  |  Walk (138)  |  Wall (71)

Question: What is the difference between a “real” and a “virtual” image? Give a drawing showing the formation of one of each kind.
Answer: You see a real image every morning when you shave. You do not see virtual images at all. The only people who see virtual images are those people who are not quite right, like Mrs. A. Virtual images are things which don't exist. I can't give you a reliable drawing of a virtual image, because I never saw one.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 177-8, Question 6. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Difference (355)  |  Do (1905)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Examination (102)  |  Exist (458)  |  Existence (481)  |  Formation (100)  |  Howler (15)  |  Image (97)  |  Kind (564)  |  Mirror (43)  |  Morning (98)  |  People (1031)  |  Question (649)  |  Real (159)  |  Reliability (18)  |  Right (473)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1094)  |  Shave (2)  |  Showing (6)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Virtual (5)

Qui ergo munitam vult habere navem habet etiam acum jaculo suppositam. Rotabitur enim et circumvolvetur acus, donec cuspis acus respiciat orientem sicque comprehendunt quo tendere debeant nautaw cum Cynosura latet in aeris turbatione; quamvis ad occasum numquam tendat, propter circuli brevitatem.
If then one wishes a ship well provided with all things, then one must have also a needle mounted on a dart. The needle will be oscillated and turn until the point of the needle directs itself to the East* [North], thus making known to sailors the route which they should hold while the Little Bear is concealed from them by the vicissitudes of the atmosphere; for it never disappears under the horizon because of the smallness of the circle it describes.
Latin text from Thomas Wright, 'De Utensilibus', A Volume of Vocabularies, (1857) as cited with translation in Park Benjamin, The Intellectual Rise in Electricity: A History (1895), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Atmosphere (117)  |  Bear (162)  |  Circle (117)  |  Compass (37)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Describe (132)  |  Direct (228)  |  Disappear (84)  |  Horizon (47)  |  Known (453)  |  Little (717)  |  Magnetism (43)  |  Making (300)  |  Mount (43)  |  Must (1525)  |  Point (584)  |  Sailor (21)  |  Ship (69)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Turn (454)  |  Vicissitude (6)  |  Will (2350)

Qui est de nous & qui seul peut nous égarer; à le mettre continuellement à épreuve de l'expérience; à ne conserver que les faits qui ne font que des données de la nature , & qui ne peuvent nous tromper; à ne chercher la vérité que dans l'enchaînement naturel des expériences & des observations
We must trust to nothing but facts: These are presented to us by Nature, and cannot deceive. We ought, in every instance, to submit our reasoning to the test of experiment, and never to search for truth but by the natural road of experiment and observation.
From the original French in Traité élémentaire de chimie (1789, 1793), discours préliminaire, x; and from edition translated into English by Robert Kerr, as Elements of Chemistry (1790), Preface, xviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Deceive (26)  |  Deception (9)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Must (1525)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Observation (593)  |  Present (630)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Search (175)  |  Test (221)  |  Trust (72)  |  Truth (1109)

Sir Robert Chiltern: You think science cannot grapple with the problem of women?
Mrs. Cheveley: Science can never grapple with the irrational. That is why it has no future before it in this world.
In play, An Ideal Husband (1912, 2001), Act 1, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Future (467)  |  Grapple (11)  |  Irrational (16)  |  Problem (731)  |  Think (1122)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1850)

Steckt keine Poesie in der Lokomotive, die brausend durch die Nacht zieht und über die zitternde Erde hintobt, als wollte sie Raum und Zeit zermalmen, in dem hastigen, aber wohl geregelten Zucken und Zerren ihrer gewaltigen Glieder, in dem stieren, nur auf ein Ziel losstürmenden Blick ihrer roten Augen, in dem emsigen, willenlosen Gefolge der Wagen, die kreischend und klappernd, aber mit unfehlbarer Sicherheit dem verkörperten Willen aus Eisen und Stahl folge leisten?
Is there no poetry in the locomotive roaring through the night and charging over the quivering earth as if it wanted to crush time and space? Is there no poetry in the hasty but regular jerking and tugging of its powerful limbs, in the stare of its red eyes that never lose sight of their goal? Is there no poetry in the bustling, will-less retinue of cars that follow, screeching and clattering with unmistakable surety, the steel and iron embodiment of will?
Max Eyth
From 'Poesie und Technik' (1904) (Poetry and Technology), in Schweizerische Techniker-Zeitung (1907), Vol 4, 306, as translated in Paul A. Youngman, Black Devil and Iron Angel: The Railway in Nineteenth-Century German Realism (2005), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Car (75)  |  Crush (19)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  Eye (440)  |  Follow (389)  |  Goal (155)  |  Hasty (7)  |  Iron (99)  |  Limb (9)  |  Locomotive (8)  |  Lose (165)  |  Night (133)  |  Poetry (150)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Quivering (2)  |  Red (38)  |  Regular (48)  |  Retinue (3)  |  Sight (135)  |  Space (523)  |  Stare (9)  |  Steel (23)  |  Through (846)  |  Time (1911)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Unmistakable (6)  |  Want (504)  |  Wanted (4)  |  Will (2350)

That the general characters of the big group to which the embryo belongs appear in development earlier than the special characters. In agreement with this is the fact that the vesicular form is the most general form of all; for what is common in a greater degree to all animals than the opposition of an internal and an external surface?
The less general structural relations are formed after the more general, and so on until the most special appear.
The embryo of any given form, instead of passing through the state of other definite forms, on the contrary separates itself from them.

Fundamentally the embryo of a higher animal form never resembles the adult of another animal form, but only its embryo.
Über Entwicklungsgeschichte der Thiere: Beobachtung und Reflexion (1828), 224. Trans. E. S. Russell, Form and Function: A Contribution to the History of Animal Morphology (1916), 125-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (55)  |  Animal (651)  |  Belong (168)  |  Character (259)  |  Common (447)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Definite (114)  |  Degree (277)  |  Development (441)  |  Embryo (30)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Form (976)  |  General (521)  |  Greater (288)  |  Internal (69)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Opposition (49)  |  Other (2233)  |  Passing (76)  |  Resemble (65)  |  Separate (151)  |  Special (188)  |  State (505)  |  Structural (29)  |  Surface (223)  |  Through (846)

Third Fisherman: Master, I marvel how the fishes live in the sea.
First Fisherman: Why, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the little ones: I can compare our rich misers to nothing so fitly as to a whale; a’ plays and tumbles, driving the poor fry before him, and at last devours them all at a mouthful: such whales have I heard on o’ the land, who never leave gaping till they’ve swallowed the whole parish, church, steeple, bells, and all.
In Pericles (1609), Act 2, Scene 1, line 29-38.
Science quotes on:  |  Bell (35)  |  Church (64)  |  Compare (76)  |  Devour (29)  |  Do (1905)  |  Driving (28)  |  Eat (108)  |  First (1302)  |  Fish (130)  |  Fisherman (9)  |  Great (1610)  |  Last (425)  |  Little (717)  |  Live (650)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Marvel (37)  |  Master (182)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Poor (139)  |  Sea (326)  |  Steeple (4)  |  Swallow (32)  |  Whale (45)  |  Whole (756)  |  Why (491)

CALPURNIA: When beggars die there are no comets seen;
The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
CAESAR: Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I have yet heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.
Julius Caesar (1599), II, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Beggar (5)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Comet (65)  |  Coward (5)  |  Death (406)  |  End (603)  |  Fear (212)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Most (1728)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Prince (13)  |  Seeing (143)  |  Small (489)  |  Strange (160)  |  Taste (93)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1911)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wonder (251)

~~[Attributed without source; Very dubious]~~ You should never bet against anything in science at odds of more than about 10-12 to 1.
Often seen, virally spread, but always without a source citation. If you can provide a primary source, please contact Webmaster. Until then the quote should be regarded as not authenticated. The odds are seen variously expressed as “10-12”, “10 or 12”, “1012”, “10^12”, or “trillion”. [All this sloppiness makes the quote a very dubious one. —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Bet (13)  |  More (2558)  |  Odds (6)

~~[Attributed]~~ A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.
As quoted, without citation, in William Joseph Grace, Art of Communicating Ideas (1952), 389. Sadly, much searching produces no primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Car (75)  |  Education (423)  |  Freight (3)  |  Man (2252)  |  Railroad (36)  |  School (227)  |  Steal (14)  |  University (130)  |  Whole (756)

1066. … At that time, throughout all England, a portent such as men had never seen before was seen in the heavens. Some declared that the star was a comet, which some call “the long-haired star”: it first appeared on the eve of the festival of Letania Maior, that is on 24 April, and shone every night for a week.
In George Norman Garmonsway (ed., trans.), 'The Parker Chronicle', The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1953), 195. This translation from the original Saxon, is a modern printing of an ancient anthology known as The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Manuscript copies were held at various English monasteries. These copies of the Chronicle include content first recorded in the late 9th century. The monasteries continued independently updating these annals. This quote comes from a copy once owned by Matthew Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury. Known as the Winchester (or Parker) Chronicle, it is the oldest surviving manuscript.
Science quotes on:  |  April (9)  |  Call (781)  |  Comet (65)  |  Declared (24)  |  England (43)  |  Eve (4)  |  Festival (2)  |  First (1302)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Long (778)  |  Night (133)  |  Portent (2)  |  Shine (49)  |  Star (460)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1911)  |  Week (73)

A bad earthquake at once destroys the oldest associations: the world, the very emblem of all that is solid, has moved beneath our feet like a crust over a fluid; one second of time has conveyed to the mind a strange idea of insecurity, which hours of reflection would never have created.
Journal of Researches: Into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited During the Voyage of H.M.S. BeagIe Round the World (1839), ch. XVI, 369.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (49)  |  Bad (185)  |  Beneath (68)  |  Crust (43)  |  Destroy (189)  |  Earthquake (37)  |  Fluid (54)  |  Hour (192)  |  Idea (881)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Reflection (93)  |  Solid (119)  |  Strange (160)  |  Time (1911)  |  World (1850)

A conceptual scheme is never discarded merely because of a few stubborn facts with which it cannot be reconciled; a conceptual scheme is either modified or replaced by a better one, never abandoned with nothing left to take its place.
Science and Common Sense (1951), 173.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Better (493)  |  Discard (32)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Merely (315)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Scheme (62)  |  Stubborn (14)  |  Theory (1015)

A favourite piece of advice [by William Gull] to his students was, “never disregard what a mother says;” he knew the mother’s instinct, and her perception, quickened by love, would make her a keen observer.
Stated in Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), xxiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (57)  |  Disregard (12)  |  Favourite (7)  |  Sir William Withey Gull (39)  |  Instinct (91)  |  Love (328)  |  Mother (116)  |  Observer (48)  |  Perception (97)  |  Say (989)  |  Student (317)

A few days ago, a Master of Arts, who is still a young man, and therefore the recipient of a modern education, stated to me that until he had reached the age of twenty he had never been taught anything whatever regarding natural phenomena, or natural law. Twelve years of his life previously had been spent exclusively amongst the ancients. The case, I regret to say, is typical. Now we cannot, without prejudice to humanity, separate the present from the past.
'On the Study of Physics', From a Lecture delivered in the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Spring of 1854. Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 1, 284-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Ancient (198)  |  Art (680)  |  Education (423)  |  Humanity (186)  |  Law (913)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Master (182)  |  Modern (402)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Law (46)  |  Past (355)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Prejudice (96)  |  Present (630)  |  Previous (17)  |  Reach (286)  |  Recipient (3)  |  Regret (31)  |  Say (989)  |  Separate (151)  |  Separation (60)  |  Spent (85)  |  Statement (148)  |  Still (614)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Twelve (4)  |  Twenty (4)  |  Typical (16)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Year (963)  |  Young (253)

A fool, Mr, Edgeworth, is one who has never made an experiment.
Remark to Richard Lovell Edgeworth, as quoted by W. Stanley Jevons in ‘Experimental Legislation’, Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 754.
Science quotes on:  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fool (121)

A government, at bottom, is nothing more than a gang of men, and as a practical matter most of them are inferior men ... Government is actually the worst failure of civilized man. There has never been a really good one, and even those that are most tolerable are arbitrary, cruel, grasping and unintelligent. Indeed, it would not be far wrong to describe the best as the common enemy of all decent citizens.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Arbitrary (27)  |  Bad (185)  |  Best (467)  |  Bottom (36)  |  Citizen (52)  |  Civilized (20)  |  Common (447)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Decent (12)  |  Describe (132)  |  Enemy (86)  |  Failure (176)  |  Far (158)  |  Gang (4)  |  Good (906)  |  Government (116)  |  Grasp (65)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Man (2252)  |  Matter (821)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Practical (225)  |  Really (77)  |  Tolerable (2)  |  Unintelligent (2)  |  Worst (57)  |  Wrong (246)

A harmless and a buoyant cheerfulness are not infrequent concomitants of genius; and we are never more deceived than when we mistake gravity for greatness, solemnity for science, and pomposity for erudition.
Lacon: Or, Many Things in Few Words (1865), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Buoyant (6)  |  Genius (301)  |  Gravity (140)  |  Greatness (55)  |  Happiness (126)  |  Mistake (180)  |  More (2558)

A hundred years ago, Auguste Compte, … a great philosopher, said that humans will never be able to visit the stars, that we will never know what stars are made out of, that that's the one thing that science will never ever understand, because they're so far away. And then, just a few years later, scientists took starlight, ran it through a prism, looked at the rainbow coming from the starlight, and said: “Hydrogen!” Just a few years after this very rational, very reasonable, very scientific prediction was made, that we'll never know what stars are made of.
Quoted in Nina L. Diamond, Voices of Truth (2000), 332.
Science quotes on:  |  Coming (114)  |  Auguste Comte (24)  |  Great (1610)  |  Human (1512)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Hydrogen (80)  |  Know (1538)  |  Look (584)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Prediction (89)  |  Prism (8)  |  Rainbow (17)  |  Rational (95)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Star (460)  |  Starlight (5)  |  Stars (304)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Through (846)  |  Understand (648)  |  Will (2350)  |  Year (963)

A love affair with knowledge will never end in heartbreak.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  End (603)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Love (328)  |  Will (2350)

A man of science rises ever, in seeking truth; and if he never finds it in its wholeness, he discovers nevertheless very significant fragments; and these fragments of universal truth are precisely what constitutes science.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1927, 1957), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1927, 1957), 222. From the original French by Claude Bernard: “le savant monte toujours en cherchant la vérité, et s'il ne la trouve jamais tout entière, il en découvre néanmoins des fragments très-importants, et ce sont précisément ces fragments de la vérité générale qui constituent la science.” (1865), 389. A Google translation gives: “The scientist always rises by seeking the truth, and if he never finds it entirely, he nevertheless discovers very important fragments of it, and it is precisely these fragments of the general truth which constitute science.”
Science quotes on:  |  Constitute (99)  |  Constitution (78)  |  Discover (571)  |  Find (1014)  |  Fragment (58)  |  Man (2252)  |  Men Of Science (147)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Precisely (93)  |  Rise (169)  |  Rising (44)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Significant (78)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Universal (198)  |  Wholeness (9)

A man who has once looked with the archaeological eye will never see quite normally. He will be wounded by what other men call trifles. It is possible to refine the sense of time until an old shoe in the bunch grass or a pile of nineteenth century beer bottles in an abandoned mining town tolls in one’s head like a hall clock.
The Night Country (1971), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (41)  |  Abandon (73)  |  Archaeology (51)  |  Beer (10)  |  Bottle (17)  |  Call (781)  |  Century (319)  |  Clock (51)  |  Eye (440)  |  Grass (49)  |  Hall (5)  |  Head (87)  |  Look (584)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mine (78)  |  Mining (22)  |  Old (499)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pile (12)  |  Possible (560)  |  Refine (8)  |  See (1094)  |  Sense (785)  |  Shoe (12)  |  Time (1911)  |  Toll (3)  |  Town (30)  |  Trifle (18)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wound (26)

A man who is convinced of the truth of his religion is indeed never tolerant. At the least, he is to feel pity for the adherent of another religion but usually it does not stop there. The faithful adherent of a religion will try first of all to convince those that believe in another religion and usually he goes on to hatred if he is not successful. However, hatred then leads to persecution when the might of the majority is behind it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adherent (6)  |  Behind (139)  |  Belief (615)  |  Convince (43)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Faithful (13)  |  Feel (371)  |  First (1302)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Lead (391)  |  Least (75)  |  Majority (68)  |  Man (2252)  |  Persecution (14)  |  Pity (16)  |  Religion (369)  |  Stop (89)  |  Successful (134)  |  Tolerant (4)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Try (296)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2350)

A mathematician who can only generalise is like a monkey who can only climb UP a tree. ... And a mathematician who can only specialise is like a monkey who can only climb DOWN a tree. In fact neither the up monkey nor the down monkey is a viable creature. A real monkey must find food and escape his enemies and so must be able to incessantly climb up and down. A real mathematician must be able to generalise and specialise. ... There is, I think, a moral for the teacher. A teacher of traditional mathematics is in danger of becoming a down monkey, and a teacher of modern mathematics an up monkey. The down teacher dishing out one routine problem after another may never get off the ground, never attain any general idea. and the up teacher dishing out one definition after the other may never climb down from his verbiage, may never get down to solid ground, to something of tangible interest for his pupils.
From 'A Story With A Moral', Mathematical Gazette (Jun 1973), 57, No. 400, 86-87
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (126)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Climb (39)  |  Creature (242)  |  Danger (127)  |  Definition (238)  |  Down (455)  |  Enemy (86)  |  Escape (85)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Find (1014)  |  Food (213)  |  General (521)  |  Generalization (61)  |  Ground (222)  |  Idea (881)  |  Incessant (9)  |  Interest (416)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Modern (402)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Monkey (57)  |  Moral (203)  |  Must (1525)  |  Other (2233)  |  Problem (731)  |  Pupil (62)  |  Real (159)  |  Routine (26)  |  Solid (119)  |  Something (718)  |  Specialization (24)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Think (1122)  |  Tree (269)  |  Up (5)  |  Verbiage (3)

A mind that is stretched by a new idea can never go back to its original dimensions.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (395)  |  Dimension (64)  |  Idea (881)  |  Mind (1377)  |  New (1273)  |  Stretch (39)

A noble, logical diagram once recorded will never die, but long after we are gone be a living thing, asserting itself with ever-growing insistency. Remember that our sons and our grandsons are going to do things that would stagger us.
(1907) As quoted in 'Closing In', Charles Moore, Daniel H. Burnham, Architect, Planner of Cities (1921), Vol. 2, 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Amaze (5)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Do (1905)  |  Future (467)  |  Growing (99)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Logical (57)  |  Long (778)  |  Noble (93)  |  Record (161)  |  Recorded (2)  |  Remember (189)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Will (2350)

A number of years ago, when I was a freshly-appointed instructor, I met, for the first time, a certain eminent historian of science. At the time I could only regard him with tolerant condescension.
I was sorry of the man who, it seemed to me, was forced to hover about the edges of science. He was compelled to shiver endlessly in the outskirts, getting only feeble warmth from the distant sun of science- in-progress; while I, just beginning my research, was bathed in the heady liquid heat up at the very center of the glow.
In a lifetime of being wrong at many a point, I was never more wrong. It was I, not he, who was wandering in the periphery. It was he, not I, who lived in the blaze.
I had fallen victim to the fallacy of the “growing edge;” the belief that only the very frontier of scientific advance counted; that everything that had been left behind by that advance was faded and dead.
But is that true? Because a tree in spring buds and comes greenly into leaf, are those leaves therefore the tree? If the newborn twigs and their leaves were all that existed, they would form a vague halo of green suspended in mid-air, but surely that is not the tree. The leaves, by themselves, are no more than trivial fluttering decoration. It is the trunk and limbs that give the tree its grandeur and the leaves themselves their meaning.
There is not a discovery in science, however revolutionary, however sparkling with insight, that does not arise out of what went before. “If I have seen further than other men,” said Isaac Newton, “it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.”
Adding A Dimension: Seventeen Essays on the History of Science (1964), Introduction.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (298)  |  Air (366)  |  Arise (162)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Behind (139)  |  Being (1276)  |  Belief (615)  |  Certain (557)  |  Condescension (3)  |  Count (107)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Edge (51)  |  Everything (489)  |  Exist (458)  |  Fad (10)  |  Fallacy (31)  |  First (1302)  |  Form (976)  |  Frontier (41)  |  Giant (73)  |  Grandeur (35)  |  Green (65)  |  Growing (99)  |  Halo (7)  |  Heat (180)  |  Historian (59)  |  History Of Science (80)  |  Hover (8)  |  Insight (107)  |  Leaf (73)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Man (2252)  |  Meaning (244)  |  Mid-Air (3)  |  More (2558)  |  Newborn (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Number (710)  |  Other (2233)  |  Point (584)  |  Progress (492)  |  Regard (312)  |  Research (753)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sorry (31)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Spring (140)  |  Sun (407)  |  Surely (101)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1911)  |  Tree (269)  |  Trivial (59)  |  Trunk (23)  |  Twig (15)  |  Vague (50)  |  Victim (37)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Wrong (246)  |  Year (963)

A physician advised his patient that had sore eyes, that he should abstain from wine; but the patient said, “I think rather, sir, from wine and water; for I have often marked it in blue eyes, and I have seen water come forth, but never wine.”
In 'A Collection of Apophthegms, New and Old' (1625). As given in Essays, Moral, Economical, and Political: A New Edition, With the Latin Quotations Translated (1813), No. 52, 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstain (7)  |  Advice (57)  |  Eye (440)  |  Marked (55)  |  Patient (209)  |  Physician (284)  |  Sore (4)  |  Tear (48)  |  Think (1122)  |  Water (503)  |  Wine (39)

