Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Cease

Cease Quotes (79 quotes)

Gilbert shall live, till Load-stones cease to draw,
Or British Fleets the boundless Ocean awe.
'Of Miscellany Poems To my Honor’d Friend Dr. Charleton On his Learned and Useful Works; But more particularly his Treatise of Stone-Heng, By him restored to the true Founders', collected in Poetical Miscellanies: The Fifth Part (1704), 39. (Dr Walter Charleton was physician in ordinary to King Charles I. His treatise on Stonehenge was published in 1663.)
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (43)  |  Boundless (26)  |  British (41)  |  Draw (137)  |  William Gilbert (10)  |  Live (628)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Poem (96)  |  Stone (162)

[As Chief Scientific Adviser to the British Ministry of Defence] We persist in regarding ourselves as a Great Power, capable of everything and only temporarily handicapped by economic difficulties. We are not a great power and never will be again. We are a great nation, but if we continue to behave like a Great Power we shall soon cease to be a great nation. Let us take warning from the fate of the Great Powers of the past and not burst ourselves with pride (see Aesop’s fable of the frog). (1949)
As quoted by Peter Hennessy, Whitehall (1989), 155.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Behave (17)  |  British (41)  |  Burst (39)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chief (97)  |  Continue (165)  |  Defence (14)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economy (55)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fable (12)  |  Fate (72)  |  Frog (38)  |  Great (1574)  |  Handicap (6)  |  Handicapped (7)  |  Nation (193)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Past (337)  |  Persist (11)  |  Power (746)  |  Pride (78)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Soon (186)  |  Warning (17)  |  Will (2355)

[Students or readers about teachers or authors.] They will listen with both ears to what is said by the men just a step or two ahead of them, who stand nearest to them, and within arm’s reach. A guide ceases to be of any use when he strides so far ahead as to be hidden by the curvature of the earth.
From Lecture (5 Apr 1917) at Hackley School, Tarrytown, N.Y., 'Choosing Books', collected in Canadian Stories (1918), 150.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arm (81)  |  Author (167)  |  Both (493)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Ear (68)  |  Earth (996)  |  Far (154)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Listen (73)  |  Nearest (4)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reader (40)  |  Stand (274)  |  Step (231)  |  Stride (15)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

A man ceases to be a beginner in any given science and becomes a master in that science when he has learned that ... he is going to be a beginner all his life.
The New Leviathan: or Man, Society, Civilization and Barbarism (1942, 1999) Pt. 1, Ch. 1, Aph. 46, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Beginner (11)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Science (3879)

According to their [Newton and his followers] doctrine, God Almighty wants to wind up his watch from time to time: otherwise it would cease to move. He had not, it seems, sufficient foresight to make it a perpetual motion. Nay, the machine of God's making, so imperfect, according to these gentlemen; that he is obliged to clean it now and then by an extraordinary concourse, and even to mend it, as clockmaker mends his work.
'Mr. Leibniz's First Paper' (1715). In H. G. Alexander (ed.), The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence (1956), 11-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Clean (50)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  God (757)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Machine (257)  |  Making (300)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Time (1877)  |  Want (497)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wind (128)  |  Work (1351)

And we daily in our experiments electrise bodies plus or minus, as we think proper. [These terms we may use till your Philosophers give us better.] To electrise plus or minus, no more needs to be known than this, that the parts of the Tube or Sphere, that are rubb’d, do, in the Instant of Friction, attract the Electrical Fire, and therefore take it from the Thin rubbing; the same parts immediately, as the Friction upon them ceases, are disposed to give the fire they have received, to any Body that has less.
Letter 25 May 1747. Quoted in I. Bernard Cohen, Franklin and Newton: An Enquiry into Speculative Newtonian Experimental Science and Franklin’s Work in Electricity as an Example Thereof (1956), 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Daily (87)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fire (189)  |  Friction (14)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Instant (45)  |  Known (454)  |  Minus (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plus (43)  |  Proper (144)  |  Spark (31)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Think (1086)  |  Use (766)

As knowledge advances, science ceases to scoff at religion; and religion ceases to frown on science. The hour of mockery by the one, and of reproof by the other, is passing away. Henceforth, they will dwell together in unity and goodwill. They will mutually illustrate the wisdom, power, and grace of God. Science will adorn and enrich religion; and religion will ennoble and sanctify science.
In Tryon Edwards, A Dictionary of Thoughts (1908), 505.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Ennoble (8)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Frown (5)  |  God (757)  |  Goodwill (6)  |  Grace (31)  |  Hour (186)  |  Illustrate (10)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mockery (2)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Mutually (7)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Power (746)  |  Religion (361)  |  Reproof (2)  |  Sanctify (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scoff (7)  |  Together (387)  |  Unity (78)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)

As the Director of the Theoretical Division of Los Alamos, I participated at the most senior level in the World War II Manhattan Project that produced the first atomic weapons.
Now, at age 88, I am one of the few remaining such senior persons alive. Looking back at the half century since that time, I feel the most intense relief that these weapons have not been used since World War II, mixed with the horror that tens of thousands of such weapons have been built since that time—one hundred times more than any of us at Los Alamos could ever have imagined.
Today we are rightly in an era of disarmament and dismantlement of nuclear weapons. But in some countries nuclear weapons development still continues. Whether and when the various Nations of the World can agree to stop this is uncertain. But individual scientists can still influence this process by withholding their skills.
Accordingly, I call on all scientists in all countries to cease and desist from work creating, developing, improving and manufacturing further nuclear weapons - and, for that matter, other weapons of potential mass destruction such as chemical and biological weapons.
[On the occasion of the 50th Anniversary of Hiroshima.]
Letter, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Nov 1995), 51:6, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Back (390)  |  Biological (137)  |  Call (769)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Continue (165)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Development (422)  |  Disarmament (6)  |  Division (65)  |  Era (51)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Hiroshima (18)  |  Horror (14)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Looking (189)  |  Los Alamos (5)  |  Manhattan Project (12)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Weapon (17)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Potential (69)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  Project (73)  |  Relief (30)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Senior (6)  |  Skill (109)  |  Still (613)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Various (200)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Astrophysicists have the formidable privilege of having the largest view of the Universe; particle detectors and large telescopes are today used to study distant stars, and throughout space and time, from the infinitely large to the infinitely small, the Universe never ceases to surprise us by revealing its structures little by little.
In Black Holes (1992), xv.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrophysicist (7)  |  Detector (4)  |  Distant (33)  |  Formidable (7)  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Large (394)  |  Largest (39)  |  Little (707)  |  Never (1087)  |  Particle (194)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Revealing (4)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)

At first it seems obvious, but the more you think about it the stranger the deductions from this axiom seem to become; in the end you cease to understand what is meant by it.
As quoted, without citation, in Stories about Sets (1968), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (63)  |  Become (815)  |  Deduction (82)  |  End (590)  |  First (1283)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Seem (145)  |  Strange (157)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)

Before a complex of sensations becomes a recollection placeable in time, it has ceased to be actual. We must lose our awareness of its infinite complexity, or it is still actual ... It is only after a memory has lost all life that it can be classed in time, just as only dissected flowers find their way into the herbarium of a botanist.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Class (164)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Find (998)  |  Flower (106)  |  Herbarium (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lose (159)  |  Memory (134)  |  Must (1526)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

