Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Rationality

Rationality Quotes (24 quotes)

Behind and permeating all our scientific activity, whether in critical analysis or in discovery, there is an elementary and overwhelming faith in the possibility of grasping the real world with out concepts, and, above all, faith in the truth over which we have no control but in the service of which our rationality stands or falls. Faith and intrinsic rationality are interlocked with one another
Christian Theology of Scientific Culture (1981), 63. In Vinoth Ramachandra, Subverting Global Myths: Theology and the Public Issues Shaping our World (2008), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Behind (137)  |  Concept (221)  |  Control (167)  |  Critical (66)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fall (230)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Interlock (3)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Permeate (2)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Real World (14)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Service (110)  |  Stand (274)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)

Every scientist is an agent of cultural change. He may not be a champion of change; he may even resist it, as scholars of the past resisted the new truths of historical geology, biological evolution, unitary chemistry, and non-Euclidean geometry. But to the extent that he is a true professional, the scientist is inescapably an agent of change. His tools are the instruments of change—skepticism, the challenge to establish authority, criticism, rationality, and individuality.
In Science in Russian Culture: A History to 1860 (1963).
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  Authority (95)  |  Biological (137)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extent (139)  |  Geology (220)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Historical (70)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Instrument (144)  |  New (1216)  |  Non-Euclidean (7)  |  Past (337)  |  Professional (70)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Tool (117)  |  Truth (1057)

For more than half a century, Martin Gardner has been the single brightest beacon defending rationality and good science against the mysticism and anti-intellectualism that surround us.
As quoted on the back cover of several of the books by Martin Gardner.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Beacon (8)  |  Bright (79)  |  Brightest (12)  |  Century (310)  |  Defend (30)  |  Martin Gardner (50)  |  Good (889)  |  Half (56)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  More (2559)  |  Mysticism (14)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Surround (30)

If we can combine our knowledge of science with the wisdom of wildness, if we can nurture civilization through roots in the primitive, man’s potentialities appear to be unbounded, Through this evolving awareness, and his awareness of that awareness, he can emerge with the miraculous—to which we can attach what better name than “God”? And in this merging, as long sensed by intuition but still only vaguely perceived by rationality, experience may travel without need for accompanying life.
A Letter From Lindbergh', Life (4 Jul 1969), 61. In Eugene C. Gerhart, Quote it Completely! (1998), 409.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accompany (22)  |  Attach (56)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Better (486)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Combine (57)  |  Experience (467)  |  God (757)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Name (333)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Potential (69)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Still (613)  |  Through (849)  |  Travel (114)  |  Wildness (4)  |  Wisdom (221)

In mathematics we find the primitive source of rationality; and to mathematics must the biologists resort for means to carry out their researches.
The Positive Philosophy, trans. Harriet Martineau (1853), Vol. 1, 388.
Science quotes on:  |  Biologist (69)  |  Carry (127)  |  Find (998)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Primitive (75)

In such sad circumstances I but see myself exalted by my own enemies, for in order to defeat some small works of mine they try to make the whole rational medicine and anatomy fall, as if I were myself these noble disciplines.
'Letter to Marescotti about the dispute with Sbaraglia and others, 1689(?)', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), The Correspondence of Marcello Malpighi (1975), Vol. 4, 1561.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Defeat (29)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exaltation (5)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Fall (230)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mine (76)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nobility (4)  |  Noble (90)  |  Order (632)  |  Rational (90)  |  Sadness (35)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Small (477)  |  Try (283)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

It is clear, then, that the idea of a fixed method, or of a fixed theory of rationality, rests on too naive a view of man and his social surroundings. To those who look at the rich material provided by history, and who are not intent on impoverishing it in order to please their lower instincts, their craving for intellectual security in the form of clarity, precision, “objectivity”, “truth”, it will become clear that there is only one principle that can be defended under all circumstances and in all stages of human development. It is the principle: anything goes.
Against Method: Outline of an Anarchistic Theory of Knowledge (1975, 1993), 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Development (422)  |  Form (959)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Method (505)  |  Naive (13)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Order (632)  |  Please (65)  |  Precision (68)  |  Principle (507)  |  Rest (280)  |  Security (47)  |  Social (252)  |  Stage (143)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)

