Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Partial

Partial Quotes (10 quotes)

All Nature is but Art, unknown to thee;
All Chance, Direction, which thou canst not see;
All Discord, Harmony, not understood;
All partial Evil, universal Good:
And, spite of Pride, in erring Reason’s spite,
One truth is clear, “Whatever IS, is RIGHT.”
'An Essay on Man' (1733-4), Epistle I. In John Butt (ed.), The Poems of Alexander Pope (1965), 515.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Chance (239)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discord (10)  |  Evil (116)  |  Existence (456)  |  Good (889)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pride (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Right (452)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Spite (55)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Universal (189)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Whatever (234)

Exits sun; enters moon.
This moon is never alone.
Stars are seen all around.
These twinklers do not make a sound.
The tiny ones shine from their place.
Mother moon watches with a smiling face.
Its light is soothing to the eyes.
Night’s darkness hides its face.
Cool and calm is its light.
Heat and sweat are never felt.
Some days, moon is not seen.
Makes kids wonder, where had it been?
Partial eclipse shades the moon.
In summers it does not arrive soon.
Beautiful is this milky ball.
It is the love of one and all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Calm (31)  |  Cool (13)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Enter (141)  |  Exit (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Feel (367)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hide (69)  |  Kid (15)  |  Light (607)  |  Love (309)  |  Moon (237)  |  Mother (114)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Place (177)  |  See (1081)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shine (45)  |  Smile (31)  |  Soon (186)  |  Soothing (3)  |  Sound (183)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wonder (236)

He is not a true man of science who does not bring some sympathy to his studies, and expect to learn something by behavior as well as by application. It is childish to rest in the discovery of mere coincidences, or of partial and extraneous laws.
In A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1862), 381.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Childish (20)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extraneous (6)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mere (84)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Study (653)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  True (212)

Physicists are, as a general rule, highbrows. They think and talk in long, Latin words, and when they write anything down they usually include at least one partial differential and three Greek letters.
In 'A Newsman Looks at Physicists', Physics Today (May 1948), 1, No. 1, 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Differential (7)  |  Down (456)  |  General (511)  |  Greek (107)  |  Include (90)  |  Latin (38)  |  Letter (109)  |  Long (790)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Rule (294)  |  Talk (100)  |  Think (1086)  |  Usually (176)  |  Word (619)  |  Write (230)

Probability is expectation founded upon partial knowledge.
An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854), 244. This is part of a longer quote, which begins, “A distinguished writer…”, on the George Boole Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (221)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Founded (20)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Probability (130)

Secondly, the study of mathematics would show them the necessity there is in reasoning, to separate all the distinct ideas, and to see the habitudes that all those concerned in the present inquiry have to one another, and to lay by those which relate not to the proposition in hand, and wholly to leave them out of the reckoning. This is that which, in other respects besides quantity is absolutely requisite to just reasoning, though in them it is not so easily observed and so carefully practised. In those parts of knowledge where it is thought demonstration has nothing to do, men reason as it were in a lump; and if upon a summary and confused view, or upon a partial consideration, they can raise the appearance of a probability, they usually rest content; especially if it be in a dispute where every little straw is laid hold on, and everything that can but be drawn in any way to give color to the argument is advanced with ostentation. But that mind is not in a posture to find truth that does not distinctly take all the parts asunder, and, omitting what is not at all to the point, draws a conclusion from the result of all the particulars which in any way influence it.
In Conduct of the Understanding, Sect. 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argument (138)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Color (137)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confused (12)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Content (69)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Easily (35)  |  Especially (31)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  Give (202)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hold (95)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laid (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Lump (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Omit (11)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Posture (7)  |  Practise (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Requisite (11)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Show (346)  |  Straw (7)  |  Study (653)  |  Summary (11)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)

