Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I was going to record talking... the foil was put on; I then shouted 'Mary had a little lamb',... and the machine reproduced it perfectly.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Active

Active Quotes (17 quotes)

A man’s indebtedness … is not virtue; his repayment is. Virtue begins when he dedicates himself actively to the job of gratitude.
In The Chrysanthemum and the Sword (1946, 2006), 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (52)  |  Dedicate (9)  |  Gratitude (10)  |  Indebtedness (3)  |  Job (33)  |  Virtue (55)

Active conservation [of gorillas] involves simply going out into the forest, on foot, day after day after day, attempting to capture poachers, killing—regretfully—poacher dogs, which spread rabies within the park, and cutting down traps.
Interview at her camp in Rwanda (May 1985). As quoted in article from Times Wire Services, 'Naturalist Dian Fossey Slain at Camp in Rwanda: American Was Expert on Mountain Gorillas; Assailants Hunted', Los Angeles Times (29 Dec 1985). The newspaper states the interview was one of the last she gave, and the report said using “continuous anti-poaching surveillance…only her patrols adequately protected the apes.”
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Capture (8)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Day (38)  |  Foot (39)  |  Forest (88)  |  Gorilla (16)  |  Trap (3)

I have long been active in and supportive of conservation and historical preservation causes.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Historical (10)  |  Long (95)  |  Preservation (28)

If I choose to impose individual blame for all past social ills, there will be no one left to like in some of the most fascinating periods of our history. For example ... if I place every Victorian anti-Semite beyond the pale of my attention, my compass of available music and literature will be pitifully small. Though I hold no shred of sympathy for active persecution, I cannot excoriate individuals who acquiesced passively in a standard societal judgment. Rail instead against the judgment, and try to understand what motivates men of decent will.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acquiesce (2)  |  Attention (76)  |  Available (18)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Blame (17)  |  Choose (35)  |  Compass (19)  |  Decent (4)  |  Example (57)  |  Fascinating (17)  |  History (302)  |  Hold (56)  |  Impose (17)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instead (12)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Leave (63)  |  Literature (64)  |  Motivate (4)  |  Music (66)  |  Pale (4)  |  Passively (3)  |  Past (109)  |  Period (49)  |  Persecution (9)  |  Place (111)  |  Rail (3)  |  Shred (6)  |  Small (97)  |  Social (93)  |  Standard (41)  |  Sympathy (15)  |  Try (103)  |  Understand (189)  |  Victorian (5)

If I dared to say just what I think, I should add that it is chiefly in the service where the medication is the most active and heroic that the mortality is the greatest. Gentlemen, medicine is charlatanism.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Chiefly (7)  |  Dare (22)  |  Gentleman (17)  |  Great (300)  |  Heroic (4)  |  Medication (6)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Mortality (13)  |  Say (126)  |  Service (54)  |  Think (205)

It is certain that as a nation we are all smoking a great deal too much ... Smoking among boys—to whom it cannot possibly do any kind of good, while it may do a vast amount of active harm—is becoming prevalent to a most pernicious extent. ... It would be an excellent thing for the morality of the people could the use of “intoxicants and tobacco” be forbidden to all persons under twenty years of age. (1878)
In London Daily Telegraph (22 Jan 1878). Reprinted in English Anti-Tobacco Society and Anti-Narcotic League, Monthly letters of the Committee of the English Anti-Tobacco Society and Anti-Narcotic League 1878, 1879, 1880, (1 Feb 1878), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Becoming (13)  |  Certain (84)  |  Deal (25)  |  Excellent (15)  |  Forbidden (8)  |  Good (228)  |  Great (300)  |  Harm (31)  |  Morality (33)  |  Nation (111)  |  People (269)  |  Pernicious (2)  |  Person (114)  |  Prevalent (3)  |  Smoking (22)  |  Tobacco (16)  |  Twenty (4)  |  Vast (56)  |  Year (214)

