Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, ... finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell ... whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Occupied

Occupied Quotes (45 quotes)

A book should have either intelligibility or correctness; to combine the two is impossible, but to lack both is to be unworthy of a place as Euclid has occupied in education.
In essay, 'Mathematics and the Metaphysicians' (1901), collected in Mysticism and Logic: And Other Essays (1917), 73. The essay was also published as 'Recent Work in the Philosophy of Mathematics', in the American magazine, International Monthly.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Combine (57)  |  Correct (86)  |  Education (378)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Lack (119)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Two (937)  |  Unworthy (18)

According to Democritus, atoms had lost the qualities like colour, taste, etc., they only occupied space, but geometrical assertions about atoms were admissible and required no further analysis. In modern physics, atoms lose this last property, they possess geometrical qualities in no higher degree than colour, taste, etc. The atom of modern physics can only be symbolized by a partial differential equation in an abstract multidimensional space. Only the experiment of an observer forces the atom to indicate a position, a colour and a quantity of heat. All the qualities of the atom of modern physics are derived, it has no immediate and direct physical properties at all, i.e. every type of visual conception we might wish to design is, eo ipso, faulty. An understanding of 'the first order' is, I would almost say by definition, impossible for the world of atoms.
Philosophic Problems of Nuclear Science, trans. F. C. Hayes (1952), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  According (237)  |  Admissible (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atom (355)  |  Conception (154)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Design (195)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Direct (225)  |  Equation (132)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Heat (174)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Last (426)  |  Lose (159)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Order (632)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possess (156)  |  Property (168)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Required (108)  |  Say (984)  |  Space (500)  |  Taste (90)  |  Type (167)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

An evolutionary perspective of our place in the history of the earth reminds us that Homo sapiens sapiens has occupied the planet for the tiniest fraction of that planet's four and a half thousand million years of existence. In many ways we are a biological accident, the product of countless propitious circumstances. As we peer back through the fossil record, through layer upon layer of long-extinct species, many of which thrived far longer than the human species is ever likely to do, we are reminded of our mortality as a species. There is no law that declares the human animal to be different, as seen in this broad biological perspective, from any other animal. There is no law that declares the human species to be immortal.
Co-author with American science writer Roger Amos Lewin (1946), Origins: What New Discoveries Reveal about the Emergence of our Species and its Possible Future (1977), 256.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Animal (617)  |  Back (390)  |  Biological (137)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Countless (36)  |  Declare (45)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fossil Record (10)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Earth (2)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Law (894)  |  Layer (40)  |  Long (790)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Planet (356)  |  Product (160)  |  Record (154)  |  Species (401)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

And yet I think that the Full House model does teach us to treasure variety for its own sake–for tough reasons of evolutionary theory and nature’s ontology, and not from a lamentable failure of thought that accepts all beliefs on the absurd rationale that disagreement must imply disrespect. Excellence is a range of differences, not a spot. Each location on the range can be occupied by an excellent or an inadequate representative– and we must struggle for excellence at each of these varied locations. In a society driven, of ten unconsciously, to impose a uniform mediocrity upon a former richness of excellence–where McDonald’s drives out the local diner, and the mega-Stop & Shop eliminates the corner Mom and Pop–an understanding and defense of full ranges as natural reality might help to stem the tide and preserve the rich raw material of any evolving system: variation itself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Corner (57)  |  Defense (23)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Disrespect (3)  |  Drive (55)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Failure (161)  |  Former (137)  |  Full (66)  |  Help (105)  |  House (140)  |  Imply (17)  |  Impose (22)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Lamentable (5)  |  Local (19)  |  Location (15)  |  Material (353)  |  Mediocrity (8)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Pop (2)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Range (99)  |  Rationale (7)  |  Raw (28)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reason (744)  |  Representative (14)  |  Rich (62)  |  Richness (14)  |  Sake (58)  |  Shop (11)  |  Society (326)  |  Spot (17)  |  Stem (31)  |  Struggle (105)  |  System (537)  |  Teach (277)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tide (34)  |  Tough (19)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Variation (90)  |  Variety (132)  |  Vary (27)

