Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Resolve

Resolve Quotes (13 quotes)

Fortunately analysis is not the only way to resolve inner conflicts. Life itself still remains a very effective therapist.
Our Inner Conflicts: A Constructive Theory of Neurosis (1945, 1999), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (124)  |  Conflict (51)  |  Life (993)

I am convinced that an important stage of human thought will have been reached when the physiological and the psychological, the objective and the subjective, are actually united, when the tormenting conflicts or contradictions between my consciousness and my body will have been factually resolved or discarded.
Physiology of the Higher Nervous Activity (1932), 93-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (35)  |  Body (206)  |  Conflict (51)  |  Consciousness (73)  |  Contradiction (46)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Discard (17)  |  Fact (628)  |  Human (472)  |  Importance (186)  |  Objective (51)  |  Physiology (76)  |  Psychology (128)  |  Reach (89)  |  Stage (43)  |  Subjective (9)  |  Thought (400)  |  Torment (14)  |  Unite (16)

It is admitted, on all hands, that the Scriptures are not intended to resolve physical questions, or to explain matters in no way related to the morality of human actions; and if, in consequence of this principle, a considerable latitude of interpretation were not allowed, we should continue at this moment to believe, that the earth is flat; that the sun moves round the earth; and that the circumference of a circle is no more than three times its diameter.
In The Works of John Playfair: Vol. 1: Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1822), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (163)  |  Belief (421)  |  Circle (32)  |  Circumference (13)  |  Diameter (9)  |  Earth (582)  |  Explain (71)  |  Flat (15)  |  Human (472)  |  Intend (8)  |  Interpretation (63)  |  Morality (35)  |  Move (75)  |  Physical (100)  |  Question (327)  |  Science And Religion (271)  |  Scripture (10)  |  Sun (252)

It is strange that the immense variety in nature can be resolved into a series of numbers.
Lecture (Christmas 1923), 'The Atoms of Which Things Are Made'. Collected in Concerning the Nature of Things: Six Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution (1925, 1954), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Immense (34)  |  Nature (1081)  |  Number (188)  |  Series (41)  |  Strange (67)  |  Variety (59)

Obstacles cannot crush me. Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Change (324)  |  Crush (7)  |  Fix (15)  |  Mind (576)  |  Obstacle (28)  |  Star (310)  |  Stern (2)  |  Yield (25)

Our most distinguished “man of science” was the then veteran John Dalton. He was rarely absent from his seat in a warm corner of the room during the meetings of the Literary and Philosophical Society. Though a sober-minded Quaker, he was not devoid of some sense of fun; and there was a tradition amongst us, not only that he had once been a poet, but that, although a bachelor, two manuscript copies were still extant of his verses on the subject of matrimonial felicity; and it is my belief there was foundation for the tradition. The old man was sensitive on the subject of his age. Dining one day ... he was placed between two ladies ... [who] resolved to extract from him some admission on the tender point, but in vain. Though never other than courteous, Dalton foiled all their feminine arts and retained his secret. ... Dalton's quaint and diminutive figure was a strongly individualized one.
In Reminiscences of a Yorkshire Naturalist (1896), 73-74.
Science quotes on:  |  Absent (3)  |  Admission (11)  |  Age (146)  |  Art (217)  |  Bachelor (2)  |  Biography (228)  |  Corner (27)  |  Courteous (2)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Devoid (5)  |  Diminutive (3)  |  Distinguished (6)  |  Extract (14)  |  Felicity (2)  |  Feminine (3)  |  Figure (36)  |  Foiled (2)  |  Fun (29)  |  Individual (185)  |  Lady (9)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Manuscript (7)  |  Meeting (14)  |  Poet (62)  |  Quaint (5)  |  Quaker (2)  |  Room (32)  |  Seat (6)  |  Secret (104)  |  Sensitive (13)  |  Vain (26)  |  Verse (7)  |  Warm (31)

Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings, but they cannot touch the foundation of America. These acts shatter steel, but they cannot dent the steel of American resolve.
Address to the US after hijack attacks on the US World Trade Centers and Pentagon, September 11, 2001
Science quotes on:  |  Act (86)  |  America (79)  |  American (39)  |  Attack (30)  |  Big (45)  |  Buildings (4)  |  Foundation (78)  |  Shake (25)  |  Shatter (8)  |  Steel (16)  |  Terrorist (2)  |  Touch (61)

The main Business of Natural Philosophy is to argue from Phζnomena without feigning Hypotheses, and to deduce Causes from Effects till we come to the very first Cause, which certainly is not mechanical; and not only to unfold the Mechanism of the World, but chiefly to resolve these, and to such like Questions.
From 'Query 31', Opticks (1704, 2nd ed., 1718), 344.
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (17)  |  Business (74)  |  Cause (242)  |  Certainly (22)  |  Deduce (8)  |  Effect (140)  |  First (214)  |  Hypothesis (231)  |  Mechanical (32)  |  Mechanism (45)  |  Natural Philosophy (21)  |  Phenomenon (223)  |  Question (327)  |  Unfold (8)  |  World (746)