A school teacher probably never enjoys anything she reads, she is so intently looking for errors.
In Sinner Sermons: A Selection of the Best Paragraphs of E. W. Howe (1926), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Enjoy (48)  |  Error (339)  |  Intently (2)  |  Looking (191)  |  Read (308)  |  School (227)  |  Teacher (154)

Gordon Lindsay Glegg quote
Background art by Nils86, (cc by-sa 3.0) (source)
A scientist may exhaust himself; he frequently exhausts his colleagues, always exhausts his money, but never exhausts his subject.
In The Development of Design (1981), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Colleague (51)  |  Exhausting (2)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Himself (461)  |  Money (178)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Subject (543)

A sick man talks obsessively about his illness; a healthy man never talks about his health; for as Pirandello points out, we take happiness for granted, and only begin to question life when we are unhappy.
In Introduction to the New Existentialism (1966), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (275)  |  Grant (76)  |  Granted (5)  |  Happiness (126)  |  Health (210)  |  Healthy (70)  |  Illness (35)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Obsessive (3)  |   Luigi Pirandello (3)  |  Point (584)  |  Question (649)  |  Sick (83)  |  Talk (108)  |  Unhappy (16)

A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.
In recent years, this has been widely quoted and cited as an (ancient?) Greek proverb. Seen, for example in, Violence on Television: Hearings Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance (1994), 340. Webmaster however has so far found no example of this wording in, say, 19th century quotation collections. Which leaves the authenticity of the citation in question. Variations exist (for example “The beginning of wisdom comes when a person plants trees, the shade under which they know they will never sit.” (1993) or “Thoughtless men might ask why an old man plants a tree when he may never hope to sit in its shade” (1954).) However, the general sentiment has indeed existed for a long time. For example, “He that plants Trees, loves others besides himself,” collected in Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia: Adagies and Proverbs (1731), 91, No. 2248.
Science quotes on:  |  Great (1610)  |  Greatness (55)  |  Grow (247)  |  Know (1538)  |  Man (2252)  |  Old (499)  |  Plant (320)  |  Shade (35)  |  Sit (51)  |  Society (350)  |  Tree (269)  |  Wisdom (235)

A student who wishes now-a-days to study geometry by dividing it sharply from analysis, without taking account of the progress which the latter has made and is making, that student no matter how great his genius, will never be a whole geometer. He will not possess those powerful instruments of research which modern analysis puts into the hands of modern geometry. He will remain ignorant of many geometrical results which are to be found, perhaps implicitly, in the writings of the analyst. And not only will he be unable to use them in his own researches, but he will probably toil to discover them himself, and, as happens very often, he will publish them as new, when really he has only rediscovered them.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometrical Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Discover (571)  |  Divide (77)  |  Genius (301)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Great (1610)  |  Happen (282)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (91)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Instrument (158)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (821)  |  Modern (402)  |  New (1273)  |  Possess (157)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Progress (492)  |  Publish (42)  |  Remain (355)  |  Research (753)  |  Result (700)  |  Student (317)  |  Study (701)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Toil (29)  |  Use (771)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)  |  Writing (192)

A teacher effects eternity; [s]he can never tell where [her] his influence stops.
The Education of Henry Adams: An Autobiography? (1918), 300.
Science quotes on:  |  Effect (414)  |  Eternity (64)  |  Influence (231)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Tell (344)

A theory is the more impressive the greater the simplicity of its premises is, the more different kinds of things it relates, and the more extended is its area of applicability. Therefore the deep impression which classical thermodynamics made upon me. It is the only physical theory of universal content concerning which I am convinced that within the framework of the applicability of its basic concepts, it will never be overthrown.
Autobiographical Notes (1946), 33. Quoted in Gerald Holton and Yehuda Elkana, Albert Einstein: Historical and Cultural Perspectives (1997), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicability (7)  |  Area (33)  |  Basic (144)  |  Classical (49)  |  Concept (242)  |  Concern (239)  |  Content (75)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Deep (241)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Extend (129)  |  Extension (60)  |  Framework (33)  |  Greater (288)  |  Impression (118)  |  Impressive (27)  |  Impressiveness (2)  |  Kind (564)  |  More (2558)  |  Overthrown (8)  |  Physical (518)  |  Premise (40)  |  Relation (166)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Universal (198)  |  Will (2350)

A very sincere and serious freshman student came to my office with a question that had clearly been troubling him deeply. He said to me, ‘I am a devout Christian and have never had any reason to doubt evolution, an idea that seems both exciting and well documented. But my roommate, a proselytizing evangelical, has been insisting with enormous vigor that I cannot be both a real Christian and an evolutionist. So tell me, can a person believe both in God and in evolution?’ Again, I gulped hard, did my intellectual duty, a nd reassured him that evolution was both true and entirely compatible with Christian belief –a position that I hold sincerely, but still an odd situation for a Jewish agnostic.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agnostic (10)  |  Belief (615)  |  Both (496)  |  Christian (44)  |  Clearly (45)  |  Compatible (4)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Devout (5)  |  Document (7)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Duty (71)  |  Enormous (44)  |  Entirely (36)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Evolutionist (8)  |  Exciting (50)  |  Freshman (3)  |  God (776)  |  Gulp (3)  |  Hard (246)  |  Hold (96)  |  Idea (881)  |  Insist (22)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Nd (2)  |  Odd (15)  |  Office (71)  |  Person (366)  |  Position (83)  |  Question (649)  |  Real (159)  |  Reason (766)  |  Reassure (7)  |  Roommate (2)  |  Say (989)  |  Seem (150)  |  Serious (98)  |  Sincere (4)  |  Sincerely (3)  |  Situation (117)  |  Still (614)  |  Student (317)  |  Tell (344)  |  Trouble (117)  |  True (239)  |  Vigor (12)

A Vulgar Mechanick can practice what he has been taught or seen done, but if he is in an error he knows not how to find it out and correct it, and if you put him out of his road, he is at a stand; Whereas he that is able to reason nimbly and judiciously about figure, force and motion, is never at rest till he gets over every rub.
Letter (25 May 1694) to Nathaniel Hawes. In J. Edleston (ed.), Correspondence of Sir Isaac Newton and Professor Cotes (1850), 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Correct (95)  |  Error (339)  |  Figure (162)  |  Find (1014)  |  Force (497)  |  Judicious (3)  |  Know (1538)  |  Mechanic (120)  |  Motion (320)  |  Nimble (2)  |  Practice (212)  |  Reason (766)  |  Rest (287)  |  Stand (284)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Vulgar (33)

A weird happening has occurred in the case of a lansquenet named Daniel Burghammer, of the squadron of Captain Burkhard Laymann Zu Liebenau, of the honorable Madrucci Regiment in Piadena, in Italy. When the same was on the point of going to bed one night he complained to his wife, to whom he had been married by the Church seven years ago, that he had great pains in his belly and felt something stirring therein. An hour thereafter he gave birth to a child, a girl. When his wife was made aware of this, she notified the occurrence at once. Thereupon he was examined and questioned. … He confessed on the spot that he was half man and half woman and that for more than seven years he had served as a soldier in Hungary and the Netherlands… . When he was born he was christened as a boy and given in baptism the name of Daniel… . He also stated that while in the Netherlands he only slept once with a Spaniard, and he became pregnant therefrom. This, however, he kept a secret unto himself and also from his wife, with whom he had for seven years lived in wedlock, but he had never been able to get her with child… . The aforesaid soldier is able to suckle the child with his right breast only and not at all on the left side, where he is a man. He has also the natural organs of a man for passing water. Both are well, the child is beautiful, and many towns have already wished to adopt it, which, however, has not as yet been arranged. All this has been set down and described by notaries. It is considered in Italy to be a great miracle, and is to be recorded in the chronicles. The couple, however, are to be divorced by the clergy.
Anonymous
'From Piadena in Italy, the 26th day of May 1601'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) The Fugger Newsletter (1970), 247-248. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg. This was footnoted in The Story of the Secret Service (1937), 698. https://books.google.com/books?id=YfssAAAAMAAJ Richard Wilmer Rowan - 1937
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Birth (154)  |  Both (496)  |  Boy (100)  |  Captain (16)  |  Child (333)  |  Church (64)  |  Confess (42)  |  Consider (428)  |  Divorce (7)  |  Down (455)  |  Girl (38)  |  Great (1610)  |  Happening (59)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Hour (192)  |  Hungary (3)  |  Man (2252)  |  Miracle (85)  |  More (2558)  |  Name (359)  |  Natural (810)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Organ (118)  |  Pain (144)  |  Passing (76)  |  Point (584)  |  Question (649)  |  Record (161)  |  Reproduction (74)  |  Right (473)  |  Secret (216)  |  Set (400)  |  Side (236)  |  Soldier (28)  |  Something (718)  |  Water (503)  |  Wife (41)  |  Wish (216)  |  Woman (160)  |  Year (963)

A work of genius is something like the pie in the nursery song, in which the four and twenty blackbirds are baked. When the pie is opened, the birds begin to sing. Hereupon three fourths of the company run away in a fright; and then after a time, feeling ashamed, they would fain excuse themselves by declaring, the pie stank so, they could not sit near it. Those who stay behind, the men of taste and epicures, say one to another, We came here to eat. What business have birds, after they have been baked, to be alive and singing? This will never do. We must put a stop to so dangerous an innovation: for who will send a pie to an oven, if the birds come to life there? We must stand up to defend the rights of all the ovens in England. Let us have dead birds..dead birds for our money. So each sticks his fork into a bird, and hacks and mangles it a while, and then holds it up and cries, Who will dare assert that there is any music in this bird’s song?
Co-author with his brother Augustus William Hare Guesses At Truth, By Two Brothers: Second Edition: With Large Additions (1848), Second Series, 86. (The volume is introduced as “more than three fourths new.” This quote is identified as by Julius; Augustus had died in 1833.)
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (97)  |  Ashamed (3)  |  Assert (69)  |  Assertion (35)  |  Baking (2)  |  Begin (275)  |  Behind (139)  |  Bird (163)  |  Blackbird (4)  |  Business (156)  |  Company (63)  |  Cry (30)  |  Dangerous (108)  |  Dare (55)  |  Death (406)  |  Defend (32)  |  Do (1905)  |  Eat (108)  |  Eating (46)  |  England (43)  |  Excuse (27)  |  Feeling (259)  |  Fork (2)  |  Fright (11)  |  Genius (301)  |  Hacking (2)  |  Holding (3)  |  Innovation (49)  |  Life (1870)  |  Money (178)  |  Music (133)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nursery (4)  |  Open (277)  |  Opening (15)  |  Oven (5)  |  Pie (4)  |  Right (473)  |  Run (158)  |  Say (989)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Sing (29)  |  Singing (19)  |  Something (718)  |  Song (41)  |  Stand (284)  |  Standing (11)  |  Stink (8)  |  Stop (89)  |  Taste (93)  |  Themself (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1911)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

A young person who reads a science book is confronted with a number of facts, x = ma … ma - me² … You never see in the scientific books what lies behind the discovery—the struggle and the passion of the person, who made that discovery.
From 'Asking Nature', collected in Lewis Wolpert and Alison Richards (eds.), Passionate Minds: The Inner World of Scientists (1997), 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (139)  |  Book (413)  |  Confront (18)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Lie (370)  |  Number (710)  |  Passion (121)  |  Person (366)  |  Read (308)  |  Scientific (955)  |  See (1094)  |  Struggle (111)  |  Young (253)

About 6 or 8 years ago My Ingenious friend Mr John Robinson having [contrived] conceived that a fire engine might be made without a Lever—by Inverting the Cylinder & placing it above the mouth of the pit proposed to me to make a model of it which was set about by having never Compleated & I [being] having at that time Ignorant little knoledge of the machine however I always thought the Machine Might be applied to [more] other as valuable purposes [than] as drawing Water.
Entry in notebook (1765). The bracketed words in square brackets were crossed out by Watt. in Eric Robinson and Douglas McKie (eds.), Partners in Science: Letters of James Watt and Joseph Black (1970), 434.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (257)  |  Applied (176)  |  Being (1276)  |  Bracket (2)  |  Completed (30)  |  Conceived (3)  |  Cylinder (11)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Engine (99)  |  Fire (203)  |  Friend (180)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Ignorant (91)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Lever (13)  |  Little (717)  |  Machine (271)  |  Model (106)  |  More (2558)  |  Mouth (54)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pit (20)  |  Proposal (21)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Set (400)  |  Steam Engine (47)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Value (393)  |  Water (503)  |  Year (963)

Act as if you are going to live for ever and cast your plans way ahead. You must feel responsible without time limitations, and the consideration of whether you may or may not be around to see the results should never enter your thoughts.
In Theodore Rockwell, The Rickover Effect: How One Man Made A Difference (2002), 342.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Ahead (21)  |  Cast (69)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Death (406)  |  Enter (145)  |  Ever (4)  |  Feel (371)  |  Life (1870)  |  Limitation (52)  |  Live (650)  |  Must (1525)  |  Plan (122)  |  Responsibility (71)  |  Result (700)  |  See (1094)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Way (1214)

After we came out of the church, we stood talking for some time together of Bishop Berkeley’s ingenious sophistry to prove the non-existence of matter, and that every thing in the universe is merely ideal. I observed, that though we are satisfied his doctrine is not true, it is impossible to refute it. I never shall forget the alacrity with which Johnson answered, striking his foot with mighty force against a large stone, till he rebounded from it, “I refute it thus.”
In Boswell’s Life of Johnson (1820), Vol. 1, 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (389)  |  George Berkeley (7)  |  Church (64)  |  Existence (481)  |  Force (497)  |  Forget (125)  |  Ideal (110)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Samuel Johnson (51)  |  Large (398)  |  Matter (821)  |  Merely (315)  |  Observed (149)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Prove (261)  |  Stone (168)  |  Striking (48)  |  Talking (76)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Time (1911)  |  Together (392)  |  Universe (900)

Alfred Nobel - pitiable half-creature, should have been stifled by humane doctor when he made his entry yelling into life. Greatest merits: Keeps his nails clean and is never a burden to anyone. Greatest fault: Lacks family, cheerful spirits, and strong stomach. Greatest and only petition: Not to be buried alive. Greatest sin: Does not worship Mammon. Important events in his life: None.
Letter (1887) from Alfred to his brother, Ludwig. In Erik Bergengre, Alfred Nobel: the Man and His Work (1960), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (97)  |  Biography (254)  |  Birth (154)  |  Cheerful (10)  |  Cheerfulness (3)  |  Clean (52)  |  Creature (242)  |  Doctor (191)  |  Event (222)  |  Family (101)  |  Fault (58)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Humane (19)  |  Lack (127)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mammon (2)  |  Merit (51)  |  Sin (45)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Stomach (40)  |  Strong (182)  |  Worship (32)

All human affairs follow nature's great analogue, the growth of vegetation. There are three periods of growth in every plant. The first, and slowest, is the invisible growth by the root; the second and much accelerated is the visible growth by the stem; but when root and stem have gathered their forces, there comes the third period, in which the plant quickly flashes into blossom and rushes into fruit.
The beginnings of moral enterprises in this world are never to be measured by any apparent growth. ... At length comes the sudden ripeness and the full success, and he who is called in at the final moment deems this success his own. He is but the reaper and not the labourer. Other men sowed and tilled and he but enters into their labours.
Life Thoughts (1858), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogue (7)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Blossom (22)  |  Call (781)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Enter (145)  |  Entering (3)  |  Enterprise (56)  |  Final (121)  |  First (1302)  |  Follow (389)  |  Force (497)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Gather (76)  |  Great (1610)  |  Growth (200)  |  Human (1512)  |  Invention (400)  |  Invisible (66)  |  Labor (200)  |  Laborer (9)  |  Measurement (178)  |  Moment (260)  |  Moral (203)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Other (2233)  |  Period (200)  |  Plant (320)  |  Reaper (4)  |  Research (753)  |  Ripeness (2)  |  Root (121)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Soil (98)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Stem (31)  |  Success (327)  |  Sudden (70)  |  Vegetation (24)  |  Visible (87)  |  World (1850)

All that Anatomie can doe is only to shew us the gross and sensible parts of the body, or the vapid and dead juices all which, after the most diligent search, will be noe more able to direct a physician how to cure a disease than how to make a man; for to remedy the defects of a part whose organicall constitution and that texture whereby it operates, he cannot possibly know, is alike hard, as to make a part which he knows not how is made. Now it is certaine and beyond controversy that nature performs all her operations on the body by parts so minute and insensible that I thinke noe body will ever hope or pretend, even by the assistance of glasses or any other intervention, to come to a sight of them, and to tell us what organicall texture or what kinde offerment (for whether it be done by one or both of these ways is yet a question and like to be soe always notwithstanding all the endeavours of the most accurate dissections) separate any part of the juices in any of the viscera, or tell us of what liquors the particles of these juices are, or if this could be donne (which it is never like to be) would it at all contribute to the cure of the diseases of those very parts which we so perfectly knew.
'Anatomie' (1668). Quoted in Kenneth Dewhurst (ed.), Dr. Thomas Sydenham (1624-1689): His Life and Original Writings (1966), 85-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (88)  |  Alike (60)  |  Anatomy (75)  |  Assistance (23)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Body (557)  |  Both (496)  |  Constitution (78)  |  Controversy (30)  |  Cure (124)  |  Defect (31)  |  Diligence (22)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Direct (228)  |  Disease (340)  |  Dissection (35)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Hard (246)  |  Hope (321)  |  Intervention (18)  |  Juice (7)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Liquor (6)  |  Man (2252)  |  Minute (129)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Operation (221)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2233)  |  Particle (200)  |  Perform (123)  |  Physician (284)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Question (649)  |  Remedy (63)  |  Search (175)  |  Separate (151)  |  Sight (135)  |  Tell (344)  |  Viscera (2)  |  Way (1214)  |  Will (2350)

All true science must aim at objective truth, and that means that the human observer must never allow himself to get emotionally mixed up with his subject-matter. His concern is to understand the universe, not to improve it. Detachment is obligatory.
From transcript of BBC radio Reith Lecture (12 Nov 1967), 'A Runaway World', on the bbc.co.uk website.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (175)  |  Concern (239)  |  Detachment (8)  |  Emotion (106)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1512)  |  Improve (64)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Mix (24)  |  Must (1525)  |  Objective (96)  |  Obligatory (3)  |  Observer (48)  |  Subject (543)  |  Subject-Matter (8)  |  True (239)  |  True Science (25)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Understand (648)  |  Universe (900)

Although a physical law may never admit of a perfectly abrupt change, there is no limit to the approach which it may make to abruptness.
In The Principles of Science: A Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method (1874), Vols. 1-2, 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (6)  |  Admit (49)  |  Approach (112)  |  Change (639)  |  Law (913)  |  Limit (294)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physical Law (15)

Although the whole of this life were said to be nothing but a dream and the physical world nothing but a phantasm, I should call this dream or phantasm real enough, if, using reason well, we were never deceived by it.
Epigraph, without citation, in J.R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics (1956), 1832.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (781)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Dream (222)  |  Enough (341)  |  Life (1870)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Phantasm (3)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physical World (30)  |  Real (159)  |  Reason (766)  |  Say (989)  |  Whole (756)  |  World (1850)

Always deal from strength, never from weakness.
In J.S. "Torch" Lewis, 'Lear the Legend', Aviation Week & Space Technology (2 Jul 2001 ), 155 Supplement, No 1, 116
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (192)  |  Dealing (11)  |  Strength (139)  |  Weakness (50)

America has never been united by blood or birth or soil. We are bound by ideals that move us beyond our backgrounds, lift us above our interests and teach us what it means to be citizens. Every child must be taught these principles. Every citizen must uphold them. And every immigrant, by embracing these ideals, makes our country more, not less, American.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  America (143)  |  American (56)  |  Background (44)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Bind (26)  |  Birth (154)  |  Blood (144)  |  Bound (120)  |  Child (333)  |  Citizen (52)  |  Country (269)  |  Embrace (47)  |  Ideal (110)  |  Interest (416)  |  Less (105)  |  Lift (57)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  More (2558)  |  Move (223)  |  Must (1525)  |  Principle (530)  |  Soil (98)  |  Teach (299)  |  United (15)

Among innumerable footsteps of divine providence to be found in the works of nature, there is a very remarkable one to be observed in the exact balance that is maintained, between the numbers of men and women; for by this means is provided, that the species never may fail, nor perish, since every male may have its female, and of proportionable age. This equality of males and females is not the effect of chance but divine providence, working for a good end, which I thus demonstrate.
'An Argument for Divine Providence, taken from the Constant Regularity observ’d in the Births of both Sexes', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 1710-12, 27, 186. This has been regarded as the origin of mathematical statistics
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Balance (82)  |  Chance (244)  |  Divine (112)  |  Effect (414)  |  End (603)  |  Equality (34)  |  Fail (191)  |  Female (50)  |  Genetics (105)  |  Good (906)  |  Innumerable (56)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Number (710)  |  Observed (149)  |  Perish (56)  |  Providence (19)  |  Species (435)  |  Work (1402)

