Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Type

Type Quotes (167 quotes)

...the study of butterflies—creatures selected as the types of airiness and frivolity—instead of being despised, will some day be valued as one of the most important branches of Biological science.
From The Naturalist on the River Amazons: A record of Adventures, Habits of Animals, Sketches of Brazilian and Indian life, and Aspects of Nature under the Equator, During Eleven Years of Travel (1864), 413.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Branch (150)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Creature (233)  |  Despising (3)  |  Frivolity (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Most (1731)  |  Science (3879)  |  Select (44)  |  Selection (128)  |  Study (653)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

1839—The fermentation satire
THE MYSTERY OF ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION RESOLVED
(Preliminary Report by Letter) Schwindler
I am about to develop a new theory of wine fermentation … Depending on the weight, these seeds carry fermentation to completion somewhat less than as in the beginning, which is understandable … I shall develop a new theory of wine fermentation [showing] what simple means Nature employs in creating the most amazing phenomena. I owe it to the use of an excellent microscope designed by Pistorius.
When brewer’s yeast is mixed with water the microscope reveals that the yeast dissolves into endless small balls, which are scarcely 1/800th of a line in diameter … If these small balls are placed in sugar water, it can be seen that they consist of the eggs of animals. As they expand, they burst, and from them develop small creatures that multiply with unbelievable rapidity in a most unheard of way. The form of these animals differs from all of the 600 types described up until now. They possess the shape of a Beinsdorff still (without the cooling apparatus). The head of the tube is a sort of proboscis, the inside of which is filled with fine bristles 1/2000th of a line long. Teeth and eyes are not discernible; however, a stomach, intestinal canal, anus (a rose red dot), and organs for secretion of urine are plainly discernible. From the moment they are released from the egg one can see these animals swallow the sugar from the solution and pass it to the stomach. It is digested immediately, a process recognized easily by the resultant evacuation of excrements. In a word, these infusors eat sugar, evacuate ethyl alcohol from the intestinal canal, and carbon dioxide from the urinary organs. The bladder, in the filled state, has the form of a champagne bottle; when empty, it is a small button … As soon as the animals find no more sugar present, they eat each other up, which occurs through a peculiar manipulation; everything is digested down to the eggs which pass unchanged through the intestinal canal. Finally, one again fermentable yeast, namely the seed of the animals, which remain over.
In 'Das entriithselle Geheimiss der geisligen Giihrung', Annalen der Pharmacie und Chemie (1839), 29, 100-104; adapted from English translalion by Ralph E. Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 203-205.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alcohol (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Ball (62)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Burst (39)  |  Canal (17)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Carry (127)  |  Completion (22)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Creature (233)  |  Design (195)  |  Develop (268)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Differ (85)  |  Discernible (9)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dot (16)  |  Down (456)  |  Eat (104)  |  Egg (69)  |  Employ (113)  |  Empty (80)  |  Endless (56)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expand (53)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Letter (109)  |  Long (790)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Pass (238)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Proboscis (2)  |  Process (423)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Rose (34)  |  Satire (4)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  See (1081)  |  Seed (93)  |  Simple (406)  |  Small (477)  |  Solution (267)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Unbelievable (7)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Urine (16)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wine (38)  |  Word (619)  |  Yeast (7)

Branches or types are characterized by the plan of their structure,
Classes, by the manner in which that plan is executed, as far as ways and means are concerned,
Orders, by the degrees of complication of that structure,
Families, by their form, as far as determined by structure,
Genera, by the details of the execution in special parts, and
Species, by the relations of individuals to one another and to the world in which they live, as well as by the proportions of their parts, their ornamentation, etc.
Essay on Classification (1857). Contributions to the Natural History of the United States of America (1857), Vol. I, 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Classification (97)  |  Complication (29)  |  Concern (228)  |  Degree (276)  |  Detail (146)  |  Execution (25)  |  Form (959)  |  Individual (404)  |  Live (628)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Order (632)  |  Plan (117)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Mathematical truth has validity independent of place, personality, or human authority. Mathematical relations are not established, nor can they be abrogated, by edict. The multiplication table is international and permanent, not a matter of convention nor of relying upon authority of state or church. The value of π is not amenable to human caprice. The finding of a mathematical theorem may have been a highly romantic episode in the personal life of the discoverer, but it cannot be expected of itself to reveal the race, sex, or temperament of this discoverer. With modern means of widespread communication even mathematical notation tends to be international despite all nationalistic tendencies in the use of words or of type.
Anonymous
In 'Light Thrown on the Nature of Mathematics by Certain Aspects of Its Development', Mathematics in General Education (1940), 256. This is the Report of the Committee on the Function of Mathematics in General Education of the Commission on Secondary School Curriculum, which was established by the Executive Board of the Progressive Education Association in 1932.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amenable (4)  |  Authority (95)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Church (56)  |  Communication (94)  |  Convention (14)  |  Despite (7)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Episode (5)  |  Establish (57)  |  Expect (200)  |  Human (1468)  |  Independent (67)  |  International (37)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Modern (385)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Nation (193)  |  Notation (27)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Personal (67)  |  Personality (62)  |  Place (177)  |  Race (268)  |  Relation (157)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Romantic (13)  |  Sex (69)  |  State (491)  |  Table (104)  |  Temperament (17)  |  Tend (124)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Validity (47)  |  Value (365)  |  Widespread (22)  |  Word (619)

A chemical name should not be a phrase, it ought not to require circumlocutions to become definite; it should not be of the type “Glauber’s salt”, which conveys nothing about the composition of the substance; it should recall the constituents of a compound; it should be non-committal if nothing is known about the substance; the names should preferably be coined from Latin or Greek, so that their meaning can be more widely and easily understood; the form of the words should be such that they fit easily into the language into which they are to be incorporated.
(1782) As quoted in Archibald Clow, Chemical Revolution: A Contribution to Social Technology (1952, 1992), 618.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Become (815)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Definite (110)  |  Fit (134)  |  Form (959)  |  Greek (107)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Latin (38)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Require (219)  |  Salt (46)  |  Substance (248)  |  Understood (156)  |  Word (619)

A final proof of our ideas can only be obtained by detailed studies on the alterations produced in the amino acid sequence of a protein by mutations of the type discussed here.
In Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1962). Collected in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1942-1962 (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Detail (146)  |  Final (118)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Produced (187)  |  Proof (287)  |  Protein (54)  |  Sequence (68)

A Lady with a Lamp shall stand
In the great history of the land,
A noble type of good,
Heroic womanhood.
'Santa Filomena' (1857), The Poetical Works of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow? (1867), 333.
Science quotes on:  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heroine (2)  |  History (673)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Florence Nightingale (34)  |  Noble (90)  |  Poem (96)  |  Stand (274)

A short, broad man of tremendous vitality, the physical type of Hereward, the last of the English, and his brother-in-arms, Winter, Sylvester’s capacious head was ever lost in the highest cloud-lands of pure mathematics. Often in the dead of night he would get his favorite pupil, that he might communicate the very last product of his creative thought. Everything he saw suggested to him something new in the higher algebra. This transmutation of everything into new mathematics was a revelation to those who knew him intimately. They began to do it themselves. His ease and fertility of invention proved a constant encouragement, while his contempt for provincial stupidities, such as the American hieroglyphics for π and e, which have even found their way into Webster’s Dictionary, made each young worker apply to himself the strictest tests.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 265.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Algebra (113)  |  American (46)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Broad (27)  |  Brother (43)  |  Capacious (2)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Creative (137)  |  Dead (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ease (35)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  English (35)  |  Everything (476)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Head (81)  |  Hieroglyphic (6)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Invention (369)  |  Last (426)  |  Lost (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Night (120)  |  Often (106)  |  Physical (508)  |  Pi (13)  |  Product (160)  |  Provincial (2)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Saw (160)  |  Short (197)  |  Something (719)  |  Strict (17)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Test (211)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Winter (44)  |  Worker (31)  |  Young (227)

A taxonomy of abilities, like a taxonomy anywhere else in science, is apt to strike a certain type of impatient student as a gratuitous orgy of pedantry. Doubtless, compulsions to intellectual tidiness express themselves prematurely at times, and excessively at others, but a good descriptive taxonomy, as Darwin found in developing his theory, and as Newton found in the work of Kepler, is the mother of laws and theories.
From Intelligence: Its Structure, Growth and Action: Its Structure, Growth and Action (1987), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Certain (550)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Express (186)  |  Good (889)  |  Gratuitous (2)  |  Impatient (3)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Law (894)  |  Mother (114)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Orgy (3)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pedantry (5)  |  Premature (20)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strike (68)  |  Student (300)  |  Taxonomy (18)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tidiness (3)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