The scientific method is a potentiation of common sense, exercised with a specially firm determination not to persist in error if any exertion of hand or mind can deliver us from it. Like other exploratory processes, it can be resolved into a dialogue between fact and fancy, the actual and the possible; between what could be true and what is in fact the case. The purpose of scientific enquiry is not to compile an inventory of factual information, nor to build up a totalitarian world picture of Natural Laws in which every event that is not compulsory is forbidden. We should think of it rather as a logically articulated structure of justifiable beliefs about nature. It begins as a story about a Possible World—a story which we invent and criticise and modify as we go along, so that it ends by being, as nearly as we can make it, a story about real life.
Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought (1969), 59.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (35)  |  Belief (421)  |  Common Sense (70)  |  Compulsory (6)  |  Criticism (52)  |  Determination (54)  |  Dialogue (7)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Error (234)  |  Event (102)  |  Exertion (8)  |  Exploration (105)  |  Fact (628)  |  Fancy (17)  |  Forbidden (8)  |  Information (106)  |  Inventory (7)  |  Justification (35)  |  Logic (190)  |  Mind (576)  |  Modify (13)  |  Natural Law (27)  |  Nature (1081)  |  Persist (10)  |  Possible (112)  |  Process (210)  |  Real Life (5)  |  Scientific Method (156)  |  Story (62)  |  Structure (193)  |  Truth (764)

The theory of punctuated equilibrium, proposed by Niles Eldredge and myself, is not, as so often misunderstood, a radical claim for truly sudden change, but a recognition that ordinary processes of speciation, properly conceived as glacially slow by the standard of our own life-span, do not resolve into geological time as long sequences of insensibly graded intermediates (the traditional, or gradualistic, view), but as geologically ‘sudden’ origins at single bedding planes.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bed (20)  |  Change (324)  |  Claim (55)  |  Conceive (22)  |  Geological (11)  |  Grade (10)  |  Intermediate (16)  |  Long (125)  |  Misunderstand (3)  |  Myself (30)  |  Often (81)  |  Ordinary (47)  |  Origin (78)  |  Plane (17)  |  Process (210)  |  Properly (15)  |  Propose (11)  |  Punctuated Equilibrium (2)  |  Radical (17)  |  Recognition (64)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Single (88)  |  Slow (39)  |  Standard (45)  |  Sudden (23)  |  Theory (585)  |  Time (491)  |  Traditional (10)  |  Truly (22)  |  View (131)

To Nature nothing can be added; from Nature nothing can be taken away; the sum of her energies is constant, and the utmost man can do in the pursuit of physical truth, or in the applications of physical knowledge, is to shift the constituents of the never-varying total. The law of conservation rigidly excludes both creation and annihilation. Waves may change to ripples, and ripples to waves; magnitude may be substituted for number, and number for magnitude; asteroids may aggregate to suns, suns may resolve themselves into florae and faunae, and floras and faunas melt in air: the flux of power is eternally the same. It rolls in music through the ages, and all terrestrial energy—the manifestations of life as well as the display of phenomena—are but the modulations of its rhythm.
Conclusion of Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion: Being a Course of Twelve Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Season of 1862 (1863), 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (27)  |  Age (146)  |  Aggregate (9)  |  Air (171)  |  Annihilation (6)  |  Asteroid (12)  |  Change (324)  |  Conservation Of Energy (25)  |  Constant (43)  |  Constituent (13)  |  Creation (216)  |  Display (22)  |  Energy (200)  |  Eternally (3)  |  Exclude (4)  |  Fauna (11)  |  Flora (7)  |  Flux (8)  |  Knowledge (1148)  |  Life (993)  |  Magnitude (22)  |  Manifestation (31)  |  Melt (16)  |  Modulation (3)  |  Music (75)  |  Nature (1081)  |  Nothing (302)  |  Number (188)  |  Phenomenon (223)  |  Power (286)  |  Rhythm (15)  |  Ripple (4)  |  Same (107)  |  Shift (26)  |  Substitute (23)  |  Sum (31)  |  Sun (252)  |  Take Away (4)  |  Terrestrial (20)  |  Total (30)  |  Truth (764)  |  Wave (58)

When the logician has resolved each demonstration into a host of elementary operations, all of them correct, he will not yet be in possession of the whole reality, that indefinable something that constitutes the unity ... Now pure logic cannot give us this view of the whole; it is to intuition that we must look for it.
Science and Method (1914 edition, reprint 2003), 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Correct (56)  |  Demonstration (52)  |  Elementary (32)  |  Indefinable (2)  |  Intuition (41)  |  Logic (190)  |  Logician (3)  |  Operation (96)  |  Reality (155)  |  Unity (43)  |  Whole (130)

You can't really discover the most interesting conflicts and problems in a subject until you've tried to write about them. At that point, one discovers discontinuities in the data, perhaps, or in one's own thinking; then the act of writing forces you to work harder to resolve these contradictions.
From Robert S. Grumet, 'An Interview with Anthony F. C. Wallace', Ethnohistory (Winter 1998), 45, No. 1, 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (51)  |  Contradiction (46)  |  Data (103)  |  Discontinuity (3)  |  Discover (128)  |  Harder (5)  |  Interesting (42)  |  Problem (382)  |  Subject (133)  |  Thinking (223)  |  Try (118)  |  Work (493)  |  Write (93)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.