Among those whom I could never pursuade to rank themselves with idlers, and who speak with indignation of my morning sleeps and nocturnal rambles, one passes the day in catching spiders, that he may count their eyes with a microscope; another exhibits the dust of a marigold separated from the flower with a dexterity worthy of Leuwenhoweck himself. Some turn the wheel of electricity; some suspend rings to a lodestone, and find that what they did yesterday, they can do again to-day.—Some register the changes of the wind, and die fully convinced that the wind is changeable.—There are men yet more profound, who have heard that two colorless liquors may produce a color by union, and that two cold bodies will grow hot of they are mingled: they mingle them, and produce the effect expected, say it is strange, and mingle them again.
In Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (639)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Cold (115)  |  Color (155)  |  Count (107)  |  Dexterity (8)  |  Do (1905)  |  Dust (68)  |  Effect (414)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Energy (373)  |  Enquiry (89)  |  Entomologist (7)  |  Expect (203)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Eye (440)  |  Find (1014)  |  Flower (112)  |  Grow (247)  |  Heat (180)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hot (63)  |  Idleness (15)  |  Indignation (5)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (17)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Magnetism (43)  |  Meteorology (36)  |  Microscope (85)  |  Mingle (9)  |  More (2558)  |  Morning (98)  |  Observation (593)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Physics (564)  |  Pollen (6)  |  Profound (105)  |  Ramble (3)  |  Rank (69)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Register (22)  |  Repeat (44)  |  Research (753)  |  Say (989)  |  Sleep (81)  |  Speak (240)  |  Spider (14)  |  Strange (160)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Turn (454)  |  Two (936)  |  Union (52)  |  Wheel (51)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wind (141)  |  Yesterday (37)

An amoeba never is torn apart through indecision, though, for even if two parts of the amoeba are inclined to go in different directions, a choice is always made. We could interpret this as schizophrenia or just confusion, but it could also be a judicious simultaneous sampling of conditions, in order to make a wise choice of future direction.
In The Center of Life: A Natural History of the Cell (1977, 1978), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Amoeba (21)  |  Choice (114)  |  Condition (362)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Direction (185)  |  Future (467)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indecision (4)  |  Interpretation (89)  |  Order (638)  |  Sample (19)  |  Schizophrenia (4)  |  Simultaneous (23)  |  Through (846)  |  Torn (17)  |  Two (936)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  Wise (143)

An experiment is never a failure solely because it fails to achieve predicted results. An experiment is a failure only when it also fails adequately to test the hypothesis in question, when the data it produces don’t prove anything one way or another.
In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values (1974), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (187)  |  Adequate (50)  |  Data (162)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fail (191)  |  Failure (176)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Predict (86)  |  Prediction (89)  |  Production (190)  |  Proof (304)  |  Prove (261)  |  Prove Anything (7)  |  Question (649)  |  Result (700)  |  Sole (50)  |  Test (221)  |  Way (1214)

An extra-terrestrial philosopher, who had watched a single youth up to the age of twenty-one and had never come across any other human being, might conclude that it is the nature of human beings to grow continually taller and wiser in an indefinite progress towards perfection; and this generalization would be just as well founded as the generalization which evolutionists base upon the previous history of this planet.
Scientific Method in Philosophy (1914), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Base (120)  |  Being (1276)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Generalization (61)  |  Grow (247)  |  Growth (200)  |  History (716)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Indefinite (21)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perfection (131)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Planet (402)  |  Progress (492)  |  Single (365)  |  Terrestrial (62)  |  Watch (118)  |  Youth (109)

An infallible Remedy for the Tooth-ach, viz Wash the Root of an aching Tooth, in Elder Vinegar, and let it dry half an hour in the Sun; after which it will never ach more; Probatum est.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1739).
Science quotes on:  |  Ache (7)  |  Dry (65)  |  Drying (2)  |  Elder (9)  |  Hour (192)  |  Infallibility (7)  |  Infallible (18)  |  More (2558)  |  Remedy (63)  |  Root (121)  |  Sin (45)  |  Sun (407)  |  Tooth (32)  |  Toothache (3)  |  Vinegar (7)  |  Wash (23)  |  Washing (3)  |  Will (2350)

An observant parent’s evidence may be disproved but should never be ignored.
Anonymous
Lancet (1951), 1, 688.
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (65)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Parent (80)

An old French geometer used to say that a mathematical theory was never to be considered complete till you had made it so clear that you could explain it to the first man you met in the street.
In Nature (1873), 8, 458.
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (111)  |  Complete (209)  |  Consider (428)  |  Explain (334)  |  First (1302)  |  French (21)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Meet (36)  |  Old (499)  |  Say (989)  |  Street (25)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Theory (1015)

An old medical friend gave me some excellent practical advice. He said: “You will have for some time to go much oftener down steps than up steps. Never mind! win the good opinions of washerwomen and such like, and in time you will hear of their recommendations of you to the wealthier families by whom they are employed.” I did so, and found it succeed as predicted.
[On beginning a medical practice.]
From Reminiscences of a Yorkshire Naturalist (1896), 94. Going “down steps” refers to the homes of lower-class workers of the era that were often in basements and entered by exterior steps down from street level.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (57)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Down (455)  |  Employ (115)  |  Employment (34)  |  Family (101)  |  Friend (180)  |  Good (906)  |  Hear (144)  |  Medical (31)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Old (499)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Practical (225)  |  Practice (212)  |  Predict (86)  |  Recommendation (12)  |  Step (234)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Success (327)  |  Time (1911)  |  Up (5)  |  Wealth (100)  |  Will (2350)  |  Win (53)

Ancient stars in their death throes spat out atoms like iron which this universe had never known. ... Now the iron of old nova coughings vivifies the redness of our blood.
Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st century (2003), 223. Quoted in Rob Brezsny, Pronoia Is the Antidote for Paranoia (2005), 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (198)  |  Atom (381)  |  Blood (144)  |  Cough (8)  |  Death (406)  |  Iron (99)  |  Known (453)  |  Nova (7)  |  Old (499)  |  Redness (2)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Universe (900)  |  Vivify (2)

And above all things, never think that you’re not good enough yourself. A man should never think that. My belief is that in life people will take you at your own reckoning.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Enough (341)  |  Good (906)  |  Good Enough (4)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  People (1031)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Will (2350)

And as for other men, who worked in tank-rooms full of steam, and in some of which there were open vats near the level of the floor, their peculiar trouble was that they fell into the vats; and when they were fished out, there was never enough of them left to be worth exhibiting,—sometimes they would be overlooked for days, till all but the bones of them had gone out into the world as Durham's Pure Leaf Lard! This contributed to the passing of the Pure Food Act of 1906.
The Jungle (1906), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Bone (101)  |  Enough (341)  |  Fall (243)  |  Fish (130)  |  Floor (21)  |  Food (213)  |  Law (913)  |  Leaf (73)  |  Open (277)  |  Other (2233)  |  Overlook (33)  |  Passing (76)  |  Peculiar (115)  |  Pure (299)  |  Steam (81)  |  Tank (7)  |  Trouble (117)  |  Work (1402)  |  World (1850)  |  Worth (172)

And genius hath electric power,
Which earth can never tame;
Bright suns may scorch, and dark clouds lower,
Its flash is still the same.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Bright (81)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Dark (145)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Electric (76)  |  Flash (49)  |  Genius (301)  |  Low (86)  |  Power (771)  |  Same (166)  |  Scorch (2)  |  Still (614)  |  Sun (407)  |  Tame (4)

And I believe there are many Species in Nature, which were never yet taken notice of by Man, and consequently of no use to him, which yet we are not to think were created in vain; but it’s likely … to partake of the overflowing Goodness of the Creator, and enjoy their own Beings. But though in this sense it be not true, that all things were made for Man; yet thus far it is, that all the Creatures in the World may be some way or other useful to us, at least to exercise our Wits and Understandings, in considering and contemplating of them, and so afford us Subject of Admiring and Glorifying their and our Maker. Seeing them, we do believe and assert that all things were in some sense made for us, we are thereby obliged to make use of them for those purposes for which they serve us, else we frustrate this End of their Creation.
John Ray
The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of the Creation (1691), 169-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (69)  |  Being (1276)  |  Belief (615)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Contemplate (29)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Creation (350)  |  Creator (97)  |  Creature (242)  |  Do (1905)  |  End (603)  |  Exercise (113)  |  Frustration (14)  |  Glorification (2)  |  Goodness (26)  |  Maker (34)  |  Man (2252)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Notice (81)  |  Other (2233)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Seeing (143)  |  Sense (785)  |  Species (435)  |  Subject (543)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Use (771)  |  Useful (260)  |  Usefulness (92)  |  Vain (86)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wit (61)  |  World (1850)

And let me adde, that he that throughly understands the nature of Ferments and Fermentations, shall probably be much better able than he that Ignores them, to give a fair account of divers Phænomena of severall diseases (as well Feavers and others) which will perhaps be never throughly understood, without an insight into the doctrine of Fermentation.
Essay 2, 'Offering some Particulars relating to the Pathologicall Part of Physick', in the Second Part of Some Considerations Touching The Usefulnesse of Naturall Philosophy (1663, 1664), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Better (493)  |  Disease (340)  |  Doctor (191)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Ignore (52)  |  Insight (107)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Other (2233)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understood (155)  |  Will (2350)

And therefore, sir, as you desire to live,
A day or two before your laxative,
Take just three worms, nor under nor above,
Because the gods unequal numbers love.
These digestives prepare you for your purge,
Of fumetery, centaury, and spurge;
And of ground-ivy add a leaf or two.
All which within our yard or garden grow.
Eat these, and be, my lord, of better cheer:
Your father’s son was never born to fear.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (493)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Desire (212)  |  Digestion (29)  |  Eat (108)  |  Father (113)  |  Fear (212)  |  Garden (64)  |  God (776)  |  Ground (222)  |  Grow (247)  |  Ivy (3)  |  Leaf (73)  |  Live (650)  |  Lord (97)  |  Love (328)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Number (710)  |  Purge (11)  |  Two (936)  |  Unequal (12)  |  Worm (47)

And thus Nature will be very conformable to her self and very simple, performing all the great Motions of the heavenly Bodies by the Attraction of Gravity which intercedes those Bodies, and almost all the small ones of their Particles by some other attractive and repelling Powers which intercede the Particles. The Vis inertiae is a passive Principle by which Bodies persist in their Motion or Rest, receive Motion in proportion to the Force impressing it, and resist as much as they are resisted. By this Principle alone there never could have been any Motion in the World. Some other Principle was necessary for putting Bodies into Motion; and now they are in Motion, some other Principle is necessary for conserving the Motion.
From Opticks, (1704, 2nd ed. 1718), Book 3, Query 31, 372-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Attraction (61)  |  Attractive (25)  |  Conservation (187)  |  Force (497)  |  Gravity (140)  |  Great (1610)  |  Law Of Motion (14)  |  Motion (320)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Other (2233)  |  Particle (200)  |  Power (771)  |  Principle (530)  |  Proportion (140)  |  Receive (117)  |  Rest (287)  |  Self (268)  |  Simple (426)  |  Small (489)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

Angling may be said to be so like the Mathematics that it can never be fully learnt; at least not so fully but that there will still be more new experiments left for the trial of other men that succeed us.
In The Complete Angler (1653, 1915), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Angling (3)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Learning (291)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  More (2558)  |  New (1273)  |  Other (2233)  |  Still (614)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Succession (80)  |  Trial (59)  |  Will (2350)

Angling may be said to be so like the mathematics, that it can never be fully learnt.
In Izaak Walton and Charles Cotton, 'Walton to the Reader', The Complete Angler (1653, 1824), Vol. 1, lxv.
Science quotes on:  |  Angling (3)  |  Learn (672)  |  Mathematics (1395)

Antoine Magnan, a French zoologist, in 1934 made some very careful studies of bumblebee flight and came to the conclusion that bumblebees cannot fly at all! Fortunately, the bumblebees never heard this bit of news and so went on flying as usual.
Insects (1968, 1972), 68. Referring to Antoine Magnan Le Vol des Insectes (1934), Vol. 1 of Locomotion Chez les Animaux. Cited
Science quotes on:  |  Bumblebee (4)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Flight (101)  |  Fly (153)  |  Flying (74)  |  Fortunately (9)  |  French (21)  |  New (1273)  |  News (36)  |  Study (701)  |  Zoologist (12)

Any physician who advertises a positive cure for any disease, who issues nostrum testimonials, who sells his services to a secret remedy, or who diagnoses and treats by mail patients he has never seen, is a quack.
'The Sure-Cure School,' Collier’s Weekly (14 Jul 1906). Reprinted in The Great American Fraud (1907), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Advertising (9)  |  Cure (124)  |  Disease (340)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Patient (209)  |  Physician (284)  |  Positive (98)  |  Quack (18)  |  Remedy (63)  |  Secret (216)  |  Service (110)

Anybody who has any doubt about the ingenuity or the resourcefulness of a plumber never got a bill from one.
On CBS television (8 Jan 1954). As quoted in Julia Vitullo-Martin and J. Robert Moskin, The Executive's Book of Quotations (2002), 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Bill (14)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Ingenuity (42)  |  Plumber (10)  |  Resourcefulness (2)

Anyone who can leave the Yucatán with indifference has never been an artist and will never be a scholar.
Quoted (without source) in Nick Rider, Yucatan & Mayan Mexico (2005), 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (97)  |  Indifference (16)  |  Scholar (52)  |  Will (2350)

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anyone (38)  |  Mistake (180)  |  New (1273)  |  Try (296)

Anything made out of destructible matter
Infinite time would have devoured before.
But if the atoms that make and replenish the world
Have endured through the immense span of the past
Their natures are immortal—that is clear.
Never can things revert to nothingness!
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book I, lines 232-7, 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Devour (29)  |  Endure (21)  |  Immense (89)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Indestructible (12)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Matter (821)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothingness (12)  |  Past (355)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Through (846)  |  Time (1911)  |  World (1850)

Architects who have aimed at acquiring manual skill without scholarship have never been able to reach a position of authority to correspond to their pains, while those who relied only upon theories and scholarship were obviously hunting the shadow, not the substance. But those who have a thorough knowledge of both, like men armed at all points, have the sooner attained their object and carried authority with them.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 1, Sec. 2. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (175)  |  Architect (32)  |  Arm (82)  |  Attain (126)  |  Attainment (48)  |  Authority (99)  |  Both (496)  |  Education (423)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Manual (7)  |  Object (438)  |  Pain (144)  |  Point (584)  |  Reach (286)  |  Rely (12)  |  Scholarship (22)  |  Shadow (73)  |  Skill (116)  |  Substance (253)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thorough (40)

Are the humanistic and scientific approaches different? Scientists can calculate the torsion of a skyscraper at the wing-beat of a bird, or 155 motions of the Moon and 500 smaller ones in addition. They move in academic garb and sing logarithms. They say, “The sky is ours”, like priests in charge of heaven. We poor humanists cannot even think clearly, or write a sentence without a blunder, commoners of “common sense”. We never take a step without stumbling; they move solemnly, ever unerringly, never a step back, and carry bell, book, and candle.
Quoting himself in Stargazers and Gravediggers: Memoirs to Worlds in Collision (2012), 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (20)  |  Addition (70)  |  Approach (112)  |  Back (395)  |  Beat (42)  |  Bell (35)  |  Bird (163)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Book (413)  |  Calculate (58)  |  Candle (32)  |  Carry (130)  |  Charge (63)  |  Clearly (45)  |  Common (447)  |  Common Sense (136)  |  Different (595)  |  Garb (6)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Humanist (8)  |  Humanistic (3)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Moon (252)  |  Motion (320)  |  Move (223)  |  Poor (139)  |  Priest (29)  |  Say (989)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Sense (785)  |  Sentence (35)  |  Sing (29)  |  Sky (174)  |  Skyscraper (9)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Step (234)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Think (1122)  |  Unerring (4)  |  Wing (79)  |  Write (250)

Aristotle maintained that women have fewer teeth than men; although he was twice married, it never occurred to him to verify this statement by examining his wives' mouths.
In The Impact of Science on Society (1951), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (179)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mouth (54)  |  Statement (148)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Verify (24)

As a boy I had liked both drawing and physics, and I always abhorred the role of being a spectator. In 1908, when I was 15, I designed, built and flew a toy model airplane which won the then-famous James Gordon Bennett Cup. By 16 I had discovered that design could be fun and profitable, and this lesson has never been lost on me.
On the official Raymond Loewry website.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (8)  |  Airplane (43)  |  Being (1276)  |  Both (496)  |  Boy (100)  |  Career (86)  |  Design (203)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Fun (42)  |  Lesson (58)  |  Like (23)  |  Model (106)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Profit (56)  |  Profitable (29)  |  Role (86)  |  Spectator (11)  |  Toy (22)  |  Win (53)

As a naturalist you will never suffer from that awful modern disease called boredom—so go out and greet the natural world with curiosity and delight, and enjoy it.
In The Amateur Naturalist (1989), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Awful (9)  |  Boredom (11)  |  Call (781)  |  Curiosity (138)  |  Delight (111)  |  Disease (340)  |  Enjoy (48)  |  Greet (7)  |  Modern (402)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural World (33)  |  Naturalist (79)  |  Suffer (43)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

As an undergraduate who believed himself destined to be a mathematician I happened upon “Man and Superman” and as I read it at a library table I felt like Saul of Tarsus when the light broke. “If literature,” I said to myself, “can be like this then literature is the stuff for me.” And to this day I never see a differential equation written out without breathing a prayer of thanks.
In 'An Open Letter to George Bernard Shaw', Saturday Review (21 Jul 1956), 39, 12. ollected in If You Don't Mind My Saying So: Essays on Man and Nature (1964), 391.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Breathe (49)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Destined (42)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Equation (138)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happened (88)  |  Himself (461)  |  Library (53)  |  Light (635)  |  Literature (116)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Myself (211)  |  Prayer (30)  |  Read (308)  |  See (1094)  |  Superman (4)  |  Table (105)  |  Thank (48)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Undergraduate (17)

As for hailing [the new term] scientist as 'good', that was mere politeness: Faraday never used the word, describing himself as a natural philosopher to the end of his career.
Nineteenth-Century Attitudes: Men of Science (1991), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (254)  |  Career (86)  |  Description (89)  |  End (603)  |  Michael Faraday (91)  |  Good (906)  |  Himself (461)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Philosopher (4)  |  New (1273)  |  Nomenclature (159)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Term (357)  |  Word (650)

As for methods I have sought to give them all the rigour that one requires in geometry, so as never to have recourse to the reasons drawn from the generality of algebra.
In Cours d’analyse (1821), Preface, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (117)  |  Generality (45)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Method (531)  |  Reason (766)  |  Require (229)  |  Rigour (21)

As for my memory, I have a particularly good one. I never keep any record of my investigations or experiments. My memory files all these things away conveniently and reliably. I should say, though, that I didn’t cumber it up with a lot of useless matter.
From George MacAdam, 'Steinmetz, Electricity's Mastermind, Enters Politics', New York Times (2 Nov 1913), SM3.
Science quotes on:  |  Encumber (4)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Good (906)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Lot (151)  |  Matter (821)  |  Memory (144)  |  Record (161)  |  Say (989)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Useless (38)

As for the excellent little wretches who grow up in what they are taught, with never a scruple or a query, ... they signify nothing in the intellectual life of the race.
'Poet at the Breakfast-Table', The Atlantic Monthly (Oct 1872), 429.
Science quotes on:  |  Grow (247)  |  Intellect (251)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Learning (291)  |  Life (1870)  |  Little (717)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Query (4)  |  Race (278)  |  Scruple (2)  |  Significance (114)  |  Signify (17)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Wretch (5)

As for the formation of matter, it is never the product of sudden events, but always the outcome of gradual change.
In On Equilibrium (1929), trans. Yang Jing­Yi, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (639)  |  Event (222)  |  Formation (100)  |  Gradual (30)  |  Matter (821)  |  Outcome (15)  |  Product (166)  |  Sudden (70)

As for those wingy mysteries in divinity, and airy subtleties in religion, which have unhinged the brains of better heads, they never stretched the pia mater of mine: methinks there be not impossibilities enough in Religion for an active faith.
In T. Chapman (ed.), Religio Medici (1643, 1831), part 1, sect. 9, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (80)  |  Better (493)  |  Brain (281)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Enough (341)  |  Faith (209)  |  Head (87)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Mine (78)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Pia Mater (2)  |  Religion (369)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Subtle (37)

As in political revolutions, so in paradigm choice—there is no standard higher than the assent of the relevant community... this issue of paradigm choice can never be unequivocally settled by logic and experiment alone.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Assent (12)  |  Choice (114)  |  Community (111)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Logic (311)  |  Paradigm (16)  |  Political (124)  |  Revolution (133)  |  Settled (34)  |  Standard (64)

As never before, the work of the engineer is basic to the kind of society to which our best efforts are committed. Whether it be city planning, improved health care in modern facilities, safer and more efficient transportation, new techniques of communication, or better ways to control pollution and dispose of wastes, the role of the engineer—his initiative, creative ability, and hard work—is at the root of social progress.
Remarks for National Engineers Week (1971). As quoted in Consulting Engineer (1971), 36, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (162)  |  Basic (144)  |  Best (467)  |  Better (493)  |  Care (203)  |  City (87)  |  Communication (101)  |  Control (182)  |  Creative (144)  |  Creativity (84)  |  Dispose (10)  |  Efficient (34)  |  Effort (243)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Hard (246)  |  Hard Work (25)  |  Health (210)  |  Health Care (10)  |  Improve (64)  |  Initiative (17)  |  Kind (564)  |  Modern (402)  |  More (2558)  |  New (1273)  |  Planning (21)  |  Pollution (53)  |  Progress (492)  |  Role (86)  |  Root (121)  |  Safety (58)  |  Social (261)  |  Social Progress (3)  |  Society (350)  |  Technique (84)  |  Transportation (19)  |  Waste (109)  |  Way (1214)  |  Work (1402)

As soon as the circumstances of an experiment are well known, we stop gathering statistics. … The effect will occur always without exception, because the cause of the phenomena is accurately defined. Only when a phenomenon includes conditions as yet undefined,Only when a phenomenon includes conditions as yet undefined, can we compile statistics. … we must learn therefore that we compile statistics only when we cannot possibly help it; for in my opinion, statistics can never yield scientific truth.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 134-137.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Cause (561)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Compilation (3)  |  Condition (362)  |  Effect (414)  |  Exception (74)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Gather (76)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Include (93)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Known (453)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learning (291)  |  Must (1525)  |  Occur (151)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Soon (187)  |  Statistics (170)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Undefined (3)  |  Will (2350)  |  Yield (86)