Believing, as I do, in the continuity of nature, I cannot stop abruptly where our microscopes cease to be of use. Here the vision of the mind authoritatively supplements the vision of the eye. By a necessity engendered and justified by science I cross the boundary of the experimental evidence, and discern in that Matter which we, in our ignorance of its latent powers, and notwithstanding our professed reverence for its Creator, have hitherto covered with opprobrium, the promise and potency of all terrestrial Life.
'Address Delivered Before The British Association Assembled at Belfast', (19 Aug 1874). Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 2, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Cover (37)  |  Creator (91)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Do (1908)  |  Engendering (3)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Eye (419)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Justification (48)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Notwithstanding (2)  |  Potency (10)  |  Power (746)  |  Profess (20)  |  Professing (2)  |  Promise (67)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stop (80)  |  Supplement (6)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Use (766)  |  Vision (123)

Bodies, projected in our air, suffer no resistance but from the air. Withdraw the air, as is done in Mr. Boyle's vacuum, and the resistance ceases. For in this void a bit of fine down and a piece of solid gold descend with equal velocity.
In 'General Scholium' from The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1729), Vol. 2, Book 3, 388.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Air Resistance (2)  |  Body (537)  |  Robert Boyle (27)  |  Descend (47)  |  Down (456)  |  Equal (83)  |  Feather (12)  |  Gold (97)  |  Project (73)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Solid (116)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Void (31)

But by far the greatest hindrance and aberration of the human understanding proceeds from the dullness, incompetency, and deceptions of the senses; in that things which strike the sense outweigh things which do not immediately strike it, though they be more important. Hence it is that speculation commonly ceases where sight ceases; insomuch that of things invisible there is little or no observation.
From Aphorism 50, Novum Organum, Book I (1620). Collected in James Spedding (ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1858), Vol. 4, 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Aberration (8)  |  Deception (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Human (1468)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Strike (68)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understanding (513)

By the nineteenth century … new circumstances called for new conformity enforcers… The government locked you in a house of penitence—a penitentiary—where your feelings of remorse would theoretically pummel you without cease.
In 'The Conformity Police', Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st Century (2000), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (33)  |  Call (769)  |  Century (310)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Conformity (14)  |  Enforce (11)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Government (110)  |  House (140)  |  Lock (13)  |  New (1216)  |  Remorse (9)  |  Theoretical (22)

During the long ages of class rule, which are just beginning to cease, only one form of sovereignty has been assigned to all men—that, namely, over all women. Upon these feeble and inferior companions all men were permitted to avenge the indignities they suffered from so many men to whom they were forced to submit.
In “Common Sense” Applied to Woman Suffrage (1894), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Avenge (2)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Class (164)  |  Companion (19)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Form (959)  |  Indignity (2)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Permit (58)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sovereignty (6)  |  Submit (18)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Woman (151)

Environmentally friendly cars will soon cease to be an option...they will become a necessity.
Fujio Cho
Speaking as the President of Toyota Motors, at the North American International Auto Show (2004).
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Car (71)  |  Environment (216)  |  Friendly (4)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Option (9)  |  Soon (186)  |  Will (2355)

Euclid alone has looked on Beauty bare.
Let all who prate of Beauty hold their peace,
And lay them prone upon the earth and cease
To ponder on themselves, the while they stare
At nothing, intricately drawn nowhere
In shapes of shifting lineage; let geese
Gabble and hiss, but heroes seek release
From dusty bondage into luminous air.
O blinding hour, O holy, terrible day,
When first the shaft into his vision shone
Of light anatomized! Euclid alone
Has looked on Beauty bare. Fortunate they
Who, though once only and then but far away,
Have heard her massive sandal set on stone.
Poem, 'Euclid Alone Has Looked on Beauty Bare", collected in Wallace Warner Douglas and Hallett Darius Smith (eds.), The Critical Reader: Poems, Stories, Essays (1949), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blind (95)  |  Bondage (5)  |  Draw (137)  |  Dusty (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Euclid (54)  |  First (1283)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Goose (12)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hero (42)  |  Hold (95)  |  Holy (34)  |  Hour (186)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (607)  |  Lineage (3)  |  Look (582)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Massive (9)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Peace (108)  |  Ponder (14)  |  Prone (7)  |  Release (27)  |  Sandal (3)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Shaft (5)  |  Shape (72)  |  Shift (44)  |  Shine (45)  |  Stare (9)  |  Stone (162)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Vision (123)

Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.
Proper Studies (1927, 1933), 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)

Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies because they become fashions.
From The Illustrated London News (19 Apr 1930). In 'Novels on the Great War', Collected Works (1991), Vol. 35, 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Fashion (30)

For my part, I must say that science to me generally ceases to be interesting as it becomes useful.
Address, in 'Report to the Chemical Society's Jubilee', Nature (26 Mar 1891), 43, 493.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Must (1526)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

For nothing is fixed, forever and forever and forever, it is not fixed; the earth is always shifting, the light is always changing, the sea does not cease to grind down rock. Generations do not cease to be born, and we are responsible to them because we are the only witnesses they have. The sea rises, the light fails, lovers cling to each other, and children cling to us. The moment we cease to hold each other, the sea engulfs us and the light goes out.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Change (593)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Cling (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fix (25)  |  Forever (103)  |  Generation (242)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Light (607)  |  Lover (11)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shift (44)  |  Witness (54)

For what is that which we call evil but the absence of good? In the bodies of animals, disease and wounds mean nothing but the absence of health; for when a cure is effected, that does not mean that the evils which were present—namely, the diseases and wounds—go away from the body and dwell elsewhere: they altogether cease to exist; for the wound or disease is not a substance, but a defect in the fleshly substance,—the flesh itself being a substance, and therefore something good, of which those evils—that is, privations of the good which we call health—are accidents. Just in the same way, what are called vices in the soul are nothing but privations of natural good. And when they are cured, they are not transferred elsewhere: when they cease to exist in the healthy soul, they cannot exist anywhere else.
In Marcus Dods (ed.), J.F. Shaw (trans.), The Enchiridion of Augustine, Chap. 9, collected in The Works of Aurelius Augustine, Bishop of Hippo: A new translation (1873), Vol. 9, 181-182.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Accident (88)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Cure (122)  |  Defect (31)  |  Disease (328)  |  Effect (393)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exist (443)  |  Good (889)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Mean (809)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Present (619)  |  Something (719)  |  Soul (226)  |  Substance (248)  |  Vice (40)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wound (26)

For, dear me, why abandon a belief
Merely because it ceases to be true.
Cling to it long enough, and not a doubt
It will turn true again, for so it goes.
Most of the change we think we see in life
Is due to truths being in and out of favour.
'The Black Cottage'. In Edward Connery Latham (ed.), The Poetry of Robert Frost (1971), 77.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Change (593)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Due (141)  |  Enough (340)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

