Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index N > Category: Numerous

Numerous Quotes (21 quotes)

Essentially only one thing in life interests us: our psychical constitution, the mechanism of which was and is wrapped in darkness. All human resources, art, religion, literature, philosophy and historical sciences, all of them join in bringing lights in this darkness. But man has still another powerful resource: natural science with its strictly objective methods. This science, as we all know, is making huge progress every day. The facts and considerations which I have placed before you at the end of my lecture are one out of numerous attempts to employ a consistent, purely scientific method of thinking in the study of the mechanism of the highest manifestations of life in the dog, the representative of the animal kingdom that is man's best friend.
'Physiology of Digestion', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1904). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 134
Science quotes on:  |  Animal Kingdom (9)  |  Art (205)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Constitution (26)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Dog (39)  |  Employment (22)  |  Essential (87)  |  Fact (609)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Interest (170)  |  Lecture (54)  |  Life (917)  |  Literature (64)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Method (154)  |  Objective (49)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Progress (317)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Religion (210)  |  Representative (9)  |  Resource (47)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Strictness (2)  |  Study (331)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Wrap (4)

Hypotheses are cradle-songs by which the teacher lulls his scholars to sleep. The thoughtful and honest observer is always learning more and more of his limitations; he sees that the further knowledge spreads, the more numerous are the problems that make their appearance.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (77)  |  Cradle (10)  |  Honest (26)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learn (160)  |  Limitation (20)  |  Observer (33)  |  Problem (362)  |  Scholar (31)  |  See (197)  |  Sleep (42)  |  Song (18)  |  Spread (19)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Thoughtful (10)

I view the major features of my own odyssey as a set of mostly fortunate contingencies. I was not destined by inherited mentality or family tradition to become a paleontologist. I can locate no tradition for scientific or intellectual careers anywhere on either side of my eastern European Jewish background ... I view my serious and lifelong commitment to baseball in entirely the same manner: purely as a contingent circumstance of numerous, albeit not entirely capricious, accidents.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Anywhere (11)  |  Background (24)  |  Baseball (3)  |  Become (100)  |  Capricious (3)  |  Career (54)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Commitment (11)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Contingent (8)  |  Destined (5)  |  Eastern (2)  |  Entirely (23)  |  European (5)  |  Family (37)  |  Feature (34)  |  Fortunate (4)  |  Inherit (13)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Jewish (8)  |  Lifelong (8)  |  Locate (4)  |  Major (24)  |  Manner (35)  |  Mentality (5)  |  Paleontologist (15)  |  Purely (15)  |  Same (92)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Serious (37)  |  Set (56)  |  Side (36)  |  Tradition (43)  |  View (115)

If all the parts of the universe are interchained in a certain measure, any one phenomenon will not be the effect of a single cause, but the resultant of causes infinitely numerous.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Certain (84)  |  Effect (133)  |  Infinitely (8)  |  Measure (70)  |  Part (146)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Single (72)  |  Universe (563)

If we take a survey of our own world … our portion in the immense system of creation, we find every part of it, the earth, the waters, and the air that surround it, filled, and as it were crouded with life, down from the largest animals that we know of to the smallest insects the naked eye can behold, and from thence to others still smaller, and totally invisible without the assistance of the microscope. Every tree, every plant, every leaf, serves not only as an habitation, but as a world to some numerous race, till animal existence becomes so exceedingly refined, that the effluvia of a blade of grass would be food for thousands.
In The Age of Reason: Being an Investigation of True and Fabulous Theology (27 Jan O.S. 1794), 60. The word “crouded” is as it appears in the original.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Animal (309)  |  Assistance (7)  |  Behold (12)  |  Blade (5)  |  Creation (211)  |  Earth (487)  |  Effluvium (2)  |  Exceedingly (3)  |  Existence (254)  |  Filled (3)  |  Find (248)  |  Food (139)  |  Grass (30)  |  Habitation (3)  |  Immense (28)  |  Insect (57)  |  Invisible (30)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Largest (7)  |  Leaf (43)  |  Life (917)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Naked Eye (7)  |  Part (146)  |  Plant (173)  |  Portion (14)  |  Race (76)  |  Refined (6)  |  Smaller (4)  |  Smallest (6)  |  Surround (17)  |  Survey (14)  |  System (141)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Totally (4)  |  Tree (143)  |  Water (244)  |  World (667)

Individual events. Events beyond law. Events so numerous and so uncoordinated that, flaunting their freedom from formula, they yet fabricate firm form.
'Frontiers of Time', cited in At Home in the Universe (1994), 283. Quoted in James Gleick, Genius: the Life and Science of Richard Feynman (1993), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Coordination (4)  |  Event (97)  |  Fabricate (3)  |  Firm (19)  |  Form (210)  |  Formula (51)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Individual (177)  |  Law (418)