At the moment I am occupied by an investigation with Kirchoff which does not allow us to sleep. Kirchoff has made a totally unexpected discovery, inasmuch as he has found out the cause for the dark lines in the solar spectrum and can produce these lines artificially intensified both in the solar spectrum and in the continuous spectrum of a flame, their position being identical with that of Fraunhofer’s lines. Hence the path is opened for the determination of the chemical composition of the Sun and the fixed stars.
Letter to H.E. Roscoe (Nov 1859). In The Life and Experiences of Sir Henry Enfield Roscoe (1906), 71.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorption Line (2)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biography (240)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composition (84)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Dark (140)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Flame (40)  |  Identical (53)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kirchoff_Gustav (3)  |  Moment (253)  |  Open (274)  |  Path (144)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Solar Spectrum (3)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Unexpected (52)

At the moment I am occupied by an investigation with Kirchoff which does not allow us to sleep. Kirchoff has made a totally unexpected discovery, inasmuch as he has found out the cause for the dark lines in the solar spectrum and can produce these lines artificially intensified both in the solar spectrum and in the continuous spectrum of a flame, their position being identical with that of Fraunhofer’s lines. Hence the path is opened for the determination of the chemical composition of the Sun and the fixed stars.
Letter to H.E. Roscoe (Nov 1859). In The Life and Experiences of Sir Henry Enfield Roscoe (1906), 81.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorption Line (2)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biography (240)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composition (84)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Dark (140)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Flame (40)  |  Identical (53)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kirchoff_Gustav (3)  |  Moment (253)  |  Open (274)  |  Path (144)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Solar Spectrum (3)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Unexpected (52)

By research in pure science I mean research made without any idea of application to industrial matters but solely with the view of extending our knowledge of the Laws of Nature. I will give just one example of the ‘utility’ of this kind of research, one that has been brought into great prominence by the War—I mean the use of X-rays in surgery. Now, not to speak of what is beyond money value, the saving of pain, or, it may be, the life of the wounded, and of bitter grief to those who loved them, the benefit which the state has derived from the restoration of so many to life and limb, able to render services which would otherwise have been lost, is almost incalculable. Now, how was this method discovered? It was not the result of a research in applied science starting to find an improved method of locating bullet wounds. This might have led to improved probes, but we cannot imagine it leading to the discovery of X-rays. No, this method is due to an investigation in pure science, made with the object of discovering what is the nature of Electricity. The experiments which led to this discovery seemed to be as remote from ‘humanistic interest’ —to use a much misappropriated word—as anything that could well be imagined. The apparatus consisted of glass vessels from which the last drops of air had been sucked, and which emitted a weird greenish light when stimulated by formidable looking instruments called induction coils. Near by, perhaps, were great coils of wire and iron built up into electro-magnets. I know well the impression it made on the average spectator, for I have been occupied in experiments of this kind nearly all my life, notwithstanding the advice, given in perfect good faith, by non-scientific visitors to the laboratory, to put that aside and spend my time on something useful.
In Speech made on behalf of a delegation from the Conjoint Board of Scientific Studies in 1916 to Lord Crewe, then Lord President of the Council. In George Paget Thomson, J. J. Thomson and the Cavendish Laboratory in His Day (1965), 167-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Average (82)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Call (769)  |  Consist (223)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Drop (76)  |  Due (141)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grief (18)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impression (114)  |  Induction (77)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Iron (96)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Looking (189)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Method (505)  |  Money (170)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Non-Scientific (7)  |  Object (422)  |  Pain (136)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Probe (12)  |  Prominence (5)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Ray (114)  |  Remote (83)  |  Render (93)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Service (110)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spend (95)  |  State (491)  |  Suck (8)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Utility (49)  |  Value (365)  |  Vessel (63)  |  View (488)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wire (35)  |  Word (619)  |  Wound (26)  |  X-ray (37)

Chemistry... is like the maid occupied with daily civilisation; she is busy with fertilisers, medicines, glass, insecticides ... for she dispenses the recipes.
Les Confessions d'un Chimiste Ordinaire (1981), 5. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Daily (87)  |  Fertilizer (12)  |  Glass (92)  |  Insecticide (2)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Recipe (7)