It is the patient workers, and the active, kindly sympathetic men and women who hold the balance of things secure.
Aphorism in The Philistine (Apr 1905), 20, No. 5, 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (43)  |  Kind (99)  |  Patient (116)  |  Secure (13)  |  Sympathetic (3)  |  Worker (23)

Men are noisy, narrow-band devices, but their nervous systems have very many parallel and simultaneously active channels. Relative to men, computing machines are very fast and very accurate, but they are constrained to perform only one or a few elementary operations at a time. Men are flexible, capable of “programming themselves contingently” on the basis of newly received information. Computing machines are single-minded, constrained by their “pre-programming.”
From article 'Man-Computer Symbiosis', in IRE Transactions on Human Factors in Electronics (Mar 1960), Vol. HFE-1, 4-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (21)  |  Capable (26)  |  Channel (17)  |  Computer (84)  |  Constrain (6)  |  Contingent (8)  |  Device (24)  |  Elementary (30)  |  Fast (24)  |  Flexible (3)  |  Information (102)  |  Man (345)  |  Nervous System (11)  |  Noise (24)  |  Operation (96)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Perform (27)  |  Program (32)  |  Relative (24)  |  Simultaneous (12)

Natural powers, principally those of steam and falling water, are subsidized and taken into human employment Spinning-machines, power-looms, and all the mechanical devices, acting, among other operatives, in the factories and work-shops, are but so many laborers. They are usually denominated labor-saving machines, but it would be more just to call them labor-doing machines. They are made to be active agents; to have motion, and to produce effect; and though without intelligence, they are guided by laws of science, which are exact and perfect, and they produce results, therefore, in general, more accurate than the human hand is capable of producing.
Speech in Senate (12 Mar 1838). In The Writings and Speeches of Daniel Webster (1903), Vol. 8, 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Agent (27)  |  Capability (35)  |  Device (24)  |  Effect (133)  |  Employment (22)  |  Exact (38)  |  Factory (13)  |  Falling (6)  |  Hand (103)  |  Human (445)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Labor-Saving (2)  |  Laborer (6)  |  Law (418)  |  Machine (133)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Motion (127)  |  Natural (128)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Power (273)  |  Power Loom (2)  |  Principal (15)  |  Production (105)  |  Result (250)  |  Science (1699)  |  Spinning Machine (2)  |  Steam (24)  |  Water (244)  |  Workshop (7)

Nothing is less predictable than the development of an active scientific field.
From interview with Henry Spall, as in an abridged version of Earthquake Information Bulletin (Jan-Feb 1980), 12, No. 1, that is on the USGS website.
Science quotes on:  |  Development (228)  |  Field (119)  |  Less (54)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Predictable (9)  |  Scientific (169)

Scientific principles and laws do not lie on the surface of nature. They are hidden, and must be wrested from nature by an active and elaborate technique of inquiry.
Reconstruction in Philosophy, 1920
Science quotes on:  |  Elaborate (13)  |  Hide (36)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Law (418)  |  Lie (80)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Principle (228)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Surface (74)  |  Technique (41)  |  Wrest (3)

The development of civilization and industry in general has always shown itself so active in the destruction of forests that everything that has been done for their conservation and production is completely insignificant in comparison.
Karl Marx
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (155)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Completely (19)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Development (228)  |  Everything (120)  |  Forest (88)  |  General (92)  |  Industry (91)  |  Insignificant (11)  |  Production (105)  |  Show (55)