As the brain of man is the speck of dust in the universe that thinks, so the leaves—the fern and the needled pine and the latticed frond and the seaweed ribbon—perceive the light in a fundamental and constructive sense. … Their leaves see the light, as my eyes can never do. … They impound its stellar energy, and with that force they make life out of the elements.
In Flowering Earth (1939), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (281)  |  Constructive (15)  |  Do (1905)  |  Dust (68)  |  Element (322)  |  Energy (373)  |  Eye (440)  |  Fern (10)  |  Force (497)  |  Fundamental (264)  |  Leaf (73)  |  Life (1870)  |  Light (635)  |  Man (2252)  |  Photosynthesis (21)  |  Pine (12)  |  See (1094)  |  Seeing (143)  |  Sense (785)  |  Speck (25)  |  Star (460)  |  Think (1122)  |  Universe (900)

As to Science, she has never sought to ally herself to civil power. She has never attempted to throw odium or inflict social ruin on any human being. She has never subjected anyone to mental torment, physical torture, least of all to death, for the purpose of upholding or promoting her ideas. She presents herself unstained by cruelties and crimes. But in the Vatican—we have only to recall the Inquisition—the hands that are now raised in appeals to the Most Merciful are crimsoned. They have been steeped in blood!
History of the Conflict between Religion and Science (1875), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (266)  |  Being (1276)  |  Blood (144)  |  Civil (26)  |  Crime (39)  |  Death (406)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Idea (881)  |  Inquisition (9)  |  Mental (179)  |  Most (1728)  |  Physical (518)  |  Power (771)  |  Present (630)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Religion (369)  |  Ruin (44)  |  Social (261)  |  Subject (543)  |  Torment (18)  |  Torture (30)  |  Vatican (3)

Ask a follower of Bacon what [science] the new philosophy, as it was called in the time of Charles the Second, has effected for mankind, and his answer is ready; “It has lengthened life; it has mitigated pain; it has extinguished diseases; it has increased the fertility of the soil; it has given new securities to the mariner; it has furnished new arms to the warrior; it has spanned great rivers and estuaries with bridges of form unknown to our fathers; it has guided the thunderbolt innocuously from heaven to earth; it has lighted up the night with the splendour of the day; it has extended the range of the human vision; it has multiplied the power of the human muscles; it has accelerated motion; it has annihilated distance; it has facilitated intercourse, correspondence, all friendly offices, all dispatch of business; it has enabled man to descend to the depths of the sea, to soar into the air, to penetrate securely into the noxious recesses of the earth, to traverse the land in cars which whirl along without horses, to cross the ocean in ships which run ten knots an hour against the wind. These are but a part of its fruits, and of its first-fruits; for it is a philosophy which never rests, which has never attained, which is never perfect. Its law is progress. A point which yesterday was invisible is its goal to-day, and will be its starting-point to-morrow.”
From essay (Jul 1837) on 'Francis Bacon' in Edinburgh Review. In Baron Thomas Babington Macaulay and Lady Trevelyan (ed.) The Works of Lord Macaulay Complete (1871), Vol. 6, 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Aeronautics (15)  |  Against (332)  |  Agriculture (78)  |  Air (366)  |  Answer (389)  |  Arm (82)  |  Arms (37)  |  Ask (420)  |  Attain (126)  |  Attainment (48)  |  Automobile (23)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (188)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Bridge (49)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Business (156)  |  Call (781)  |  Car (75)  |  Cave (17)  |  Correspondence (24)  |  Depth (97)  |  Descend (49)  |  Disease (340)  |  Distance (171)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Effect (414)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Engineering (188)  |  Estuary (3)  |  Exploration (161)  |  Extend (129)  |  Father (113)  |  Fertility (23)  |  First (1302)  |  Form (976)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Furnish (97)  |  Goal (155)  |  Great (1610)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Horse (78)  |  Hour (192)  |  Human (1512)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Invisible (66)  |  Knot (11)  |  Law (913)  |  Life (1870)  |  Light (635)  |  Lighting (5)  |  Machine (271)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Mariner (12)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Mining (22)  |  Motion (320)  |  Muscle (47)  |  New (1273)  |  Noxious (8)  |  Ocean (216)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Office (71)  |  Pain (144)  |  Penetrate (68)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Point (584)  |  Power (771)  |  Progress (492)  |  Range (104)  |  Rest (287)  |  River (140)  |  Run (158)  |  Sea (326)  |  Ship (69)  |  Soar (23)  |  Soil (98)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Steam Engine (47)  |  Strength (139)  |  Telegraph (45)  |  Thunderbolt (7)  |  Time (1911)  |  Today (321)  |  Tomorrow (63)  |  Unknown (195)  |  Vision (127)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Whirl (10)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wind (141)  |  Yesterday (37)

Astrophysicists have the formidable privilege of having the largest view of the Universe; particle detectors and large telescopes are today used to study distant stars, and throughout space and time, from the infinitely large to the infinitely small, the Universe never ceases to surprise us by revealing its structures little by little.
In Black Holes (1992), xv.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrophysicist (7)  |  Cease (81)  |  Detector (4)  |  Distant (33)  |  Formidable (8)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Large (398)  |  Largest (39)  |  Little (717)  |  Particle (200)  |  Privilege (41)  |  Revealing (4)  |  Small (489)  |  Space (523)  |  Space And Time (38)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Structure (365)  |  Study (701)  |  Surprise (91)  |  Telescope (106)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1911)  |  Today (321)  |  Universe (900)  |  View (496)

At no period of [Michael Faraday’s] unmatched career was he interested in utility. He was absorbed in disentangling the riddles of the universe, at first chemical riddles, in later periods, physical riddles. As far as he cared, the question of utility was never raised. Any suspicion of utility would have restricted his restless curiosity. In the end, utility resulted, but it was never a criterion to which his ceaseless experimentation could be subjected.
'The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge', Harper's Magazine (Jun/Nov 1939), No. 179, 546. In Hispania (Feb 1944), 27, No. 1, 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (54)  |  Car (75)  |  Career (86)  |  Ceaseless (6)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Criterion (28)  |  Curiosity (138)  |  Disentangle (4)  |  End (603)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Michael Faraday (91)  |  First (1302)  |  Interest (416)  |  Period (200)  |  Physical (518)  |  Question (649)  |  Restless (13)  |  Result (700)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Subject (543)  |  Suspicion (36)  |  Universe (900)  |  Usefulness (92)  |  Utility (52)

At the bidding of a Peter the Hermit many millions of men swarmed to the East; the words of an hallucinated person … have created the force necessary to triumph over the Graeco-Roman world; an obscure monk like Luther set Europe ablaze and bathed in blood. The voice of a Galileo or a Newton will never have the least echo among the masses. The inventors of genius transform a civilization. The fanatics and the hallucinated create history.
From Les Premières Civilisations (1889), 171. English in The Psychology of Peoples (1898), Book 1, Chap. 1, 204, tweaked by Webmaster. Original French text: “A la voix d'un Pierre l'Ermite, plusieurs millions d'hommes se sont précipités sur l'Orient; les paroles d'un halluciné … ont créé la force nécessaire pour triompher du vieux monde gréco-romain; un moine obscur, comme Luther, a mis l'Europe à feu et à sang. Ce n’est pas parmi les foules que la voix d’un Galilée ou d’un Newton aura jamais le plus faible écho. Les inventeurs de génie transforment une civilisation. Les fanatiques et les hallucinés créent l’histoire.”
Science quotes on:  |  Bathe (3)  |  Bidding (2)  |  Blood (144)  |  Capable (174)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Create (245)  |  East (18)  |  Echo (12)  |  Enthusiast (9)  |  Europe (50)  |  Fanatic (7)  |  Force (497)  |  Galileo Galilei (134)  |  Genius (301)  |  Greece (9)  |  Hasten (13)  |  History (716)  |  Inventor (79)  |  Martin Luther (9)  |  March (48)  |  Million (124)  |  Monk (5)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Obscure (66)  |  Orient (5)  |  Person (366)  |  Roman (39)  |  Rome (19)  |  Set (400)  |  Swarm (15)  |  Transform (74)  |  Triumph (76)  |  Voice (54)  |  Will (2350)  |  Word (650)  |  World (1850)

At the outset do not be worried about this big question—Truth. It is a very simple matter if each one of you starts with the desire to get as much as possible. No human being is constituted to know the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; and even the best of men must be content with fragments, with partial glimpses, never the full fruition. In this unsatisfied quest the attitude of mind, the desire, the thirst—a thirst that from the soul must arise!—the fervent longing, are the be-all and the end-all.
'The Student Life' (1905). In G. L. Keynes (ed.), Selected Writings of Sir William Osler (1951), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (162)  |  Attitude (84)  |  Being (1276)  |  Best (467)  |  Constitution (78)  |  Contentment (11)  |  Desire (212)  |  Do (1905)  |  End (603)  |  Fervent (6)  |  Fragment (58)  |  Fruition (2)  |  Glimpse (16)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Know (1538)  |  Longing (19)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Outset (7)  |  Possible (560)  |  Quest (39)  |  Question (649)  |  Simple (426)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Soul (235)  |  Start (237)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Whole (756)

Atoms and molecules … from their very nature can never be made the objects of sensuous contemplation.
In Ernst Mach and Thomas J. McCormack (trans.), 'Space and Geometry from the Point of View of Physical Inquiry', Space and Geometry in the Light of Physiological, Psychological and Physical Inquiry (1906), 138. Originally written as an article for The Monist (1 Oct 1903), 14, No. 1, Mach believed the realm of science should include only phenomena directly observable by the senses, and rejected theories of unseeable atomic orbitals.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Object (438)  |  Sensuous (5)

Attempt the end and never stand to doubt;
Nothing's so hard, but search will find it out.
'Seeke and Finde', Hesperides: Or, the Works Both Humane and Divine of Robert Herrick Esq. (1648). In J. Max Patrick (ed.), The Complete Poetry of Robert Herrick (1963), 411.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (266)  |  Doubt (314)  |  End (603)  |  Find (1014)  |  Hard (246)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Research (753)  |  Search (175)  |  Stand (284)  |  Will (2350)

Bad philosophers may have a certain influence; good philosophers, never.
Uncertain attribution. Often seen, but Webmaster has not yet found this wording in a primary source, and remains uncertain that this is an actual Russell quote. It is included here to provide this caution. Contact Webmaster if you have more information.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (185)  |  Certain (557)  |  Good (906)  |  Influence (231)  |  Philosopher (269)

Be a nuisance where it counts. … Do your part to inform and stimulate the public to join your action. Be depressed, discouraged, and disappointed at failure and the disheartening effects of ignorance, greed, corruption, and bad politics — but never give up.
As quoted in Post Editors, 'Marjory Stoneman Douglas and The Saturday Evening Post', Saturday Evening Post (26 Feb 2018). Cited as “From a 1980 article she wrote”, in 'A Life of Advocacy and Activism', a floridastateparks.org webpage.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (342)  |  Bad (185)  |  Corruption (17)  |  Depressed (3)  |  Disappointment (18)  |  Discourage (14)  |  Effect (414)  |  Failure (176)  |  Give Up (10)  |  Greed (17)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Inform (50)  |  Join (32)  |  Nuisance (10)  |  Politics (122)  |  Public (100)  |  Stimulate (21)

Besides accustoming the student to demand, complete proof, and to know when he has not obtained it, mathematical studies are of immense benefit to his education by habituating him to precision. It is one of the peculiar excellencies of mathematical discipline, that the mathematician is never satisfied with à peu près. He requires the exact truth. Hardly any of the non-mathematical sciences, except chemistry, has this advantage. One of the commonest modes of loose thought, and sources of error both in opinion and in practice, is to overlook the importance of quantities. Mathematicians and chemists are taught by the whole course of their studies, that the most fundamental difference of quality depends on some very slight difference in proportional quantity; and that from the qualities of the influencing elements, without careful attention to their quantities, false expectation would constantly be formed as to the very nature and essential character of the result produced.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 611. [The French phrase, à peu près means “approximately”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Advantage (144)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Attention (196)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Both (496)  |  Careful (28)  |  Character (259)  |  Chemist (169)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Complete (209)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Course (413)  |  Demand (131)  |  Depend (238)  |  Difference (355)  |  Discipline (85)  |  Education (423)  |  Element (322)  |  Error (339)  |  Essential (210)  |  Exact (75)  |  Excellence (40)  |  Expectation (67)  |  False (105)  |  Form (976)  |  Fundamental (264)  |  Habituate (3)  |  Hardly (19)  |  Immense (89)  |  Importance (299)  |  Influence (231)  |  Know (1538)  |  Loose (14)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mode (43)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Overlook (33)  |  Peculiar (115)  |  Practice (212)  |  Precision (72)  |  Produce (117)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proof (304)  |  Proportional (5)  |  Quality (139)  |  Quantity (136)  |  Require (229)  |  Result (700)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Slight (32)  |  Source Of Error (2)  |  Student (317)  |  Study (701)  |  Teach (299)  |  Thought (995)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Whole (756)

Better to hunt in fields, for health unbought, Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught, The wise, for cure, on exercise depend; God never made his work for man to mend.
'To my Honoured Kinsman, John Dryden', The English Poets (1901), Vol. 2, 491.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (493)  |  Cure (124)  |  Depend (238)  |  Doctor (191)  |  Exercise (113)  |  Field (378)  |  God (776)  |  Health (210)  |  Hunt (32)  |  Man (2252)  |  Money (178)  |  Physician (284)  |  Wise (143)  |  Work (1402)

Both died, ignored by most; they neither sought nor found public favour, for high roads never lead there. Laurent and Gerhardt never left such roads, were never tempted to peruse those easy successes which, for strongly marked characters, offer neither allure nor gain. Their passion was for the search for truth; and, preferring their independence to their advancement, their convictions to their interests, they placed their love for science above that of their worldly goods; indeed above that for life itself, for death was the reward for their pains. Rare example of abnegation, sublime poverty that deserves the name nobility, glorious death that France must not forget!
'Éloge de Laurent et Gerhardt', Moniteur Scientifique (1862), 4, 473-83, trans. Alan J. Rocke.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (63)  |  Allure (4)  |  Both (496)  |  Character (259)  |  Conviction (100)  |  Death (406)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Easy (213)  |  Fame (51)  |  Forget (125)  |  Gain (146)  |  Charles Gerhardt (3)  |  Glorious (49)  |  Good (906)  |  High (370)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Independence (37)  |  Interest (416)  |  Auguste Laurent (5)  |  Lead (391)  |  Life (1870)  |  Love (328)  |  Marked (55)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Name (359)  |  Nobility (5)  |  Offer (142)  |  Pain (144)  |  Passion (121)  |  Poverty (40)  |  Rare (94)  |  Reward (72)  |  Search (175)  |  Sublime (50)  |  Success (327)  |  Truth (1109)

But at the same time, there must never be the least hesitation in giving up a position the moment it is shown to be untenable. It is not going too far to say that the greatness of a scientific investigator does not rest on the fact of his having never made a mistake, but rather on his readiness to admit that he has done so, whenever the contrary evidence is cogent enough.
Principles of General Physiology (1915), x.xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Cogent (6)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Enough (341)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Greatness (55)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Investigator (71)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Moment (260)  |  Must (1525)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Readiness (9)  |  Rest (287)  |  Say (989)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Time (1911)  |  Untenable (5)  |  Whenever (81)

But for the persistence of a student of this university in urging upon me his desire to study with me the modern algebra I should never have been led into this investigation; and the new facts and principles which I have discovered in regard to it (important facts, I believe), would, so far as I am concerned, have remained still hidden in the womb of time. In vain I represented to this inquisitive student that he would do better to take up some other subject lying less off the beaten track of study, such as the higher parts of the calculus or elliptic functions, or the theory of substitutions, or I wot not what besides. He stuck with perfect respectfulness, but with invincible pertinacity, to his point. He would have the new algebra (Heaven knows where he had heard about it, for it is almost unknown in this continent), that or nothing. I was obliged to yield, and what was the consequence? In trying to throw light upon an obscure explanation in our text-book, my brain took fire, I plunged with re-quickened zeal into a subject which I had for years abandoned, and found food for thoughts which have engaged my attention for a considerable time past, and will probably occupy all my powers of contemplation advantageously for several months to come.
In Johns Hopkins Commemoration Day Address, Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 3, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Advantageous (10)  |  Algebra (117)  |  Attention (196)  |  Beaten Track (4)  |  Belief (615)  |  Better (493)  |  Book (413)  |  Brain (281)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Concern (239)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Continent (79)  |  Desire (212)  |  Discover (571)  |  Do (1905)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Engage (41)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Far (158)  |  Find (1014)  |  Fire (203)  |  Food (213)  |  Function (235)  |  Hear (144)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Hide (70)  |  High (370)  |  Important (229)  |  In Vain (12)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Know (1538)  |  Lead (391)  |  Less (105)  |  Lie (370)  |  Light (635)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Modern (402)  |  Month (91)  |  New (1273)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Obscure (66)  |  Occupy (27)  |  Other (2233)  |  Part (235)  |  Past (355)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Persistence (25)  |  Pertinacity (2)  |  Plunge (11)  |  Point (584)  |  Power (771)  |  Principle (530)  |  Probably (50)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Regard (312)  |  Remain (355)  |  Represent (157)  |  Several (33)  |  Stick (27)  |  Still (614)  |  Student (317)  |  Study (701)  |  Subject (543)  |  Substitution (16)  |  Text-Book (5)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thought (995)  |  Throw (45)  |  Time (1911)  |  Track (42)  |  Try (296)  |  Trying (144)  |  University (130)  |  Unknown (195)  |  Urge (17)  |  Vain (86)  |  Will (2350)  |  Womb (25)  |  Year (963)  |  Yield (86)  |  Zeal (12)

But how is it that they [astrologers] have never been able to explain why, in the life of twins, in their actions, in their experiences, their professions, their accomplishments, their positions—in all the other circumstances of human life, and even in death itself, there is often found such a diversity that in those respects many strangers show more resemblance to them than they show to one another, even though the smallest possible interval separated their births and though they were conceived at the same moment, by a single act of intercourse.
De Civitate Dei (The City of God) [413-426], Book V, chapter I, trans. H. Bettenson (1972),180-181.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (102)  |  Act (278)  |  Action (342)  |  Astrology (46)  |  Birth (154)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Death (406)  |  Diversity (75)  |  Experience (494)  |  Explain (334)  |  Human (1512)  |  Life (1870)  |  Moment (260)  |  More (2558)  |  Other (2233)  |  Possible (560)  |  Profession (108)  |  Resemblance (39)  |  Respect (212)  |  Show (353)  |  Single (365)  |  Twin (16)  |  Twins (2)  |  Why (491)

But no other theory can explain so much. Continental drift is without a cause or a physical theory. It has never been applied to any but the last part of geological time.
In 'Geophysics and Continental Growth', American Scientist (1959), 47, 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (176)  |  Cause (561)  |  Continental Drift (15)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Geology (240)  |  Last (425)  |  Other (2233)  |  Physical (518)  |  Plate Tectonics (22)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Time (1911)

But since the brain, as well as the cerebellum, is composed of many parts, variously figured, it is possible, that nature, which never works in vain, has destined those parts to various uses, so that the various faculties of the mind seem to require different portions of the cerebrum and cerebellum for their production.
A Dissertation on the Functions of the Nervous System (1784), trans. and ed. Thomas Laycock (1851), 446.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (281)  |  Cerebellum (4)  |  Cerebrum (10)  |  Composition (86)  |  Destined (42)  |  Different (595)  |  Faculty (76)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Part (235)  |  Portion (86)  |  Possible (560)  |  Production (190)  |  Require (229)  |  Use (771)  |  Vain (86)  |  Various (205)  |  Work (1402)

But that which will excite the greatest astonishment by far, and which indeed especially moved me to call the attention of all astronomers and philosophers, is this: namely, that I have observed four planets, neither known nor observed by any one of the astronomers before my time, which have their orbits round a certain bright star [Jupiter], one of those previously known, like Venus or Mercury round the sun, and are sometimes in front of it, sometimes behind it, though they never depart from it beyond certain limits. All of which facts were discovered and observed a few days ago by the help of a telescope devised by me, through God’s grace first enlightening my mind.
In pamphlet, The Sidereal Messenger (1610), reprinted in The Sidereal Messenger of Galileo Galilei: And a Part of the Preface to the Preface to Kepler's Dioptrics Containing the Original Account of Galileo's Astronomical Discoveries (1880), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Astronomer (97)  |  Attention (196)  |  Behind (139)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Bright (81)  |  Call (781)  |  Certain (557)  |  Discover (571)  |  Enlighten (32)  |  Enlightening (3)  |  Especially (31)  |  Excite (17)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1302)  |  Four (6)  |  Front (16)  |  God (776)  |  Grace (31)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Jupiter (28)  |  Know (1538)  |  Known (453)  |  Limit (294)  |  Mercury (54)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Observe (179)  |  Observed (149)  |  Orbit (85)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Planet (402)  |  Previously (12)  |  Star (460)  |  Sun (407)  |  Telescope (106)  |  Through (846)  |  Time (1911)  |  Venus (21)  |  Will (2350)