For, every time a certain portion is destroyed, be it of the brain or of the spinal cord, a function is compelled to cease suddenly, and before the time known beforehand when it would stop naturally, it is certain that this function depends upon the area destroyed. It is in this way that I have recognized that the prime motive power of respiration has its seat in that part of the medulla oblongata that gives rise to the nerves of the eighth pair [vagi]; and it is by this method that up to a certain point it will be possible to discover the use of certain parts of the brain.
Expériences sur le Principe de la Vie, Notamment sur celui des Mouvements du Coeur, et sur le Siege de ce Principe (1812), 148-149. Translated in Edwin Clarke and L. S. Jacyna, Nineteenth Century Origins of Neuroscientific Concepts (1987), 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Certain (550)  |  Depend (228)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discover (553)  |  Function (228)  |  Known (454)  |  Medulla Oblongata (2)  |  Method (505)  |  Motive (59)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Point (580)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Respiration (13)  |  Rise (166)  |  Spinal Cord (5)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Gather, ye nations, gather!
From forge, and mine, and mill!
Come, Science and Invention;
Come, Industry and Skill!…

Gather, ye nations, gather!
Let ancient discord cease,
And Earth, with myriad voices,
Awake the song of Peace!
From poem, 'The Festival of Labour' (1851), collected in The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected Complete in One Volume (1876), 539. Written for the opening of the Great Exhibition.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Awake (19)  |  Discord (10)  |  Earth (996)  |  Festival (2)  |  Forge (9)  |  Gather (72)  |  Industry (137)  |  Invention (369)  |  Labor (107)  |  Mill (16)  |  Mine (76)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nation (193)  |  Peace (108)  |  Science (3879)  |  Skill (109)  |  Song (37)  |  Voice (52)

Gentlemen, everyone in this room knows the difference between a live horse and a dead horse. Pray, therefore, let us cease flogging the latter.
(in conversation)
Science quotes on:  |  Dead (59)  |  Difference (337)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Horse (74)  |  Know (1518)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Live (628)  |  Pray (16)  |  Room (40)

God does not die on the day when we cease to believe in a personal deity, but we die on the day when our lives cease to be illumined by the steady radiance, renewed daily, of a wonder, the source of which is beyond all reason.
Written in his spiritual diary, published posthumously, Markings (1963), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Daily (87)  |  Deity (22)  |  Die (86)  |  God (757)  |  Live (628)  |  Personal (67)  |  Radiance (7)  |  Reason (744)  |  Renew (19)  |  Source (93)  |  Steady (44)  |  Wonder (236)

I always rejoice to hear of your being still employed in experimental researches into nature, and of the success you meet with. The rapid progress true science now makes, occasions my regretting sometimes that I was born so soon: it is impossible to imagine the height to which may be carried, in a thousand years, the power of man over matter; we may perhaps learn to deprive large masses of their gravity, and give them absolute levity for the sake of easy transport. Agriculture may diminish its labour and double its produce; all diseases may by sure means be prevented or cured (not excepting even that of old age), and our lives lengthened at pleasure even beyond the antediluvian standard. Oh! that moral science were in as fair a way of improvement; that men would cease to be wolves to one another; and that human beings would at length learn what they now improperly call humanity!
Letter to Dr Priestley, 8 Feb 1780. In Memoirs of Benjamin Franklin (1845), Vol. 2, 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Age (499)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Antediluvian (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Call (769)  |  Disease (328)  |  Easy (204)  |  Employ (113)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Hear (139)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Labour (98)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Progress (465)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Transport (30)  |  True Science (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

I am sure that one secret of a successful teacher is that he has formulated quite clearly in his mind what the pupil has got to know in precise fashion. He will then cease from half-hearted attempts to worry his pupils with memorising a lot of irrelevant stuff of inferior importance.
In 'The Rhythmic Claims of Freedom and Discipline', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Education (378)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Heart (229)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lot (151)  |  Memorization (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Secret (194)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Will (2355)

I have satisfied myself that the [cosmic] rays are not generated by the formation of new matter in space, a process which would be like water running up a hill. Nor do they come to any appreciable amount from the stars. According to my investigations the sun emits a radiation of such penetrative power that it is virtually impossible to absorb it in lead or other substances. ... This ray, which I call the primary solar ray, gives rise to a secondary radiation by impact against the cosmic dust scattered through space. It is the secondary radiation which now is commonly called the cosmic ray, and comes, of course, equally from all directions in space. [The article continues: The phenomena of radioactivity are not the result of forces within the radioactive substances but are caused by this ray emitted by the sun. If radium could be screened effectively against this ray it would cease to be radioactive, he said.]
Quoted in 'Tesla, 75, Predicts New Power Source', New York Times (5 Jul 1931), Section 2, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  According (237)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Call (769)  |  Continue (165)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Cosmic Ray (7)  |  Course (409)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dust (64)  |  Emit (15)  |  Equally (130)  |  Force (487)  |  Formation (96)  |  Hill (20)  |  Impact (42)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lead (384)  |  Matter (798)  |  Myself (212)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Power (746)  |  Primary (80)  |  Process (423)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Radium (25)  |  Ray (114)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Running (61)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sun (385)  |  Through (849)  |  Water (481)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Food is necessary to…existence
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

I think I may fairly make two postulata. First, That food is necessary to the existence of man. Secondly, That the passion between the sexes is necessary and will remain nearly in its present state. These two laws ever since we have had any knowledge of mankind, appear to have been fixed laws of our nature; and, as we have not hitherto seen any alteration in them, we have no right to conclude that they will ever cease to be what they are now, without an immediate act of power in that Being who first arranged the system of the universe; and for the advantage of his creatures, still executes, according to fixed laws, all its various operations.
First 'Essay on the Principle of Population' (1798), reprinted in Parallel Chapters from the First and Second editions of An Essay on the Principle of Population (1895), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Act (272)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Arranged (4)  |  Being (1278)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Creator (91)  |  Creature (233)  |  Execute (7)  |  Existence (456)  |  First (1283)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Food (199)  |  God (757)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Passion (114)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Remain (349)  |  Right (452)  |  Sex (69)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  System (537)  |  Think (1086)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

If I were asked to name the most needed of all reforms in the spirit of education, I should say: “Cease conceiving of education as mere preparation for later life, and make it the full meaning of the present life.”
[This is widely seen quoted in a paraphrased form: Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.]
In essay, 'Self-Realization as the Moral Ideal', collected in John Dewey and Jo Ann Boydston (ed.), The Early Works, 1882-1898: Volume 4: 1893-1894: Early Essays and The Study of Ethics (1967, 2008), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Education (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Later (18)  |  Life (1795)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Present (619)  |  Reform (22)  |  Say (984)  |  Spirit (265)

If some race of quadrumanous animals, especially one of the most perfect of them, were to lose, by force of circumstances or some other cause, the habit of climbing trees and grasping the branches with its feet in the same way as with its hands, in order to hold on to them; and if the individuals of this race were forced for a series of generations to use their feet only for walking, and to give up using their hands like feet; there is no doubt, according to the observations detailed in the preceding chapter, that these quadrumanous animals would at length be transformed into bimanous, and that the thumbs on their feet would cease to be separated from the other digits, when they only used their feet for walking.
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 349, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (53)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Climb (35)  |  Detail (146)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Force (487)  |  Generation (242)  |  Habit (168)  |  Individual (404)  |  Lose (159)  |  Most (1731)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Race (268)  |  Series (149)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Transform (73)  |  Tree (246)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