Doubtless it is true that while consciousness is occupied in the scientific interpretation of a thing, which is now and again “a thing of beauty,” it is not occupied in the aesthetic appreciation of it. But it is no less true that the same consciousness may at another time be so wholly possessed by the aesthetic appreciation as to exclude all thought of the scientific interpretation. The inability of a man of science to take the poetic view simply shows his mental limitation; as the mental limitation of a poet is shown by his inability to take the scientific view. The broader mind can take both.
In An Autobiography (1904), Vol. 1, 485.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Both (493)  |  Broader (3)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Inability (10)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Poet (83)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possession (65)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Wholly (88)

Each of the major sciences has contributed an essential ingredient in our long retreat from an initial belief in our own cosmic importance. Astronomy defined our home as a small planet tucked away in one corner of an average galaxy among millions; biology took away our status as paragons created in the image of God; geology gave us the immensity of time and taught us how little of it our own species has occupied.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Average (82)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biology (216)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Corner (57)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Create (235)  |  Define (49)  |  Essential (199)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Geology (220)  |  Give (202)  |  God (757)  |  Home (170)  |  Image (96)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Importance (286)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Initial (17)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Major (84)  |  Millions (17)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Paragon (4)  |  Planet (356)  |  Retreat (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Status (35)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tuck (3)

For several years this great man [Isaac Newton] was intensely occupied in endeavoring to discover a way of changing the base metals into gold. … There were periods when his furnace fires were not allowed to go out for six weeks; he and his secretary sitting up alternate nights to replenish them.
In 'Sir Isaac Newton', People’s Book of Biography: Or, Short Lives of the Most Interesting Persons of All Ages and Countries (1868), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternate (3)  |  Base (117)  |  Base Metal (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Discover (553)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Fire (189)  |  Furnace (12)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Metal (84)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Night (120)  |  Period (198)  |  Secretary (2)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Way (1217)  |  Week (70)  |  Year (933)

Humanism is only another name for spiritual laziness, or a vague half-creed adopted by men of science and logicians whose heads are too occupied with the world of mathematics and physics to worry about religious categories.
In The Outsider (1956), 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Creed (27)  |  Laziness (8)  |  Logician (17)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Name (333)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Vague (47)  |  World (1774)  |  Worry (33)

Hunting, fishing, drawing, and music occupied my every moment. ... Cares I knew not, and cared naught about them.
[Recalling his time spent at his father's property, Mill Grove, during his first visit to America.]
In John James Audubon and Lucy Audubon (editor), The Life of John James Audubon: the Naturalist (1869), 17.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  America (127)  |  Car (71)  |  Care (186)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Father (110)  |  First (1283)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Mill (16)  |  Moment (253)  |  Music (129)  |  Naught (10)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Property (168)  |  Spent (85)  |  Time (1877)

I am an expert of electricity. My father occupied the chair of applied electricity at the state prison.
Movie, The Big Broadcast of 1938 (1938). In Larry Langman and Paul Gold, Comedy Quotes from the Movies (2001), 248. Note that this is a variation of a similar joke published nearly two decades earlier. For example, ‘My father occupied the chair of applied physics at Cambridge.’ ‘Dat’s nuttin’; mine occupied the seat of applied electricity at Sing Sing. —Voo Doo.” included in University of Virginia, Virginia Reel (May 1920), Vol. 1, 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Chair (24)  |  Electric Chair (2)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Expert (65)  |  Father (110)  |  Prison (13)  |  State (491)

I am much occupied with the investigation of the physical causes [of motions in the Solar System]. My aim in this is to show that the celestial machine is to be likened not to a divine organism but rather to a clockwork … insofar as nearly all the manifold movements are carried out by means of a single, quite simple magnetic force. This physical conception is to be presented through calculation and geometry.
Letter to Ilerwart von Hohenburg (10 Feb 1605) Quoted in Holton, Johannes Kepler's Universe: Its Physics and Metaphysics, 342, as cited by Hylarie Kochiras, Force, Matter, and Metaphysics in Newton's Natural Philosophy (2008), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Clockwork (7)  |  Conception (154)  |  Divine (112)  |  Force (487)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Machine (257)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Organism (220)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Presenting (2)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Solar System (77)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)

