Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Correction

Correction Quotes (28 quotes)

[Question: Do you feel that scientists correct themselves as often as they should?]
More often than politicians, but not as often as they should.
Interview with Deborah Solomon, 'The Science of Second-Guessing', in New York Times Magazine (12 Dec 2004), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Often (69)  |  Politician (22)  |  Scientist (447)

All knowledge resolves itself into probability. ... In every judgment, which we can form concerning probability, as well as concerning knowledge, we ought always to correct the first judgment deriv'd from the nature of the object, by another judgment, deriv'd from the nature of the understanding.
In A treatise of Human Nature (1888), 181-182.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (76)  |  Derivation (12)  |  Form (210)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Object (110)  |  Ought (3)  |  Probability (83)  |  Resolution (16)  |  Understanding (317)

Almost everyone... seems to be quite sure that the differences between the methodologies of history and of the natural sciences are vast. For, we are assured, it is well known that in the natural sciences we start from observation and proceed by induction to theory. And is it not obvious that in history we proceed very differently? Yes, I agree that we proceed very differently. But we do so in the natural sciences as well.
In both we start from myths—from traditional prejudices, beset with error—and from these we proceed by criticism: by the critical elimination of errors. In both the role of evidence is, in the main, to correct our mistakes, our prejudices, our tentative theories—that is, to play a part in the critical discussion, in the elimination of error. By correcting our mistakes, we raise new problems. And in order to solve these problems, we invent conjectures, that is, tentative theories, which we submit to critical discussion, directed towards the elimination of error.
The Myth of the Framework: In Defence of Science and Rationality (1993), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Criticism (52)  |  Difference (208)  |  Discussion (37)  |  Elimination (17)  |  Error (230)  |  Everyone (20)  |  Evidence (157)  |  History (302)  |  Induction (45)  |  Methodology (8)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Myth (43)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Observation (418)  |  Prejudice (58)  |  Problem (362)  |  Theory (582)  |  Tradition (43)

During this [book preparation] time attacks have not been wanting—we must always be prepared for them. If they grow out of a scientific soil, they cannot but be useful, by laying bare weak points and stimulating to their correction; but if they proceed from that soil, from which the lilies of innocence and the palms of conciliation should spring up, where, however, nothing but the marsh-trefoil of credulity and the poisonous water-hemlock of calumniation grow, they deserve no attention.
Carl Vogt
From Carl Vogt and James Hunt (ed.), Lectures on Man: His Place in Creation, and in the History of the Earth (1861), Author's Preface, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (29)  |  Attention (76)  |  Credulity (8)  |  Deserving (4)  |  Innocence (10)  |  Lily (3)  |  Palm (3)  |  Poison (32)  |  Stimulation (12)  |  Weakness (31)

Evil communication corrupts good manners. I hope to live to hear that good communication corrects bad manners.
On a leaf of one of Banneker's almanacs, in his own handwriting. As quoted in George Washington Williams, History of the Negro Race in America from 1619 to 1880 (1882), Vol. 1, 390.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (78)  |  Communication (58)  |  Corruption (9)  |  Evil (67)  |  Good (228)  |  Hope (129)  |  Live (186)  |  Manners (3)

Give me a fruitful error any time, full of seeds, bursting with its own corrections. You can keep your sterile truth for yourself.
Pareto’s comment on Kepler. In John Bartlett, Familiar Quotations (12th ed. 1949), 1198. Also in Francis Crick, The Astonishing Hypothesis: the Scientific Search for the Soul (1995), 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (230)  |  Fruitful (31)  |  Keep (47)  |  Seed (52)  |  Sterile (9)  |  Truth (750)

Honorable errors do not count as failures in science, but as seeds for progress in the quintessential activity of correction.
Leonardo's Mountain of Clams and the Diet of Worms: Essays on Natural History (1998), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (230)  |  Failure (118)  |  Progress (317)