According to Democritus, atoms had lost the qualities like colour, taste, etc., they only occupied space, but geometrical assertions about atoms were admissible and required no further analysis. In modern physics, atoms lose this last property, they possess geometrical qualities in no higher degree than colour, taste, etc. The atom of modern physics can only be symbolized by a partial differential equation in an abstract multidimensional space. Only the experiment of an observer forces the atom to indicate a position, a colour and a quantity of heat. All the qualities of the atom of modern physics are derived, it has no immediate and direct physical properties at all, i.e. every type of visual conception we might wish to design is, eo ipso, faulty. An understanding of 'the first order' is, I would almost say by definition, impossible for the world of atoms.
Philosophic Problems of Nuclear Science, trans. F. C. Hayes (1952), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  According (237)  |  Admissible (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atom (355)  |  Conception (154)  |  Definition (221)  |  Degree (276)  |  Design (195)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Direct (225)  |  Equation (132)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Heat (174)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Last (426)  |  Lose (159)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Order (632)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possess (156)  |  Property (168)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Required (108)  |  Say (984)  |  Space (500)  |  Taste (90)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wish (212)  |  World (1774)

Advocacy of leaf protein as a human food is based on the undisputed fact that forage crops (such as lucerne) give a greater yield of protein than other types of crops. Even with connventional food crops there is more protein in the leafy parts than in the seeds or tubs that are usually harvested.
Quoted in 'India Children to Eat Leaf Protein in a Diet Test', New York Times (16 Dec 1973), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Crop (25)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Food (199)  |  Greater (288)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Human (1468)  |  Leaf (66)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Protein (54)  |  Seed (93)  |  Usually (176)  |  Yield (81)

After innumerable dynasties of giant creatures, after endless generations of fish and families of molluscs, man finally arrives, the degenerate product of a grandiose type, his mould perhaps broken by his Creator. Fired by his retrospection, these timid humans, born but yesterday, can now leap across chaos, sing an endless hymn, and configure the history of the universe in a sort of retrograde Apocalypse.
From 'La Peau de Chagrin' (1831). As translated as by Helen Constantine The Wild Ass’s Skin (2012), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Apocalypse (2)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Broken (56)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Creator (91)  |  Creature (233)  |  Degenerate (14)  |  Dynasty (7)  |  Endless (56)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fish (120)  |  Generation (242)  |  Giant (67)  |  Grandiose (4)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hymn (6)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Leap (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mold (33)  |  Product (160)  |  Retrograde (8)  |  Timid (5)  |  Universe (857)  |  Yesterday (36)

All fossil anthropoids found hitherto have been known only from mandibular or maxillary fragments, so far as crania are concerned, and so the general appearance of the types they represented had been unknown; consequently, a condition of affairs where virtually the whole face and lower jaw, replete with teeth, together with the major portion of the brain pattern, have been preserved, constitutes a specimen of unusual value in fossil anthropoid discovery. Here, as in Homo rhodesiensis, Southern Africa has provided documents of higher primate evolution that are amongst the most complete extant. Apart from this evidential completeness, the specimen is of importance because it exhibits an extinct race of apes intermediate between living anthropoids and man ... Whether our present fossil is to be correlated with the discoveries made in India is not yet apparent; that question can only be solved by a careful comparison of the permanent molar teeth from both localities. It is obvious, meanwhile, that it represents a fossil group distinctly advanced beyond living anthropoids in those two dominantly human characters of facial and dental recession on one hand, and improved quality of the brain on the other. Unlike Pithecanthropus, it does not represent an ape-like man, a caricature of precocious hominid failure, but a creature well advanced beyond modern anthropoids in just those characters, facial and cerebral, which are to be anticipated in an extinct link between man and his simian ancestor. At the same time, it is equally evident that a creature with anthropoid brain capacity and lacking the distinctive, localised temporal expansions which appear to be concomitant with and necessary to articulate man, is no true man. It is therefore logically regarded as a man-like ape. I propose tentatively, then, that a new family of Homo-simidæ be created for the reception of the group of individuals which it represents, and that the first known species of the group be designated Australopithecus africanus, in commemoration, first, of the extreme southern and unexpected horizon of its discovery, and secondly, of the continent in which so many new and important discoveries connected with the early history of man have recently been made, thus vindicating the Darwinian claim that Africa would prove to be the cradle of mankind.
'Australopithicus africanus: The Man-Ape of South Africa', Nature, 1925, 115, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Ape (53)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Brain (270)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Character (243)  |  Claim (146)  |  Commemoration (2)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Concern (228)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continent (76)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Creature (233)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Early (185)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evident (91)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Face (212)  |  Failure (161)  |  Family (94)  |  First (1283)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fragment (54)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Hominid (4)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Importance (286)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Known (454)  |  Living (491)  |  Major (84)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Portion (84)  |  Present (619)  |  Primate (11)  |  Prove (250)  |  Quality (135)  |  Question (621)  |  Race (268)  |  Reception (15)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Species (401)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Value (365)  |  Whole (738)

All important unit operations have much in common, and if the underlying principles upon which the rational design and operation of basic types of engineering equipment depend are understood, their successful adaptation to manufacturing processes becomes a matter of good management rather than of good fortune.
In William H. Walker, Warren K. Lewis and William H. MacAdams, The Principles of Chemical Engineering (1923), Preface to 1st. edition, v.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Become (815)  |  Common (436)  |  Depend (228)  |  Design (195)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Important (209)  |  Management (21)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Matter (798)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Rational (90)  |  Successful (123)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Understood (156)

All infections, of whatever type, with no exceptions, are products of parasitic beings; that is, by living organisms that enter in other living organisms, in which they find nourishment, that is, food that suits them, here they hatch, grow and reproduce themselves.
Quoted in English in Paolo Mazzarello, The Hidden Structure: A Scientific Biography of Camillo Golgi (1999), trans. and ed. Henry A. Buchtel and Aldo Hadiani, 19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Enter (141)  |  Exception (73)  |  Find (998)  |  Food (199)  |  Grow (238)  |  Infection (27)  |  Living (491)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Product (160)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Whatever (234)

All the remedies for all the types of conflicts are alike in that they begin by finding the facts rather than by starting a fight.
As quoted, M.Guy Mellon in Presidential Address, Purdue University. Printed in Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science (1943), 52, 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Begin (260)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fight (44)  |  Finding (30)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Starting (2)

Among all types of sexual activity, masturbation is ... the one in which the female most frequently reaches orgasm.
Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Female (50)  |  Masturbation (3)  |  Most (1731)  |  Orgasm (2)  |  Sex (69)  |  Sexual (26)

Among both the Northern and Eastern Hamites are to be found some of the most beautiful types of humanity.
In An Introduction to Physical Anthropology (1960), 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Both (493)  |  Eastern (3)  |  Find (998)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Northern (2)

And as I had my father’s kind of mind—which was also his mother’s—I learned that the mind is not sex-typed.
Blackberry Winter: My Earlier Years (1973), 54.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Father (110)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mother (114)  |  Sex (69)  |  Thinking (414)

And so many think incorrectly that everything was created by the Creator in the beginning as it is seen, that not only the mountains, valleys, and waters, but also various types of minerals occurred together with the rest of the world, and therefore it is said that it is unnecessary to investigate the reasons why they differ in their internal properties and their locations. Such considerations are very dangerous for the growth of all the sciences, and hence for natural knowledge of the Earth, particularly the art of mining, though it is very easy for those clever people to be philosophers, having learnt by heart the three words 'God so created' and to give them in reply in place of all reasons.
About the Layers of the Earth and other Works on Geology (1757), trans. A. P. Lapov (1949), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Clever (38)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Differ (85)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Everything (476)  |  Geology (220)  |  God (757)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heart (229)  |  Internal (66)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Location (15)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Mining (18)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Natural (796)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Valley (32)  |  Various (200)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