It is for such inquiries the modern naturalist collects his materials; it is for this that he still wants to add to the apparently boundless treasures of our national museums, and will never rest satisfied as long as the native country, the geographical distribution, and the amount of variation of any living thing remains imperfectly known. He looks upon every species of animal and plant now living as the individual letters which go to make up one of the volumes of our earth’s history; and, as a few lost letters may make a sentence unintelligible, so the extinction of the numerous forms of life which the progress of cultivation invariably entails will necessarily render obscure this invaluable record of the past. It is, therefore, an important object, which governments and scientific institutions should immediately take steps to secure, that in all tropical countries colonised by Europeans the most perfect collections possible in every branch of natural history should be made and deposited in national museums, where they may be available for study and interpretation. If this is not done, future ages will certainly look back upon us as a people so immersed in the pursuit of wealth as to be blind to higher considerations. They will charge us with having culpably allowed the destruction of some of those records of Creation which we had it in our power to preserve; and while professing to regard every living thing as the direct handiwork and best evidence of a Creator, yet, with a strange inconsistency, seeing many of them perish irrecoverably from the face of the earth, uncared for and unknown.
In 'On the Physical Geography of the Malay Archipelago', Journal of the Royal Geographical Society (1863), 33, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Age (137)  |  Allowed (3)  |  Amount (20)  |  Animal (309)  |  Apparently (11)  |  Available (18)  |  Back (55)  |  Best (129)  |  Blind (35)  |  Boundless (11)  |  Branch (61)  |  Certainly (18)  |  Charge (29)  |  Collect (10)  |  Collection (38)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Country (121)  |  Creation (211)  |  Creator (40)  |  Cultivation (23)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Direct (44)  |  Distribution (21)  |  Earth (487)  |  Entail (4)  |  European (5)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Face (69)  |  Form (210)  |  Future (229)  |  Geographical (3)  |  Government (85)  |  Handiwork (5)  |  Higher (28)  |  History (302)  |  Immediately (9)  |  Important (124)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Individual (177)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Institution (32)  |  Interpretation (61)  |  Invaluable (4)  |  Invariably (8)  |  Known (15)  |  Letter (36)  |  Life (917)  |  Living (44)  |  Long (95)  |  Look (46)  |  Lost (28)  |  Made (14)  |  Material (124)  |  Modern (104)  |  Museum (22)  |  National (20)  |  Native (11)  |  Natural (128)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Necessarily (13)  |  Object (110)  |  Obscure (19)  |  Past (109)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Perish (23)  |  Person (114)  |  Plant (173)  |  Possible (100)  |  Power (273)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Professing (2)  |  Progress (317)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Record (56)  |  Regard (58)  |  Remain (77)  |  Render (17)  |  Rest (64)  |  Satisfied (14)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Secure (13)  |  Seeing (48)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Species (181)  |  Step (67)  |  Strange (61)  |  Study (331)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Tropical (4)  |  Unintelligible (7)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Variation (50)  |  Volume (13)  |  Want (120)  |  Wealth (50)

Now when naturalists observe a close agreement in numerous small details of habits, tastes, and dispositions between two or more domestic races, or between nearly-allied natural forms, they use this fact as an argument that they are descended from a common progenitor who was thus endowed; and consequently that all should be classed under the same species. The same argument may be applied with much force to the races of man.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (29)  |  Apply (38)  |  Argument (59)  |  Class (64)  |  Close (40)  |  Common (92)  |  Consequently (3)  |  Descend (8)  |  Detail (65)  |  Disposition (14)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Endow (9)  |  Fact (609)  |  Force (194)  |  Form (210)  |  Habit (78)  |  Natural (128)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Observe (48)  |  Progenitor (2)  |  Race (76)  |  Same (92)  |  Small (97)  |  Species (181)  |  Taste (35)

Of … habitable worlds, such as the Earth, all which we may suppose to be of a terrestrial or terraqueous nature, and filled with beings of the human species, subject to mortality, it may not be amiss in this place to compute how many may he conceived within our finite view every clear Star-light night. … In all together then we may safely reckon 170,000,000, and yet be much within compass, exclusive Of the Comets which I judge to be by far the most numerous part of the creation.
In The Universe and the Stars: Being an Original Theory on the Visible Creation, Founded on the Laws of Nature (1750, 1837), 131-132.
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (52)  |  Comet (43)  |  Compute (10)  |  Creation (211)  |  Earth (487)  |  Habitable (3)  |  Human (445)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Night (73)  |  Reckon (6)  |  Starlight (3)  |  Terrestrial (14)  |  View (115)  |  World (667)