I believe that, as men occupied with the study and treatment of disease, we cannot have too strong a conviction that the problems presented to us are physical problems, which perhaps we may never solve, but still admitting of solution only in one way, namely, by regarding them as part of an unbroken series, running up from the lowest elementary conditions of matter to the highest composition of organic structure.
From Address (7 Aug 1868), the Hunterian Oration, 'Clinical Observation in Relation to medicine in Modern Times' delivered to a meeting of the British Medical Association, Oxford. Collected in Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Composition (84)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Disease (328)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Matter (798)  |  Never (1087)  |  Organic (158)  |  Part (222)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Running (61)  |  Series (149)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Still (613)  |  Strong (174)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Unbroken (10)  |  Way (1217)

I have been so constantly under the necessity of watching the movements of the most unprincipled set of pirates I have ever known, that all my time has been occupied in defense, in putting evidence into something like legal shape that I am the inventor of the Electro-Magnetic Telegraph.
From a letter to his brother describing the challenge of defending his patents (19 Apr 1848).
Samuel F. B. Morse, His Letters and Journals (1914), vol.2, 283.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Brother (43)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Defense (23)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Known (454)  |  Letter (109)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Patent (33)  |  Set (394)  |  Something (719)  |  Telegraph (38)  |  Time (1877)

I have been so electrically occupied of late that I feel as if hungry for a little chemistry: but then the conviction crosses my mind that these things hang together under one law & that the more haste we make onwards each in his own path the sooner we shall arrive, and meet each other, at that state of knowledge of natural causes from which all varieties of effects may be understood & enjoyed.
Letter to Eilhard Mitscherlich, 24 Jan 1838. In Frank A. J. L. James (ed.), The Correspondence of Michael Faraday (1993), Vol. 2, 488.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electrochemistry (5)  |  Feel (367)  |  Hang (45)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Late (118)  |  Law (894)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Understood (156)

I should like to compare this rearrangement which the proteins undergo in the animal or vegetable organism to the making up of a railroad train. In their passage through the body parts of the whole may be left behind, and here and there new parts added on. In order to understand fully the change we must remember that the proteins are composed of Bausteine united in very different ways. Some of them contain Bausteine of many kinds. The multiplicity of the proteins is determined by many causes, first through the differences in the nature of the constituent Bausteine; and secondly, through differences in the arrangement of them. The number of Bausteine which may take part in the formation of the proteins is about as large as the number of letters in the alphabet. When we consider that through the combination of letters an infinitely large number of thoughts may be expressed, we can understand how vast a number of the properties of the organism may be recorded in the small space which is occupied by the protein molecules. It enables us to understand how it is possible for the proteins of the sex-cells to contain, to a certain extent, a complete description of the species and even of the individual. We may also comprehend how great and important the task is to determine the structure of the proteins, and why the biochemist has devoted himself with so much industry to their analysis.
'The Chemical Composition of the Cell', The Harvey Lectures (1911), 7, 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Behind (137)  |  Biochemist (9)  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Combination (144)  |  Compare (69)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Determine (144)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Enable (119)  |  Express (186)  |  Extent (139)  |  First (1283)  |  Formation (96)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Individual (404)  |  Industry (137)  |  Kind (557)  |  Large (394)  |  Letter (109)  |  Making (300)  |  Model (102)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Passage (50)  |  Possible (552)  |  Protein (54)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Rearrangement (5)  |  Record (154)  |  Remember (179)  |  Sex (69)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)

If a man devotes himself to the promotion of science, he is firstly opposed, and then he is informed that his ground is already occupied. At first men will allow no value to what we tell them, and then they behave as if they knew it all themselves.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 199.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Already (222)  |  Behave (17)  |  Devote (35)  |  First (1283)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inform (47)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Promotion (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

It is perhaps a law of nature that when a species (or group) fits itself to a place not previously occupied, and in which it is subject to no opposition from beings of its own class, or where it attains so great a perfection as to be able easily to overcome all opposition, the character eventually loses its original plasticity, or tendency to vary, since improvement in such a case would be superfluous, and becomes, so to speak, crystallized in that form which continues thereafter unaltered. … [Such as] the humming-bird.
In The Naturalist in La Plata (1895), 40.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attain (125)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Character (243)  |  Class (164)  |  Continue (165)  |  Crystallize (12)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fit (134)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Humming (5)  |  Hummingbird (4)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Lose (159)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Niche (9)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Plasticity (7)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superfluous (21)  |  Tendency (99)