It is therefore easy to see why the churches have always fought science and persecuted its devotees. On the other hand, I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research. Only those who realize the immense efforts and, above all, the devotion without which pioneer work in theoretical science cannot be achieved are able to grasp the strength of the emotion out of which alone such work, remote as it is from the immediate realities of life, can issue. What a deep conviction of the rationality of the universe and what a yearning to understand, were it but a feeble reflection of the mind revealed in this world, Kepler and Newton must have had to enable them to spend years of solitary labor in disentangling the principles of celestial mechanics! Those whose acquaintance with scientific research is derived chiefly from its practical results easily develop a completely false notion of the mentality of the men who, surrounded by a skeptical world, have shown the way to kindred spirits scattered wide through the world and through the centuries. Only one who has devoted his life to similar ends can have a vivid realization of what has inspired these men and given them the strength to remain true to their purpose in spite of countless failures. It is cosmic religious feeling that gives a man such strength. A contemporary has said, not unjustly, that in this materialistic age of ours the serious scientific workers are the only profoundly religious people.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Celestial Mechanics (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Church (56)  |  Completely (135)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Countless (36)  |  Deep (233)  |  Derive (65)  |  Develop (268)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Disentangle (4)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Enable (119)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  False (100)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fight (44)  |  Give (202)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Issue (42)  |  Kepler (4)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Materialistic (2)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Newton (10)  |  Nobl (4)  |  Notion (113)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ours (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Persecute (4)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Profoundly (13)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Serious (91)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Skeptical (20)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spite (55)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Surround (30)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Through (849)  |  True (212)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unjustly (2)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Wide (96)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

Mathematics and music, the most sharply contrasted fields of scientific activity which can be found, and yet related, supporting each other, as if to show forth the secret connection which ties together all the activities of our mind, and which leads us to surmise that the manifestations of the artist’s genius are but the unconscious expressions of a mysteriously acting rationality.
In Vorträge und Reden (1884, 1896), Vol 1, 122. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 191. From the original German, “Mathematik und Musik, der schärfste Gegensatz geistiger Thätigkeit, den man auffinden kann, und doch verbunden, sich unterstützend, als wollten sie die geheime Consequenz nachweisen, die sich durch alle Thätigkeiten unseres Geistes hinzieht, und die auch in den Offenbarungen des künstlerischen Genius uns unbewusste Aeusserungen geheimnissvoll wirkender Vernunftmässigkeit ahnen lässt.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Artist (90)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Expression (175)  |  Field (364)  |  Genius (284)  |  Lead (384)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Other (2236)  |  Relate (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Show (346)  |  Support (147)  |  Surmise (7)  |  Tie (38)  |  Together (387)  |  Unconscious (22)

One can be deluded in favor of a proposition as well as against it. Reasons are often and for the most part only expositions of pretensions designed to give a coloring of legitimacy and rationality to something we would have done in any case.
Aphorism 50 in Notebook C (1772-1773), as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990). Reprinted as The Waste Books (2000), 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Deluded (7)  |  Delusion (25)  |  Design (195)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Favor (63)  |  Legitimacy (5)  |  Most (1731)  |  Pretension (6)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Something (719)