The belief that mathematics, because it is abstract, because it is static and cold and gray, is detached from life, is a mistaken belief. Mathematics, even in its purest and most abstract estate, is not detached from life. It is just the ideal handling of the problems of life, as sculpture may idealize a human figure or as poetry or painting may idealize a figure or a scene. Mathematics is precisely the ideal handling of the problems of life, and the central ideas of the science, the great concepts about which its stately doctrines have been built up, are precisely the chief ideas with which life must always deal and which, as it tumbles and rolls about them through time and space, give it its interests and problems, and its order and rationality. That such is the case a few indications will suffice to show. The mathematical concepts of constant and variable are represented familiarly in life by the notions of fixedness and change. The concept of equation or that of an equational system, imposing restriction upon variability, is matched in life by the concept of natural and spiritual law, giving order to what were else chaotic change and providing partial freedom in lieu of none at all. What is known in mathematics under the name of limit is everywhere present in life in the guise of some ideal, some excellence high-dwelling among the rocks, an “ever flying perfect” as Emerson calls it, unto which we may approximate nearer and nearer, but which we can never quite attain, save in aspiration. The supreme concept of functionality finds its correlate in life in the all-pervasive sense of interdependence and mutual determination among the elements of the world. What is known in mathematics as transformation—that is, lawful transfer of attention, serving to match in orderly fashion the things of one system with those of another—is conceived in life as a process of transmutation by which, in the flux of the world, the content of the present has come out of the past and in its turn, in ceasing to be, gives birth to its successor, as the boy is father to the man and as things, in general, become what they are not. The mathematical concept of invariance and that of infinitude, especially the imposing doctrines that explain their meanings and bear their names—What are they but mathematicizations of that which has ever been the chief of life’s hopes and dreams, of that which has ever been the object of its deepest passion and of its dominant enterprise, I mean the finding of the worth that abides, the finding of permanence in the midst of change, and the discovery of a presence, in what has seemed to be a finite world, of being that is infinite? It is needless further to multiply examples of a correlation that is so abounding and complete as indeed to suggest a doubt whether it be juster to view mathematics as the abstract idealization of life than to regard life as the concrete realization of mathematics.
In 'The Humanization of Teaching of Mathematics', Science, New Series, 35, 645-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abide (12)  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Cease (79)  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Constant (144)  |  Content (69)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detach (5)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dream (208)  |  Element (310)  |  Ralph Waldo Emerson (150)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equation (132)  |  Especially (31)  |  Estate (5)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Flux (21)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Functionality (2)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guise (5)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Impose (22)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indication (33)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invariance (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Needless (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Painting (44)  |  Passion (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Pervasive (5)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Realization (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Rock (161)  |  Roll (40)  |  Save (118)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stately (12)  |  Static (8)  |  Successor (14)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tumble (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unto (8)  |  Variability (5)  |  Variable (34)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

There are two processes which we adopt consciously or unconsciously when we try to prophesy. We can seek a period in the past whose conditions resemble as closely as possible those of our day, and presume that the sequel to that period will, save for some minor alterations, be similar. Secondly, we can survey the general course of development in our immediate past, and endeavor to prolong it into the near future. The first is the method the historian; the second that of the scientist. Only the second is open to us now, and this only in a partial sphere.
From 'Fifty Years Hence', Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57, No. 3, 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (30)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Course (409)  |  Development (422)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Historian (54)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Method (505)  |  Minor (10)  |  Open (274)  |  Past (337)  |  Period (198)  |  Possible (552)  |  Presume (9)  |  Process (423)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Prophesy (10)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Save (118)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sequel (2)  |  Similar (36)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Survey (33)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Will (2355)

Truth is a totality, the sum of many overlapping partial images. History, on the other hand, sacrifices totality in the interest of continuity.
Unverified. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Continuity (38)  |  History (673)  |  Image (96)  |  Interest (386)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overlap (8)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Sum (102)  |  Totality (15)  |  Truth (1057)

Until its results have gone through the painful process of publication, preferably in a refereed journal of high standards, scientific research is just play. Publication is an indispensable part of science. “Publish or perish” is not an indictment of the system of academia; it is a partial prescription for creativity and innovation. Sustained and substantial publication favors creativity. Novelty of conception has a large component of unpredictability. ... One is often a poor judge of the relative value of his own creative efforts. An artist’s ranking of his own works is rarely the same as that of critics or of history. Most scientists have had similar experiences. One’s supply of reprints for a pot-boiler is rapidly exhausted, while a major monograph that is one’s pride and joy goes unnoticed. The strategy of choice is to increase the odds favoring creativity by being productive.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 233-234.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Academia (4)  |  Artist (90)  |  Being (1278)  |  Choice (110)  |  Component (48)  |  Conception (154)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Critic (20)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Experience (467)  |  Favor (63)  |  Favored (5)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indictment (2)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Journal (30)  |  Joy (107)  |  Judge (108)  |  Large (394)  |  Major (84)  |  Monograph (5)  |  Most (1731)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Odds (6)  |  Often (106)  |  Painful (11)  |  Part (222)  |  Perish (50)  |  Play (112)  |  Poor (136)  |  Preferably (2)  |  Prescription (18)  |  Pride (78)  |  Process (423)  |  Productive (32)  |  Publication (101)  |  Publish (36)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Referee (7)  |  Relative (39)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Similar (36)  |  Standard (57)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Supply (93)  |  Sustain (46)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Unnoticed (5)  |  Unpredictability (7)  |  Value (365)  |  Work (1351)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.