By destroying the biological character of phenomena, the use of averages in physiology and medicine usually gives only apparent accuracy to the results. From our point of view, we may distinguish between several kinds of averages: physical averages, chemical averages and physiological and pathological averages. If, for instance, we observe the number of pulsations and the degree of blood pressure by means of the oscillations of a manometer throughout one day, and if we take the average of all our figures to get the true or average blood pressure and to learn the true or average number of pulsations, we shall simply have wrong numbers. In fact, the pulse decreases in number and intensity when we are fasting and increases during digestion or under different influences of movement and rest; all the biological characteristics of the phenomenon disappear in the average. Chemical averages are also often used. If we collect a man's urine during twenty-four hours and mix all this urine to analyze the average, we get an analysis of a urine which simply does not exist; for urine, when fasting, is different from urine during digestion. A startling instance of this kind was invented by a physiologist who took urine from a railroad station urinal where people of all nations passed, and who believed he could thus present an analysis of average European urine! Aside from physical and chemical, there are physiological averages, or what we might call average descriptions of phenomena, which are even more false. Let me assume that a physician collects a great many individual observations of a disease and that he makes an average description of symptoms observed in the individual cases; he will thus have a description that will never be matched in nature. So in physiology, we must never make average descriptions of experiments, because the true relations of phenomena disappear in the average; when dealing with complex and variable experiments, we must study their various circumstances, and then present our most perfect experiment as a type, which, however, still stands for true facts. In the cases just considered, averages must therefore be rejected, because they confuse, while aiming to unify, and distort while aiming to simplify. Averages are applicable only to reducing very slightly varying numerical data about clearly defined and absolutely simple cases.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Average (89)  |  Biological (137)  |  Blood (144)  |  Call (781)  |  Character (259)  |  Characteristic (154)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Complex (202)  |  Consider (428)  |  Data (162)  |  Degree (277)  |  Different (595)  |  Digestion (29)  |  Disappear (84)  |  Disease (340)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Distort (22)  |  Exist (458)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fasting (3)  |  Figure (162)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hour (192)  |  Increase (225)  |  Individual (420)  |  Influence (231)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Kind (564)  |  Learn (672)  |  Man (2252)  |  Match (30)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Medicine (392)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Movement (162)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nation (208)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Number (710)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observe (179)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Pass (241)  |  Pathological (21)  |  People (1031)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physician (284)  |  Physiological (64)  |  Physiologist (31)  |  Physiology (101)  |  Point (584)  |  Point Of View (85)  |  Present (630)  |  Pressure (69)  |  Pulse (22)  |  Railroad (36)  |  Reject (67)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rest (287)  |  Result (700)  |  Simple (426)  |  Simplify (14)  |  Stand (284)  |  Startling (15)  |  Station (30)  |  Still (614)  |  Study (701)  |  Symptom (38)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Type (171)  |  Unify (7)  |  Urine (18)  |  Use (771)  |  Usually (176)  |  Variable (37)  |  Various (205)  |  View (496)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wrong (246)

Cat-Ideas and Mouse-Ideas. We can never get rid of mouse-ideas completely, they keep turning up again and again, and nibble, nibble—no matter how often we drive them off. The best way to keep them down is to have a few good strong cat-ideas which will embrace them and ensure their not reappearing till they do so in another shape.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 216.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (467)  |  Cat (52)  |  Completely (137)  |  Do (1905)  |  Down (455)  |  Embrace (47)  |  Ensure (27)  |  Good (906)  |  Idea (881)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mouse (33)  |  Nibble (2)  |  Strong (182)  |  Way (1214)  |  Will (2350)

Chemistry affords two general methods of determining the constituent principles of bodies, the method of analysis, and that of synthesis. When, for instance, by combining water with alkohol, we form the species of liquor called, in commercial language, brandy or spirit of wine, we certainly have a right to conclude, that brandy, or spirit of wine, is composed of alkohol combined with water. We can produce the same result by the analytical method; and in general it ought to be considered as a principle in chemical science, never to rest satisfied without both these species of proofs. We have this advantage in the analysis of atmospherical air, being able both to decompound it, and to form it a new in the most satisfactory manner.
Elements of Chemistry (1790), trans. R. Kerr, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (144)  |  Air (366)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Atmosphere (117)  |  Being (1276)  |  Both (496)  |  Brandy (3)  |  Call (781)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Consider (428)  |  Constituent (47)  |  Decomposition (19)  |  Form (976)  |  General (521)  |  Language (308)  |  Method (531)  |  Most (1728)  |  New (1273)  |  Principle (530)  |  Proof (304)  |  Rest (287)  |  Result (700)  |  Right (473)  |  Species (435)  |  Spirit (278)  |  Synthesis (58)  |  Two (936)  |  Water (503)  |  Wine (39)

Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life.
Anonymous
Too often seen carelessly attributed to Confucius. Webmaster has searched the original writings of the disciples of Confucius who recorded his thoughts, and has seen nothing resembling this. Peasants of his era did not “choose a job”—they merely worked on raising food and providing the necessities of life for their family and community.
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (116)  |  Job (86)  |  Life (1870)  |  Love (328)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

Circumstantial evidence can be overwhelming. We have never seen an atom, but we nevertheless know that it must exist.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Circumstantial (2)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Exist (458)  |  Know (1538)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  See (1094)

Civilisations as yet have only been created and directed by a small intellectual aristocracy, never by crowds. Crowds are only powerful for destruction.
From original French, “Les civilisations n’ont été créées et guidées jusqu’ici que par une petite aristocratie intellectuelle, jamais par les foules. Les foules n’ont de puissance que pour détruire,” in Psychologie des Foules (1895), Preface, 6. English text in The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind (1897), Introduction, xviii. Also seen translated as, “All the civilizations we know have been created and directed by small intellectual aristocracies, never by people in the mass. The power of crowds is only to destroy.”
Science quotes on:  |  Aristocracy (7)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Create (245)  |  Crowd (25)  |  Destruction (135)  |  Direct (228)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Small (489)

Classical thermodynamics ... is the only physical theory of universal content which I am convinced ... will never be overthrown.
Quoted in Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking (ed.), A Stubbornly Persistent Illusion (2007), 353.
Science quotes on:  |  Classical (49)  |  Overthrown (8)  |  Physical (518)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Universal (198)  |  Will (2350)

Common sense always speaks too late. Common sense is the guy who tells you you ought to have had your brakes relined last week before you smashed a front end this week. Common sense is the Monday morning quarterback who could have won the ball game if he had been on the team. But he never is. He’s high up in the stands with a flask on his hip. Common sense is the little man in a grey suit who never makes a mistake in addition. But it’s always somebody else’s money he’s adding up.
In novel, Playback (1958), Chap. 14, 95.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (70)  |  Ball (64)  |  Brake (2)  |  Common (447)  |  Common Sense (136)  |  End (603)  |  Flask (2)  |  Front (16)  |  Game (104)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (370)  |  Hip (3)  |  Last (425)  |  Late (119)  |  Little (717)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Money (178)  |  Morning (98)  |  Repair (11)  |  Sense (785)  |  Smash (5)  |  Speak (240)  |  Stand (284)  |  Suit (12)  |  Team (17)  |  Tell (344)  |  Week (73)  |  Win (53)

Confucius once said: “our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in getting up every time we do”. Scholars believe he was referring to roller coasters.
Anonymous
The anonymous quote includes an embedded quote misattributed to Confucius; it is not in his writings. It is first seen written (… but in rising every time we fall) by Oliver Goldmith, in The Citizen of the World: or, Letters from a Chinese Philosopher, Residing in London, to His Friends in the East (1762). The imaginary letters are from an invented character, Lien Chi Altangi, and include Goldsmith’s probably fictional reference to Confucius for verisimilitude. See the quoteinvestigator.com website for more details.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Confucius (13)  |  Do (1905)  |  Falling (6)  |  Get Up (5)  |  Glory (66)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Refer (14)  |  Scholar (52)  |  Time (1911)

Consciousness is never experienced in the plural, only in the singular. Not only has none of us ever experienced more than one consciousness, but there is also no trace of circumstantial evidence of this ever happening anywhere in the world. If I say that there cannot be more than one consciousness in the same mind, this seems a blunt tautology–we are quite unable to imagine the contrary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Anywhere (16)  |  Blunt (5)  |  Circumstantial (2)  |  Consciousness (132)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Experience (494)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happening (59)  |  Imagine (176)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Same (166)  |  Say (989)  |  Seem (150)  |  Singular (24)  |  Tautology (4)  |  Trace (109)  |  Unable (25)  |  World (1850)

Considerable obstacles generally present themselves to the beginner, in studying the elements of Solid Geometry, from the practice which has hitherto uniformly prevailed in this country, of never submitting to the eye of the student, the figures on whose properties he is reasoning, but of drawing perspective representations of them upon a plane. ...I hope that I shall never be obliged to have recourse to a perspective drawing of any figure whose parts are not in the same plane.
Quoted in Adrian Rice, 'What Makes a Great Mathematics Teacher?' The American Mathematical Monthly, (June-July 1999), 540.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (680)  |  Beginner (11)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Country (269)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Element (322)  |  Eye (440)  |  Figure (162)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Hope (321)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Practice (212)  |  Present (630)  |  Prevail (47)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Representation (55)  |  Solid (119)  |  Student (317)  |  Studying (70)  |  Themselves (433)

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretch’d in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
Second verse of poem, 'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud', In Poems: Including Lyrical Ballads: In two Volumes (1815), Vol. 1, 328.
Science quotes on:  |  Bay (6)  |  Continuous (83)  |  Dance (35)  |  Glance (36)  |  Head (87)  |  Line (100)  |  Margin (6)  |  Milky Way (29)  |  Never-Ending (3)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1094)  |  Shine (49)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Stretched (2)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Toss (8)  |  Twinkle (6)  |  Way (1214)

Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state. We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone.
'The Laws of Habit', The Popular Science Monthly (Feb 1887), 451.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Bundle (7)  |  Conduct (70)  |  Evil (122)  |  Fate (76)  |  Good (906)  |  Habit (174)  |  Heed (12)  |  More (2558)  |  Plastic (30)  |  Realize (157)  |  Soon (187)  |  Spinning (18)  |  State (505)  |  Will (2350)  |  Young (253)

Create a vision and never let the environment, other people’s beliefs, or the limits of what has been done in the past shape your decisions. Ignore conventional wisdom.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Conventional (31)  |  Conventional Wisdom (3)  |  Create (245)  |  Decision (98)  |  Environment (239)  |  Ignore (52)  |  Let (64)  |  Limit (294)  |  Other (2233)  |  Past (355)  |  People (1031)  |  Shape (77)  |  Vision (127)  |  Wisdom (235)

Creative people see Prometheus in a mirror, never Pandora.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Creative (144)  |  Mirror (43)  |  People (1031)  |  Prometheus (7)  |  See (1094)

Creativity comes from trust. Trust your instincts. And never hope more than you work.
In Starting From Scratch: A Different Kind of Writers’ Manual (1988), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Creativity (84)  |  Hope (321)  |  Instinct (91)  |  More (2558)  |  Trust (72)  |  Work (1402)

Debate is an art form. It is about the winning of arguments. It is not about the discovery of truth. There are certain rules and procedures to debate that really have nothing to do with establishing fact–which creationists have mastered. Some of those rules are: never say anything positive about your own position because it can be attacked, but chip away at what appear to be the weaknesses in your opponent’s position. They are good at that. I don’t think I could beat the creationists at debate. I can tie them. But in courtrooms they are terrible, because in courtrooms you cannot give speeches. In a courtroom you have to answer direct questions about the positive status of your belief. We destroyed them in Arkansas. On the second day of the two-week trial we had our victory party!
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Appear (122)  |  Argument (145)  |  Arkansas (2)  |  Art (680)  |  Attack (86)  |  Beat (42)  |  Belief (615)  |  Certain (557)  |  Chip (4)  |  Creationist (16)  |  Debate (40)  |  Destroy (189)  |  Direct (228)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Do (1905)  |  Establish (63)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Form (976)  |  Give (208)  |  Good (906)  |  Master (182)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Opponent (23)  |  Party (19)  |  Position (83)  |  Positive (98)  |  Procedure (48)  |  Question (649)  |  Really (77)  |  Rule (307)  |  Say (989)  |  Second (66)  |  Speech (66)  |  Status (35)  |  Terrible (41)  |  Think (1122)  |  Tie (42)  |  Trial (59)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Two (936)  |  Victory (40)  |  Weakness (50)  |  Week (73)  |  Win (53)  |  Winning (19)

Defeat never comes to any man until he admits it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (49)  |  Defeat (31)  |  Man (2252)

Degree is much: the whole Atlantic might be lukewarm and never boil us a potato.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Atlantic (8)  |  Boil (24)  |  Degree (277)  |  Lukewarm (2)  |  Potato (11)  |  Whole (756)

Dermatology is the best specialty. The patient never dies and never gets well.
Anonymous
J. Dantith and A. Isaacs, Medical Quotes: A Thematic Dictionary (1989)
Science quotes on:  |  Best (467)  |  Dermatologist (3)  |  Dermatology (2)  |  Patient (209)  |  Specialty (13)

Descartes, the father of modern philosophy … would never—so he assures us—have been led to construct his philosophy if he had had only one teacher, for then he would have believed what he had been told; but, finding that his professors disagreed with each other, he was forced to conclude that no existing doctrine was certain.
From 'Philosophy For Laymen', collected in Unpopular Essays (1950, 1996), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Assure (16)  |  Belief (615)  |  Certain (557)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Construct (129)  |  René Descartes (83)  |  Disagreed (4)  |  Doctrine (81)  |  Existing (10)  |  Father (113)  |  Forced (3)  |  Modern (402)  |  Other (2233)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Professor (133)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Told (4)

Details are all that matters: God dwells there, and you never get to see Him if you don’t struggle to get them right.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Detail (150)  |  Dwell (19)  |  God (776)  |  Matter (821)  |  Right (473)  |  See (1094)  |  Struggle (111)

Dirichlet was not satisfied to study Gauss’ Disquisitiones arithmetical once or several times, but continued throughout life to keep in close touch with the wealth of deep mathematical thoughts which it contains by perusing it again and again. For this reason the book was never placed on the shelf but had an abiding place on the table at which he worked. … Dirichlet was the first one, who not only fully understood this work, but made it also accessible to others.
In Dirichlet, Werke, Bd. 2, 315. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 159.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Accessible (27)  |  Book (413)  |  Close (77)  |  Contain (68)  |  Continue (179)  |  Deep (241)  |  Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (3)  |  Disquisitiones Arithmeticae (2)  |  First (1302)  |  Fully (20)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (79)  |  Keep (104)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Other (2233)  |  Peruse (2)  |  Place (192)  |  Reason (766)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Shelf (8)  |  Study (701)  |  Table (105)  |  Thought (995)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1911)  |  Touch (146)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understood (155)  |  Wealth (100)  |  Work (1402)

Does it seem all but incredible to you that intelligence should travel for two thousand miles, along those slender copper lines, far down in the all but fathomless Atlantic; never before penetrated … save when some foundering vessel has plunged with her hapless company to the eternal silence and darkness of the abyss? Does it seem … but a miracle … that the thoughts of living men … should burn over the cold, green bones of men and women, whose hearts, once as warm as ours, burst as the eternal gulfs closed and roared over them centuries ago?
A tribute to the Atlantic telegraph cable by Edward Everett, one of the topics included in his inauguration address at the Washington University of St. Louis (22 Apr 1857). In Orations and Speeches on Various Occasions: Volume 3 (1870), 509-511.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (30)  |  Atlantic Ocean (7)  |  Bone (101)  |  Burn (99)  |  Burst (41)  |  Century (319)  |  Closed (38)  |  Cold (115)  |  Company (63)  |  Copper (25)  |  Darkness (72)  |  Down (455)  |  Eternal (113)  |  Fathomless (3)  |  Foundering (2)  |  Green (65)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Heart (243)  |  Incredible (43)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Line (100)  |  Living (492)  |  Mile (43)  |  Miracle (85)  |  Save (126)  |  Shipwreck (8)  |  Silence (62)  |  Thought (995)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Travel (125)  |  Two (936)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Warm (74)

Don’t despise empiric truth. Lots of things work in practice for which the laboratory has never found proof.
Martin H. Fischer, Howard Fabing (ed.) and Ray Marr (ed.), Fischerisms (1944).
Science quotes on:  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Laboratory (214)  |  Lot (151)  |  Practice (212)  |  Proof (304)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Work (1402)

Doubly galling was the fact that at the same time my roommate was taking a history course … filled with excitement over a class discussion. … I was busy with Ampere’s law. We never had any fascinating class discussions about this law. No one, teacher or student, ever asked me what I thought about it.
In Understanding the Universe: An Inquiry Approach to Astronomy and the Nature of Scientific Research (2013), ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (420)  |  Class (168)  |  Course (413)  |  Discussion (78)  |  Excitement (61)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Fascinating (38)  |  Fascination (35)  |  History (716)  |  Law (913)  |  Roommate (2)  |  Student (317)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)

Doubt is the offspring of knowledge: the savage never doubts at all.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Doubt (314)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Savage (33)

Dreams are the reality you are afraid to live, reality is the fact that your dreams will probably never come true. You can find the word me in dream, that is because it is up to you to make them come true.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afraid (24)  |  Dream (222)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Find (1014)  |  Live (650)  |  Probably (50)  |  Reality (274)  |  True (239)  |  Will (2350)  |  Word (650)

During a conversation with the writer in the last weeks of his life, Sylvester remarked as curious that notwithstanding he had always considered the bent of his mind to be rather analytical than geometrical, he found in nearly every case that the solution of an analytical problem turned upon some quite simple geometrical notion, and that he was never satisfied until he could present the argument in geometrical language.
In Proceedings London Royal Society, 63, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (244)  |  Argument (145)  |  Consider (428)  |  Conversation (46)  |  Curious (95)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Language (308)  |  Last (425)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Notion (120)  |  Present (630)  |  Problem (731)  |  Remark (28)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Simple (426)  |  Solution (282)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Turn (454)  |  Week (73)  |  Writer (90)

During my second year at Edinburgh [1826-27] I attended Jameson's lectures on Geology and Zoology, but they were incredible dull. The sole effect they produced on me was the determination never as long as I lived to read a book on Geology.
Charles Darwin, His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter and a Selected Series of his Published Letters (1892), 15. In Patrick Wyse Jackson, Four Centuries of Geological Travel (2007), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (67)  |  Biography (254)  |  Book (413)  |  Determination (80)  |  Dull (58)  |  Effect (414)  |  Geology (240)  |  Incredible (43)  |   Robert Jameson (2)  |  Lecture (111)  |  Long (778)  |  Produced (187)  |  Read (308)  |  Sole (50)  |  Year (963)  |  Zoology (38)

During my stay in London I resided for a considerable time in Clapham Road in the neighbourhood of Clapham Common... One fine summer evening I was returning by the last bus 'outside' as usual, through the deserted streets of the city, which are at other times so full of life. I fell into a reverie (Träumerei), and 10, the atoms were gambolling before my eyes! Whenever, hitherto, these diminutive beings had appeared to me, they had always been in motion: but up to that time I had never been able to discern the nature of their motion. Now, however, I saw how, frequently, two smaller atoms united to form a pair: how the larger one embraced the two smaller ones: how still larger ones kept hold of three or even four of the smaller: whilst the whole kept whirling in a giddy dance. I saw how the larger ones formed a chain, dragging the smaller ones after them but only at the ends of the chain. I saw what our past master, Kopp, my highly honoured teacher and friend has depicted with such charm in his Molekular-Welt: but I saw it long before him. The cry of the conductor 'Clapham Road', awakened me from my dreaming: but I spent part of the night in putting on paper at least sketches of these dream forms. This was the origin of the 'Structural Theory'.
Kekule at Benzolfest in Berichte (1890), 23, 1302.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Being (1276)  |  Chain (51)  |  Charm (54)  |  City (87)  |  Common (447)  |  Compound (117)  |  Conductor (17)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Cry (30)  |  Dance (35)  |  Desert (59)  |  Discern (35)  |  Dragging (6)  |  Dream (222)  |  End (603)  |  Eye (440)  |  Form (976)  |  Friend (180)  |  Honour (58)  |  Hermann Franz Moritz Kopp (2)  |  Last (425)  |  Life (1870)  |  Long (778)  |  Master (182)  |  Motion (320)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Origin (250)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outside (141)  |  Paper (192)  |  Past (355)  |  Saw (160)  |  Spent (85)  |  Still (614)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (365)  |  Summer (56)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Through (846)  |  Time (1911)  |  Two (936)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Whole (756)

Each and every loss becomes an instance of ultimate tragedy–something that once was, but shall never be known to us. The hump of the giant deer–as a nonfossilizable item of soft anatomy–should have fallen into the maw of erased history. But our ancestors provided a wondrous rescue, and we should rejoice mightily. Every new item can instruct us; every unexpected object possesses beauty for its own sake; every rescue from history’s great shredding machine is–and I don’t know how else to say this–a holy act of salvation for a bit of totality.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Anatomy (75)  |  Ancestor (63)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Become (821)  |  Bit (21)  |  Deer (11)  |  Erase (7)  |  Fall (243)  |  Giant (73)  |  Great (1610)  |  History (716)  |  Holy (35)  |  Hump (3)  |  Instance (33)  |  Instruction (101)  |  Item (4)  |  Know (1538)  |  Known (453)  |  Loss (117)  |  Machine (271)  |  Mightily (2)  |  New (1273)  |  Object (438)  |  Possess (157)  |  Provide (79)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Rescue (14)  |  Sake (61)  |  Salvation (13)  |  Say (989)  |  Shred (7)  |  Soft (30)  |  Something (718)  |  Totality (17)  |  Tragedy (31)  |  Ultimate (152)  |  Unexpected (55)  |  Wondrous (22)