Progress is achieved by exchanging our theories for new ones which go further than the old, until we find one based on a larger number of facts. … Theories are only hypotheses, verified by more or less numerous facts. Those verified by the most facts are the best, but even then they are never final, never to be absolutely believed.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Achievement (128)  |  Belief (400)  |  Best (129)  |  Fact (609)  |  Final (33)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Larger (8)  |  Less (54)  |  New (340)  |  Progress (317)  |  Theory (582)  |  Verification (20)

Progress is made by trial and failure; the failures are generally a hundred times more numerous than the successes; yet they are usually left unchronicled. The reason is that the investigator feels that even though he has failed in achieving an expected result, some other more fortunate experimenter may succeed, and it is unwise to discourage his attempts.
From 'Radium and its Products', Harper’s Magazine (Dec 1904), 110, No. 655, 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Achieving (3)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Discourage (3)  |  Expected (5)  |  Experimenter (18)  |  Failed (3)  |  Failure (118)  |  Feel (93)  |  Fortunate (4)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Progress (317)  |  Reason (330)  |  Result (250)  |  Succeed (11)  |  Success (202)  |  Trial (23)  |  Unwise (3)

So numerous are the objects which meet our view in the heavens, that we cannot imagine a point of space where some light would not strike the eye;—innumerable stars, thousands of double and multiple systems, clusters in one blaze with their tens of thousands of stars, and the nebulae amazing us by the strangeness of their forms and the incomprehensibility of their nature, till at last, from the limit of our senses, even these thin and airy phantoms vanish in the distance.
On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (1858), 420.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazement (9)  |  Blaze (9)  |  Cluster (10)  |  Distance (54)  |  Eye (159)  |  Form (210)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Incomprehensibility (2)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Light (246)  |  Limit (86)  |  Multiple (9)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nebula (15)  |  Object (110)  |  Phantom (5)  |  Point (72)  |  Sense (240)  |  Space (154)  |  Star (251)  |  Strangeness (10)  |  System (141)  |  Thin (7)  |  Vanish (10)  |  View (115)

The art of drawing conclusions from experiments and observations consists in evaluating probabilities and in estimating whether they are sufficiently great or numerous enough to constitute proofs. This kind of calculation is more complicated and more diff
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Consist (22)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Draw (25)  |  Estimate (19)  |  Evaluate (5)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Great (300)  |  Kind (99)  |  Observation (418)  |  Probability (83)  |  Proof (192)  |  Sufficiently (6)

The Earth obey’d and straight
Op’ning her fertile womb, teem’d at a birth Innumerous living creatures, perfect forms,
Limb’d and full grown.
From 'Paradise Lost', Book 7, collected in Edward Hawkins (ed.), The Poetical Works of John Milton (1824), Vol. 2, 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (81)  |  Creature (127)  |  Earth (487)  |  Fertile (10)  |  Form (210)  |  Full (38)  |  Grow (66)  |  Live (186)  |  Obey (13)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Womb (13)

The elements of the living body have the chemical peculiarity of forming with each other most numerous combinations and very large molecules, consisting of five, six or even seven different elements.
In discourse (10 Dec 1893) to General Meeting, Nassau Association for Natural Science, Wiesbaden, Germany. Printed in 'The Distribution of the Organic Elements', The Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science (1895), 71, No. 1832, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Biochemistry (46)  |  Body (193)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Combination (69)  |  Element (129)  |  Forming (6)  |  Large (82)  |  Life (917)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Organic Chemistry (33)  |  Peculiarity (15)

The nervous system is the most complex and delicate instrument on our planet, by means of which relations, connections are established between the numerous parts of the organism, as well as between the organism, as a highly complex system, and the innumerable, external influences. If the closing and opening of electric current is now regarded as an ordinary technical device, why should there be any objection to the idea that the same principle acts in this wonderful instrument? On this basis the constant connection between the external agent and the response of the organism, which it evokes, can be rightly called an unconditioned reflex, and the temporary connection—a conditioned reflex.
The Conditioned Reflex (1935), 249.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (27)  |  Called (7)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Conditioning (3)  |  Connection (86)  |  Constancy (4)  |  Current (43)  |  Delicacy (2)  |  Device (24)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Establishment (29)  |  External (45)  |  Idea (440)  |  Influence (110)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Objection (16)  |  Opening (15)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Organism (126)  |  Part (146)  |  Planet (199)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reflex (9)  |  Regard (58)  |  Relation (96)  |  Response (24)  |  Technology (199)  |  Temporary (13)  |  Wonder (134)