I was an impostor, the worthy associate of a brigand, &c., &c., and all this for an atom of chlorine put in the place of an atom of hydrogen, for the simple correction of a chemical formula!
Chemical Method (1855), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (251)  |  Chlorine (11)  |  Formula (51)  |  Hydrogen (37)  |  Impostor (3)  |  Substitution (6)

If I have put the case of science at all correctly, the reader will have recognised that modern science does much more than demand that it shall be left in undisturbed possession of what the theologian and metaphysician please to term its “legitimate field.” It claims that the whole range of phenomena, mental as well as physical—the entire universe—is its field. It asserts that the scientific method is the sole gateway to the whole region of knowledge.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 29-30.
Science quotes on:  |  Assertion (23)  |  Case (64)  |  Claim (52)  |  Demand (52)  |  Field (119)  |  Gateway (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Left (13)  |  Legitimate (8)  |  Metaphysician (4)  |  Mind (544)  |  Modern Science (10)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Possession (37)  |  Range (38)  |  Reader (22)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Region (26)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Sole (9)  |  Term (87)  |  Theologian (14)  |  Universe (563)  |  Whole (122)

If there ever was a misnomer, it is “exact science.” Science has always been full of mistakes. The present day is no exception. And our mistakes are good mistakes; they require a genius to correct. Of course, we do not see our own mistakes.
In Edward Teller, Wendy Teller and Wilson Talley, Conversations on the Dark Secrets of Physics (1991, 2013), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Exact Science (4)  |  Exactness (18)  |  Full (38)  |  Genius (186)  |  Good (228)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Seeing (48)

It is not hard to learn more. What is hard is to unlearn when you discover yourself wrong
Science quotes on:  |  Error (230)  |  Learn (160)

Nature, … in order to carry out the marvelous operations [that occur] in animals and plants has been pleased to construct their organized bodies with a very large number of machines, which are of necessity made up of extremely minute parts so shaped and situated as to form a marvelous organ, the structure and composition of which are usually invisible to the naked eye without the aid of a microscope. … Just as Nature deserves praise and admiration for making machines so small, so too the physician who observes them to the best of his ability is worthy of praise, not blame, for he must also correct and repair these machines as well as he can every time they get out of order.
'Reply to Doctor Sbaraglia' in Opera Posthuma (1697), in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 1, 568.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Admiration (34)  |  Aid (23)  |  Animal (309)  |  Blame (17)  |  Body (193)  |  Composition (52)  |  Construction (69)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Formation (54)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Machine (133)  |  Making (26)  |  Marvel (24)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Minuteness (3)  |  Naked Eye (7)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Observation (418)  |  Operation (96)  |  Organ (60)  |  Organization (79)  |  Out Of Order (2)  |  Part (146)  |  Physician (232)  |  Plant (173)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Praise (17)  |  Repair (7)  |  Shape (52)  |  Small (97)  |  Structure (191)

Orthodoxy can be as stubborn in science as in religion. I do not know how to shake it except by vigorous imagination that inspires unconventional work and contains within itself an elevated potential for inspired error. As the great Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto wrote: ‘Give me a fruitful error any time, full of seeds, bursting with its own corrections. You can keep your sterile truth for yourself.’ Not to mention a man named Thomas Henry Huxley who, when not in the throes of grief or the wars of parson hunting, argued that ‘irrationally held truths may be more harmful than reasoned errors.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (17)  |  Burst (17)  |  Contain (37)  |  Economist (13)  |  Elevate (5)  |  Error (230)  |  Fruitful (31)  |  Full (38)  |  Give (117)  |  Great (300)  |  Grief (6)  |  Harmful (10)  |  Hold (56)  |  Hunt (12)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Italian (3)  |  Keep (47)  |  Know (321)  |  Mention (12)  |  Name (118)  |  Orthodoxy (7)  |  Vilfredo Pareto (4)  |  Parson (2)  |  Potential (34)  |  Reason (330)  |  Religion (210)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seed (52)  |  Shake (19)  |  Sterile (9)  |  Stubborn (5)  |  Time (439)  |  Truth (750)  |  Unconventional (4)  |  Vigorous (11)  |  War (144)  |  Work (457)  |  Write (87)