Ecologically speaking, a spilt tanker load is like sticking a safety pin into an elephant’s foot. The planet barely notices. After the Exxon Valdez accident in Alaska the oil company spent billions tidying up the coastline, but it was a waste of money because the waves were cleaning up faster than Exxon could. Environmentalists can never accept the planet’s ability to self-heal.
'Seat Leon Cupra SR1, in The Times (22 Dec 2002)
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (162)  |  Accept (198)  |  Accident (92)  |  Alaska (3)  |  Billion (104)  |  Cleaning (7)  |  Company (63)  |  Ecology (81)  |  Elephant (35)  |  Environmentalist (7)  |  Faster (50)  |  Money (178)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Notice (81)  |  Oil (67)  |  Oil Spill (6)  |  Pin (20)  |  Planet (402)  |  Safety (58)  |  Self (268)  |  Speaking (118)  |  Spent (85)  |  Valdez (2)  |  Waste (109)  |  Wave (112)

Education has, thus, become the chief problem of the world, its one holy cause. The nations that see this will survive, and those that fail to do so will slowly perish. There must be re-education of the will and of the heart as well as of the intellect, and the ideals of service must supplant those of selfishness and greed. ... Never so much as now is education the one and chief hope of the world.
Confessions of a Psychologist (1923). Quoted in Bruce A. Kimball, The True Professional Ideal in America: A History (1996), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Cause (561)  |  Chief (99)  |  Do (1905)  |  Education (423)  |  Fail (191)  |  Greed (17)  |  Heart (243)  |  Holy (35)  |  Hope (321)  |  Ideal (110)  |  Intellect (251)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nation (208)  |  Perish (56)  |  Problem (731)  |  See (1094)  |  Service (110)  |  Survive (87)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

EFFECT, n. The second of two phenomena which always occur together in the same order. The first, called a Cause, is said to generate the other—which is no more sensible than it would be for one who has never seen a dog except in pursuit of a rabbit to declare the rabbit the cause of the dog.
The Cynic's Word Book (1906), 86. Later published as The Devil's Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (781)  |  Cause (561)  |  Declare (48)  |  Dog (70)  |  Effect (414)  |  First (1302)  |  Generate (16)  |  More (2558)  |  Occur (151)  |  Order (638)  |  Other (2233)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Pursuit (128)  |  Rabbit (10)  |  Same (166)  |  Sensible (28)  |  Together (392)  |  Two (936)

Einstein never accepted quantum mechanics because of this element of chance and uncertainty. He said: God does not play dice. It seems that Einstein was doubly wrong. The quantum effects of black holes suggests that not only does God play dice, He sometimes throws them where they cannot be seen.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Black Holes (4)  |  Chance (244)  |  Dice (21)  |  Effect (414)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Element (322)  |  God (776)  |  Mechanic (120)  |  Mechanics (137)  |  Play (116)  |  Quantum (118)  |  Quantum Mechanics (47)  |  Say (989)  |  See (1094)  |  Seem (150)  |  Sometimes (46)  |  Suggest (38)  |  Throw (45)  |  Uncertainty (58)  |  Wrong (246)

Electric and magnetic forces. May they live for ever, and never be forgot, if only to remind us that the science of electromagnetics, in spite of the abstract nature of its theory, involving quantities whose nature is entirely unknown at the present, is really and truly founded on the observations of real Newtonian forces, electric and magnetic respectively.
From 'Electromagnetic Theory, CXII', The Electrician (23 Feb 1900), Vol. 44, 615.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Electromagnetism (19)  |  Force (497)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (43)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Observation (593)  |  Present (630)  |  Quantity (136)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Spite (55)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Truly (118)  |  Unknown (195)

Enough for me the mystery of the eternity of life, and the inkling of the marvellous structure of reality, together with the single-hearted endeavour to comprehend a portion, be it never so tiny, of the reason that manifests itself in nature.
In Alan Harris (ed.), The World As I See It (1934), 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Comprehend (44)  |  Endeavor (74)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Enough (341)  |  Eternity (64)  |  Heart (243)  |  Life (1870)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Portion (86)  |  Reality (274)  |  Reason (766)  |  Single (365)  |  Structure (365)  |  Tiny (74)  |  Together (392)

Equations are Expressions of Arithmetical Computation, and properly have no place in Geometry, except as far as Quantities truly Geometrical (that is, Lines, Surfaces, Solids, and Proportions) may be said to be some equal to others. Multiplications, Divisions, and such sort of Computations, are newly received into Geometry, and that unwarily, and contrary to the first Design of this Science. For whosoever considers the Construction of a Problem by a right Line and a Circle, found out by the first Geometricians, will easily perceive that Geometry was invented that we might expeditiously avoid, by drawing Lines, the Tediousness of Computation. Therefore these two Sciences ought not to be confounded. The Ancients did so industriously distinguish them from one another, that they never introduced Arithmetical Terms into Geometry. And the Moderns, by confounding both, have lost the Simplicity in which all the Elegance of Geometry consists. Wherefore that is Arithmetically more simple which is determined by the more simple Equation, but that is Geometrically more simple which is determined by the more simple drawing of Lines; and in Geometry, that ought to be reckoned best which is geometrically most simple.
In 'On the Linear Construction of Equations', Universal Arithmetic (1769), Vol. 2, 470.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (198)  |  Arithmetic (144)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Best (467)  |  Both (496)  |  Circle (117)  |  Computation (28)  |  Confound (21)  |  Confounding (8)  |  Consider (428)  |  Consist (223)  |  Construction (114)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Design (203)  |  Determine (152)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Division (67)  |  Draw (140)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Easily (36)  |  Elegance (40)  |  Equal (88)  |  Equation (138)  |  Expression (181)  |  Far (158)  |  Find (1014)  |  First (1302)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Industrious (12)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Invent (57)  |  Line (100)  |  Lose (165)  |  Modern (402)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Multiplication (46)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perceive (46)  |  Place (192)  |  Problem (731)  |  Proportion (140)  |  Quantity (136)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Right (473)  |  Simple (426)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Solid (119)  |  Sort (50)  |  Surface (223)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Tedious (15)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)  |  Truly (118)  |  Two (936)  |  Wherefore (2)  |  Will (2350)

Error, never can be consistent, nor can truth fail of having support from the accurate examination of every circumstance.
'Theory of the Earth', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1788), 1, 259.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (88)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Consistent (50)  |  Error (339)  |  Examination (102)  |  Fail (191)  |  Observation (593)  |  Support (151)  |  Truth (1109)

Euclid always contemplates a straight line as drawn between two definite points, and is very careful to mention when it is to be produced beyond this segment. He never thinks of the line as an entity given once for all as a whole. This careful definition and limitation, so as to exclude an infinity not immediately apparent to the senses, was very characteristic of the Greeks in all their many activities. It is enshrined in the difference between Greek architecture and Gothic architecture, and between Greek religion and modern religion. The spire of a Gothic cathedral and the importance of the unbounded straight line in modern Geometry are both emblematic of the transformation of the modern world.
In Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (218)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Architecture (50)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Both (496)  |  Careful (28)  |  Cathedral (27)  |  Characteristic (154)  |  Contemplate (29)  |  Definite (114)  |  Definition (238)  |  Difference (355)  |  Draw (140)  |  Enshrine (2)  |  Entity (37)  |  Euclid (60)  |  Exclude (8)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Give (208)  |  Gothic (4)  |  Greek (109)  |  Immediately (115)  |  Importance (299)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Limitation (52)  |  Line (100)  |  Mention (84)  |  Modern (402)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Modern World (5)  |  Point (584)  |  Produce (117)  |  Produced (187)  |  Religion (369)  |  Segment (6)  |  Sense (785)  |  Spire (5)  |  Straight (75)  |  Straight Line (34)  |  Think (1122)  |  Transformation (72)  |  Two (936)  |  Unbounded (5)  |  Whole (756)  |  World (1850)

Even in populous districts, the practice of medicine is a lonely road which winds up-hill all the way and a man may easily go astray and never reach the Delectable Mountains unless he early finds those shepherd guides of whom Bunyan tells, Knowledge, Experience, Watchful, and Sincere.
In Aequanimitas (1904), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Astray (13)  |  Early (196)  |  Experience (494)  |  Find (1014)  |  Guide (107)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Man (2252)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Physician (284)  |  Practice (212)  |  Reach (286)  |  Tell (344)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wind (141)

Events in the past may be roughly divided into those which probably never happened and those which do not matter. This is what makes the trade of historian so attractive.
Dean Inge
In 'Prognostications', Assessments and Anticipations (1929), 149.
Science quotes on:  |  Attractive (25)  |  Divide (77)  |  Divided (50)  |  Do (1905)  |  Event (222)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happened (88)  |  Historian (59)  |  Matter (821)  |  Past (355)  |  Probably (50)  |  Trade (34)

Eventually man has to get there [Mars] because we will never be satisfied with unmanned exploration.
In 'Interview: Cyril Ponnamperuma', Space World (1989), 5, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Eventually (64)  |  Exploration (161)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mars (47)  |  Planet (402)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Will (2350)

Every common mechanic has something to say in his craft about good and evil, useful and useless, but these practical considerations never enter into the purview of the mathematician.
Quoted in Robert Drew Hicks, Stoic and Epicurean (1910), 210.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (447)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Craft (11)  |  Enter (145)  |  Evil (122)  |  Good (906)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mechanic (120)  |  Practical (225)  |  Say (989)  |  Something (718)  |  Something To Say (4)  |  Useful (260)  |  Usefulness (92)  |  Uselessness (22)

Every farm woodland, in addition to yielding lumber, fuel, and posts, should provide its owner a liberal education. This crop of wisdom never fails, but it is not always harvested.
In A Sand County Almanac: and Sketches Here and There (1949, 1989), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (70)  |  Crop (26)  |  Education (423)  |  Fail (191)  |  Farm (28)  |  Forestry (17)  |  Fuel (39)  |  Harvest (28)  |  Lumber (5)  |  Post (8)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  Woodland (3)  |  Yield (86)

Every man has some forte something he can do better than he can do anything else. Many men, however, never find the job they are best fitted for. And often this is because they do not think enough. Too many men drift lazily into any job, suited or unsuited for them; and when they don’t get along well they blame everybody and everything except themselves.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (467)  |  Better (493)  |  Blame (31)  |  Do (1905)  |  Drift (14)  |  Enough (341)  |  Everybody (72)  |  Everything (489)  |  Find (1014)  |  Fit (139)  |  Forte (3)  |  Job (86)  |  Lazy (10)  |  Man (2252)  |  Something (718)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)

Every philosophy is tinged with the colouring of some secret imaginative background, which never emerges explicitly into its train of reasoning.
In Science and the Modern World (1925), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Background (44)  |  Color (155)  |  Emerge (24)  |  Explicitly (2)  |  Imaginative (9)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Secret (216)  |  Tinge (2)  |  Train (118)

Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. One could write a history of science in reverse by assembling the solemn pronouncements of highest authority about what could not be done and could never happen.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Assemble (14)  |  Authority (99)  |  Everything (489)  |  Happen (282)  |  High (370)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Science (80)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Pronouncement (2)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Theoretically (2)  |  Write (250)

Evolution ... is really two theories, the vague theory and the precise theory. The vague theory has been abundantly proved.... The precise theory has never been proved at all. However, like relativity, it is accepted on faith.... On getting down to actual details, difficulties begin.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 101 & 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (26)  |  Accept (198)  |  Actual (118)  |  Begin (275)  |  Detail (150)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Down (455)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Faith (209)  |  Precise (71)  |  Precision (72)  |  Proof (304)  |  Relativity (91)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Two (936)  |  Vague (50)  |  Vagueness (15)

Excellence is never granted to man, but as the reward of labour.
From 'A Discourse Delivered to the Students of the Royal Academy, on the Distribution of Prizes' (11 Dec 1769), in Seven Discourses Delivered in the Royal Academy (1778), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Excellence (40)  |  Grant (76)  |  Labor (200)  |  Man (2252)  |  Reward (72)

Exits sun; enters moon.
This moon is never alone.
Stars are seen all around.
These twinklers do not make a sound.
The tiny ones shine from their place.
Mother moon watches with a smiling face.
Its light is soothing to the eyes.
Night’s darkness hides its face.
Cool and calm is its light.
Heat and sweat are never felt.
Some days, moon is not seen.
Makes kids wonder, where had it been?
Partial eclipse shades the moon.
In summers it does not arrive soon.
Beautiful is this milky ball.
It is the love of one and all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Arrive (40)  |  Ball (64)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Calm (32)  |  Cool (15)  |  Darkness (72)  |  Do (1905)  |  Eclipse (25)  |  Enter (145)  |  Exit (4)  |  Eye (440)  |  Face (214)  |  Feel (371)  |  Heat (180)  |  Hide (70)  |  Kid (18)  |  Light (635)  |  Love (328)  |  Moon (252)  |  Mother (116)  |  Night (133)  |  Partial (10)  |  Place (192)  |  See (1094)  |  Shade (35)  |  Shine (49)  |  Smile (34)  |  Soon (187)  |  Soothing (3)  |  Sound (187)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Summer (56)  |  Sun (407)  |  Sweat (17)  |  Tiny (74)  |  Watch (118)  |  Wonder (251)

Experience is never at fault; it is only your judgment that is in error in promising itself such results from experience as are not caused by our experiments. For having given a beginning, what follows from it must necessarily be a natural development of such a beginning, unless it has been subject to a contrary influence, while, if it is affected by any contrary influence, the result which ought to follow from the aforesaid beginning will be found to partake of this contrary influence in a greater or less degree in proportion as the said influence is more or less powerful than the aforesaid beginning.
'Philosophy', in The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, trans. E. MacCurdy (1938), Vol. 1, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (312)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Degree (277)  |  Development (441)  |  Error (339)  |  Experience (494)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Fault (58)  |  Follow (389)  |  Greater (288)  |  Influence (231)  |  Judgment (140)  |  More (2558)  |  More Or Less (71)  |  Must (1525)  |  Natural (810)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Proportion (140)  |  Result (700)  |  Subject (543)  |  Will (2350)

Experiment is the interpreter of nature. Experiments never deceive. It is our judgment which sometimes deceives itself because it expects results which experiment refuses. We must consult experiment, varying the circumstances, until we have deduced general rules, for experiment alone can furnish reliable rules.
In Introductory College Physics by Oswald Blackwood (1939).
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Expect (203)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Furnish (97)  |  General (521)  |  Judgment (140)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Refuse (45)  |  Result (700)  |  Rule (307)

Experimenters don’t come in late—they never went home.
In Leon Lederman and Dick Teresi, The God Particle: If the Universe is the Answer, What is the Question (1993), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Home (184)  |  Late (119)

Facts are certainly the solid and true foundation of all sectors of nature study ... Reasoning must never find itself contradicting definite facts; but reasoning must allow us to distinguish, among facts that have been reported, those that we can fully believe, those that are questionable, and those that are false. It will not allow us to lend faith to those that are directly contrary to others whose certainty is known to us; it will not allow us to accept as true those that fly in the face of unquestionable principles.
Memoires pour Servir a l'Histoire des Insectes (1736), Vol. 2, xxxiv. Quoted in Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, ed. Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Belief (615)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Contradiction (69)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Definite (114)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Face (214)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (209)  |  Falsity (16)  |  Find (1014)  |  Fly (153)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Known (453)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Other (2233)  |  Principle (530)  |  Questionable (3)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Report (42)  |  Sector (7)  |  Solid (119)  |  Solidity (3)  |  Study (701)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Unquestionable (10)  |  Will (2350)

Facts are the air of scientists. Without them you can never fly.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fly (153)  |  Scientist (881)

Facts were never pleasing to him. He acquired them with reluctance and got rid of them with relief. He was never on terms with them until he had stood them on their heads.
The Greenwood Hat (1937), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (77)  |  Acquisition (46)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Head (87)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Relief (30)  |  Reluctance (6)  |  Rid (14)  |  Stand (284)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)

Few men during their lifetime come anywhere near exhausting the resources dwelling within them. There are deep wells of strength that are never used.
In Alone (1938), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Deep (241)  |  Dwelling (12)  |  Lifetime (40)  |  Resource (74)  |  Strength (139)  |  Well (14)

First of all, we ought to observe, that mathematical propositions, properly so called, are always judgments a priori, and not empirical, because they carry along with them necessity, which can never be deduced from experience. If people should object to this, I am quite willing to confine my statements to pure mathematics, the very concept of which implies that it does not contain empirical, but only pure knowledge a priori.
In Critique of Pure Reason (1900), 720.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  Call (781)  |  Carry (130)  |  Concept (242)  |  Confine (26)  |  Contain (68)  |  Deduce (27)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Empirical (58)  |  Experience (494)  |  First (1302)  |  Imply (20)  |  Judgment (140)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Object (438)  |  Observe (179)  |  People (1031)  |  Properly (21)  |  Proposition (126)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pure Mathematics (72)  |  Statement (148)  |  Willing (44)

First, In showing in how to avoid attempting impossibilities. Second, In securing us from important mistakes in attempting what is, in itself possible, by means either inadequate or actually opposed to the end in view. Thirdly, In enabling us to accomplish our ends in the easiest, shortest, most economical, and most effectual manner. Fourth, In inducing us to attempt, and enabling us to accomplish, object which, but for such knowledge, we should never have thought of understanding.
On the ways that a knowledge of the order of nature can be of use.
Quoted in Robert Routledge, Discoveries and Inventions of the 19th Century (1890), 665.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (266)  |  Avoid (123)  |  End (603)  |  First (1302)  |  Inadequate (20)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Object (438)  |  Order (638)  |  Possible (560)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Thought (995)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Use (771)  |  View (496)  |  Way (1214)

Florey was not an easy personality. His drive and ambition were manifest from the day he arrived ... He could be ruthless and selfish; on the other hand, he could show kindliness, a warm humanity and, at times, sentiment and a sense of humour. He displayed utter integrity and he was scathing of humbug and pretence. His attitude was always—&ldqo;You must take me as you find me” But to cope with him at times, you had to do battle, raise your voice as high as his and never let him shout you down. You had to raise your pitch to his but if you insisted on your right he was always, in the end, very fair. I must say that at times, he went out of his way to cut people down to size with some very destructive criticism. But I must also say in the years I knew him he did not once utter a word of praise about himself.
Personal communication (1970) to Florey's Australian biographer, Lennard Bickel. By letter, Drury described his experience as a peer, being a research collaborator while Florey held a Studentship at Cambridge in the 1920s. This quote appears without naming Drury, in Eric Lax, The Mold in Dr. Florey's Coat: The Story of the Penicillin Miracle (2004), 40. Dury is cited in Lennard Bickel, Rise Up to Life: A Biography of Howard Walter Florey Who Gave Penicillin to the World (1972), 24. Also in Eric Lax
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (46)  |  Attitude (84)  |  Battle (36)  |  Coping (4)  |  Criticism (85)  |  Cut (116)  |  Destruction (135)  |  Display (59)  |  Do (1905)  |  Down (455)  |  Drive (61)  |  Easy (213)  |  End (603)  |  Fairness (2)  |  Find (1014)  |  Sir Howard Walter Florey (3)  |  High (370)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humanity (186)  |  Humbug (6)  |  Humour (116)  |  Insistence (12)  |  Integrity (21)  |  Manifestation (61)  |  Must (1525)  |  Other (2233)  |  People (1031)  |  Personality (66)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Praise (28)  |  Pretense (2)  |  Right (473)  |  Ruthless (12)  |  Ruthlessness (3)  |  Say (989)  |  Selfish (12)  |  Selfishness (9)  |  Sense (785)  |  Sense of Humour (2)  |  Sentiment (16)  |  Shout (25)  |  Show (353)  |  Time (1911)  |  Voice (54)  |  Warm (74)  |  Way (1214)  |  Word (650)  |  Year (963)

Flowers always make people better, happier, and more helpful; they are sunshine, food and medicine for the soul and can never be taken in overdoses.
From Paper (18 Jun 1901), read before the California Academy of Sciences, published in 'The Making of New Flowers', American Gardening (13 Jul 1901), 22, No. 342, 489.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (493)  |  Flower (112)  |  Food (213)  |  Happy (108)  |  Heath (5)  |  Helpful (16)  |  Medicine (392)  |  More (2558)  |  People (1031)  |  Soul (235)  |  Sunshine (12)

For a billion years the patient earth amassed documents and inscribed them with signs and pictures which lay unnoticed and unused. Today, at last, they are waking up, because man has come to rouse them. Stones have begun to speak, because an ear is there to hear them. Layers become history and, released from the enchanted sleep of eternity, life’s motley, never-ending dance rises out of the black depths of the past into the light of the present.
In 'Prologue', Conversation with the Earth (1954), 4. As translated by E.B. Garside from Gespräch mit der Erde (1947).
Science quotes on:  |  Amass (6)  |  Become (821)  |  Billion (104)  |  Dance (35)  |  Depth (97)  |  Ear (69)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Eternity (64)  |  Geology (240)  |  Hear (144)  |  History (716)  |  Last (425)  |  Layer (41)  |  Life (1870)  |  Light (635)  |  Man (2252)  |  Past (355)  |  Patient (209)  |  Picture (148)  |  Present (630)  |  Rise (169)  |  Rock (176)  |  Sleep (81)  |  Speak (240)  |  Stone (168)  |  Today (321)  |  Waking (17)  |  Year (963)