It was noted long ago that the front row of burlesque houses was occupied predominantly by bald-headed men. In fact, such a row became known as the bald-headed row. It might be assumed from this on statistical evidence that the continued close observation of chorus girls in tights caused loss of hair from the top of the head.
[Disputing a statistical study for the American Cancer Society showing smoking to be a cancer causative.]
In Bess Furman, '2 Cite Extraction of Cigarette Tar', New York Times (26 Jul 1957), 21. The article reported on testimony before the Legal and Monetary Affairs Subcommittee of the House Government Operations Committee.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (92)  |  Burlesque (2)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Chorus (6)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Front (16)  |  Girl (37)  |  Hair (25)  |  Head (81)  |  House (140)  |  Known (454)  |  Long (790)  |  Loss (110)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Row (9)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Society (326)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)  |  Top (96)

It was through living among these groups and much more I think, through moving regularly from one to the other and back again that I got occupied with the problem of what, long before I put it on paper, I christened to myself as the ‘two cultures’. For constantly I felt I was moving among two groups [scientists and literary intellectuals] comparable in intelligence, identical in race, not grossly different in social origin, earning about the same incomes, who had almost ceased to communicate at all, who in intellectual, moral and psychological climate had so little in common that instead of going from Burlington House or South Kensington to Chelsea, one might have crossed an ocean.
The Two Cultures: The Rede Lecture (1959), 2. The places mentioned are all in London. Burlington House is the home of the Royal Society and South Kensington is the site of the Natural History Museum, whereas Chelsea represents an affluent centre of artistic life.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Climate (97)  |  Common (436)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Cross (16)  |  Culture (143)  |  Different (577)  |  House (140)  |  Identical (53)  |  Income (17)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Race (268)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  South (38)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)

It [analysis] lacks at this point such plan and unity that it is really amazing that it can be studied by so many people. The worst is that it has not at all been treated with rigor. There are only a few propositions in higher analysis that have been demonstrated with complete rigor. Everywhere one finds the unfortunate manner of reasoning from the particular to the general, and it is very unusual that with such a method one finds, in spite of everything, only a few of what many be called paradoxes. It is really very interesting to seek the reason.
In my opinion that arises from the fact that the functions with which analysis has until now been occupied can, for the most part, be expressed by means of powers. As soon as others appear, something that, it is true, does not often happen, this no longer works and from false conclusions there flow a mass of incorrect propositions.
From a letter to his professor Hansteen in Christiania, Oslo in Correspondence (1902), 23 . In Umberto Bottazzini and Warren Van Egmond, The Higher Calculus (1986), 87-88.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Arise (158)  |  Call (769)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Everything (476)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Express (186)  |  Fact (1210)  |  False (100)  |  Find (998)  |  Flow (83)  |  Function (228)  |  General (511)  |  Happen (274)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Lack (119)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paradox (50)  |  People (1005)  |  Plan (117)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Rigour (Rigor) (2)  |  Seek (213)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spite (55)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  Unity (78)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worst (57)

Liebig himself seems to have occupied the role of a gate, or sorting-demon, such as his younger contemporary Clerk Maxwell once proposed, helping to concentrate energy into one favored room of the Creation at the expense of everything else.
Gravity's Rainbow (1973), 411.
Science quotes on:  |  Clerk (13)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Creation (327)  |  Demon (8)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everything (476)  |  Favor (63)  |  Gate (32)  |  Himself (461)  |  Justus von Liebig (38)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Role (86)  |  Younger (21)

Man is occupied and has been persistently occupied since his separate evolution, with three kinds of struggle: first with the massive unintelligent forces of nature, heat and cold, winds, rivers, matter and energy; secondly, with the things closer to him, animals and plants, his own body, its health and disease; and lastly, with his desires and fears, his imaginations and stupidities.
In The World, the Flesh and the Devil (1929).
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Body (537)  |  Closer (43)  |  Cold (112)  |  Desire (204)  |  Disease (328)  |  Energy (344)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fear (197)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Health (193)  |  Heat (174)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Massive (9)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Plant (294)  |  River (119)  |  Separate (143)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wind (128)