And there are absolutely no judgments (or rules) in Mechanics which do not also pertain to Physics, of which Mechanics is a part or type: and it is as natural for a clock, composed of wheels of a certain kind, to indicate the hours, as for a tree, grown from a certain kind of seed, to produce the corresponding fruit. Accordingly, just as when those who are accustomed to considering automata know the use of some machine and see some of its parts, they easily conjecture from this how the other parts which they do not see are made: so, from the perceptible effects and parts of natural bodies, I have attempted to investigate the nature of their causes and of their imperceptible parts.
Principles of Philosophy (1644), trans. V. R. and R. P. Miller (1983), 285-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Clock (47)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Hour (186)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Rule (294)  |  See (1081)  |  Seed (93)  |  Tree (246)  |  Use (766)  |  Wheel (50)

Are God and Nature then at strife,
That Nature lends such evil dreams?
So careful of the type she seems,
So careless of the single life; ...
'So careful of the type', but no.
From scarped cliff and quarried stone
She cries, 'A thousand types are gone:
I care for nothing, all shall go' ...
Man, her last work, who seemed so fair,
Such splendid purpose in his eyes,
Who rolled the psalm to wintry skies,
Who built him fanes of fruitless prayer,
Who trusted God was love indeed
And love Creation's final law—
Tho’ Nature red in tooth and claw
With ravine, shrieked against his creed...
In Memoriam A. H. H. (1850), Cantos 56-57. Collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 176.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Care (186)  |  Claw (8)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creed (27)  |  Cry (29)  |  Dream (208)  |  Evil (116)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fairness (2)  |  Final (118)  |  Fruitless (8)  |  God (757)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quarry (13)  |  Ravine (5)  |  Red (35)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rolling (3)  |  Scarp (2)  |  Shriek (3)  |  Single (353)  |  Sky (161)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strife (9)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Trust (66)  |  Winter (44)  |  Work (1351)

Are God and Nature then at strife,
That Nature lends such evil dreams?
So careful of the type she seems,
So careless of the single life…
So careful of the type, but no.
From scarped cliff and quarried stone
She cries, “A thousand types are gone;
I care for nothing, all shall go.”
From poem, 'In Memoriam A.H.H.' written between 1833-50, and first published anonymously in 1850. Collected in Poetical Works of Alfred Tennyson (1860), Vol.2, 64.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Care (186)  |  Careful (24)  |  Careless (5)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Cry (29)  |  Dream (208)  |  Evil (116)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fossil (136)  |  God (757)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Quarry (13)  |  Scarp (2)  |  Seem (145)  |  Single (353)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strife (9)  |  Thousand (331)

As for types like my own, obscurely motivated by the conviction that our existence was worthless if we didn’t make a turning point of it, we were assigned to the humanities, to poetry, philosophy, painting—the nursery games of humankind, which had to be left behind when the age of science began. The humanities would be called upon to choose a wallpaper for the crypt, as the end drew near.
From More Die of Heartbreak (1987, 1997), 246-247.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Age Of Science (2)  |  Assigned (2)  |  Behind (137)  |  Call (769)  |  Choose (112)  |  Conviction (97)  |  End (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Game (101)  |  Humanities (20)  |  Humankind (11)  |  Motivated (14)  |  Nursery (4)  |  Painting (44)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Point (580)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Turning Point (8)  |  Wallpaper (2)  |  Worthless (21)

As geologists, we learn that it is not only the present condition of the globe that has been suited to the accommodation of myriads of living creatures, but that many former states also have been equally adapted to the organization and habits of prior races of beings. The disposition of the seas, continents, and islands, and the climates have varied; so it appears that the species have been changed, and yet they have all been so modelled, on types analogous to those of existing plants and animals, as to indicate throughout a perfect harmony of design and unity of purpose. To assume that the evidence of the beginning or end of so vast a scheme lies within the reach of our philosophical inquiries, or even of our speculations, appears to us inconsistent with a just estimate of the relations which subsist between the finite powers of man and the attributes of an Infinite and Eternal Being.
Concluding remark, Principles of Geology(1833), Vol. 3, 384-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Climate (97)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continent (76)  |  Creature (233)  |  Design (195)  |  Disposition (42)  |  End (590)  |  Equally (130)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Finite (59)  |  Former (137)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Island (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Organization (114)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Sea (308)  |  Species (401)  |  Speculation (126)  |  State (491)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Unity (78)  |  Vast (177)

As scientists the two men were contrasting types—Einstein all calculation, Rutherford all experiment ... There was no doubt that as an experimenter Rutherford was a genius, one of the greatest. He worked by intuition and everything he touched turned to gold. He had a sixth sense.
(Reminiscence comparing his friend, Ernest Rutherford, with Albert Einstein, whom he also knew.)
Trial and Error: The Autobiography of Chaim Weizman (1949), 118. Quoted in A Force of Nature: The Frontier Genius of Ernest Rutherford (2007), 65-66.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Everything (476)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Friend (168)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gold (97)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Reminiscence (4)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Touch (141)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Work (1351)

Before delivering your lectures, the manuscript should be in such a perfect form that, if need be, it could be set in type. Whether you follow the manuscript during the delivery of the lecture is purely incidental. The essential point is that you are thus master of the subject matter.
Advice to his son. As quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side Of Scientists (1975), 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Delivery (6)  |  Essential (199)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Master (178)  |  Matter (798)  |  Need (290)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Point (580)  |  Purely (109)  |  Set (394)  |  Subject (521)

Biologists have long attempted by chemical means to induce in higher organisms predictable and specific changes which thereafter could be transmitted in series as hereditary characters. Among microorganisms the most striking example of inheritable and specific alterations in cell structure and function that can be experimentally induced and are reproducible under well defined and adequately controlled conditions is the transformation of specific types of Pneumococcus.
Oswald T. Avery (1877-1955), Colin Macleod (1909-72) and Maclyn McCarty (1911-2005), 'Studies on the Chemical Nature of the Substance Inducing Transformation of Pneumococcal Types', Journal of Experimental Medicine 1944, 79, 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Alteration (30)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Condition (356)  |  Function (228)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Induce (22)  |  Long (790)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Micro-Organism (3)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organism (220)  |  Reproducible (7)  |  Series (149)  |  Specific (95)  |  Striking (48)  |  Structure (344)  |  Transformation (69)

But I think that in the repeated and almost entire changes of organic types in the successive formations of the earth—in the absence of mammalia in the older, and their very rare appearance (and then in forms entirely. unknown to us) in the newer secondary groups—in the diffusion of warm-blooded quadrupeds (frequently of unknown genera) through the older tertiary systems—in their great abundance (and frequently of known genera) in the upper portions of the same series—and, lastly, in the recent appearance of man on the surface of the earth (now universally admitted—in one word, from all these facts combined, we have a series of proofs the most emphatic and convincing,—that the existing order of nature is not the last of an uninterrupted succession of mere physical events derived from laws now in daily operation: but on the contrary, that the approach to the present system of things has been gradual, and that there has been a progressive development of organic structure subservient to the purposes of life.
'Address to the Geological Society, delivered on the Evening of the 18th of February 1831', Proceedings of the Geological Society (1834), 1, 305-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Abundance (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Approach (108)  |  Blood (134)  |  Change (593)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Daily (87)  |  Development (422)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Event (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Genus (25)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Great (1574)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Organic (158)  |  Physical (508)  |  Portion (84)  |  Present (619)  |  Progression (23)  |  Proof (287)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Rare (89)  |  Recent (77)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Series (149)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subservience (3)  |  Succession (77)  |  Successive (73)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  System (537)  |  Tertiary (4)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  Word (619)