In geometry, as in most sciences, it is very rare that an isolated proposition is of immediate utility. But the theories most powerful in practice are formed of propositions which curiosity alone brought to light, and which long remained useless without its being able to divine in what way they should one day cease to be so. In this sense it may be said, that in real science, no theory, no research, is in effect useless.
In 'Geometry', A Philosophical Dictionary, (1881), Vol. l, 374.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bring (90)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Divine (112)  |  Effect (393)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Practice (204)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Rare (89)  |  Real (149)  |  Remain (349)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Theory (970)  |  Useless (33)  |  Utility (49)  |  Way (1217)

In its most primitive form, life is, therefore, no longer bound to the cell, the cell which possesses structure and which can be compared to a complex wheel-work, such as a watch which ceases to exist if it is stamped down in a mortar. No, in its primitive form life is like fire, like a flame borne by the living substance;—like a flame which appears in endless diversity and yet has specificity within it;—which can adopt the form of the organic world, of the lank grass-leaf and of the stem of the tree.
Address given at the 1913 meeting of the Koninklijke Akademie van Wetenschappen in Amsterdam. Trans. in G. Van Iterson, Jr, L. E. Den Dooren De Jong and A. J. Kluyver, Martinus Willem Beilerinck: His Life and Work (1940), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  Bound (119)  |  Cell (138)  |  Complex (188)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Down (456)  |  Endless (56)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Form (959)  |  Grass (46)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organic (158)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Stem (31)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Tree (246)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

It is not within the power of the properly constructed human mind to he satisfied. Progress would cease if this were the case.
From Cameron Prize Lecture (1928), delivered before the University of Edinburgh. As quoted in J.B. Collip 'Frederick Grant Banting, Discoverer of Insulin', The Scientific Monthly (May 1941), 52, No. 5, 474.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (99)  |  Construct (124)  |  Constructed (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Power (746)  |  Progress (465)  |  Properly (20)  |  Satisfied (23)

It [science] must be amoral by its very nature: the minute it begins separating facts into the two categories of good ones and bad ones it ceases to be science and becomes a mere nuisance, like theology.
From American Mercury (Sep 1927). Collected in A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949, 1956), 331.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Category (18)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Good (889)  |  Mere (84)  |  Minute (125)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nuisance (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separate (143)  |  Theology (52)  |  Two (937)

Like so many aging college people, Pnin had long ceased to notice the existence of students on the campus.
In Pnin (1957), 53
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Aging (9)  |  Campus (3)  |  College (66)  |  Existence (456)  |  Long (790)  |  Notice (77)  |  People (1005)  |  Student (300)

Neither is there a smallest part of what is small, but there is always a smaller (for it is impossible that what is should cease to be). Likewise there is always something larger than what is large.
Simplicius, Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics, 164, 17-9. In G. S. Kirk, J. E. Raven and M. Schofield (eds.), The Presocratic Philosophers: A Critical History with a Selection of Texts (1983), p. 360.
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Atom (355)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Large (394)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)

Nor bring, to see me cease to live,
Some doctor full of phrase and fame,
To shake his sapient head, and give
The ill he cannot cure a name.
'A Wish' (1867). In Kenneth Allot (ed.), Matthew Arnold: A Selection (1954), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Cure (122)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Fame (50)  |  Live (628)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Name (333)  |  Phrase (61)  |  See (1081)  |  Shake (41)

Nothing in the entire universe ever perishes, believe me, but things vary, and adopt a new form. The phrase “being born” is used for beginning to be something different from what one was before, while “dying” means ceasing to be the same. Though this thing may pass into that, and that into this, yet the sums of things remains unchanged.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Bear (159)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Die (86)  |  Different (577)  |  Entire (47)  |  Form (959)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perish (50)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Remain (349)  |  Same (157)  |  Something (719)  |  Sum (102)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unchanged (3)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vary (27)

Once early in the morning, at two or three in the morning, when the master was asleep, the books in the library began to quarrel with each other as to which was the king of the library. The dictionary contended quite angrily that he was the master of the library because without words there would be no communication at all. The book of science argued stridently that he was the master of the library for without science there would have been no printing press or any of the other wonders of the world. The book of poetry claimed that he was the king, the master of the library, because he gave surcease and calm to his master when he was troubled. The books of philosophy, the economic books, all put in their claims, and the clamor was great and the noise at its height when a small low voice was heard from an old brown book lying in the center of the table and the voice said, “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.” And all of the noise and the clamor in the library ceased, and there was a hush in the library, for all of the books knew who the real master of the library was.
'Ministers of Justice', address delivered to the Eighty-Second Annual Convention of the Tennessee Bar Association at Gatlinburg (5 Jun 1963). In Tennessee Law Review (Fall 1963), 31, No. 1, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anger (20)  |  Bible (91)  |  Book (392)  |  Brown (23)  |  Calm (31)  |  Claim (146)  |  Clamor (7)  |  Communication (94)  |  Dictionary (15)  |  Early (185)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  King (35)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Library (48)  |  Lord (93)  |  Low (80)  |  Lying (55)  |  Master (178)  |  Morning (94)  |  Noise (37)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Printing (22)  |  Printing Press (3)  |  Quarrel (10)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shepherd (6)  |  Small (477)  |  Table (104)  |  Two (937)  |  Voice (52)  |  Want (497)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

One is constantly reminded of the infinite lavishness and fertility of Nature—inexhaustible abundance amid what seems enormous waste. And yet when we look into any of her operations that lie within reach of our minds, we learn that no particle of her material is wasted or worn out. It is eternally flowing from use to use, beauty to yet higher beauty; and we soon cease to lament waste and death, and rather rejoice and exult in the imperishable, unspendable wealth of the universe.
John Muir
In My First Summer in the Sierra (1911), 325. Based on Muir's original journals and sketches of his 1869 stay in the Sierra.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Carbon Cycle (5)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Death (388)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Flow (83)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Lament (11)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lie (364)  |  Look (582)  |  Material (353)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Particle (194)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Soon (186)  |  Universe (857)  |  Use (766)  |  Waste (101)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Worn (5)

Our confused wish finds expression in the confused question as to the nature of force and electricity. But the answer which we want is not really an answer to this question. It is not by finding out more and fresh relations and connections that it can be answered; but by removing the contradictions existing between those already known, and thus perhaps by reducing their number. When these painful contradictions are removed, the question as to the nature of force will not have been answered; but our minds, no longer vexed, will cease to ask illegitimate questions.
Principles of Mechanics (1899), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Expression (175)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Question (621)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Relation (157)  |  Removal (11)  |  Vex (9)  |  Vexation (2)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

Penetrating so many secrets, we cease to believe in the Unknowable. But there it sits, nevertheless, calmly licking its chops.
John Mitchinson and John Lloyd, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?: Smart Quotes for Dumb Times (2009), 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Chop (7)  |  Lick (4)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sit (48)  |  Unknowable (2)