Men who are occupied in the restoration of health to other men, by the joint exertion of skill and humanity, are above all the great of the earth. They even partake of divinity, since to preserve and renew is almost as noble as to create.
A Philosophical Dictionary? (1764, 1843), Vol. 2, 317.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Create (235)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Earth (996)  |  Great (1574)  |  Health (193)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Joint (31)  |  Noble (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physician (273)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Renew (19)  |  Skill (109)

Millions of our race are now supported by lands situated where deep seas once prevailed in earlier ages. In many districts not yet occupied by man, land animals and forests now abound where the anchor once sank into the oozy bottom.
Principles of Geology (1837), Vol. 1, 237.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Age (499)  |  Anchor (10)  |  Animal (617)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deep Sea (10)  |  Forest (150)  |  Geology (220)  |  Land (115)  |  Man (2251)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Race (268)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Support (147)

My picture of the world is drawn in perspective and not like a model to scale. The foreground is occupied by human beings and the stars are all as small as three-penny bits. I don't really believe in astronomy, except as a complicated description of part of the course of human and possibly animal sensation. I apply my perspective not merely to space but also to time. In time the world will cool and everything will die; but that is a long time off still and its present value at compound discount is almost nothing.
From a paper read to the Apostles, a Cambridge discussion society (1925). In 'The Foundations of Mathematics' (1925), collected in Frank Plumpton Ramsey and D.H. Mellor (ed.), Philosophical Papers (1990), Epilogue, 249. Citation to the paper, in Nils-Eric Sahlin, The Philosophy of F.P. Ramsey (1990), 225.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Coin (12)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Compound (113)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Course (409)  |  Death (388)  |  Description (84)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Everything (476)  |  Foreground (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Long (790)  |  Merely (316)  |  Model (102)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Part (222)  |  Perspective (28)  |  Picture (143)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Present (619)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

No matter how we twist and turn we shall always come back to the cell. The eternal merit of Schwann does not lie in his cell theory that has occupied the foreground for so long, and perhaps will soon be given up, but in his description of the development of the various tissues, and in his demonstration that this development (hence all physiological activity) is in the end traceable back to the cell. Now if pathology is nothing but physiology with obstacles, and diseased life nothing but healthy life interfered with by all manner of external and internal influences then pathology too must be referred back to the cell.
In 'Cellular-Pathologie', Archiv für pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und fur klinische Medizin (1855), 8, 13-14, as translated in LellandJ. Rather, 'Cellular Pathology', Disease, Life, and Man: Selected Essays by Rudolf Virchow (1958), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cell Theory (4)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Description (84)  |  Development (422)  |  Disease (328)  |  End (590)  |  Eternal (110)  |  External (57)  |  Foreground (3)  |  Given (5)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Influence (222)  |  Interference (21)  |  Internal (66)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merit (50)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Theodor Schwann (12)  |  Soon (186)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Trace (103)  |  Traceable (5)  |  Turn (447)  |  Twist (8)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

Science is occupied with “how” not “why”.
In On Love & Psychological Exercises: With Some Aphorisms & Other Essays (1998), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Science (3879)  |  Why (491)

The chemists who uphold dualism are far from being agreed among themselves; nevertheless, all of them in maintaining their opinion, rely upon the phenomena of chemical reactions. For a long time the uncertainty of this method has been pointed out: it has been shown repeatedly, that the atoms put into movement during a reaction take at that time a new arrangement, and that it is impossible to deduce the old arrangement from the new one. It is as if, in the middle of a game of chess, after the disarrangement of all the pieces, one of the players should wish, from the inspection of the new place occupied by each piece, to determine that which it originally occupied.
Chemical Method (1855), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chess (25)  |  Determine (144)  |  Dualism (4)  |  Game (101)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Long (790)  |  Method (505)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Point (580)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Wish (212)

The days of the Mosaic creation are not to be strictly construed as implying the same length of time which is at present occupied by a single revolution of our globe, but PERIODS of a much longer extent.
Vindiciae Geologicae (1820),32.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (327)  |  Extent (139)  |  Period (198)  |  Present (619)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Single (353)  |  Time (1877)