The number of humble-bees in any district depends in a great degree on the number of field-mice, which destroy their combs and nests; and Mr. H. Newman, who has long attended to the habits of humble-bees, ... says “Near villages and small towns I have found the nests of humble-bees more numerous than elsewhere, which I attribute to the number of cats that destroy the mice.” Hence it is quite credible that the presence of a feline animal in large numbers in a district might determine, through the intervention first of mice and then of bees, the frequency of certain flowers in that district!
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (22)  |  Bee (21)  |  Cat (31)  |  Certain (84)  |  Depend (56)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Determine (45)  |  District (7)  |  Elsewhere (7)  |  Flower (65)  |  Food Chain (6)  |  Found (11)  |  Frequency (13)  |  Habit (78)  |  Intervention (8)  |  Mouse (24)  |  Nest (11)  |  Town (18)  |  Village (6)

The theory here developed is that mega-evolution normally occurs among small populations that become preadaptive and evolve continuously (without saltation, but at exceptionally rapid rates) to radically different ecological positions. The typical pattern involved is probably this: A large population is fragmented into numerous small isolated lines of descent. Within these, inadaptive differentiation and random fixation of mutations occur. Among many such inadaptive lines one or a few are preadaptive, i.e., some of their characters tend to fit them for available ecological stations quite different from those occupied by their immediate ancestors. Such groups are subjected to strong selection pressure and evolve rapidly in the further direction of adaptation to the new status. The very few lines that successfully achieve this perfected adaptation then become abundant and expand widely, at the same time becoming differentiated and specialized on lower levels within the broad new ecological zone.
Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (15)  |  Achievement (128)  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Ancestor (35)  |  Character (82)  |  Descent (14)  |  Development (228)  |  Difference (208)  |  Direction (56)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Expansion (25)  |  Fragment (24)  |  Group (52)  |  Isolation (26)  |  Level (51)  |  Mutation (25)  |  Occupation (37)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Population (71)  |  Position (54)  |  Pressure (31)  |  Probability (83)  |  Radically (5)  |  Rapidity (14)  |  Selection (27)  |  Small (97)  |  Specialization (12)  |  Station (9)  |  Status (18)  |  Theory (582)  |  Typical (10)  |  Zone (4)

These duplicates in those parts of the body, without which a man might have very well subsisted, though not so well as with them, are a plain demonstration of an all-wise Contriver, as those more numerous copyings which are found among the vessels of the same body are evident demonstrations that they could not be the work of chance. This argument receives additional strength if we apply it to every animal and insect within our knowledge, as well as to those numberless living creatures that are objects too minute for a human eye: and if we consider how the several species in this whole world of life resemble one another in very many particulars, so far as is convenient for their respective states of existence, it is much more probable that a hundred millions of dice should be casually thrown a hundred millions of times in the same number than that the body of any single animal should be produced by the fortuitous concourse of matter.
In The Spectator (22 Nov 1712), No. 543, as collected in Vol. 4 (1721, 10th ed.), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Additional (4)  |  Animal (309)  |  Apply (38)  |  Argument (59)  |  Body (193)  |  Chance (122)  |  Concourse (5)  |  Consider (45)  |  Contriver (2)  |  Creature (127)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Dice (13)  |  Duplicate (4)  |  Evident (14)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Existence (254)  |  Fortuitous (7)  |  Human Eye (2)  |  Insect (57)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Matter (270)  |  Million (89)  |  Minute (25)  |  Object (110)  |  Particular (54)  |  Probability (83)  |  Probable (14)  |  Produce (63)  |  Receive (39)  |  Resemble (16)  |  Species (181)  |  Strength (63)  |  Subsist (3)  |  Throw (31)  |  Vessel (21)  |  Wisdom (151)

Why the dinosaurs died out is not known, but it is supposed to be because they had minute brains and devoted themselves to the growth of weapons of offense in the shape of numerous horns. However that may be, it was not through their line that life developed.
In 'Men versus. Insects' (1933), collected in In Praise of Idleness and Other Essays (1935), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (181)  |  Developed (8)  |  Devoted (8)  |  Dinosaur (23)  |  Extinction (55)  |  Horn (10)  |  Life (917)  |  Line (44)  |  Minute (25)  |  Offense (3)  |  Paleontology (29)  |  Shape (52)  |  Weapon (57)

With highly civilised nations continued progress depends in a subordinate degree on natural selection; for such nations do not supplant and exterminate one another as do savage tribes. Nevertheless the more intelligent members within the same community will succeed better in the long run than the inferior, and leave a more numerous progeny, and this is a form of natural selection.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (131)  |  Civilised (3)  |  Community (65)  |  Continue (38)  |  Degree (48)  |  Depend (56)  |  Exterminate (7)  |  Form (210)  |  Highly (8)  |  Inferior (14)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Leave (63)  |  Long (95)  |  Member (27)  |  Nation (111)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Progeny (6)  |  Progress (317)  |  Run (33)  |  Same (92)  |  Savage (23)  |  Subordinate (6)  |  Succeed (11)  |  Supplant (2)  |  Tribe (10)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.