Science has hitherto been proceeding without the guidance of any rational theory of logic, and has certainly made good progress. It is like a computer who is pursuing some method of arithmetical approximation. Even if he occasionally makes mistakes in his ciphering, yet if the process is a good one they will rectify themselves. But then he would approximate much more rapidly if he did not commit these errors; and in my opinion, the time has come when science ought to be provided with a logic. My theory satisfies me; I can see no flaw in it. According to that theory universality, necessity, exactitude, in the absolute sense of these words, are unattainable by us, and do not exist in nature. There is an ideal law to which nature approximates; but to express it would require an endless series of modifications, like the decimals expressing surd. Only when you have asked a question in so crude a shape that continuity is not involved, is a perfectly true answer attainable.
Letter to G. F. Becker, 11 June 1893. Merrill Collection, Library of Congress. Quoted in Nathan Reingold, Science in Nineteenth-Century America: A Documentary History (1966), 231-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  According (237)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Commit (41)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Computer (127)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Crude (31)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endless (56)  |  Error (321)  |  Exactitude (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Express (186)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Good (889)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Involved (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Logic (287)  |  Method (505)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Provision (16)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rational (90)  |  Require (219)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Has Come (8)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universality (22)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Scientific research can reduce superstition by encouraging people to think and survey things in terms of cause and effect. Certain it is that a conviction, akin to religious feeling, of the rationality or intelligibility of the world lies behind all scientific work of a higher order.
From 'Scientific Truth' in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Effect (393)  |  Encouraging (12)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Higher (37)  |  Lie (364)  |  Order (632)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Religious (126)  |  Research (664)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Superstition (66)  |  Survey (33)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The air of caricature never fails to show itself in the products of reason applied relentlessly and without correction. The observation of clinical facts would seem to be a pursuit of the physician as harmless as it is indispensable. [But] it seemed irresistibly rational to certain minds that diseases should be as fully classifiable as are beetles and butterflies. This doctrine … bore perhaps its richest fruit in the hands of Boissier de Sauvauges. In his Nosologia Methodica published in 1768 … this Linnaeus of the bedside grouped diseases into ten classes, 295 genera, and 2400 species.
In 'General Ideas in Medicine', The Lloyd Roberts lecture at House of the Royal Society of Medicine (30 Sep 1935), British Medical Journal (5 Oct 1935), 2, 609. In The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Bedside (3)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Certain (550)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Correction (40)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Genus (25)  |  Harmless (8)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (31)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Physician (273)  |  Product (160)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relentless (8)  |  Richness (14)  |  Seem (145)  |  Show (346)  |  Species (401)

The belief that mathematics, because it is abstract, because it is static and cold and gray, is detached from life, is a mistaken belief. Mathematics, even in its purest and most abstract estate, is not detached from life. It is just the ideal handling of the problems of life, as sculpture may idealize a human figure or as poetry or painting may idealize a figure or a scene. Mathematics is precisely the ideal handling of the problems of life, and the central ideas of the science, the great concepts about which its stately doctrines have been built up, are precisely the chief ideas with which life must always deal and which, as it tumbles and rolls about them through time and space, give it its interests and problems, and its order and rationality. That such is the case a few indications will suffice to show. The mathematical concepts of constant and variable are represented familiarly in life by the notions of fixedness and change. The concept of equation or that of an equational system, imposing restriction upon variability, is matched in life by the concept of natural and spiritual law, giving order to what were else chaotic change and providing partial freedom in lieu of none at all. What is known in mathematics under the name of limit is everywhere present in life in the guise of some ideal, some excellence high-dwelling among the rocks, an “ever flying perfect” as Emerson calls it, unto which we may approximate nearer and nearer, but which we can never quite attain, save in aspiration. The supreme concept of functionality finds its correlate in life in the all-pervasive sense of interdependence and mutual determination among the elements of the world. What is known in mathematics as transformation—that is, lawful transfer of attention, serving to match in orderly fashion the things of one system with those of another—is conceived in life as a process of transmutation by which, in the flux of the world, the content of the present has come out of the past and in its turn, in ceasing to be, gives birth to its successor, as the boy is father to the man and as things, in general, become what they are not. The mathematical concept of invariance and that of infinitude, especially the imposing doctrines that explain their meanings and bear their names—What are they but mathematicizations of that which has ever been the chief of life’s hopes and dreams, of that which has ever been the object of its deepest passion and of its dominant enterprise, I mean the finding of the worth that abides, the finding of permanence in the midst of change, and the discovery of a presence, in what has seemed to be a finite world, of being that is infinite? It is needless further to multiply examples of a correlation that is so abounding and complete as indeed to suggest a doubt whether it be juster to view mathematics as the abstract idealization of life than to regard life as the concrete realization of mathematics.
In 'The Humanization of Teaching of Mathematics', Science, New Series, 35, 645-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abide (12)  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Cease (79)  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Constant (144)  |  Content (69)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detach (5)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dream (208)  |  Element (310)  |  Ralph Waldo Emerson (150)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equation (132)  |  Especially (31)  |  Estate (5)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Flux (21)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Functionality (2)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guise (5)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Impose (22)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indication (33)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invariance (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Needless (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Painting (44)  |  Partial (10)  |  Passion (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Pervasive (5)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pure (291)  |  Realization (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Rock (161)  |  Roll (40)  |  Save (118)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stately (12)  |  Static (8)  |  Successor (14)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tumble (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unto (8)  |  Variability (5)  |  Variable (34)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