The first successes were such that one might suppose all the difficulties of science overcome in advance, and believe that the mathematician, without being longer occupied in the elaboration of pure mathematics, could turn his thoughts exclusively to the study of natural laws.
From Preface to Traité de calcul différentiel et de calcul intégral (1864-70), i. Quoted in address to the section of Algebra and Analysis, International Congress of Arts and Sciences, St. Louis (22 Sep 1904), 'On the Development of Mathematical Analysis and its Relation to Certain Other Sciences,' as translated by M.W. Haskell in Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (May 1905), 11, 408.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  First (1283)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Success (302)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thought (953)  |  Turn (447)

The general knowledge of our author [Leonhard Euler] was more extensive than could well be expected, in one who had pursued, with such unremitting ardor, mathematics and astronomy as his favorite studies. He had made a very considerable progress in medical, botanical, and chemical science. What was still more extraordinary, he was an excellent scholar, and possessed in a high degree what is generally called erudition. He had attentively read the most eminent writers of ancient Rome; the civil and literary history of all ages and all nations was familiar to him; and foreigners, who were only acquainted with his works, were astonished to find in the conversation of a man, whose long life seemed solely occupied in mathematical and physical researches and discoveries, such an extensive acquaintance with the most interesting branches of literature. In this respect, no doubt, he was much indebted to an uncommon memory, which seemed to retain every idea that was conveyed to it, either from reading or from meditation.
In Philosophical and Mathematical Dictionary (1815), 493-494.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Ardor (5)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Author (167)  |  Botany (57)  |  Branch (150)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Civil (26)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Convey (16)  |  Degree (276)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Erudition (6)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Find (998)  |  Foreigner (3)  |  General (511)  |  Generally (15)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indebted (7)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Literary (13)  |  Literature (103)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Memory (134)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possess (156)  |  Progress (465)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Respect (207)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rome (19)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writer (86)

The great scientists have been occupied with values—it is only their vulgar followers who think they are not. If scientists like Descartes, Newton, Einstein, Darwin, and Freud don’t “look deeply into experience,” what do they do? They have imaginations as powerful as any poet’s and some of them were first-rate writers as well. How do you draw the line between Walden and The Voyage of the Beagle? The product of the scientific imagination is a new vision of relations—like that of the artistic imagination.
In a letter to Allen Tate, July 20, 1931.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Beagle (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Look (582)  |  New (1216)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Product (160)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Think (1086)  |  Value (365)  |  Vision (123)  |  Voyage Of The Beagle (4)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Writer (86)

The Mathematician deals with two properties of objects only, number and extension, and all the inductions he wants have been formed and finished ages ago. He is now occupied with nothing but deduction and verification.
In 'On the Educational Value of the Natural History Sciences', Lay Sermons, Addresses and Reviews (1872), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Extension (59)  |  Finish (59)  |  Form (959)  |  Induction (77)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Property (168)  |  Two (937)  |  Verification (31)  |  Want (497)

The mystery of life is certainly the most persistent problem ever placed before the thought of man. There is no doubt that from the time humanity began to think it has occupied itself with the problem of its origin and its future which undoubtedly is the problem of life. The inability of science to solve it is absolute. This would be truly frightening were it not for faith.
Address (10 Sep 1934) to the International Congress of Electro-Radio Biology, Venice. In Associated Press, 'Life a Closed Book, Declares Marconi', New York Times (11 Sep 1934), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Faith (203)  |  Frightening (3)  |  Future (429)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Inability (10)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Problem (676)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truly (116)

The theory here developed is that mega-evolution normally occurs among small populations that become preadaptive and evolve continuously (without saltation, but at exceptionally rapid rates) to radically different ecological positions. The typical pattern involved is probably this: A large population is fragmented into numerous small isolated lines of descent. Within these, inadaptive differentiation and random fixation of mutations occur. Among many such inadaptive lines one or a few are preadaptive, i.e., some of their characters tend to fit them for available ecological stations quite different from those occupied by their immediate ancestors. Such groups are subjected to strong selection pressure and evolve rapidly in the further direction of adaptation to the new status. The very few lines that successfully achieve this perfected adaptation then become abundant and expand widely, at the same time becoming differentiated and specialized on lower levels within the broad new ecological zone.
Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  Abundant (22)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Available (78)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Character (243)  |  Descent (27)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Direction (175)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fixation (5)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Group (78)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Involved (90)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Large (394)  |  Level (67)  |  Mutation (37)  |  New (1216)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Occur (150)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Population (110)  |  Position (77)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Probability (130)  |  Radically (5)  |  Random (41)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Selection (128)  |  Small (477)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Station (29)  |  Status (35)  |  Strong (174)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tend (124)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Typical (13)  |  Zone (5)