By destroying the biological character of phenomena, the use of averages in physiology and medicine usually gives only apparent accuracy to the results. From our point of view, we may distinguish between several kinds of averages: physical averages, chemical averages and physiological and pathological averages. If, for instance, we observe the number of pulsations and the degree of blood pressure by means of the oscillations of a manometer throughout one day, and if we take the average of all our figures to get the true or average blood pressure and to learn the true or average number of pulsations, we shall simply have wrong numbers. In fact, the pulse decreases in number and intensity when we are fasting and increases during digestion or under different influences of movement and rest; all the biological characteristics of the phenomenon disappear in the average. Chemical averages are also often used. If we collect a man's urine during twenty-four hours and mix all this urine to analyze the average, we get an analysis of a urine which simply does not exist; for urine, when fasting, is different from urine during digestion. A startling instance of this kind was invented by a physiologist who took urine from a railroad station urinal where people of all nations passed, and who believed he could thus present an analysis of average European urine! Aside from physical and chemical, there are physiological averages, or what we might call average descriptions of phenomena, which are even more false. Let me assume that a physician collects a great many individual observations of a disease and that he makes an average description of symptoms observed in the individual cases; he will thus have a description that will never be matched in nature. So in physiology, we must never make average descriptions of experiments, because the true relations of phenomena disappear in the average; when dealing with complex and variable experiments, we must study their various circumstances, and then present our most perfect experiment as a type, which, however, still stands for true facts. In the cases just considered, averages must therefore be rejected, because they confuse, while aiming to unify, and distort while aiming to simplify. Averages are applicable only to reducing very slightly varying numerical data about clearly defined and absolutely simple cases.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 134-135.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Average (82)  |  Biological (137)  |  Blood (134)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consider (416)  |  Data (156)  |  Degree (276)  |  Different (577)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distort (22)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fasting (3)  |  Figure (160)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Increase (210)  |  Individual (404)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Pass (238)  |  Pathological (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physician (273)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Present (619)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplify (13)  |  Stand (274)  |  Startling (15)  |  Station (29)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Unify (6)  |  Urine (16)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Variable (34)  |  Various (200)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

Catastrophe Theory is—quite likely—the first coherent attempt (since Aristotelian logic) to give a theory on analogy. When narrow-minded scientists object to Catastrophe Theory that it gives no more than analogies, or metaphors, they do not realise that they are stating the proper aim of Catastrophe Theory, which is to classify all possible types of analogous situations.
From 'La Théorie des catastrophes État présent et perspective', as quoted in Erick Christopher Zeeman, (ed.), Catastrophe Theory: Selected Papers, 1972-1977 (1977), 637, as cited in Martin Krampe (ed.), Classics of Semiotics (1987), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Aristotelian (2)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Catastrophe Theory (2)  |  Classify (6)  |  Coherent (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Likely (34)  |  Logic (287)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Narrow-Minded (5)  |  Object (422)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proper (144)  |  Realize (147)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Situation (113)  |  Theory (970)

Coming to the question of life being found on other planets, Professor Haldane apologized for discoursing, as a mere biologist, on a subject on which we had been expecting a lecture by a physicist [J. D. Bernal]. He mentioned three hypotheses:
(a) That life had a supernatural origin,
(b) That it originated from inorganic materials, and (c) That life is a constituent of the Universe and can only arise from pre-existing life. The first hypothesis, he said, should be taken seriously, and he would proceed to do so. From the fact that there are 400,000 species of beetle on this planet, but only 8,000 species of mammals, he concluded that the Creator, if he exists, has a special preference for beetles, and so we might be more likely to meet them than any other type of animal on a planet which would support life.
In Mark Williamson, 'Haldane’s Special Preference', The Linnean, 1992, 8, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beetle (15)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Coming (114)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Creator (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Insect (77)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Material (353)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Planet (356)  |  Preference (28)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Professor (128)  |  Question (621)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  Support (147)  |  Universe (857)

Common to all these types is the anthropomorphic character of their conception of God. In general, only individuals of exceptional endowments, and exceptionally high-minded communities, rise to any considerable extent above this level. But there is a third stage of religious experience which belongs to all of them, even though it is rarely found in a pure form: I shall call it cosmic religious feeling. It is very difficult to elucidate this feeling to anyone who is entirely without it, especially as there is no anthropomorphic conception of God corresponding to it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anthropomorphic (3)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Belong (162)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Common (436)  |  Community (104)  |  Conception (154)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Endowment (16)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Especially (31)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Exceptionally (3)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extent (139)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Individual (404)  |  Level (67)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Religious (126)  |  Rise (166)  |  Stage (143)  |  Third (15)

Creative activity could be described as a type of learning process where teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.
In Drinkers of Infinity: Essays, 1955-1967 (1969), 235.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Creative (137)  |  Describe (128)  |  Individual (404)  |  Learning (274)  |  Locate (7)  |  Process (423)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Same (157)  |  Teacher (143)

Davy was the type of all the jumped-up second-raters of all time.
Spoken by the fictional character, Luard, an unhappy school chemistry teacher in the novel The Search (1932), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Biography (240)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Jump (29)  |  Time (1877)

Descartes is the completest type which history presents of the purely mathematical type of mind—that in which the tendencies produced by mathematical cultivation reign unbalanced and supreme.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 626.
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (204)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  History (673)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Present (619)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Purely (109)  |  Reign (23)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Unbalanced (2)

Don’t forget that the flavors of wine and cheese depend upon the types of infecting microorganisms.
Science quotes on:  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Cheese (9)  |  Depend (228)  |  Flavor (7)  |  Forget (115)  |  Microorganism (28)  |  Wine (38)

Fertilization of mammalian eggs is followed by successive cell divisions and progressive differentiation, first into the early embryo and subsequently into all of the cell types that make up the adult animal. Transfer of a single nucleus at a specific stage of development, to an enucleated unfertilized egg, provided an opportunity to investigate whether cellular differentiation to that stage involved irreversible genetic modification. The first offspring to develop from a differentiated cell were born after nuclear transfer from an embryo-derived cell line that had been induced to became quiescent. Using the same procedure, we now report the birth of live lambs from three new cell populations established from adult mammary gland, fetus and embryo. The fact that a lamb was derived from an adult cell confirms that differentiation of that cell did not involve the irreversible modification of genetic material required far development to term. The birth of lambs from differentiated fetal and adult cells also reinforces previous speculation that by inducing donor cells to became quiescent it will be possible to obtain normal development from a wide variety of differentiated cells.
[Co-author of paper announcing the cloned sheep, ‘Dolly’.]
In I. Wilmut, A. E. Schnieke, J. McWhir, et al., 'Viable Offspring Derived from Petal and Adult Mammalian Cells', Nature (1997), 385, 810.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Author (167)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cell Division (5)  |  Clone (8)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Division (65)  |  Dolly (2)  |  Early (185)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Gland (14)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Material (353)  |  Modification (55)  |  New (1216)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Paper (182)  |  Population (110)  |  Possible (552)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Reinforce (5)  |  Required (108)  |  Single (353)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Stage (143)  |  Successive (73)  |  Term (349)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

Fleets are not confined to the ocean, but now sail over the land. … All the power of the British Navy has not been able to prevent Zeppelins from reaching England and attacking London, the very heart of the British Empire. Navies do not protect against aerial attack. … Heavier-than-air flying machines of the aeroplane type have crossed right over the heads of armies, of million of men, armed with the most modern weapons of destruction, and have raided places in the rear. Armies do not protect against aerial war.
In 'Preparedness for Aerial Defense', Addresses Before the Eleventh Annual Convention of the Navy League of the United States, Washington, D.C., April 10-13, 1916 (1916), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Aerial (10)  |  Against (332)  |  Air (347)  |  Airplane (41)  |  All (4108)  |  Arm (81)  |  Army (33)  |  Attack (84)  |  British (41)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Do (1908)  |  England (40)  |  Fleet (4)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Heart (229)  |  London (12)  |  Machine (257)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Navy (9)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Raid (4)  |  Right (452)  |  Sail (36)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Zeppelin (4)

For the philosopher, order is the entirety of repetitions manifested, in the form of types or of laws, by perceived objects. Order is an intelligible relation. For the biologist, order is a sequence in space and time. However, according to Plato, all things arise out of their opposites. Order was born of the original disorder, and the long evolution responsible for the present biological order necessarily had to engender disorder.
An organism is a molecular society, and biological order is a kind of social order. Social order is opposed to revolution, which is an abrupt change of order, and to anarchy, which is the absence of order.
I am presenting here today both revolution and anarchy, for which I am fortunately not the only one responsible. However, anarchy cannot survive and prosper except in an ordered society, and revolution becomes sooner or later the new order. Viruses have not failed to follow the general law. They are strict parasites which, born of disorder, have created a very remarkable new order to ensure their own perpetuation.
'Interaction Among Virus, Cell, and Organism', Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1965). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1963-1970 (1972), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Anarchy (6)  |  Arise (158)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Change (593)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Entirety (6)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fail (185)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Intelligible (34)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Organism (220)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Perpetuation (4)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plato (76)  |  Present (619)  |  Prosper (6)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (326)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Virus (27)