The layman, taught to revere scientists for their absolute respect for the observed facts, and for the judiciously detached and purely provisional manner in which they hold scientific theories (always ready to abandon a theory at the sight of any contradictory evidence) might well have thought that, at [Dayton C.] Miller's announcement of this overwhelming evidence of a “positive effect” [indicating that the speed of light is not independent from the motion of the observer, as Einstein's theory of relativity demands] in his presidential address to the American Physical Society on December 29th, 1925, his audience would have instantly abandoned the theory of relativity. Or, at the very least, that scientists—wont to look down from the pinnacle of their intellectual humility upon the rest of dogmatic mankind—might suspend judgment in this matter until Miller's results could be accounted for without impairing the theory of relativity. But no: by that time they had so well closed their minds to any suggestion which threatened the new rationality achieved by Einstein's world-picture, that it was almost impossible for them to think again in different terms. Little attention was paid to the experiments, the evidence being set aside in the hope that it would one day turn out to be wrong.
Personal Knowledge: Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy (1958, 1998), 13. Miller had earlier presented his evidence against the validity of the relativity theory at the annual meeting, 28 Apr 1925, of the National Academy of Sciences. Miller believed he had, by a much-refined and improved repetition of the so-called Michelson-Morley experiment, shown that there is a definite and measurable motion of the earth through the ether. In 1955, a paper by R.S. Shankland, et al., in Rev. Modern Phys. (1955), 27, 167, concluded that statistical fluctuations and temperature effects in the data had simulated what Miller had taken to be he apparent ether drift.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Account (192)  |  Announcement (15)  |  Attention (190)  |  Audience (26)  |  Being (1278)  |  Closed (38)  |  Demand (123)  |  Different (577)  |  Down (456)  |  Effect (393)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Hope (299)  |  Humility (28)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Layman (21)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Physical (508)  |  Picture (143)  |  Positive (94)  |  Provisional (7)  |  Purely (109)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Sight (132)  |  Society (326)  |  Speed (65)  |  Speed Of Light (17)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)

The line separating investment and speculation, which is never bright and clear, becomes blurred still further when most market participants have recently enjoyed triumphs. Nothing sedates rationality like large doses of effortless money. After a heady experience of that kind, normally sensible people drift into behavior akin to that of Cinderella at the ball. They know that overstaying the festivities—that is, continuing to speculate in companies that have gigantic valuations relative to the cash they are likely to generate in the future—will eventually bring on pumpkins and mice. But they nevertheless hate to miss a single minute of what is one helluva party. Therefore, the giddy participants all plan to leave just seconds before midnight. There’s a problem, though: They are dancing in a room in which the clocks have no hands.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Akin (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Become (815)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Blur (8)  |  Bright (79)  |  Bring (90)  |  Cash (2)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clock (47)  |  Company (59)  |  Continue (165)  |  Dance (32)  |  Dose (16)  |  Drift (13)  |  Effortless (3)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Experience (467)  |  Far (154)  |  Future (429)  |  Generate (16)  |  Giddy (3)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hate (64)  |  Heady (2)  |  Investment (13)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Leave (130)  |  Likely (34)  |  Line (91)  |  Market (20)  |  Midnight (11)  |  Minute (125)  |  Miss (51)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Normally (2)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Overstay (2)  |  Participant (6)  |  Party (18)  |  People (1005)  |  Plan (117)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recently (3)  |  Relative (39)  |  Room (40)  |  Second (62)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Separate (143)  |  Single (353)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Still (613)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Valuation (4)  |  Will (2355)