There can never be two or more equivalent electrons in an atom, for which in a strong field the values of all the quantum numbers n, k1, k2 and m are the same. If an electron is present, for which these quantum numbers (in an external field) have definite values, then this state is ‘occupied.’
Quoted by M. Fierz, in article ‘Wolfgang Pauli’, in C. C. Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 10, 423.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Definite (110)  |  Electron (93)  |  Equivalence (6)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Field (364)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Present (619)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Number (2)  |  State (491)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Two (937)  |  Value (365)

There is no profession so incompatible with original enquiry as is a Scotch Professorship, where one’s income depends on the numbers of pupils. Is there one Professor in Edinburgh pursuing science with zeal? Are they not all occupied as showmen whose principal object is to attract pupils and make money?
Brewster to J. D. Forbes, 11 February 1830 (St. Andrew's University Library). Quoted in William Cochlan, 'Sir David Brewster: An Outline Biography', in J.R.R. Christie (ed.), Martyr of Science: Sir David Brewster, 1781-1868 (1984), 13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Depend (228)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Income (17)  |  Money (170)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Principal (63)  |  Profession (99)  |  Professor (128)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Science (3879)

Wherefore also these Kinds [elements] occupied different places even before the universe was organised and generated out of them. Before that time, in truth, all these were in a state devoid of reason or measure, but when the work of setting in order this Universe was being undertaken, fire and water and earth and air, although possessing some traces of their known nature, were yet disposed as everything is likely to be in the absence of God; and inasmuch as this was then their natural condition, God began by first marking them out into shapes by means of forms and numbers.
Plato
Timaeus 53ab, trans. R. G. Bury, in Plato: Timaeus, Critias, Cleitophon, Menexenus, Epistles (1929), 125-7.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Condition (356)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  God (757)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measure (232)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Order (632)  |  Organization (114)  |  Place (177)  |  Reason (744)  |  Setting (44)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Water (481)  |  Work (1351)

While the Mathematician is busy with deductions from general propositions, the Biologist is more especially occupied with observation, comparison, and those processes which lead to general propositions.
In 'On the Educational Value of the Natural History Sciences', Science and Education: Essays (1894), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Biologist (69)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Deduction (82)  |  General (511)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Process (423)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Science And Mathematics (10)

With respect to those who may ask why Nature does not produce new beings? We may enquire of them in turn, upon what foundation they suppose this fact? What it is that authorizes them to believe this sterility in Nature? Know they if, in the various combinations which she is every instant forming, Nature be not occupied in producing new beings, without the cognizance of these observers? Who has informed them that this Nature is not actually assembling, in her immense elaboratory, the elements suitable to bring to light, generations entirely new, that will have nothing in common with those of the species at present existing? What absurdity then, or what want of just inference would there be, to imagine that the man, the horse, the fish, the bird will be no more? Are these animals so indispensably requisite to Nature, that without them she cannot continue her eternal course? Does not all change around us? Do we not ourselves change? ... Nature contains no one constant form.
The System of Nature (1770), trans. Samuel Wilkinson (1820), Vol. 1, 94-95.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ask (411)  |  Authorize (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bird (149)  |  Change (593)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Constant (144)  |  Continue (165)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fish (120)  |  Form (959)  |  Forming (42)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Generation (242)  |  Horse (74)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inference (45)  |  Inform (47)  |  Instant (45)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Present (619)  |  Respect (207)  |  Species (401)  |  Sterility (10)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Turn (447)  |  Various (200)  |  Want (497)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

[Henry Cavendish] fixed the weight of the earth; he established the proportions of the constituents of the air; he occupied himself with the quantitative study of the laws of heat; and lastly, he demonstrated the nature of water and determined its volumetric composition. Earth, air, fire, and water—each and all came within the range of his observations.
Essays in Historical Chemistry (1894), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Henry Cavendish (7)  |  Composition (84)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Density (25)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fire (189)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Heat (174)  |  Himself (461)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Range (99)  |  Study (653)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.