For all these years you were merely
A smear of light through our telescopes
On the clearest, coldest night; a hint
Of a glint, just a few pixels wide
On even your most perfectly-framed portraits.
But now, now we see you!
Swimming out of the dark - a great
Stone shark, your star-tanned skin pitted
And pocked, scarred after eons of drifting
Silently through the endless ocean of space.
Here on Earth our faces lit up as we saw
You clearly for the first time; eyes wide
With wonder we traced the strangely familiar
Grooves raked across your sides,
Wondering if Rosetta had doubled back to Mars
And raced past Phobos by mistake –
Then you were gone, falling back into the black,
Not to be seen by human eyes again for a thousand
Blue Moons or more. But we know you now,
We know you; you’ll never be just a speck of light again.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Back (395)  |  Black (46)  |  Blue (63)  |  Clear (111)  |  Clearly (45)  |  Cold (115)  |  Dark (145)  |  Double (18)  |  Drift (14)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Endless (60)  |  Eon (12)  |  Eye (440)  |  Face (214)  |  Fall (243)  |  Familiar (47)  |  First (1302)  |  First Time (14)  |  Glint (2)  |  Great (1610)  |  Groove (3)  |  Hint (21)  |  Human (1512)  |  Know (1538)  |  Light (635)  |  Mars (47)  |  Merely (315)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Moon (252)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Night (133)  |  Ocean (216)  |  Past (355)  |  Pit (20)  |  Pixel (2)  |  Portrait (5)  |  Race (278)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scar (8)  |  See (1094)  |  Shark (11)  |  Side (236)  |  Silently (4)  |  Skin (48)  |  Smear (3)  |  Space (523)  |  Speck (25)  |  Star (460)  |  Stone (168)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Swim (32)  |  Swimming (19)  |  Telescope (106)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Through (846)  |  Time (1911)  |  Trace (109)  |  Wide (97)  |  Wonder (251)  |  Year (963)

For centuries we have dreamt of flying; recently we made that come true: we have always hankered for speed; now we have speeds greater than we can stand: we wanted to speak to far parts of the Earth; we can: we wanted to explore the sea bottom; we have: and so on, and so on. And, too, we wanted the power to smash our enemies utterly; we have it. If we had truly wanted peace, we should have had that as well. But true peace has never been one of the genuine dreams—we have got little further than preaching against war in order to appease out consciences.
The Outward Urge (1959)
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Appease (6)  |  Conscience (52)  |  Dream (222)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Flying (74)  |  Genuine (54)  |  Greater (288)  |  Little (717)  |  Order (638)  |  Peace (116)  |  Power (771)  |  Sea (326)  |  Speak (240)  |  Speed (66)  |  Stand (284)  |  Truly (118)  |  Want (504)  |  War (233)

For the holy Bible and the phenomena of nature proceed alike from the divine Word, the former as the dictate of the Holy Ghost and the latter as the observant executrix of God's commands. It is necessary for the Bible, in order to be accommodated to the understanding of every man, to speak many things which appear to differ from the absolute truth so far as the bare meaning of the words is concerned. But Nature, on the other hand, is inexorable and immutable; she never transgresses the laws imposed upon her, or cares a whit whether her abstruse reasons and methods of operation are understandable to men. For that reason it appears that nothing physical which sense-experience sets before our eyes, or which necessary demonstrations prove to us, ought to be called in question (much less condemned) upon the testimony of biblical passages which may have some different meaning beneath their words.
Letter to Madame Christina of Lorraine, Grand Duchess of Tuscany: Concerning the Use of Biblical Quotations in Matters of Science (1615), trans. Stillman Drake, Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (1957), 182-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Abstruse (12)  |  Alike (60)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beneath (68)  |  Call (781)  |  Care (203)  |  Command (60)  |  Concern (239)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Demonstration (120)  |  Differ (88)  |  Different (595)  |  Divine (112)  |  Experience (494)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Eye (440)  |  Former (138)  |  Ghost (36)  |  God (776)  |  Holy (35)  |  Immutable (26)  |  Inexorable (10)  |  Law (913)  |  Man (2252)  |  Meaning (244)  |  Method (531)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Observation (593)  |  Operation (221)  |  Order (638)  |  Other (2233)  |  Passage (52)  |  Physical (518)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Prove (261)  |  Question (649)  |  Reason (766)  |  Sense (785)  |  Set (400)  |  Speak (240)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Word (650)

For there are two modes of acquiring knowledge, namely, by reasoning and experience. Reasoning draws a conclusion and makes us grant the conclusion, but does not make the conclusion certain, nor does it remove doubt so that the mind may rest on the intuition of truth, unless the mind discovers it by the path of experience; since many have the arguments relating to what can be known, but because they lack experience they neglect the arguments, and neither avoid what is harmful nor follow what is good. For if a man who has never seen fire should prove by adequate reasoning that fire burns and injures things and destroys them, his mind would not be satisfied thereby, nor would he avoid fire, until he placed his hand or some combustible substance in the fire, so that he might prove by experience that which reasoning taught. But when he has had actual experience of combustion his mind is made certain and rests in the full light of truth. Therefore reasoning does not suffice, but experience does.
Opus Majus [1266-1268], Part VI, chapter I, trans. R. B. Burke, The Opus Majus of Roger Bacon (1928), Vol. 2, 583.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (118)  |  Adequate (50)  |  Argument (145)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Burn (99)  |  Certain (557)  |  Combustion (22)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Destroy (189)  |  Discover (571)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Draw (140)  |  Experience (494)  |  Fire (203)  |  Follow (389)  |  Good (906)  |  Grant (76)  |  Intuition (82)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Known (453)  |  Lack (127)  |  Light (635)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Observation (593)  |  Path (159)  |  Prove (261)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Remove (50)  |  Rest (287)  |  Substance (253)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Two (936)

For there was never yet philosopher
That could endure the toothache patiently,
However they have writ the style of gods,
And made a push at chance and sufferance.
Much Ado about Nothing (1598-9), V, i.
Science quotes on:  |  Chance (244)  |  Endurance (8)  |  God (776)  |  Patience (58)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Push (66)  |  Sufferance (2)  |  Toothache (3)

For when I look at the moon I do not see a hostile, empty world. I see … a radiant body where man has taken his first steps into an endless frontier.
In David Scott and ‎Alexei Leonov, Two Sides of the Moon: Our Story of the Cold War Space Race (2004), 390.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (557)  |  Do (1905)  |  Empty (82)  |  End (603)  |  First (1302)  |  Frontier (41)  |  Hostile (8)  |  Look (584)  |  Man (2252)  |  Moon (252)  |  Radiant (15)  |  See (1094)  |  Space Exploration (15)  |  Step (234)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

Form your life humanly, and you have done enough: but you will never reach the height of art and the depth of science without something divine.
Idea 68. In Friedrich Schlegel, translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms (trans. 1968), 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (680)  |  Depth (97)  |  Divine (112)  |  Enough (341)  |  Form (976)  |  Height (33)  |  Life (1870)  |  Reach (286)  |  Reaching (2)  |  Science And Art (195)  |  Something (718)  |  Will (2350)

Fortunately science, like that nature to which it belongs, is neither limited by time nor by space. It belongs to the world, and is of no country and of no age. The more we know, the more we feel our ignorance; the more we feel how much remains unknown; and in philosophy, the sentiment of the Macedonian hero can never apply,– there are always new worlds to conquer.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Apply (170)  |  Belong (168)  |  Conquer (39)  |  Country (269)  |  Feel (371)  |  Fortunately (9)  |  Hero (45)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Know (1538)  |  Limit (294)  |  Limited (102)  |  More (2558)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Remain (355)  |  Sentiment (16)  |  Space (523)  |  Time (1911)  |  Unknown (195)  |  World (1850)

Fractal geometry will make you see everything differently. There is a danger in reading further. You risk the loss of your childhood vision of clouds, forests, flowers, galaxies, leaves, feathers, rocks, mountains, torrents of water, carpet, bricks, and much else besides. Never again will your interpretation of these things be quite the same.
Fractals Everywhere (2000), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Brick (20)  |  Carpet (3)  |  Childhood (42)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Danger (127)  |  Everything (489)  |  Feather (13)  |  Flower (112)  |  Forest (161)  |  Fractal (11)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Galaxy (53)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Interpretation (89)  |  Leaf (73)  |  Loss (117)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Reading (136)  |  Risk (68)  |  River (140)  |  Rock (176)  |  See (1094)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Vision (127)  |  Water (503)  |  Will (2350)

Freudian psychoanalytical theory is a mythology that answers pretty well to Levi-Strauss's descriptions. It brings some kind of order into incoherence; it, too, hangs together, makes sense, leaves no loose ends, and is never (but never) at a loss for explanation. In a state of bewilderment it may therefore bring comfort and relief … give its subject a new and deeper understanding of his own condition and of the nature of his relationship to his fellow men. A mythical structure will be built up around him which makes sense and is believable-in, regardless of whether or not it is true.
From 'Science and Literature', The Hope of Progress: A Scientist Looks at Problems in Philosophy, Literature and Science (1973), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Believable (3)  |  Bewilderment (8)  |  Comfort (64)  |  Condition (362)  |  Deeper (4)  |  Description (89)  |  End (603)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Sigmund Freud (70)  |  Freudian (4)  |  Hang (46)  |  Incoherence (2)  |  Kind (564)  |  Loose End (3)  |  Loss (117)  |  Myth (58)  |  Mythology (19)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Order (638)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Relief (30)  |  Sense (785)  |  State (505)  |  Structure (365)  |  Subject (543)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Together (392)  |  True (239)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Will (2350)

From the aspect of energy, renewed by radio-active phenomena, material corpuscles may now be treated as transient reservoirs of concentrated power. Though never found in a state of purity, but always more or less granulated (even in light) energy nowadays represents for science the most primitive form of universal stuff.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 42. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Active (80)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Corpuscle (14)  |  Energy (373)  |  Form (976)  |  Light (635)  |  Material (366)  |  More (2558)  |  More Or Less (71)  |  Most (1728)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Power (771)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Purity (15)  |  Radio (60)  |  Radioactive (24)  |  Renew (20)  |  Represent (157)  |  Reservoir (9)  |  State (505)  |  Stuff (24)  |  Transient (13)  |  Universal (198)

Galen never inspected a human uterus.
In De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem [Seven Books on the Structure of the Human Body] (1543), 532. Quoted and trans. in Charles Donald O'Malley, Andreas Vesalius of Brussels, 1514-1564 (1964), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Galen (20)  |  Human (1512)  |  Inspection (7)  |  Uterus (2)

Games are among the most interesting creations of the human mind, and the analysis of their structure is full of adventure and surprises. Unfortunately there is never a lack of mathematicians for the job of transforming delectable ingredients into a dish that tastes like a damp blanket.
In J.R. Newman (ed.), 'Commentary on Games and Puzzles', The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol. 4, 2414.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (69)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Blanket (10)  |  Creation (350)  |  Delectable (2)  |  Dish (3)  |  Game (104)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Ingredient (16)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Job (86)  |  Lack (127)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Most (1728)  |  Structure (365)  |  Surprise (91)  |  Taste (93)  |  Transform (74)  |  Unfortunately (40)

Gel’fand amazed me by talking of mathematics as though it were poetry. He once said about a long paper bristling with formulas that it contained the vague beginnings of an idea which could only hint at and which he had never managed to bring out more clearly. I had always thought of mathematics as being much more straightforward: a formula is a formula, and an algebra is an algebra, but Gel’fand found hedgehogs lurking in the rows of his spectral sequences!
In '1991 Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize', Notices of the American Mathematical Society (Mar 1991), 38, No. 3, 186. This is from her acceptance of the 1991 Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (117)  |  Amazed (4)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Beginnings (5)  |  Being (1276)  |  Bring Out (4)  |  Bristle (3)  |  Clearly (45)  |  Contain (68)  |  Find (1014)  |  Formula (102)  |  Hedgehog (4)  |  Hint (21)  |  Idea (881)  |  Long (778)  |  Lurk (5)  |  Lurking (7)  |  Manage (26)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  More (2558)  |  Paper (192)  |  Poetry (150)  |  Row (9)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Straightforward (10)  |  Talk (108)  |  Talking (76)  |  Thought (995)  |  Vague (50)

Genius can never despise labor.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Despise (16)  |  Genius (301)  |  Labor (200)

Genius must be born, and never can be taught.
Louis Klopsch, Many Thoughts of Many Minds (1896), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (162)  |  Genius (301)  |  Must (1525)  |  Teach (299)

Get into any taxi and tell the driver you are a mathematician and the response is predictable … you will hear the immortal words: “I was never any good at mathematics.” My response is: “I was never any good at being a taxi driver so I went into mathematics.”
In paper, 'A Mathematician’s Survival Guide', pdf document linked from his homepage at math.missouri.edu (undated, but 2011 or earlier, indicated by an “accessed on” date elsewhere.) Collected in Peter Casazza, Steven G. Krantz and Randi D. Ruden (eds.) I, Mathematician (2005), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Driver (5)  |  Good (906)  |  Hear (144)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Response (56)  |  Taxi (4)  |  Tell (344)  |  Will (2350)  |  Word (650)

Give me the third best technology. The second best won’t be ready in time. The best will never be ready.
As quoted in a speech by an unnamed executive of General Electric, excerpted in Richard Dowis, The Lost Art of the Great Speech: How to Write It, How to Deliver It (2000), 150. By
Science quotes on:  |  Best (467)  |  Ready (43)  |  Second (66)  |  Technology (281)  |  Third (17)  |  Time (1911)  |  Will (2350)

Go into a room where the shutters are always shut (in a sick-room or a bed-room there should never be shutters shut), and though the room be uninhabited—though the air has never been polluted by the breathing of human beings, you will observe a close, musty smell of corrupt air—of air unpurified by the effect of the sun's rays.
Notes on Nursing: What it is and what it is not (1860), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Being (1276)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Effect (414)  |  Health (210)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Light (635)  |  Observe (179)  |  Ray (115)  |  Shut (41)  |  Sick (83)  |  Smell (29)  |  Sun (407)  |  Will (2350)

Goethe said that he who cannot draw on 3,000 years of learning is living hand to mouth. It could just as well be said that individuals who do tap deeply into this rich cultural legacy are wealthy indeed. Yet the paradox is that much of this wisdom is buried in a sea of lesser books or like lost treasure beneath an ocean of online ignorance and trivia. That doesn’t mean that with a little bit of diligence you can’t tap into it. Yet many people, perhaps most, never take advantage of all this human experience. They aren’t obtaining knowledge beyond what they need to know for work or to get by. As a result, their view of our amazing world is diminished and their lives greatly circumscribed.
In An Embarrassment of Riches: Tapping Into the World's Greatest Legacy of Wealth (2013), 65.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (144)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Arent (6)  |  Beneath (68)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Bit (21)  |  Book (413)  |  Bury (19)  |  Circumscribe (3)  |  Cultural (26)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Diligence (22)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Do (1905)  |  Draw (140)  |  Experience (494)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (150)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hand (149)  |  Human (1512)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Individual (420)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learning (291)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Lesser (6)  |  Little (717)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Lose (165)  |  Mean (810)  |  Most (1728)  |  Mouth (54)  |  Need (320)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Ocean (216)  |  Online (4)  |  Paradox (54)  |  People (1031)  |  Result (700)  |  Rich (66)  |  Say (989)  |  Sea (326)  |  Tap (10)  |  Treasure (59)  |  Trivia (2)  |  View (496)  |  Wealthy (5)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  Work (1402)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

Gold is found in our own part of the world; not to mention the gold extracted from the earth in India by the ants, and in Scythia by the Griffins. Among us it is procured in three different ways; the first of which is in the shape of dust, found in running streams. … A second mode of obtaining gold is by sinking shafts or seeking among the debris of mountains …. The third method of obtaining gold surpasses the labors of the giants even: by the aid of galleries driven to a long distance, mountains are excavated by the light of torches, the duration of which forms the set times for work, the workmen never seeing the light of day for many months together.
In Pliny and John Bostock (trans.), The Natural History of Pliny (1857), Vol. 6, 99-101.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (101)  |  Ant (34)  |  Debris (7)  |  Different (595)  |  Distance (171)  |  Dust (68)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Excavate (4)  |  Extract (40)  |  First (1302)  |  Form (976)  |  Gallery (7)  |  Giant (73)  |  Gold (101)  |  India (23)  |  Labor (200)  |  Light (635)  |  Long (778)  |  Mention (84)  |  Method (531)  |  Month (91)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Procure (6)  |  Run (158)  |  Running (61)  |  Seeing (143)  |  Seek (218)  |  Set (400)  |  Shaft (5)  |  Stream (83)  |  Surpass (33)  |  Time (1911)  |  Together (392)  |  Torch (13)  |  Way (1214)  |  Work (1402)  |  Workman (13)  |  World (1850)

Governments and parliaments must find that astronomy is one of the sciences which cost most dear: the least instrument costs hundreds of thousands of dollars, the least observatory costs millions; each eclipse carries with it supplementary appropriations. And all that for stars which are so far away, which are complete strangers to our electoral contests, and in all probability will never take any part in them. It must be that our politicians have retained a remnant of idealism, a vague instinct for what is grand; truly, I think they have been calumniated; they should be encouraged and shown that this instinct does not deceive them, that they are not dupes of that idealism.
In Henri Poincaré and George Bruce Halsted (trans.), The Value of Science: Essential Writings of Henri Poincare (1907), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriation (5)  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Complete (209)  |  Cost (94)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Dupe (5)  |  Eclipse (25)  |  Election (7)  |  Encourage (43)  |  Far (158)  |  Find (1014)  |  Government (116)  |  Grand (29)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Idealism (4)  |  Instinct (91)  |  Instrument (158)  |  Millions (17)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Observatory (18)  |  Parliament (8)  |  Politician (40)  |  Probability (135)  |  Remnant (7)  |  Retain (57)  |  Show (353)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stranger (16)  |  Supplementary (4)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Truly (118)  |  Vague (50)  |  Will (2350)

Great inventions are never, and great discoveries are seldom, the work of any one mind. Every great invention is really an aggregation of minor inventions, or the final step of a progression. It is not usually a creation, but a growth, as truly so as is the growth of the trees in the forest.
In 'The Growth of the Steam-Engine', The Popular Science Monthly (Nov 1877), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggregation (6)  |  Creation (350)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Final (121)  |  Forest (161)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greatness (55)  |  Growth (200)  |  Invention (400)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Minor (12)  |  Progression (23)  |  Seldom (68)  |  Step (234)  |  Tree (269)  |  Truly (118)  |  Usually (176)  |  Work (1402)

Great truths can only be forgotten and can never be falsified.
From Illustrated London News (30 Sep 1933). In 'The Idolatry of the Clock', The Collected Works of G.K. Chesterton (2011), Vol. 36, 349.
Science quotes on:  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Great (1610)  |  Truth (1109)

Grouches are nearly always pinheads, small men who have never made any effort to improve their mental capacity.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (105)  |  Effort (243)  |  Improvement (117)  |  Mental (179)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Small (489)

Guard well your spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. Discard them and their value will never be known. Improve them and they will become the brightest gems in a useful life.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Bright (81)  |  Brightest (12)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Discard (32)  |  Gem (17)  |  Guard (19)  |  Improve (64)  |  Know (1538)  |  Known (453)  |  Life (1870)  |  Moment (260)  |  Spare (9)  |  Useful (260)  |  Value (393)  |  Will (2350)

Had you or I been born at the Bay of Soldania, possibly our Thoughts, and Notions, had not exceeded those brutish ones of the Hotentots that inhabit there: And had the Virginia King Apochancana, been educated in England, he had, perhaps been as knowing a Divine, and as good a Mathematician as any in it. The difference between him, and a more improved English-man, lying barely in this, That the exercise of his Facilities was bounded within the Ways, Modes, and Notions of his own Country, and never directed to any other or farther Enquiries.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book I, Chapter 4, Section 12, 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Bound (120)  |  Country (269)  |  Difference (355)  |  Direct (228)  |  Divine (112)  |  Englishman (5)  |  Enquiry (89)  |  Exercise (113)  |  Facility (14)  |  Farther (51)  |  Good (906)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Lying (55)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  More (2558)  |  Notion (120)  |  Other (2233)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Thought (995)  |  Way (1214)

Harvard never produced anyone of great originality.
Quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Great (1610)  |  Harvard (7)  |  Originality (21)  |  Produced (187)

Having probes in space was like having a cataract removed. We could see things never seen before, just as Galileo could with his telescope.
Quoted, without citation, in Eric Lerner, The Big Bang Never Happened: A Startling Refutation of the Dominant Theory of the Origin of the Universe (2010), 45. Need primary source - can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Cataract (4)  |  Galileo Galilei (134)  |  Probe (12)  |  Remove (50)  |  See (1094)  |  Space (523)  |  Telescope (106)  |  Thing (1914)

He [Sylvester] had one remarkable peculiarity. He seldom remembered theorems, propositions, etc., but had always to deduce them when he wished to use them. In this he was the very antithesis of Cayley, who was thoroughly conversant with everything that had been done in every branch of mathematics.
I remember once submitting to Sylvester some investigations that I had been engaged on, and he immediately denied my first statement, saying that such a proposition had never been heard of, let alone proved. To his astonishment, I showed him a paper of his own in which he had proved the proposition; in fact, I believe the object of his paper had been the very proof which was so strange to him.
As quoted by Florian Cajori, in Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 268.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Antithesis (7)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Belief (615)  |  Branch (155)  |  Arthur Cayley (17)  |  Conversant (6)  |  Deduce (27)  |  Deny (71)  |  Engage (41)  |  Everything (489)  |  Fact (1257)  |  First (1302)  |  Hear (144)  |  Immediately (115)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Let (64)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Object (438)  |  Paper (192)  |  Peculiarity (26)  |  Proof (304)  |  Proposition (126)  |  Prove (261)  |  Remarkable (50)  |  Remember (189)  |  Say (989)  |  Seldom (68)  |  Show (353)  |  Statement (148)  |  Strange (160)  |  Submit (21)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Theorem (116)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Use (771)  |  Wish (216)

He never got drunk, he never got tired, and he never perspired.
[Harvard chemistry students’ axioms.]
Anonymous
As attributed in John D. Roberts, The Right Place at the Right Time (1990), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (65)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Harvard (7)  |  Student (317)  |  Tired (13)