Science is best defined as a careful, disciplined, logical search for knowledge about any and all aspects of the universe, obtained by examination of the best available evidence and always subject to correction and improvement upon discovery of better evidence. What's left is magic. And it doesn't work.
The Mask of Nostradamus: The Prophecies of the World's Most Famous Seer (1993), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (591)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Improvement (67)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Magic (67)  |  Research (517)  |  Scientific Method (155)

Science is continually correcting what it has said. Fertile corrections... science is a ladder... poetry is a winged flight... An artistic masterpiece exists for all time... Dante does not efface Homer.
Quoted in Pierre Biquard, Frederic Joliot-Curie: The Man and his Theories (1961), trans. Geoffrey Strachan (1965), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Poetry (96)  |  Progress (317)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Art (157)

Science starts with preconception, with the common culture, and with common sense. It moves on to observation, is marked by the discovery of paradox, and is then concerned with the correction of preconception. It moves then to use these corrections for the designing of further observation and for more refined experiment. And as it moves along this course the nature of the evidence and experience that nourish it becomes more and more unfamiliar; it is not just the language that is strange [to common culture].
From 'The Growth of Science and the Structure of Culture', Daedalus (Winter 1958), 87, No. 1, 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Common Sense (69)  |  Culture (85)  |  Design (92)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Experience (268)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Language (155)  |  Nourish (8)  |  Observation (418)  |  Paradox (35)  |  Preconception (10)  |  Refined (6)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Start (68)  |  Strange (61)  |  Unfamiliar (3)

The air of caricature never fails to show itself in the products of reason applied relentlessly and without correction. The observation of clinical facts would seem to be a pursuit of the physician as harmless as it is indispensable. [But] it seemed irresistibly rational to certain minds that diseases should be as fully classifiable as are beetles and butterflies. This doctrine … bore perhaps its richest fruit in the hands of Boissier de Sauvauges. In his Nosologia Methodica published in 1768 … this Linnaeus of the bedside grouped diseases into ten classes, 295 genera, and 2400 species.
In 'General Ideas in Medicine', The Lloyd Roberts lecture at House of the Royal Society of Medicine (30 Sep 1935), British Medical Journal (5 Oct 1935), 2, 609. In The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Application (117)  |  Bedside (2)  |  Butterfly (19)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Class (64)  |  Classification (79)  |  Clinical (2)  |  Disease (257)  |  Doctrine (53)  |  Fact (609)  |  Failure (118)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Genus (16)  |  Harmless (6)  |  Indispensable (8)  |  Irresistible (6)  |  Observation (418)  |  Physician (232)  |  Product (72)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Rationality (11)  |  Reason (330)  |  Relentless (5)  |  Richness (14)  |  Seem (89)  |  Show (55)  |  Species (181)

The glimpses of chemical industry's services to man afforded by this book could be presented only by utilizing innumerable chemical products. The first outline of its plan began to take shape on chemically produced notepaper with the aid of a chemically-treated graphite held in a synthetic resin pencil. Early corrections were made with erasers of chemically compounded rubber. In its ultimate haven on the shelves of your bookcase, it will rest on a coating of chemical varnish behind a pane of chemically produced glass. Nowhere has it been separated from that industry's products.
Man in a Chemical World (1937), L'Envoi, 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Eraser (2)  |  Glass (35)  |  Graphite (2)  |  Industry (91)  |  Paper (52)  |  Pencil (7)  |  Product (72)  |  Resin (2)  |  Rubber (3)  |  Shelf (5)  |  Synthetic (12)

The glory of science is not that it discovers “truth”; rather it advances inexorably by discovering and correcting error.
In Francis Bello, Lawrence Lessing and George A.W. Boehm, Great American Scientists (1960, 1961), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Error (230)  |  Glory (44)  |  Inexorable (5)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Truth (750)