The study of mathematics cannot be replaced by any other activity that will train and develop man’s purely logical faculties to the same level of rationality.
In The American Mathematical Monthly (1949), 56, 19. Excerpted in John Ewing (ed,), A Century of Mathematics: Through the Eyes of the Monthly (1996), 186.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Develop (268)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Level (67)  |  Logical (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Purely (109)  |  Replace (31)  |  Same (157)  |  Study (653)  |  Train (114)  |  Will (2355)

We do whatever we can to deny intuition of the invisible realms. We clog up our senses with smog, jam our minds with media overload. We drown ourselves in alcohol or medicate ourselves into rigidly artificial states... we take pride in our cynicism and detachment. Perhaps we are terrified to discover that our “rationality” is itself a kind of faith, an artifice, that beneath it lies the vast territory of the unknown.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 29
Science quotes on:  |  Alcohol (22)  |  Artifice (4)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Clog (5)  |  Cynicism (4)  |  Deny (66)  |  Detachment (8)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drown (12)  |  Faith (203)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Jam (3)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lie (364)  |  Media (13)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pride (78)  |  Realm (85)  |  Rigidly (4)  |  Sense (770)  |  State (491)  |  Terrified (4)  |  Territory (24)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vast (177)  |  Whatever (234)

We hold these truths to be self-evident.
Franklin's edit to the assertion of religion in Thomas Jefferson's original wording, “We hold these truths to be sacred and undeniable” in a draft of the Declaration of Independence changes it instead into an assertion of rationality. The scientific mind of Franklin drew on the scientific determinism of Isaac Newton and the analytic empiricism of David Hume and Gottfried Leibniz. In what became known as “Hume's Fork” the latters' theory distinguished between synthetic truths that describe matters of fact, and analytic truths that are self-evident by virtue of reason and definition.
As explained by Walter Isaacson in Benjamin Franklin: An American Life (2004), 312.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Change (593)  |  Declaration (10)  |  Declaration Of Independence (4)  |  Definition (221)  |  Describe (128)  |  Determinism (12)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1210)  |  David Hume (33)  |  Known (454)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Virtue (109)

What a deep faith in the rationality of the structure of the world and what a longing to understand even a small glimpse of the reason revealed in the world there must have been in Kepler and Newton to enable them to unravel the mechanism of the heavens in long years of lonely work!
'Religion and Science', The New York Times (9 Nov 1930), Sunday Magazine, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Deep (233)  |  Enable (119)  |  Faith (203)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Long (790)  |  Longing (19)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unravel (14)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Whoever has undergone the intense experience of successful advances made in [science], is moved by profound reverence for the rationality made manifest in existence.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Intense (20)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Move (216)  |  Profound (104)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Successful (123)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Whoever (42)

Without a commitment to science and rationality in its proper domain, there can be no solution to the problems that engulf us. Still, the Yahoos never rest.
Ever Since Darwin (1980),146.
Science quotes on:  |  Commitment (27)  |  Domain (69)  |  Never (1087)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proper (144)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Still (613)

[I find it as difficult] to understand a scientist who does not acknowledge the presence of a superior rationality behind the existence of the universe as it is to comprehend a theologian who would deny the advances of science.
Speech, Huntsville Ministerial Association, in Wernher Von Braun and Irene E. Powell-Willhite (ed.), The Voice of Dr. Wernher Von Braun: An Anthology (2007), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Advance (280)  |  Behind (137)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Deny (66)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Existence (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Presence (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Superior (81)  |  Theologian (22)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)

[Martin Gardner is] the single brightest beacon defending rationality and good science against the mysticism and anti-intellectualism that surround us.
As quoted in Kendrick Frazier, 'A Mind at Play: An Interview with Martin Gardner', Skeptical Inquirer (Mar/Apr 1998), 22, No. 2, 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Beacon (8)  |  Brightest (12)  |  Defend (30)  |  Martin Gardner (50)  |  Good (889)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Mysticism (14)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Surround (30)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.