For the sake of persons of ... different types, scientific truth should be presented in different forms, and should be regarded as equally scientific, whether it appears in the robust form and the vivid coloring of a physical illustration, or in the tenuity and paleness of a symbolic expression.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Different (577)  |  Equally (130)  |  Expression (175)  |  Form (959)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Regard (305)  |  Robust (7)  |  Sake (58)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Tenuity (2)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vivid (23)

Geology is part of that remarkable dynamic process of the human mind which is generally called science and to which man is driven by an inquisitive urge. By noticing relationships in the results of his observations, he attempts to order and to explain the infinite variety of phenomena that at first sight may appear to be chaotic. In the history of civilization this type of progressive scientist has been characterized by Prometheus stealing the heavenly fire, by Adam eating from the tree of knowledge, by the Faustian ache for wisdom.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 454.
Science quotes on:  |  Ache (7)  |  Adam (7)  |  Appear (118)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Call (769)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Eating (45)  |  Explain (322)  |  Faustian (2)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  First Sight (6)  |  Geology (220)  |  Heavenly (8)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Process (423)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Prometheus (7)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sight (132)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Of Knowledge (8)  |  Urge (17)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wisdom (221)

John B. Watson quote: Give me a dozen healthy infants, well-formed, and my own specified world to bring them up in and I’ll guar
Give me a dozen healthy infants, well-formed, and my own specified world to bring them up in and I’ll guarantee to take any one at random and train him to become any type of specialist I might select—doctor, lawyer, artist, merchant-chief and, yes, even beggar-man and thief, regardless of his talents, penchants, tendencies, abilities, vocations, and race of his ancestors. (1930)
Behaviorism (1998), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Artist (90)  |  Become (815)  |  Beggar (5)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Chief (97)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Form (959)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Infant (26)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Race (268)  |  Random (41)  |  Select (44)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thief (6)  |  Train (114)  |  Vocation (6)  |  World (1774)

Given one well-trained physician of the highest type and he will do better work for a thousand people than ten specialists.
From speech 'In the Time of Henry Jacob Bigelow', given to the Boston Surgical Society, Medalist Meeting (6 Jun 1921). Printed in Journal of the Medical Association (1921), 77, 601.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Do (1908)  |  People (1005)  |  Physician (273)  |  Specialist (28)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Train (114)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Half a century ago Oswald (1910) distinguished classicists and romanticists among the scientific investigators: the former being inclined to design schemes and to use consistently the deductions from working hypotheses; the latter being more fit for intuitive discoveries of functional relations between phenomena and therefore more able to open up new fields of study. Examples of both character types are Werner and Hutton. Werner was a real classicist. At the end of the eighteenth century he postulated the theory of “neptunism,” according to which all rocks including granites, were deposited in primeval seas. It was an artificial scheme, but, as a classification system, it worked quite satisfactorily at the time. Hutton, his contemporary and opponent, was more a romanticist. His concept of “plutonism” supposed continually recurrent circuits of matter, which like gigantic paddle wheels raise material from various depths of the earth and carry it off again. This is a very flexible system which opens the mind to accept the possible occurrence in the course of time of a great variety of interrelated plutonic and tectonic processes.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 456-7.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Accept (191)  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Artificial (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Century (310)  |  Character (243)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Classicist (2)  |  Classification (97)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consistently (8)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Course (409)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Depth (94)  |  Design (195)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Field (364)  |  Fit (134)  |  Flexible (6)  |  Former (137)  |  Functional (10)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Granite (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  James Hutton (20)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Open (274)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Wilhelm Ostwald (5)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Primeval (15)  |  Process (423)  |  Raise (35)  |  Recurrent (2)  |  Relation (157)  |  Rock (161)  |  Romanticist (2)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sea (308)  |  Study (653)  |  Suppose (156)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Various (200)  |  Abraham Werner (5)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)  |  Working (20)

However closely we may associate thought with the physical machinery of the brain, the connection is dropped as irrelevant as soon as we consider the fundamental property of thought—that it may be correct or incorrect. …that involves recognising a domain of the other type of law—laws which ought to be kept, but may be broken.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 57-58.
Science quotes on:  |  Associate (25)  |  Brain (270)  |  Broken (56)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Domain (69)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Involve (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Property (168)  |  Soon (186)  |  Thought (953)

However, all scientific statements and laws have one characteristic in common: they are “true or false” (adequate or inadequate). Roughly speaking, our reaction to them is “yes” or “no.” The scientific way of thinking has a further characteristic. The concepts which it uses to build up its coherent systems are not expressing emotions. For the scientist, there is only “being,” but no wishing, no valuing, no good, no evil; no goal. As long as we remain within the realm of science proper, we can never meet with a sentence of the type: “Thou shalt not lie.” There is something like a Puritan's restraint in the scientist who seeks truth: he keeps away from everything voluntaristic or emotional.
Essays in Physics (1950), 68.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adequate (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Build (204)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Common (436)  |  Concept (221)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evil (116)  |  False (100)  |  Goal (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Long (790)  |  Never (1087)  |  Proper (144)  |  Puritan (3)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Realm (85)  |  Remain (349)  |  Restraint (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Something (719)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Statement (142)  |  System (537)  |  Thinking (414)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)

I am quite aware that we have just now lightheartedly expelled in imagination many excellent men who are largely, perhaps chiefly, responsible for the buildings of the temple of science; and in many cases our angel would find it a pretty ticklish job to decide. But of one thing I feel sure: if the types we have just expelled were the only types there were, the temple would never have come to be, any more than a forest can grow which consists of nothing but creepers. For these people any sphere of human activity will do, if it comes to a point; whether they become engineers, officers, tradesmen, or scientists depends on circumstances.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Angel (44)  |  Aware (31)  |  Become (815)  |  Building (156)  |  Buildings (4)  |  Case (99)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consist (223)  |  Decide (41)  |  Depend (228)  |  Do (1908)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Expel (4)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Forest (150)  |  Grow (238)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Job (82)  |  Largely (13)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Officer (12)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Temple (42)  |  Temple Of Science (8)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

I cannot conceive of a God who rewards and punishes his creatures, or has a will of the type of which we are conscious in ourselves. An individual who should survive his physical death is also beyond my comprehension, nor do I wish it otherwise; such notions are for the fears or absurd egoism of feeble souls.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Creature (233)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeble (27)  |  God (757)  |  Individual (404)  |  Notion (113)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physical (508)  |  Punish (9)  |  Reward (68)  |  Soul (226)  |  Survive (79)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

I feel that the recent ruling of the United States Army and Navy regarding the refusal of colored blood donors is an indefensible one from any point of view. As you know, there is no scientific basis for the separation of the bloods of different races except on the basis of the individual blood types or groups. (1942)
Spencie Love, One Blood: The Death and Resurrection of Charles R. Drew (1996), 155-56, quoting as it appeared in Current Biography (1944), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Army (33)  |  Basis (173)  |  Blood (134)  |  Color (137)  |  Different (577)  |  Feel (367)  |  Group (78)  |  Individual (404)  |  Know (1518)  |  Navy (9)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Race (268)  |  Recent (77)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Separation (57)  |  State (491)  |  United States (31)  |  View (488)

I had at one time a very bad fever of which I almost died. In my fever I had a long consistent delirium. I dreamt that I was in Hell, and that Hell is a place full of all those happenings that are improbable but not impossible. The effects of this are curious. Some of the damned, when they first arrive below, imagine that they will beguile the tedium of eternity by games of cards. But they find this impossible, because, whenever a pack is shuffled, it comes out in perfect order, beginning with the Ace of Spades and ending with the King of Hearts. There is a special department of Hell for students of probability. In this department there are many typewriters and many monkeys. Every time that a monkey walks on a typewriter, it types by chance one of Shakespeare's sonnets. There is another place of torment for physicists. In this there are kettles and fires, but when the kettles are put on the fires, the water in them freezes. There are also stuffy rooms. But experience has taught the physicists never to open a window because, when they do, all the air rushes out and leaves the room a vacuum.
'The Metaphysician's Nightmare', Nightmares of Eminent Persons and Other Stories (1954), 38-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrival (15)  |  Bad (180)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Chance (239)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Damned (4)  |  Death (388)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Effect (393)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fever (29)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Freeze (5)  |  Game (101)  |  Happening (58)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hell (32)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Improbable (13)  |  Kettle (3)  |  Long (790)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Never (1087)  |  Open (274)  |  Opening (15)  |  Order (632)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Probability (130)  |  Room (40)  |  Rush (18)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Shuffle (5)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Special (184)  |  Student (300)  |  Tedium (3)  |  Time (1877)  |  Torment (18)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Walk (124)  |  Water (481)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2355)  |  Window (58)