People like you and I, though mortal of course like everyone else, do not grow old no matter how long we live...[We] never cease to stand like curious children before the great mystery into which we were born.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Course (409)  |  Curious (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Never (1087)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Old (481)  |  People (1005)  |  Stand (274)

Psychologists must cease to be content with the sterile and narrow conception of their science as the science of consciousness, and must boldly assert its claim to be the positive science of mind in all its aspects and modes of functining, or, as I would prefer to say, the positive science of conduct or behavior.
An Introduction to Social Psychology (1928), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Assert (66)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conception (154)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Positive (94)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sterile (21)

Recurrences of like cases in which A is always connected with B, that is, like results under like circumstances, that is again, the essence of the connection of cause and effect, exist but in the abstraction which we perform for the purpose of mentally reproducing the facts. Let a fact become familiar, and we no longer require this putting into relief of its connecting marks, our attention is no longer attracted to the new and surprising, and we cease to speak of cause and effect.
In The Science of Mechanics (1893), 483.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Attention (190)  |  Become (815)  |  Case (99)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Effect (393)  |  Essence (82)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Mental (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Perform (121)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recurrence (5)  |  Relief (30)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Speak (232)  |  Surprising (4)

Researchers, with science as their authority, will be able to cut [animals] up, alive, into small pieces, drop them from a great height to see if they are shattered by the fall, or deprive them of sleep for sixteen days and nights continuously for the purposes of an iniquitous monograph... Animal trust, undeserved faith, when at last will you turn away from us? Shall we never tire of deceiving, betraying, tormenting animals before they cease to trust us?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Animal (617)  |  Authority (95)  |  Betray (8)  |  Continuously (7)  |  Cut (114)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Deceiving (5)  |  Deprive (12)  |  Drop (76)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fall (230)  |  Great (1574)  |  Height (32)  |  Last (426)  |  Monograph (5)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Piece (38)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Shatter (8)  |  Shattered (8)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Small (477)  |  Tire (7)  |  Torment (18)  |  Trust (66)  |  Turn (447)  |  Undeserved (3)  |  Will (2355)

Science and knowledge are subject, in their extension and increase, to laws quite opposite to those which regulate the material world. Unlike the forces of molecular attraction, which cease at sensible distances; or that of gravity, which decreases rapidly with the increasing distance from the point of its origin; the farther we advance from the origin of our knowledge, the larger it becomes, and the greater power it bestows upon its cultivators, to add new fields to its dominions.
In 'Future Prospects', On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures (1st ed., 1832), chap. 32, 277-278.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Become (815)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Decrease (15)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dominion (11)  |  Extension (59)  |  Farther (51)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greater (288)  |  Increase (210)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Material (353)  |  Material World (8)  |  Molecular (7)  |  New (1216)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Origin (239)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of Origin (2)  |  Power (746)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Regulate (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)  |  Unlike (8)  |  World (1774)

Science has a simple faith, which transcends utility. Nearly all men of science, all men of learning for that matter, and men of simple ways too, have it in some form and in some degree. It is the faith that it is the privilege of man to learn to understand, and that this is his mission. If we abandon that mission under stress we shall abandon it forever, for stress will not cease. Knowledge for the sake of understanding, not merely to prevail, that is the essence of our being. None can define its limits, or set its ultimate boundaries.
Science is Not Enough (1967), 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Essence (82)  |  Faith (203)  |  Forever (103)  |  Form (959)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mission (21)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Stress (22)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Transcendence (2)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Utility (49)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

She [Nettie Stevens] was a trained expert in the modern sense—in the sense in which biology has ceased to be a playground for the amateur and a plaything for the mystic.
In obituary, 'The Scientific Work of Miss N.M. Steves', Science (11 Oct 1912), 36, No. 928, 470.
Science quotes on:  |  Amateur (19)  |  Biology (216)  |  Expert (65)  |  Modern (385)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Playground (6)  |  Plaything (3)  |  Sense (770)  |  Nettie Maria Stevens (4)  |  Train (114)  |  Trained (5)

Some months ago we discovered that certain light elements emit positrons under the action of alpha particles. Our latest experiments have shown a very striking fact: when an aluminium foil is irradiated on a polonium preparation [alpha ray emitter], the emission of positrons does not cease immediately when the active preparation is removed: the foil remains radioactive and the emission of radiation decays exponentially as for an ordinary radio-element. We observed the same phenomenon with boron and magnesium.
[Co-author with Irène Joliot-Curie. This one-page paper reported their discovery of artificial radioactivity for which they were awarded the 1935 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.]
Letter to the Editor, 'Artificial Production of a New Kind of Radio-Element'(10 Jan 1934) published in Nature (1934), 133, 201-2. Cited in Mauro Dardo, Nobel Laureates and Twentieth-Century Physics (2004), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Active (76)  |  Alpha Particle (5)  |  Alpha Ray (3)  |  Aluminium (3)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Author (167)  |  Award (13)  |  Boron (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Decay (53)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Element (310)  |  Emission (17)  |  Emit (15)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exponential (3)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Foil (3)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Light (607)  |  Magnesium (4)  |  Month (88)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Paper (182)  |  Particle (194)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Polonium (5)  |  Positron (4)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Radio (50)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Ray (114)  |  Remain (349)  |  Striking (48)

The artist and the scientist—and the physician, in a sense, is both—is a man who is presumed to be interested primarily in his work, not in its emoluments. He can do genuinely good work, indeed, only to the extent that he is so interested. The moment he begins habitually to engage in enterprises that offer him only profit he ceases to be either an artist or a scientist, and becomes a mere journeyman artisan.
From Baltimore Evening Sun (12 May 1924). Collected in A Mencken Chrestomathy (1949, 1956), 297.
Science quotes on:  |  Artisan (9)  |  Artist (90)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Both (493)  |  Do (1908)  |  Emolument (2)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Extent (139)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Good (889)  |  Habitual (3)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Interest (386)  |  Journeyman (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mere (84)  |  Moment (253)  |  Offer (141)  |  Physician (273)  |  Profit (52)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Work (1351)