The history of science, like the history of all human ideas, is a history of irresponsible dreams, of obstinacy, and of error. But science is one of the very few human activities—perhaps the only one—in which errors are systematically criticized and fairly often, in time, corrected. This is why we can say that, in science, we often learn from our mistakes, and why we can speak clearly and sensibly about making progress there. In most other fields of human endeavour there is change, but rarely progress ... And in most fields we do not even know how to evaluate change.
From Conjectures and Refutations: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge (1963), 216. Reproduced in Karl Popper, Truth, Rationality and the Growth of Scientific Knowledge (1979), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Clarity (31)  |  Criticism (52)  |  Dream (92)  |  Error (230)  |  History (302)  |  History Of Science (53)  |  Human (445)  |  Idea (440)  |  Irresponsibility (4)  |  Learning (174)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Obstinacy (3)  |  Progress (317)  |  Sense (240)  |  Speaking (38)  |  Systematically (6)

The intricate edifice of verifiable fact and tested theory that has been patiently created in just a brief few hundred years is man’s most solid achievement on earth.
In Francis Bello, Lawrence Lessing and George A.W. Boehm, Great American Scientists (1960, 1961), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Error (230)  |  Glory (44)  |  Inexorable (5)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Truth (750)

There are many hypotheses in science which are wrong. That’s perfectly all right; they’re the aperture to finding out what’s right. Science is a self-correcting process. To be accepted, new ideas must survive the most rigorous standards of evidence and scrutiny.
Quoted in Donald R. Prothero and Carl Dennis Buell, Evolution: What the Fossils Say and Why it Matters (2007), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Aperture (4)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Idea (440)  |  Scrutiny (13)  |  Truth (750)  |  Wrong (116)

There is nothing distinctively scientific about the hypothetico-deductive process. It is not even distinctively intellectual. It is merely a scientific context for a much more general stratagem that underlies almost all regulative processes or processes of continuous control, namely feedback, the control of performance by the consequences of the act performed. In the hypothetico-deductive scheme the inferences we draw from a hypothesis are, in a sense, its logical output. If they are true, the hypothesis need not be altered, but correction is obligatory if they are false. The continuous feedback from inference to hypothesis is implicit in Whewell’s account of scientific method; he would not have dissented from the view that scientific behaviour can be classified as appropriately under cybernetics as under logic.
Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought (1969), 54-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (22)  |  Behaviour (24)  |  Classification (79)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Context (17)  |  Control (93)  |  Cybernetics (3)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Dissent (7)  |  Distinctive (8)  |  False (79)  |  Feedback (8)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Implicit (4)  |  Inference (26)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Logic (187)  |  Output (9)  |  Performance (27)  |  Process (201)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Stratagem (2)  |  Truth (750)  |  William Whewell (55)

There is, however, no genius so gifted as not to need control and verification. ... [T]he brightest flashes in the world of thought are incomplete until they have been proved to have their counterparts in the world of fact. Thus the vocation of the true experimentalist may be defined as the continued exercise of spiritual insight, and its incessant correction and realisation. His experiments constitute a body, of which his purified intuitions are, as it were, the soul.
In 'Vitality', Scientific Use of the Imagination and Other Essays (1872), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (193)  |  Bright (26)  |  Constitution (26)  |  Continuation (17)  |  Control (93)  |  Counterpart (5)  |  Definition (152)  |  Exercise (35)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Experimentalist (11)  |  Fact (609)  |  Flash (25)  |  Genius (186)  |  Gift (47)  |  Incessant (6)  |  Incompleteness (2)  |  Insight (57)  |  Intuition (39)  |  Need (211)  |  Proof (192)  |  Purification (6)  |  Realization (33)  |  Soul (139)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Thought (374)  |  Verification (20)  |  Vocation (2)  |  World (667)