I have decided today that the United States should proceed at once with the development of an entirely new type of space transportation system designed to help transform the space frontier of the 1970s into familiar territory, easily accessible for human endeavor in the 1980s and ’90s. This system will center on a space vehicle that can shuttle repeatedly from Earth to orbit and back. It will revolutionize transportation into near space, by routinizing it. It will take the astronomical costs out of astronautics. In short, it will go a long way toward delivering the rich benefits of practical space utilization and the valuable spin-offs from space efforts into the daily lives of Americans and all people.
Statement by President Nixon (5 Jan 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Back (390)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Cost (86)  |  Daily (87)  |  Daily Life (17)  |  Decide (41)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Design (195)  |  Development (422)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easily (35)  |  Effort (227)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Human (1468)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  Orbit (81)  |  People (1005)  |  Practical (200)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Revolutionize (8)  |  Routine (25)  |  Short (197)  |  Shuttle (3)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Shuttle (12)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spin-Off (2)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Territory (24)  |  Today (314)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transportation (14)  |  United States (23)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Utilize (9)  |  Value (365)  |  Vehicle (11)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

I have no doubt that many small strikes of a hammer will finally have as much effect as one very heavy blow: I say as much in quantity, although they may be different in mode, but in my opinion, everything happens in nature in a mathematical way, and there is no quantity that is not divisible into an infinity of parts; and Force, Movement, Impact etc. are types of quantities.
From the original French, “Ie ne doute point que plusieurs petits coups de Marteau ne fassent enfin autant d’effet qu’vn fort grand coup, ie dis autant en quantité, bien qu’ils puissent estre différents, in modo; mais apud me omnia fiunt Mathematicè in Natura, & il n’y a point de quantité qui ne soit divisible en une infinité de parties; Or la Force, le Mouuement, la Percussion, &c. sont des Especes de quantitez,” in letter (11 Mar 1640) to Père Marin Mersenne (AT III 36), collected in Lettres de Mr Descartes (1659), Vol. 2, 211-212. English version by Webmaster using online resources.
Science quotes on:  |  Blow (44)  |  Different (577)  |  Divisible (4)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everything (476)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Happen (274)  |  Impact (42)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Part (222)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Say (984)  |  Small (477)  |  Strike (68)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

I want to note that, because there is the aforementioned difference between mountain and mountain, it will be appropriate, to avoid confusion, to distinguish one [type] from another by different terms; so I shall call the first Primary and the second Secondary.
From De’ Crostacei e degli altri Marini Corpi che si truovano su’ monti (1740), 263, as translated by Ezio Vaccari, from the original Italian, “Qui sol piacemi notare, che, giacchè tra monti e monti v’è l'accennata differenza, farà bene, per ischifar la confusione , distinguere gli uni dagli altri con differenti vocaboli; e perciò i primi Primarie, i secondi Secondarie monti per me si appelleranno.”
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Call (769)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  First (1283)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Primary (80)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

I was a reasonably good student in college ... My chief interests were scientific. When I entered college, I was devoted to out-of-doors natural history, and my ambition was to be a scientific man of the Audubon, or Wilson, or Baird, or Coues type—a man like Hart Merriam, or Frank Chapman, or Hornaday, to-day.
In Theodore Roosevelt: An Autobiography (1913), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambition (43)  |  John James Audubon (9)  |  Chief (97)  |  College (66)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Door (93)  |  Enter (141)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  Interest (386)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Student (300)

If my doctor told me I had only six minutes to live, I wouldn’t brood. I’d type a little faster.
Life (1984).
Science quotes on:  |  Death (388)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Faster (50)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Minute (125)  |  Physician (273)

If we thus go very far back to the source of the Mammalian type of organisation; it is extremely improbable that any of [his relatives shall likewise] the successors of his relations now exist,—In same manner, if we take [a man from] any large family of 12 brothers & sisters [in a state which does not increase] it will be chances against anyone [of them] having progeny living ten thousand years hence; because at present day many are relatives so that tracing back the [descen] fathers would be reduced to small percentage.—& [in] therefore the chances are excessively great against, any two of the 12, having progeny, after that distant period.
P. H. Barrett et al. (eds.), Charles Darwin's Notebooks, 1836-1844: Geology, Transmutation of the Species and Metaphysical Enquiries (1987), Notebook B, 40-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Back (390)  |  Brother (43)  |  Chance (239)  |  Exist (443)  |  Family (94)  |  Father (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Increase (210)  |  Large (394)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Period (198)  |  Present (619)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Small (477)  |  State (491)  |  Successor (14)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

In attempting to explain geological phenomena, the bias has always been on the wrong side; there has always been a disposition to reason á priori on the extraordinary violence and suddenness of changes, both in the inorganic crust of the earth, and in organic types, instead of attempting strenuously to frame theories in accordance with the ordinary operations of nature.
Letter to Rev. W. Whewell (7 Mar 1837). Quoted in Mrs Lyell (ed.), Life, Letters and Journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart (1881), Vol. 2, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Bias (20)  |  Both (493)  |  Change (593)  |  Crust (38)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organic (158)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Reason (744)  |  Side (233)  |  Suddenness (6)  |  Violence (34)  |  Wrong (234)

In deriving a body from the water type I intend to express that to this body, considered as an oxide, there corresponds a chloride, a bromide, a sulphide, a nitride, etc., susceptible of double compositions, or resulting from double decompositions, analogous to those presented by hydrochloric acid, hydrobromic acid, sulphuretted hydrogen, ammonia etc., or which give rise to the same compounds. The type is thus the unit of comparison for all the bodies which, like it, are susceptible of similar changes or result from similar changes.
Traité de Chimie Organique, 1856, 4, 587. Trans. J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry, (1970), Vol. 4, 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Body (537)  |  Change (593)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consider (416)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Express (186)  |  Hydrochloric Acid (2)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Present (619)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Water (481)

In describing a protein it is now common to distinguish the primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The primary structure is simply the order, or sequence, of the amino-acid residues along the polypeptide chains. This was first determined by Sanger using chemical techniques for the protein insulin, and has since been elucidated for a number of peptides and, in part, for one or two other small proteins. The secondary structure is the type of folding, coiling or puckering adopted by the polypeptide chain: the a-helix structure and the pleated sheet are examples. Secondary structure has been assigned in broad outline to a number of librous proteins such as silk, keratin and collagen; but we are ignorant of the nature of the secondary structure of any globular protein. True, there is suggestive evidence, though as yet no proof, that a-helices occur in globular proteins, to an extent which is difficult to gauge quantitatively in any particular case. The tertiary structure is the way in which the folded or coiled polypeptide chains are disposed to form the protein molecule as a three-dimensional object, in space. The chemical and physical properties of a protein cannot be fully interpreted until all three levels of structure are understood, for these properties depend on the spatial relationships between the amino-acids, and these in turn depend on the tertiary and secondary structures as much as on the primary. Only X-ray diffraction methods seem capable, even in principle, of unravelling the tertiary and secondary structures.
Co-author with G. Bodo, H. M. Dintzis, R. G. Parrish, H. Wyckoff, and D. C. Phillips
'A Three-Dimensional Model of the Myoglobin Molecule Obtained by X-ray Analysis', Nature (1958) 181, 662.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Author (167)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Common (436)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Diffraction (5)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Extent (139)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Helix (10)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Polypeptide (2)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proof (287)  |  Protein (54)  |  Ray (114)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Residue (9)  |  Frederick Sanger (6)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Silk (13)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Structure (344)  |  Technique (80)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Understood (156)  |  Way (1217)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Diffraction (3)

In organic chemistry there exist certain types which are conserved even when, in place of hydrogen, equal volumes of chlorine, of bromine, etc. are introduced.
Comptes Rendus, 1839, 8, 609-22. Trans. J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry, Vol. 4, 364.
Science quotes on:  |  Bromine (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Exist (443)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Inorganic (13)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)