The belief that mathematics, because it is abstract, because it is static and cold and gray, is detached from life, is a mistaken belief. Mathematics, even in its purest and most abstract estate, is not detached from life. It is just the ideal handling of the problems of life, as sculpture may idealize a human figure or as poetry or painting may idealize a figure or a scene. Mathematics is precisely the ideal handling of the problems of life, and the central ideas of the science, the great concepts about which its stately doctrines have been built up, are precisely the chief ideas with which life must always deal and which, as it tumbles and rolls about them through time and space, give it its interests and problems, and its order and rationality. That such is the case a few indications will suffice to show. The mathematical concepts of constant and variable are represented familiarly in life by the notions of fixedness and change. The concept of equation or that of an equational system, imposing restriction upon variability, is matched in life by the concept of natural and spiritual law, giving order to what were else chaotic change and providing partial freedom in lieu of none at all. What is known in mathematics under the name of limit is everywhere present in life in the guise of some ideal, some excellence high-dwelling among the rocks, an “ever flying perfect” as Emerson calls it, unto which we may approximate nearer and nearer, but which we can never quite attain, save in aspiration. The supreme concept of functionality finds its correlate in life in the all-pervasive sense of interdependence and mutual determination among the elements of the world. What is known in mathematics as transformation—that is, lawful transfer of attention, serving to match in orderly fashion the things of one system with those of another—is conceived in life as a process of transmutation by which, in the flux of the world, the content of the present has come out of the past and in its turn, in ceasing to be, gives birth to its successor, as the boy is father to the man and as things, in general, become what they are not. The mathematical concept of invariance and that of infinitude, especially the imposing doctrines that explain their meanings and bear their names—What are they but mathematicizations of that which has ever been the chief of life’s hopes and dreams, of that which has ever been the object of its deepest passion and of its dominant enterprise, I mean the finding of the worth that abides, the finding of permanence in the midst of change, and the discovery of a presence, in what has seemed to be a finite world, of being that is infinite? It is needless further to multiply examples of a correlation that is so abounding and complete as indeed to suggest a doubt whether it be juster to view mathematics as the abstract idealization of life than to regard life as the concrete realization of mathematics.
In 'The Humanization of Teaching of Mathematics', Science, New Series, 35, 645-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abide (12)  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Constant (144)  |  Content (69)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detach (5)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dream (208)  |  Element (310)  |  Ralph Waldo Emerson (150)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equation (132)  |  Especially (31)  |  Estate (5)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Flux (21)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Functionality (2)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guise (5)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Impose (22)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indication (33)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invariance (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Needless (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Painting (44)  |  Partial (10)  |  Passion (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Pervasive (5)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Realization (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Rock (161)  |  Roll (40)  |  Save (118)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stately (12)  |  Static (8)  |  Successor (14)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tumble (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unto (8)  |  Variability (5)  |  Variable (34)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

The empirical basis of objective science has nothing “absolute” about it. Science does not rest upon solid bedrock. The bold structure of its theories rises, as it were, above a swamp. It is like a building erected on piles. The piles are driven down from above into the swamp, but not down to any natural or “given” base; and when we cease our attempts to drive our piles into a deeper layer, it is not because we have reached firm ground. We simply stop when we are satisfied that they are firm enough to carry the structure, at least for the time being.
The Logic of Scientific Discovery: Logik Der Forschung (1959, 2002), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bold (22)  |  Building (156)  |  Carry (127)  |  Down (456)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Enough (340)  |  Firm (47)  |  Ground (217)  |  Layer (40)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Objective (91)  |  Piles (7)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solid (116)  |  Structure (344)  |  Swamp (7)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)

The evidence from both approaches, statistical and experimental, does not appear sufficiently significant to me to warrant forsaking the pleasure of smoking. As a matter of fact, if the investigations had been pointed toward some material that I thoroughly dislike, such as parsnips, I still would not feel that evidence of the type presented constituted a reasonable excuse for eliminating the things from my diet. I will still continue to smoke, and if the tobacco companies cease manufacturing their product, I will revert to sweet fern and grape leaves.
Introduction in Eric Northrup, Science Looks at Smoking (1957), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Both (493)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Continue (165)  |  Diet (54)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fern (9)  |  Grape (4)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Manufacturer (10)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Product (160)  |  Revert (4)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Still (613)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  Type (167)  |  Warrant (8)  |  Will (2355)

The invention of what we may call primary or fundamental notation has been but little indebted to analogy, evidently owing to the small extent of ideas in which comparison can be made useful. But at the same time analogy should be attended to, even if for no other reason than that, by making the invention of notation an art, the exertion of individual caprice ceases to be allowable. Nothing is more easy than the invention of notation, and nothing of worse example and consequence than the confusion of mathematical expressions by unknown symbols. If new notation be advisable, permanently or temporarily, it should carry with it some mark of distinction from that which is already in use, unless it be a demonstrable extension of the latter.
In 'Calculus of Functions', Encyclopaedia of Pure Mathematics (1847), Addition to Article 26, 388.
Science quotes on:  |  Allowable (2)  |  Already (222)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Art (657)  |  Attend (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Carry (127)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Easy (204)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Example (94)  |  Exertion (15)  |  Expression (175)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Invention (369)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Notation (27)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owing (39)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Primary (80)  |  Reason (744)  |  Same (157)  |  Small (477)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Worse (24)

The moment philosophy supposes it can find a final and comprehensive solution, it ceases to be inquiry and becomes either apologetics or propaganda.
Logic (1938), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Moment (253)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Propaganda (13)  |  Solution (267)  |  Suppose (156)

The universe flows, carrying with it milky ways and worlds, Gondwanas and Eurasias, inconsistent visions and clumsy systems. But the good conceptual models, these serena templa of intelligence on which several masters have worked, never disappear entirely. They are the great legacy of the past. They linger under more and more harmonious forms and actually never cease to grow. They bring solace by the great art that is inseparable from them. Their permanence relies on the immortal poetry of truth, of the truth that is given to us in minute amounts, foretelling an order whose majesty dominates time.
Tectonics of Asia (1924),164, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Art (657)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flow (83)  |  Form (959)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Harmonious (18)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Inseparable (16)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Linger (14)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Master (178)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Minute (125)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Past (337)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  Poetry (143)  |  System (537)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The “big bang” … set matter whirling in a maelstrom of activity that would never cease. The forces of order sought to bring this process under control, to tame chance. The result was not the rigid order of a crystal but the order of life. From the outset, chance has been the essential counterpart of the ordering forces.
As co-author with Ruthild Winkler, trans by Robert and Rita Kimber, in The Laws of the Game: How the Principles of Nature Govern Chance (1981, 1993), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Chance (239)  |  Control (167)  |  Counterpart (9)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Essential (199)  |  Force (487)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Process (423)  |  Result (677)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Set (394)

There was yet another disadvantage attaching to the whole of Newton’s physical inquiries, ... the want of an appropriate notation for expressing the conditions of a dynamical problem, and the general principles by which its solution must be obtained. By the labours of LaGrange, the motions of a disturbed planet are reduced with all their complication and variety to a purely mathematical question. It then ceases to be a physical problem; the disturbed and disturbing planet are alike vanished: the ideas of time and force are at an end; the very elements of the orbit have disappeared, or only exist as arbitrary characters in a mathematical formula
Address to the Mechanics Institute, 'An Address on the Genius and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton' (1835), excerpted in paper by Luis M. Laita, Luis de Ledesma, Eugenio Roanes-Lozano and Alberto Brunori, 'George Boole, a Forerunner of Symbolic Computation', collected in John A. Campbell and Eugenio Roanes-Lozano (eds.), Artificial Intelligence and Symbolic Computation: International Conference AISC 2000 (2001), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Character (243)  |  Complication (29)  |  Condition (356)  |  Disadvantage (10)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Element (310)  |  End (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expression (175)  |  Force (487)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Labour (98)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (26)  |  Motion (310)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Notation (27)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Physical (508)  |  Planet (356)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Purely (109)  |  Question (621)  |  Solution (267)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vanishing (11)  |  Variety (132)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)