Those who have taken upon them to lay down the law of nature as a thing already searched out and understood, whether they have spoken in simple assurance or professional affectation, have therein done philosophy and the sciences great injury. For as they have been successful in inducing belief, so they have been effective in quenching and stopping inquiry; and have done more harm by spoiling and putting an end to other men's efforts than good by their own. Those on the other hand who have taken a contrary course, and asserted that absolutely nothing can be known — whether it were from hatred of the ancient sophists, or from uncertainty and fluctuation of mind, or even from a kind of fullness of learning, that they fell upon this opinion — have certainly advanced reasons for it that are not to be despised; but yet they have neither started from true principles nor rested in the just conclusion, zeal and affectation having carried them much too far...
Now my method, though hard to practice, is easy to explain; and it is this. I propose to establish progressive stages of certainty. The evidence of the sense, helped and guarded by a certain process of correction, I retain. But the mental operation which follows the act of sense I for the most part reject; and instead of it I open and lay out a new and certain path for the mind to proceed in, starting directly from the simple sensuous perception.
Novum Organum (1620)
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (97)  |  Law (418)  |  Scientific Method (155)

We are not to think that Jupiter has four satellites given him by nature, in order, by revolving round him, to immortalize the name of the Medici, who first had notice of the observation. These are the dreams of idle men, who love ludicrous ideas better than our laborious and industrious correction of the heavens.—Nature abhors so horrible a chaos, and to the truly wise, such vanity is detestable.
From Nodus Gordius, Appendix, as cited in John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune, Life of Galileo Galilei: With Illustrations of the Advancement of Experimental Philosophy (1832), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhor (3)  |  Better (131)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Dream (92)  |  First (174)  |  Gift (47)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Horrible (7)  |  Idea (440)  |  Idleness (8)  |  Immortalize (2)  |  Industrious (6)  |  Jupiter (17)  |  Laborious (3)  |  Love (164)  |  Ludicrous (3)  |  Moon (132)  |  Name (118)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Notice (20)  |  Observation (418)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Satellite (22)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Truly (19)  |  Vanity (14)  |  Wise (43)

When we seek a textbook case for the proper operation of science, the correction of certain error offers far more promise than the establishment of probable truth. Confirmed hunches, of course, are more upbeat than discredited hypotheses. Since the worst traditions of ‘popular’ writing falsely equate instruction with sweetness and light, our promotional literature abounds with insipid tales in the heroic mode, although tough stories of disappointment and loss give deeper insight into a methodology that the celebrated philosopher Karl Popper once labeled as ‘conjecture and refutation.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (3)  |  Bad (78)  |  Case (64)  |  Celebrate (7)  |  Certain (84)  |  Confirm (12)  |  Conjecture (22)  |  Deep (81)  |  Disappointment (11)  |  Discredit (7)  |  Equate (3)  |  Error (230)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Far (77)  |  Give (117)  |  Heroic (4)  |  Hunch (4)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Insight (57)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Label (11)  |  Light (246)  |  Literature (64)  |  Loss (62)  |  Methodology (8)  |  Mode (29)  |  Of Course (11)  |  Offer (16)  |  Operation (96)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Karl Raimund Popper (44)  |  Popular (21)  |  Probable (14)  |  Promise (27)  |  Proper (27)  |  Refutation (10)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seek (57)  |  Story (58)  |  Sweetness (8)  |  Tale (12)  |  Textbook (19)  |  Tough (8)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Truth (750)  |  Write (87)

Your printers have made but one blunder,
Correct it instanter, and then for the thunder!
We'll see in a jiffy if this Mr S[pencer]
Has the ghost of a claim to be thought a good fencer.
To my vision his merits have still seemed to dwindle,
Since I have found him allied with the great Dr T[yndall]
While I have, for my part, grown cockier and cockier,
Since I found an ally in yourself, Mr L[ockyer]
And am always, in consequence, thoroughly willin',
To perform in the pages of Nature's M[acmillan].
Postcard from Tait to Lockyer, editor of Nature, cited by H. Dingle, Nature (1969), 224, 829.
Science quotes on:  |  Blunder (13)  |  Claim (52)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Fencer (2)  |  Ghost (20)  |  Merit (25)  |  Page (18)  |  Performance (27)  |  Herbert Spencer (35)  |  John Tyndall (46)  |  Vision (55)  |  Willingness (9)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.