In the beginning there was an explosion. Not an explosion like those familiar on earth, starting from a definite center and spreading out to engulf more and more of the circumambient air, but an explosion which occurred simultaneously everywhere, filling all space from the beginning, with every particle of matter rushing apart from every other particle. ‘All space’ in this context may mean either all of an infinite universe, or all of a finite universe which curves back on itself like the surface of a sphere. Neither possibility is easy to comprehend, but this will not get in our way; it matters hardly at all in the early universe whether space is finite or infinite. At about one-hundredth of a second, the earliest time about which we can speak with any confidence, the temperature of the universe was about a hundred thousand million (1011) degrees Centigrade. This is much hotter than in the center of even the hottest star, so hot, in fact, that none of the components of ordinary matter, molecules, or atoms, or even the nuclei of atoms, could have held together. Instead, the matter rushing apart in this explosion consisted of various types of the so-called elementary particles, which are the subject of modern high­energy nuclear physics.
The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe (1977), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Back (390)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Call (769)  |  Component (48)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Consist (223)  |  Context (29)  |  Curve (49)  |  Definite (110)  |  Degree (276)  |  Early (185)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Energy (344)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finite (59)  |  High (362)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hottest (2)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Million (114)  |  Modern (385)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physics (5)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibility (164)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Space (500)  |  Speak (232)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Star (427)  |  Subject (521)  |  Surface (209)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

In the end, science as we know it has two basic types of practitioners. One is the educated man who still has a controlled sense of wonder before the universal mystery, whether it hides in a snail’s eye or within the light that impinges on that delicate organ. The second kind of observer is the extreme reductionist who is so busy stripping things apart that the tremendous mystery has been reduced to a trifle, to intangibles not worth troubling one’s head about.
In 'Science and the Sense of the Holy,' The Star Thrower (1978), 190.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Basic (138)  |  Busy (28)  |  Control (167)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Educate (13)  |  End (590)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Eye (419)  |  Head (81)  |  Hide (69)  |  Impinge (4)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Observer (43)  |  Organ (115)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Sense (770)  |  Snail (10)  |  Still (613)  |  Strip (6)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Universal (189)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Worth (169)

In the printed page the only real things are the paper and the ink; the white spaces play the same part in aiding the eye to take in the meaning of the print as do the black letters.
From Under the Apple-Trees (1916), 302.
Science quotes on:  |  Black (42)  |  Black And White (3)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eye (419)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Letter (109)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Observation (555)  |  Page (30)  |  Paper (182)  |  Part (222)  |  Play (112)  |  Print (17)  |  Space (500)  |  Thing (1915)  |  White (127)

Industrial Society is not merely one containing 'industry,' large-scale productive units capable of supplying man's material needs in a way which can eliminate poverty: it is also a society in which knowledge plays a part wholly different from that which it played in earlier social forms, and which indeed possesses a quite different type of knowledge. Modern science is inconceivable outside an industrial society: but modern industrial society is equally inconceivable without modern science. Roughly, science is the mode of cognition of industrial society, and industry is the ecology of science.
Thought and Change (1965), 179.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cognition (7)  |  Different (577)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Equally (130)  |  Form (959)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Industry (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Merely (316)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Outside (141)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Productive (32)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)

It has been said that computing machines can only carry out the processes that they are instructed to do. This is certainly true in the sense that if they do something other than what they were instructed then they have just made some mistake. It is also true that the intention in constructing these machines in the first instance is to treat them as slaves, giving them only jobs which have been thought out in detail, jobs such that the user of the machine fully understands what in principle is going on all the time. Up till the present machines have only been used in this way. But is it necessary that they should always be used in such a manner? Let us suppose we have set up a machine with certain initial instruction tables, so constructed that these tables might on occasion, if good reason arose, modify those tables. One can imagine that after the machine had been operating for some time, the instructions would have altered out of all recognition, but nevertheless still be such that one would have to admit that the machine was still doing very worthwhile calculations. Possibly it might still be getting results of the type desired when the machine was first set up, but in a much more efficient manner. In such a case one would have to admit that the progress of the machine had not been foreseen when its original instructions were put in. It would be like a pupil who had learnt much from his master, but had added much more by his own work. When this happens I feel that one is obliged to regard the machine as showing intelligence.
Lecture to the London Mathematical Society, 20 February 1947. Quoted in B. E. Carpenter and R. W. Doran (eds.), A. M. Turing's Ace Report of 1946 and Other Papers (1986), 122-3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Computer (127)  |  Construct (124)  |  Detail (146)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Happen (274)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intention (46)  |  Job (82)  |  Machine (257)  |  Master (178)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Regard (305)  |  Result (677)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Slave (37)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Table (104)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Understand (606)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worthwhile (18)

It is evident that certain genes which either initially or ultimately have beneficial effects may at the same time produce characters of a non-adaptive type, which will therefore be established with them. Such characters may sometimes serve most easily to distinguish different races or species; indeed, they may be the only ones ordinarily available, when the advantages with which they are associated are of a physiological nature. Further, it may happen that the chain of reactions which a gene sets going is of advantage, while the end-product to which this gives rise, say a character in a juvenile or the adult stage, is of no adaptive significance.
Mendelism and Evolution (1931), 78-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Available (78)  |  Certain (550)  |  Character (243)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Evident (91)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Happen (274)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Product (160)  |  Race (268)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Rise (166)  |  Say (984)  |  Set (394)  |  Significance (113)  |  Species (401)  |  Stage (143)  |  Time (1877)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Will (2355)

It is probable that all organisms now alive are descended from one ancestor, for the following reason. Most of our structural molecules are asymmetrical, as shown by the fact that they rotate the plane of polarized light, and often form asymmetrical crystals. But of the two possible types of any such molecule, related to one another like a right and left boot, only one is found throughout living nature. The apparent exceptions to this rule are all small molecules which are not used in the building of the large structures which display the phenomena of life.
In 'The Origin of Life', The Inequality of Man: And Other Essays (1932), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Building (156)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Descend (47)  |  Display (56)  |  Exception (73)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Form (959)  |  Large (394)  |  Left (13)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Living (491)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Plane (20)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reason (744)  |  Right (452)  |  Rotate (8)  |  Rule (294)  |  Small (477)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (344)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Two (937)

It is tautological to say that an organism is adapted to its environment. It is even tautological to say that an organism is physiologically adapted to its environment. However, just as in the case of many morphological characters, it is unwarranted to conclude that all aspects of the physiology of an organism have evolved in reference to a specific milieu. It is equally gratuitous to assume that an organism will inevitably show physiological specializations in its adaptation to a particular set of conditions. All that can be concluded is that the functional capacities of an organism are sufficient to have allowed persistence within its environment. On one hand, the history of an evolutionary line may place serious constraints upon the types of further physiological changes that are readily feasible. Some changes might require excessive restructuring of the genome or might involve maladaptive changes in related functions. On the other hand, a taxon which is successful in occupying a variety of environments may be less impressive in individual physiological capacities than one with a far more limited distribution.
In W.R. Dawson, G.A. Bartholomew, and A.F. Bennett, 'A Reappraisal of the Aquatic Specializations of the Galapagos Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)', Evolution (1977), 31, 891.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Assume (38)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Case (99)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Far (154)  |  Feasible (3)  |  Function (228)  |  Functional (10)  |  Genome (15)  |  Gratuitous (2)  |  Hand (143)  |  History (673)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Less (103)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Line (91)  |  Milieu (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphological (3)  |  Occupy (26)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Place (177)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relate (21)  |  Require (219)  |  Restructuring (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Specific (95)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Tautological (2)  |  Unwarranted (2)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)

It is the very strangeness of nature that makes science engrossing. That ought to be at the center of science teaching. There are more than seven-times-seven types of ambiguity in science, awaiting analysis. The poetry of Wallace Stevens is crystal-clear alongside the genetic code.
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony(1984), 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Ambiguity (17)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Center (33)  |  Code (31)  |  Crystal (68)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ought (3)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seven (5)  |  Wallace Stevens (3)  |  Strangeness (10)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wait (58)