Thinking must never submit itself, neither to a dogma, nor to a party, nor to a passion, nor to an interest, nor to a preconceived idea, nor to whatever it may be, if not to facts themselves, because, for it, to submit would be to cease to be.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dogma (48)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interest (386)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Party (18)  |  Passion (114)  |  Preconceived (3)  |  Submit (18)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Whatever (234)

Touch is the most fundamental sense. A baby experiences it, all over, before he is born and long before he learns to use sight, hearing, or taste, and no human ever ceases to need it.
In Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 366.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Baby (28)  |  Birth (147)  |  Ceasing (2)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Human (1468)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Need (290)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Taste (90)  |  Touch (141)  |  Use (766)

Twin sister of natural and revealed religion, and of heavenly birth, science will never belie her celestial origin, nor cease to sympathize with all that emanates from the same pure home. Human ignorance and prejudice may for a time seem to have divorced what God has joined together; but human ignorance and prejudice shall at length pass away, and then science and religion shall be seen blending their particolored rays into one beautiful bow of light, linking heaven to earth and earth to heaven.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Belie (3)  |  Birth (147)  |  Blend (9)  |  Bow (14)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Divorce (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emanate (2)  |  God (757)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavenly (8)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Join (26)  |  Length (23)  |  Light (607)  |  Link (43)  |  Linking (8)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pass (238)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Pure (291)  |  Ray (114)  |  Religion (361)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sister (8)  |  Sympathize (2)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Twin (15)  |  Will (2355)

Two extreme views have always been held as to the use of mathematics. To some, mathematics is only measuring and calculating instruments, and their interest ceases as soon as discussions arise which cannot benefit those who use the instruments for the purposes of application in mechanics, astronomy, physics, statistics, and other sciences. At the other extreme we have those who are animated exclusively by the love of pure science. To them pure mathematics, with the theory of numbers at the head, is the only real and genuine science, and the applications have only an interest in so far as they contain or suggest problems in pure mathematics.
Of the two greatest mathematicians of modern tunes, Newton and Gauss, the former can be considered as a representative of the first, the latter of the second class; neither of them was exclusively so, and Newton’s inventions in the science of pure mathematics were probably equal to Gauss’s work in applied mathematics. Newton’s reluctance to publish the method of fluxions invented and used by him may perhaps be attributed to the fact that he was not satisfied with the logical foundations of the Calculus; and Gauss is known to have abandoned his electro-dynamic speculations, as he could not find a satisfying physical basis. …
Newton’s greatest work, the Principia, laid the foundation of mathematical physics; Gauss’s greatest work, the Disquisitiones Arithmeticae, that of higher arithmetic as distinguished from algebra. Both works, written in the synthetic style of the ancients, are difficult, if not deterrent, in their form, neither of them leading the reader by easy steps to the results. It took twenty or more years before either of these works received due recognition; neither found favour at once before that great tribunal of mathematical thought, the Paris Academy of Sciences. …
The country of Newton is still pre-eminent for its culture of mathematical physics, that of Gauss for the most abstract work in mathematics.
In History of European Thought in the Nineteenth Century (1903), 630.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Academy (35)  |  Academy Of Sciences (4)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Animated (5)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Basis (173)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Class (164)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contain (68)  |  Country (251)  |  Culture (143)  |  Deterrent (2)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Due (141)  |  Easy (204)  |  Equal (83)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Favor (63)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Fluxion (7)  |  Fluxions (2)  |  Form (959)  |  Former (137)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Head (81)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invent (51)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Laid (7)  |  Latter (21)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematical Physics (11)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paris (11)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Preeminent (5)  |  Principia (13)  |  Probably (49)  |  Problem (676)  |  Publish (36)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reader (40)  |  Real (149)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Reluctance (5)  |  Representative (14)  |  Result (677)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Satisfy (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Snake (26)  |  Soon (186)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Step (231)  |  Still (613)  |  Style (23)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tribunal (2)  |  Tune (19)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

We all know, from what we experience with and within ourselves, that our conscious acts spring from our desires and our fears. Intuition tells us that that is true also of our fellows and of the higher animals. We all try to escape pain and death, while we seek what is pleasant. We are all ruled in what we do by impulses; and these impulses are so organized that our actions in general serve for our self preservation and that of the race. Hunger, love, pain, fear are some of those inner forces which rule the individual’s instinct for self preservation. At the same time, as social beings, we are moved in the relations with our fellow beings by such feelings as sympathy, pride, hate, need for power, pity, and so on. All these primary impulses, not easily described in words, are the springs of man’s actions. All such action would cease if those powerful elemental forces were to cease stirring within us. Though our conduct seems so very different from that of the higher animals, the primary instincts are much alike in them and in us. The most evident difference springs from the important part which is played in man by a relatively strong power of imagination and by the capacity to think, aided as it is by language and other symbolical devices. Thought is the organizing factor in man, intersected between the causal primary instincts and the resulting actions. In that way imagination and intelligence enter into our existence in the part of servants of the primary instincts. But their intervention makes our acts to serve ever less merely the immediate claims of our instincts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Causal (7)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Death (388)  |  Describe (128)  |  Desire (204)  |  Device (70)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Escape (80)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hate (64)  |  High (362)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Important (209)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inner (71)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Less (103)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Need (290)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pain (136)  |  Part (222)  |  Pity (14)  |  Play (112)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Pride (78)  |  Primary (80)  |  Race (268)  |  Relation (157)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Same (157)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seem (145)  |  Self (267)  |  Servant (39)  |  Serve (59)  |  Social (252)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stir (21)  |  Strong (174)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  True (212)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

We do not cease to play because we grow old.
We grow old because we cease to play.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Grow (238)  |  Old (481)  |  Play (112)

We may, I think, draw a yet higher and deeper teaching from the phenomena of degeneration. We seem to learn from it the absolute necessity of labour and effort, of struggle and difficulty, of discomfort and pain, as the condition of all progress, whether physical or mental, and that the lower the organism the more need there is of these ever-present stimuli, not only to effect progress, but to avoid retrogression. And if so, does not this afford us the nearest attainable solution of the great problem of the origin of evil? What we call evil is the essential condition of progress in the lower stages of the development of conscious organisms, and will only cease when the mind has become so thoroughly healthy, so well balanced, and so highly organised, that the happiness derived from mental activity, moral harmony, and the social affections, will itself be a sufficient stimulus to higher progress and to the attainment of a more perfect life.
In 'Two Darwinian Essays', Nature (1880), 22, 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Activity (210)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Condition (356)  |  Degeneration (10)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Draw (137)  |  Effect (393)  |  Effort (227)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evil (116)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pain (136)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Retrogression (6)  |  Social (252)  |  Solution (267)  |  Stage (143)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Will (2355)