He that waits upon fortune is never sure of a dinner.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dinner (15)  |  Fortune (50)  |  Wait (66)

He was not a mathematician–he never even took a maths class after high school–yet Martin Gardner, who has died aged 95, was arguably the most influential and inspirational figure in mathematics in the second half of the last century.
In 'Martin Gardner Obituary', The Guardian (27 May 2010)
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Century (319)  |  Class (168)  |  Die (94)  |  Figure (162)  |  Martin Gardner (50)  |  High (370)  |  High School (15)  |  Influence (231)  |  Inspiration (80)  |  Last (425)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Most (1728)  |  School (227)

He who has never been deceived by a lie does not know the meaning of bliss.
In a letter to Elsa Lowenthal, April 30, 1912.
Science quotes on:  |  Know (1538)  |  Lie (370)  |  Meaning (244)

He who studies it [Nature] has continually the exquisite pleasure of discerning or half discerning and divining laws; regularities glimmer through an appearance of confusion, analogies between phenomena of a different order suggest themselves and set the imagination in motion; the mind is haunted with the sense of a vast unity not yet discoverable or nameable. There is food for contemplation which never runs short; you are gazing at an object which is always growing clearer, and yet always, in the very act of growing clearer, presenting new mysteries.
From 'Natural History', Macmillan's Magazine (1875), 31, 366.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Analogy (76)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Clearer (4)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Different (595)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Discover (571)  |  Exquisite (27)  |  Food (213)  |  Gaze (23)  |  Glimmer (5)  |  Growing (99)  |  Half (63)  |  Haunting (3)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Law (913)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Motion (320)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Object (438)  |  Order (638)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Presenting (2)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Run (158)  |  Sense (785)  |  Set (400)  |  Short (200)  |  Study (701)  |  Suggestion (49)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (846)  |  Unity (81)  |  Vast (188)

Heat can never pass from a colder to a warmer body without some other change, connected therewith, occurring at the same time.
'On a Modified Form of the Second Fundamental Theorem in the Mechanical Theory of Heat', Philosophical Magazine, 1856, 12, 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (557)  |  Change (639)  |  Connect (126)  |  Heat (180)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pass (241)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Time (1911)

Here's to pure mathematics—may it never be of any use to anybody.
Anonymous
A toast, variously attributed as used of old at Cambridge University, or as used by G.N. Hardy (according to Arthur C. Clarke in 'The Joy of Maths', Greetings, Carbon-Based Bipeds!: Collected Essays, 1934-1998 (2001), 460).
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pure Mathematics (72)  |  Toast (8)  |  Use (771)

Hospitals are only an intermediate stage of civilization, never intended ... to take in the whole sick population. May we hope that the day will come ... when every poor sick person will have the opportunity of a share in a district sick-nurse at home.
In 'Nursing of the Sick' paper, collected in Hospitals, Dispensaries and Nursing: Papers and Discussions in the International Congress of Charities, Correction and Philanthropy, Section III, Chicago, June 12th to 17th, 1893 (1894), 457.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (220)  |  District (11)  |  Home (184)  |  Hope (321)  |  Hospital (45)  |  Intent (9)  |  Intermediate (38)  |  Nurse (33)  |  Opportunity (95)  |  Person (366)  |  Poor (139)  |  Population (115)  |  Share (82)  |  Sick (83)  |  Stage (152)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)

However, all scientific statements and laws have one characteristic in common: they are “true or false” (adequate or inadequate). Roughly speaking, our reaction to them is “yes” or “no.” The scientific way of thinking has a further characteristic. The concepts which it uses to build up its coherent systems are not expressing emotions. For the scientist, there is only “being,” but no wishing, no valuing, no good, no evil; no goal. As long as we remain within the realm of science proper, we can never meet with a sentence of the type: “Thou shalt not lie.” There is something like a Puritan's restraint in the scientist who seeks truth: he keeps away from everything voluntaristic or emotional.
Essays in Physics (1950), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (50)  |  Being (1276)  |  Build (211)  |  Characteristic (154)  |  Common (447)  |  Concept (242)  |  Emotion (106)  |  Everything (489)  |  Evil (122)  |  False (105)  |  Goal (155)  |  Good (906)  |  Inadequate (20)  |  Law (913)  |  Lie (370)  |  Long (778)  |  Proper (150)  |  Puritan (3)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Realm (87)  |  Remain (355)  |  Restraint (16)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Seek (218)  |  Something (718)  |  Speaking (118)  |  Statement (148)  |  System (545)  |  Thinking (425)  |  True (239)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Type (171)  |  Use (771)  |  Value (393)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wish (216)

However, on many occasions, I examined normal blood and normal tissues and there was no possibility of overlooking bacteria or confusing them with granular masses of equal size. I never found organisms. Thus, I conclude that bacteria do not occur in healthy human or animal tissues.
'Investigations of the Etiology of Wound Infections' (1878), Essays of Robert Koch (1987), trans. K. Codell Carter, 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (651)  |  Bacteria (50)  |  Blood (144)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Do (1905)  |  Granular (4)  |  Health (210)  |  Healthy (70)  |  Human (1512)  |  Occasion (87)  |  Occur (151)  |  Organism (231)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Tissue (51)

Human consciousness is just about the last surviving mystery. A mystery is a phenomenon that people don’t know how to think about—yet. There have been other great mysteries: the mystery of the origin of the universe, the mystery of life and reproduction, the mystery of the design to be found in nature, the mysteries of time, space, and gravity. These were not just areas of scientific ignorance, but of utter bafflement and wonder. We do not yet have the final answers to any of the questions of cosmology and particle physics, molecular genetics and evolutionary theory, but we do know how to think about them. The mysteries haven't vanished, but they have been tamed. They no longer overwhelm our efforts to think about the phenomena, because now we know how to tell the misbegotten questions from the right questions, and even if we turn out to be dead wrong about some of the currently accepted answers, we know how to go about looking for better answers. With consciousness, however, we are still in a terrible muddle. Consciousness stands alone today as a topic that often leaves even the most sophisticated thinkers tongue-tied and confused. And, as with all the earlier mysteries, there are many who insist—and hope—that there will never be a demystification of consciousness.
Consciousness Explained (1991), 21-22.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Alone (324)  |  Answer (389)  |  Bafflement (3)  |  Better (493)  |  Consciousness (132)  |  Cosmology (26)  |  Design (203)  |  Do (1905)  |  Effort (243)  |  Final (121)  |  Genetic (110)  |  Gravity (140)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hope (321)  |  Human (1512)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Know (1538)  |  Last (425)  |  Life (1870)  |  Looking (191)  |  Most (1728)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Origin (250)  |  Origin Of The Universe (20)  |  Other (2233)  |  Particle (200)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  People (1031)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Question (649)  |  Reproduction (74)  |  Right (473)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Space (523)  |  Stand (284)  |  Still (614)  |  Tell (344)  |  Terrible (41)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinker (41)  |  Time (1911)  |  Today (321)  |  Tongue (44)  |  Topic (23)  |  Turn (454)  |  Universe (900)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wonder (251)  |  Wrong (246)

Human evolution is nothing else but the natural continuation, at a collective level, of the perennial and cumulative process of “psychogenetic” arrangement of matter which we call life. … The whole history of mankind has been nothing else (and henceforth it will never be anything else) but an explosive outburst of ever-growing cerebration. … Life, if fully understood, is not a freak in the universe—nor man a freak in life. On the contrary, life physically culminates in man, just as energy physically culminates in life.
(1952). As quoted in Stephen Jay Gould, Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes: Further Reflections in Natural History (1984, 1994), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Call (781)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Cumulative (14)  |  Energy (373)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Explosive (24)  |  Freak (6)  |  Growing (99)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Mankind (15)  |  Human (1512)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Matter (821)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Perennial (9)  |  Process (439)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understood (155)  |  Universe (900)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)

Humanity stands ... before a great problem of finding new raw materials and new sources of energy that shall never become exhausted. In the meantime we must not waste what we have, but must leave as much as possible for coming generations.
Chemistry in Modern Life (1925), trans. Clifford Shattuck-Leonard, vii.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conservation (187)  |  Energy (373)  |  Generation (256)  |  Great (1610)  |  Humanity (186)  |  Material (366)  |  Must (1525)  |  New (1273)  |  Possible (560)  |  Problem (731)  |  Raw (28)  |  Stand (284)  |  Waste (109)

I always feel as if my books came half out of Lyell's brain... & therefore that when seeing a thing never seen by Lyell, one yet saw it partially through his eyes.
Letter to Leonard Horner, 29 August 1844. In F. Burkhardt and S. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin 1844-1846 (1987), Vol. 3, 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (413)  |  Brain (281)  |  Eye (440)  |  Feel (371)  |  Sir Charles Lyell (42)  |  Partially (8)  |  Saw (160)  |  Seeing (143)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Through (846)

I am almost thanking God that I was never educated, for it seems to me that 999 of those who are so, expensively and laboriously, have lost all before they arrive at my age—& remain like Swift's Stulbruggs—cut and dry for life, making no use of their earlier-gained treasures:—whereas, I seem to be on the threshold of knowledge.
In Vivien Noakes, Edward Lear: the Life of a Wanderer (1969), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Biography (254)  |  Cut (116)  |  Dry (65)  |  Education (423)  |  Expense (21)  |  Gain (146)  |  God (776)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Labor (200)  |  Life (1870)  |  Making (300)  |  Remain (355)  |  Jonathan Swift (27)  |  Thank (48)  |  Threshold (11)  |  Treasure (59)  |  Use (771)

I am never content until I have constructed a mechanical model of the subject I am studying. If I succeed in making one, I understand. Otherwise, I do not. [Attributed; source unverified.]
Note: Webmaster has been unable to verify this quotation allegedly from his Baltimore Lectures. Is is widely quoted, usually without citation. A few instances indicate the quote came from a guest lecture, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (1884). The lecture notes were published in Baltimore Lectures on Molecular Dynamics and the Wave Theory of Light (1904). Webmaster has found no citation giving a page number, and has been unable to find the quote in that text. Anyone with more specific information, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Construct (129)  |  Construction (114)  |  Content (75)  |  Do (1905)  |  Making (300)  |  Mechanical (145)  |  Model (106)  |  Studying (70)  |  Subject (543)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Success (327)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)

I am only a physicist with nothing material to show for my labours. I have never even seen the ionosphere, although I have worked on the subject for thirty years. That does show how lucky people can be. If there had been no ionosphere I would not have been standing here this morning.
Response to receiving an honour from the Institute of Mechanical Engineers. As quoted in New Scientist (22 Nov 1956), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Labor (200)  |  Luck (44)  |  Material (366)  |  Morning (98)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  People (1031)  |  Physicist (270)  |  Show (353)  |  Subject (543)  |  Work (1402)  |  Year (963)

I am quite aware that we have just now lightheartedly expelled in imagination many excellent men who are largely, perhaps chiefly, responsible for the buildings of the temple of science; and in many cases our angel would find it a pretty ticklish job to decide. But of one thing I feel sure: if the types we have just expelled were the only types there were, the temple would never have come to be, any more than a forest can grow which consists of nothing but creepers. For these people any sphere of human activity will do, if it comes to a point; whether they become engineers, officers, tradesmen, or scientists depends on circumstances.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (218)  |  Angel (47)  |  Aware (36)  |  Become (821)  |  Building (158)  |  Buildings (5)  |  Case (102)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consist (223)  |  Decide (50)  |  Depend (238)  |  Do (1905)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Excellent (29)  |  Expel (4)  |  Feel (371)  |  Find (1014)  |  Forest (161)  |  Grow (247)  |  Human (1512)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Job (86)  |  Largely (14)  |  More (2558)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Officer (12)  |  People (1031)  |  Point (584)  |  Pretty (21)  |  Responsible (19)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Sphere (118)  |  Temple (45)  |  Temple Of Science (8)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Type (171)  |  Will (2350)

I am the daughter of earth and water, And the nursling of the sky;
I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores;
I change, but I cannot die.
For after the rain when with never a stain,
The pavilion of Heaven is bare,
And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams,
Build up the blue dome of air,
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph, And out of the caverns of rain,
Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb,
I arise and unbuild it again.
The Cloud (1820). In K. Raine (ed.), Shelley (1974), 289.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Arise (162)  |  Bare (33)  |  Build (211)  |  Cavern (9)  |  Cenotaph (2)  |  Change (639)  |  Child (333)  |  Convex (6)  |  Daughter (30)  |  Die (94)  |  Dome (9)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Ghost (36)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Laugh (50)  |  Ocean (216)  |  Pass (241)  |  Pore (7)  |  Rain (70)  |  Shore (25)  |  Sky (174)  |  Stain (10)  |  Through (846)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Water (503)  |  Wind (141)  |  Womb (25)

I am truly a ‘lone traveler’ and have never belonged to my country, my home, my friends, or even my immediate family, with my whole heart; in the face of all these ties, I have never lost a sense of distance and a need for solitude.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (168)  |  Country (269)  |  Distance (171)  |  Face (214)  |  Family (101)  |  Friend (180)  |  Heart (243)  |  Home (184)  |  Immediate (98)  |  Lone (3)  |  Lose (165)  |  Need (320)  |  Sense (785)  |  Solitude (20)  |  Tie (42)  |  Traveler (33)  |  Truly (118)  |  Whole (756)

I ask any one who has adopted the calling of an engineer, how much time he lost when he left school, because he had to devote himself to pursuits which were absolutely novel and strange, and of which he had not obtained the remotest conception from his instructors? He had to familiarize himself with ideas of the course and powers of Nature, to which his attention had never been directed during his school-life, and to learn, for the first time, that a world of facts lies outside and beyond the world of words.
From After-Dinner Speech (Apr 1869) delivered before the Liverpool Philomathic Society, 'Scientific Education', collected in Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 63. Previously published in Macmillan’s Magazine.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (420)  |  Attention (196)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Conception (160)  |  Course (413)  |  Direct (228)  |  Directed (2)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Engineering (188)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Familiarize (5)  |  First (1302)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idea (881)  |  Instructor (5)  |  Learn (672)  |  Lie (370)  |  Life (1870)  |  Lose (165)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Novel (35)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Outside (141)  |  Power (771)  |  Pursuit (128)  |  School (227)  |  Strange (160)  |  Time (1911)  |  Word (650)  |  World (1850)

Florence Nightingale quote: I attribute my success to this:— I never gave or took an excuse.
I attribute my success to this:— I never gave or took an excuse.
Letter (1861) to Miss H. Bonham Carter, transcribed in Edward Cook, The Life of Florence Nightingale (1913, 1914), Vol. 1, 506.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (65)  |  Excuse (27)  |  Give (208)  |  Success (327)  |  Take (10)

I beg this committee to recognize that knowledge is not simply another commodity. On the contrary. Knowledge is never used up, it increases by diffusion, and grows by dispersion. Knowledge and information cannot be quantitatively assessed, as a percentage of the G.N.P. Any willful cut in our resources of knowledge is an act of self-destruction.
While Librarian of Congress, asking a House Appropriations subcommittee to restore money cut from the library’s budget. As reported in New York Times (23 Feb 1986).
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Commodity (5)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Cut (116)  |  Destruction (135)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Dispersion (2)  |  Grow (247)  |  Increase (225)  |  Information (173)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Quantitative (31)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Resource (74)  |  Self (268)  |  Self-Destruction (2)  |  Willful (3)

I believe that, as men occupied with the study and treatment of disease, we cannot have too strong a conviction that the problems presented to us are physical problems, which perhaps we may never solve, but still admitting of solution only in one way, namely, by regarding them as part of an unbroken series, running up from the lowest elementary conditions of matter to the highest composition of organic structure.
From Address (7 Aug 1868), the Hunterian Oration, 'Clinical Observation in Relation to medicine in Modern Times' delivered to a meeting of the British Medical Association, Oxford. Collected in Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Composition (86)  |  Condition (362)  |  Conviction (100)  |  Disease (340)  |  Elementary (98)  |  Matter (821)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Organic (161)  |  Part (235)  |  Physical (518)  |  Present (630)  |  Problem (731)  |  Running (61)  |  Series (153)  |  Solution (282)  |  Solve (145)  |  Still (614)  |  Strong (182)  |  Structure (365)  |  Study (701)  |  Treatment (135)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  Way (1214)

I believed that, instead of the multiplicity of rules that comprise logic, I would have enough in the following four, as long as I made a firm and steadfast resolution never to fail to observe them.
The first was never to accept anything as true if I did not know clearly that it was so; that is, carefully to avoid prejudice and jumping to conclusions, and to include nothing in my judgments apart from whatever appeared so clearly and distinctly to my mind that I had no opportunity to cast doubt upon it.
The second was to subdivide each on the problems I was about to examine: into as many parts as would be possible and necessary to resolve them better.
The third was to guide my thoughts in an orderly way by beginning, as if by steps, to knowledge of the most complex, and even by assuming an order of the most complex, and even by assuming an order among objects in! cases where there is no natural order among them.
And the final rule was: in all cases, to make such comprehensive enumerations and such general review that I was certain not to omit anything.
The long chains of inferences, all of them simple and easy, that geometers normally use to construct their most difficult demonstrations had given me an opportunity to think that all the things that can fall within the scope of human knowledge follow from each other in a similar way, and as long as one avoids accepting something as true which is not so, and as long as one always observes the order required to deduce them from each other, there cannot be anything so remote that it cannot be reached nor anything so hidden that it cannot be uncovered.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 2, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Better (493)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cast (69)  |  Certain (557)  |  Complex (202)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Construct (129)  |  Demonstration (120)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Easy (213)  |  Enough (341)  |  Examine (84)  |  Fail (191)  |  Fall (243)  |  Final (121)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1302)  |  Follow (389)  |  General (521)  |  Guide (107)  |  Human (1512)  |  Include (93)  |  Inference (45)  |  Judgment (140)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Logic (311)  |  Long (778)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Most (1728)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Natural (810)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Object (438)  |  Observe (179)  |  Omit (12)  |  Opportunity (95)  |  Order (638)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2233)  |  Possible (560)  |  Prejudice (96)  |  Problem (731)  |  Reach (286)  |  Remote (86)  |  Required (108)  |  Resolution (24)  |  Resolve (43)  |  Review (27)  |  Rule (307)  |  Scope (44)  |  Simple (426)  |  Something (718)  |  Step (234)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Use (771)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whatever (234)

I can never satisfy myself until I can make a mechanical model of a thing. If I can make a mechanical model, I can understand it. As long as I cannot make a mechanical model all the way through I cannot understand.
From stenographic report by A.S. Hathaway of the Lecture 20 Kelvin presented at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, on 'Molecular Dynamics and the Wave Theory of Light' (1884), 270-271. (Hathaway was a Mathematics fellow there.) This remark is not included in the first typeset publication—a revised version, printed twenty years later, in 1904, as Lord Kelvin’s Baltimore Lectures on Molecular Dynamics and the Wave Theory of Light. The original notes were reproduced by the “papyrograph” process. They are excerpted in Pierre Maurice Marie Duhem, Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science (1996), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (56)  |  Long (778)  |  Mechanical (145)  |  Mechanics (137)  |  Model (106)  |  Myself (211)  |  Satisfaction (76)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Through (846)  |  Understand (648)  |  Way (1214)

I can still recall vividly how Freud said to me, “My dear Jung, promise me never to abandon the sexual theory. That is the most essential thing of all. You see, we must make a dogma of it, an unshakable bulwark” … In some astonishment I asked him, “A bulwark-against what?” To which he replied, “Against the black tide of mud”—and here he hesitated for a moment, then added—“of occultism.”
Carl Jung
Memories, Dreams, Reflections (1963), 147-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Against (332)  |  Ask (420)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Biography (254)  |  Dogma (49)  |  Essential (210)  |  Sigmund Freud (70)  |  Moment (260)  |  Most (1728)  |  Mud (26)  |  Must (1525)  |  Promise (72)  |  See (1094)  |  Sexual (27)  |  Still (614)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Tide (37)  |  Vividly (11)

I can’t recall a single problem in my life, of any sort, that I ever started on that I didn't solve, or prove that I couldn’t solve it. I never let up, until I had done everything that I could think of, no matter how absurd it might seem as a means to the end I was after.
As quoted in French Strother, 'The Modern Profession of Inventing', World's Work and Play (Jul 1905), 6, No. 32, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (60)  |  End (603)  |  Everything (489)  |  Life (1870)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Problem (731)  |  Prove (261)  |  Recall (11)  |  Seem (150)  |  Single (365)  |  Solve (145)  |  Start (237)  |  Think (1122)

I cannot serve as an example for younger scientists to follow. What I teach cannot be learned. I have never been a “100 percent scientist.” My reading has always been shamefully nonprofessional. I do not own an attaché case, and therefore cannot carry it home at night, full of journals and papers to read. I like long vacations, and a catalogue of my activities in general would be a scandal in the ears of the apostles of cost-effectiveness. I do not play the recorder, nor do I like to attend NATO workshops on a Greek island or a Sicilian mountain top; this shows that I am not even a molecular biologist. In fact, the list of what I have not got makes up the American Dream. Readers, if any, will conclude rightly that the Gradus ad Parnassum will have to be learned at somebody else’s feet.
In Heraclitean Fire: Sketches from a Life before Nature (1978), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (67)  |  Biography (254)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Carry (130)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Cost (94)  |  Do (1905)  |  Dream (222)  |  Ear (69)  |  Effectiveness (13)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Follow (389)  |  General (521)  |  Greek (109)  |  Home (184)  |  Island (49)  |  Journal (31)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Long (778)  |  Molecular Biologist (3)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Paper (192)  |  Read (308)  |  Reading (136)  |