The scientist, if he is to be more than a plodding gatherer of bits of information, needs to exercise an active imagination. The scientists of the past whom we now recognize as great are those who were gifted with transcendental imaginative powers, and the part played by the imaginative faculty of his daily life is as least as important for the scientist as it is for the worker in any other field—much more important than for most. A good scientist thinks logically and accurately when conditions call for logical and accurate thinking—but so does any other good worker when he has a sufficient number of well-founded facts to serve as the basis for the accurate, logical induction of generalizations and the subsequent deduction of consequences.
‘Imagination in Science’, Tomorrow (Dec 1943), 38-9. Quoted In Barbara Marinacci (ed.), Linus Pauling In His Own Words: Selected Writings, Speeches, and Interviews (1995), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Basis (60)  |  Condition (119)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Daily (19)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Exercise (35)  |  Fact (609)  |  Faculty (36)  |  Field (119)  |  Gather (29)  |  Generalization (26)  |  Gift (47)  |  Greatness (34)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Importance (183)  |  Induction (45)  |  Information (102)  |  Life (917)  |  Logic (187)  |  Past (109)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sufficiency (13)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Transcendental (3)  |  Worker (23)

The soul seems to be a very tenuous substance … [and] seems to be made of a most subtle texture, extremely mobile or active corpuscles, not unlike those of flame or heat; indeed, whether they are spherical, as the authors of atoms propound, or pyramidical as Plato thought, or some other form, they seem from their own motion and penetration through bodies to create the heat which is in the animal.
As quoted in Margaret J. Osler and Paul Lawrence Farber (eds.), Religion, Science, and Worldview: Essays in Honor of Richard S. Westfall (2002), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (59)  |  Animal (309)  |  Atom (251)  |  Author (39)  |  Body (193)  |  Corpuscle (8)  |  Create (98)  |  Flame (23)  |  Heat (90)  |  Motion (127)  |  Penetration (13)  |  Plato (47)  |  Pyramid (7)  |  Soul (139)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Substance (73)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Tenuous (2)  |  Texture (3)  |  Think (205)

The traveler was active; he went strenuously in search of people, of adventure, of experience. The tourist is passive; he expects interesting things to happen to him. He goes “sight-seeing.”
The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America (1961, 2012), 85. https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0307819167 Daniel J. Boorstin - 2012
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (36)  |  Expect (27)  |  Experience (268)  |  Happen (63)  |  Interesting (38)  |  Passive (5)  |  Search (85)  |  Sight-Seeing (2)  |  Strenuous (3)  |  Tourist (5)  |  Traveler (18)

Very few people, including authors willing to commit to paper, ever really read primary sources–certainly not in necessary depth and contemplation, and often not at all ... When writers close themselves off to the documents of scholarship, and then rely only on seeing or asking, they become conduits and sieves rather than thinkers. When, on the other hand, you study the great works of predecessors engaged in the same struggle, you enter a dialogue with human history and the rich variety of our own intellectual traditions. You insert yourself, and your own organizing powers, into this history–and you become an active agent, not merely a ‘reporter.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Ask (99)  |  Author (39)  |  Become (100)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Close (40)  |  Commit (17)  |  Conduit (2)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Depth (32)  |  Dialogue (7)  |  Document (5)  |  Engage (11)  |  Enter (20)  |  Great (300)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Include (27)  |  Insert (2)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Merely (35)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Often (69)  |  On The Other Hand (16)  |  Organize (14)  |  Paper (52)  |  People (269)  |  Power (273)  |  Predecessor (18)  |  Primary (29)  |  Read (83)  |  Really (50)  |  Rely (6)  |  Reporter (3)  |  Rich (48)  |  Same (92)  |  Scholarship (13)  |  See (197)  |  Sieve (3)  |  Source (71)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Study (331)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thinker (15)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Variety (53)  |  Work (457)  |  Writer (35)

When I worked on the polio vaccine, I had a theory. Experiments were done to determine what might or might not occur. I guided each one by imagining myself in the phenomenon in which I was interested. The intuitive realm is constantly active—the realm of imagination guides my thinking.
From interview with James Reston, Jr., in Pamela Weintraub (ed.), The Omni Interviews (1984), 98. Previously published in magazine, Omni (May 1982).
Science quotes on:  |  Constantly (19)  |  Determine (45)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Guide (46)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Interest (170)  |  Intuitive (7)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Myself (22)  |  Occur (26)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Polio (5)  |  Realm (40)  |  Research (517)  |  Theory (582)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Vaccine (8)  |  Work (457)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.