We see, then, that the disappearance of the conscious personality, the predominance of the unconscious personality, the turning by means of suggestion and contagion of feelings and ideas in an identical direction, the tendency to immediately transform the suggested ideas into acts; these, we see, are the principal characteristics of the individual forming part of a crowd. He is no longer himself, but has become an automaton who has ceased to be guided by his will.
From Psychologie des Foules (1895), 20. English text in The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind (1897), Book 1, Chap. 1, 12. Original French text: “Donc, évanouissement de la personnalité consciente, prédominance de la personnalité inconsciente, orientation par voie de suggestion et de contagion des sentiments et des idées dans un même sens, tendance a transformer immédiatement en actes les idée suggérées, tels sont les principaux caractères de l’individu en foule. II n’est plus lui-même, il est devenu un automate que sa volonté ne guide plus.”
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Become (815)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Contagion (9)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Direction (175)  |  Disappearance (28)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Forming (42)  |  Guided (3)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idea (843)  |  Identical (53)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Individual (404)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Part (222)  |  Personality (62)  |  Predominance (3)  |  Principal (63)  |  See (1081)  |  Suggested (2)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Transform (73)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Will (2355)

We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
This was a favorite quotation of John Bahcall, who used it in his presentation at the Neutrino 2000 conference.
Poem, 'Little Gidding,' (1942). Collected in Four Quartets (1943), Pt. 5, 39.
Science quotes on:  |  2000 (15)  |  All (4108)  |  Conference (17)  |  End (590)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Favorite (37)  |  First (1283)  |  Know (1518)  |  Neutrino (11)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Quotation (18)  |  Start (221)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

When every fact, every present or past phenomenon of that universe, every phase of present or past life therein, has been examined, classified, and co-ordinated with the rest, then the mission of science will be completed. What is this but saying that the task of science can never end till man ceases to be, till history is no longer made, and development itself ceases?
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Cessation (12)  |  Classification (97)  |  Completed (30)  |  Completion (22)  |  Coordination (9)  |  Development (422)  |  End (590)  |  Examination (98)  |  Fact (1210)  |  History (673)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mission (21)  |  Never (1087)  |  Past (337)  |  Phase (36)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Present (619)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Task (147)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

When rich men are thus brought to regard themselves as trustees, and poor men learn to be industrious, economical, temperate, self-denying, and diligent in the acquisition of knowledge, then the deplorable strife between capital and labor, tending to destroy their fundamental, necessary, and irrefragable harmony will cease, and the world will no longer be afflicted with such unnatural industrial conflicts as we have seen during the past century...
Address (31 May 1871) to the 12th annual commencement at the Cooper Union, honoring his 80th birthday, in New York City Mission and Tract Society, Annual report of the New York City Mission and Tract Society (1872), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Affliction (6)  |  Capital (15)  |  Century (310)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Deplorable (4)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Economy (55)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Industrious (12)  |  Industry (137)  |  Irrefragable (2)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Learn (629)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Past (337)  |  Poor (136)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rich (62)  |  Self (267)  |  Strife (9)  |  Temperance (2)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Trustee (2)  |  Unnatural (15)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

When the solution is simple, God is answering. Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Answer (366)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Being (1278)  |  Enter (141)  |  Face (212)  |  Free (232)  |  God (757)  |  Hope (299)  |  Observe (168)  |  Personal (67)  |  Realm (85)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

Where speculation ends—in real life—there real, positive science begins: the representation of the practical activity, of the practical process of development of men. Empty talk about consciousness ceases, and real knowledge has to take its place.
Karl Marx
In David McLellan (ed.), 'The Premisses of the Material Method', Karl Marx: Selected Writings (2000), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Begin (260)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Development (422)  |  Empty (80)  |  End (590)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Positive (94)  |  Practical (200)  |  Process (423)  |  Representation (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Talk (100)

Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science. If what is seen is seen and experienced is portrayed in the language of logic, we are engaged in science. If it is communicated through forms whose connections are not accessible to the conscious mind but are recognized intuitively as meaningful, then we are engaged in art.
'What Artistic and Scientific Experience Have in Common', Menschen (27 Jan 1921). In Albert Einstein, Helen Dukas, Banesh Hoffmann, Albert Einstein, The Human Side (1981), 37-38. The article was published in a German magazine on modern art, upon a request from the editor, Walter Hasenclever, for a few paragraphs on the idea that there was a close connection between the artistic developments and the scientific results belonging to a given epoch. (The magazine name, and editor's name are given by Ze'ev Rosenkranz, The Einstein Scrapbook (2002), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  Admire (18)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Being (1278)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Connection (162)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experience (467)  |  Face (212)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Hope (299)  |  Language (293)  |  Logic (287)  |  Meaningful (17)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observe (168)  |  Personal (67)  |  Portray (4)  |  Realm (85)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Through (849)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

Who does not know Maxwell’s dynamic theory of gases? At first there is the majestic development of the variations of velocities, then enter from one side the equations of condition and from the other the equations of central motions, higher and higher surges the chaos of formulas, suddenly four words burst forth: “Put n = 5.” The evil demon V disappears like the sudden ceasing of the basso parts in music, which hitherto wildly permeated the piece; what before seemed beyond control is now ordered as by magic. There is no time to state why this or that substitution was made, he who cannot feel the reason may as well lay the book aside; Maxwell is no program-musician who explains the notes of his composition. Forthwith the formulas yield obediently result after result, until the temperature-equilibrium of a heavy gas is reached as a surprising final climax and the curtain drops.
In Ceremonial Speech (15 Nov 1887) celebrating the 301st anniversary of the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. Published as Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Festrede zur Feier des 301. Gründungstages der Karl-Franzens-Universität zu Graz (1888), 29-30, as translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 187. From the original German, “Wer kennt nicht seine dynamische Gastheorie? – Zuerst entwickeln sich majestätisch die Variationen der Geschwindigkeiten, dann setzen von der einen Seite die Zustands-Gleichungen, von der anderen die Gleichungen der Centralbewegung ein, immer höher wogt das Chaos der Formeln; plötzlich ertönen die vier Worte: „Put n=5.“Der böse Dämon V verschwindet, wie in der Musik eine wilde, bisher alles unterwühlende Figur der Bässe plötzlich verstummt; wie mit einem Zauberschlage ordnet sich, was früher unbezwingbar schien. Da ist keine Zeit zu sagen, warum diese oder jene Substitution gemacht wird; wer das nicht fühlt, lege das Buch weg; Maxwell ist kein Programmmusiker, der über die Noten deren Erklärung setzen muss. Gefügig speien nun die Formeln Resultat auf Resultat aus, bis überraschend als Schlusseffect noch das Wärme-Gleichgewicht eines schweren Gases gewonnen wird und der Vorhang sinkt.” A condensed alternate translation also appears on the Ludwig Boltzmann Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bass (2)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Book (392)  |  Burst (39)  |  Central (80)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Composition (84)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Curtain (2)  |  Demon (8)  |  Development (422)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Enter (141)  |  Equation (132)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Evil (116)  |  Explain (322)  |  Feel (367)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  Formula (98)  |  Gas (83)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Higher (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Magic (86)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Motion (310)  |  Music (129)  |  Musician (21)  |  Note (34)  |  Obedient (9)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permeate (2)  |  Program (52)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Side (233)  |  State (491)  |  Substitution (13)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Surge (2)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (87)  |  Word (619)  |  Yield (81)

Whoever ceases to be a student has never been a student.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-Book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Never (1087)  |  Student (300)  |  Whoever (42)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.