It need scarcely be pointed out that with such a mechanism complete isolation of portion of a species should result relatively rapidly in specific differentiation, and one that is not necessarily adaptive. The effective inter­group competition leading to adaptive advance may be between species rather than races. Such isolation is doubtless usually geographic in character at the outset but may be clinched by the development of hybrid sterility. The usual difference of the chromosome complements of related species puts the importance of chromosome aberration as an evolutionary process beyond question, but, as I see it, this importance is not in the character differences which they bring (slight in balanced types), but rather in leading to the sterility of hybrids and thus making permanent the isolation of two groups.
How far do the observations of actual species and their subdivisions conform to this picture? This is naturally too large a subject for more than a few suggestions.
That evolution involves non-adaptive differentiation to a large extent at the subspecies and even the species level is indicated by the kinds of differences by which such groups are actually distinguished by systematics. It is only at the subfamily and family levels that clear-cut adaptive differences become the rule. The principal evolutionary mechanism in the origin of species must thus be an essentially nonadaptive one.
In Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress of Genetics: Ithaca, New York, 1932 (1932) Vol. 1, 363-364.
Science quotes on:  |  Aberration (8)  |  Actual (117)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Advance (280)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Character (243)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Clear-Cut (10)  |  Competition (39)  |  Complement (5)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cut (114)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effective (59)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extent (139)  |  Family (94)  |  Geographic (10)  |  Geography (36)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inter (11)  |  Involve (90)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Kind (557)  |  Large (394)  |  Making (300)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Observation (555)  |  Origin (239)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Picture (143)  |  Point (580)  |  Portion (84)  |  Principal (63)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Race (268)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  See (1081)  |  Species (401)  |  Specific (95)  |  Sterility (10)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Systematics (4)  |  Two (937)  |  Usually (176)

It turns out that an eerie type of chaos can lurk just behind a façade of order—and yet, deep inside the chaos lurks an even eerier type of order.
Metamagical Themas: Questing for the Essence of Mind and Pattern (1985, 1996), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (137)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Deep (233)  |  Facade (2)  |  Order (632)  |  Turn (447)

It was his [Leibnitz’s] love of method and order, and the conviction that such order and harmony existed in the real world, and that our success in understanding it depended upon the degree and order which we could attain in our own thoughts, that originally was probably nothing more than a habit which by degrees grew into a formal rule. This habit was acquired by early occupation with legal and mathematical questions. We have seen how the theory of combinations and arrangements of elements had a special interest for him. We also saw how mathematical calculations served him as a type and model of clear and orderly reasoning, and how he tried to introduce method and system into logical discussions, by reducing to a small number of terms the multitude of compound notions he had to deal with. This tendency increased in strength, and even in those early years he elaborated the idea of a general arithmetic, with a universal language of symbols, or a characteristic which would be applicable to all reasoning processes, and reduce philosophical investigations to that simplicity and certainty which the use of algebraic symbols had introduced into mathematics.
A mental attitude such as this is always highly favorable for mathematical as well as for philosophical investigations. Wherever progress depends upon precision and clearness of thought, and wherever such can be gained by reducing a variety of investigations to a general method, by bringing a multitude of notions under a common term or symbol, it proves inestimable. It necessarily imports the special qualities of number—viz., their continuity, infinity and infinite divisibility—like mathematical quantities—and destroys the notion that irreconcilable contrasts exist in nature, or gaps which cannot be bridged over. Thus, in his letter to Arnaud, Leibnitz expresses it as his opinion that geometry, or the philosophy of space, forms a step to the philosophy of motion—i.e., of corporeal things—and the philosophy of motion a step to the philosophy of mind.
In Leibnitz (1884), 44-45. [The first sentence is reworded to better introduce the quotation. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Algebraic (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Applicable (31)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bring (90)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear (100)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Corporeal (5)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Early (185)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Express (186)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Form (959)  |  Formal (33)  |  Gain (145)  |  Gap (33)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Grow (238)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Highly (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Import (5)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inestimable (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Interest (386)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Language (293)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Legal (8)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Original (58)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Precision (68)  |  Probable (20)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Quotation (18)  |  Real World (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1081)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Serve (59)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Interest (2)  |  Step (231)  |  Strength (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Symbol (93)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wherever (51)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

It was to Hofmeister, working as a young man, an amateur and enthusiast, in the early morning hours of summer months, before business, at Leipzig in the years before 1851, that the vision first appeared of a common type of Life-Cycle, running through Mosses and Ferns to Gymnosperms and Flowering Plants, linking the whole series in one scheme of reproduction and life-history.
(1919). As quoted in E.J.H. Corner, The Life of Plants (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Amateur (19)  |  Business (149)  |  Common (436)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Early (185)  |  Enthusiast (7)  |  Fern (9)  |  First (1283)  |  Flower (106)  |  History (673)  |  Wilhelm Hofmeister (2)  |  Hour (186)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life Cycle (4)  |  Life History (2)  |  Linking (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Month (88)  |  Morning (94)  |  Moss (10)  |  Plant (294)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Running (61)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Summer (54)  |  Through (849)  |  Vision (123)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

It [mathematics] is in the inner world of pure thought, where all entia dwell, where is every type of order and manner of correlation and variety of relationship, it is in this infinite ensemble of eternal verities whence, if there be one cosmos or many of them, each derives its character and mode of being,—it is there that the spirit of mathesis has its home and its life.
Is it a restricted home, a narrow life, static and cold and grey with logic, without artistic interest, devoid of emotion and mood and sentiment? That world, it is true, is not a world of solar light, not clad in the colours that liven and glorify the things of sense, but it is an illuminated world, and over it all and everywhere throughout are hues and tints transcending sense, painted there by radiant pencils of psychic light, the light in which it lies. It is a silent world, and, nevertheless, in respect to the highest principle of art—the interpenetration of content and form, the perfect fusion of mode and meaning—it even surpasses music. In a sense, it is a static world, but so, too, are the worlds of the sculptor and the architect. The figures, however, which reason constructs and the mathematic vision beholds, transcend the temple and the statue, alike in simplicity and in intricacy, in delicacy and in grace, in symmetry and in poise. Not only are this home and this life thus rich in aesthetic interests, really controlled and sustained by motives of a sublimed and supersensuous art, but the religious aspiration, too, finds there, especially in the beautiful doctrine of invariants, the most perfect symbols of what it seeks—the changeless in the midst of change, abiding things hi a world of flux, configurations that remain the same despite the swirl and stress of countless hosts of curious transformations.
In 'The Universe and Beyond', Hibbert Journal (1904-1906), 3, 314.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Art (657)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Behold (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Cold (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Construct (124)  |  Content (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Countless (36)  |  Curious (91)  |  Delicacy (8)  |  Derive (65)  |  Despite (7)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Ensemble (7)  |  Especially (31)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Flux (21)  |  Form (959)  |  Fusion (16)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Grace (31)  |  Grey (10)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Host (16)  |  Hue (3)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inner (71)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intricacy (8)  |  Invariant (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Logic (287)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mode (41)  |  Mood (13)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Music (129)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Order (632)  |  Paint (22)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Poise (4)  |  Principle (507)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Pure (291)  |  Radiant (15)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Respect (207)  |  Restrict (12)  |  Rich (62)  |  Same (157)  |  Sculptor (9)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensuous (5)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (29)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solar (8)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Static (8)  |  Statue (16)  |  Stress (22)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temple (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Tint (2)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Transformation (69)  |  True (212)  |  Variety (132)  |  Verity (5)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

Its [science’s] effectiveness is almost inevitable because it narrows the possibility of refutation and failure. Science begins by saying it can only answer this type of question and ends by saying these are the only questions that can be asked. Once the implications and shallowness of this trick are fully realised, science will be humbled and we shall be free to celebrate ourselves once again.
From Understanding the Present: An Alternative History of Science (2004), 249.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Begin (260)  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Effectiveness (12)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  Free (232)  |  Humble (50)  |  Implication (23)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Question (621)  |  Realize (147)  |  Refutation (12)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shallowness (2)  |  Trick (35)  |  Will (2355)

It’s humbling to realise that the developmental gulf between a miniscule ant colony and our modern human civilisation is only a tiny fraction of the distance between a Type 0 and a Type III civilisation – a factor of 100 billion billion, in fact. Yet we have such a highly regarded view of ourselves, we believe a Type III civilisation would find us irresistible and would rush to make contact with us. The truth is, however, they may be as interested in communicating with humans as we are keen to communicate with ants.
'Star Makers', Cosmos (Feb 2006).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ant (28)  |  Billion (95)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Colony (8)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Communication (94)  |  Contact (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Distance (161)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humility (28)  |  Interest (386)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Modern (385)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Realization (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)

I’m a little different from all those conservation types.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Different (577)  |  Little (707)

Man has generally been preoccupied with obtaining as much “production” from the landscape as possible, by developing and maintaining early successional types of ecosystems, usually monocultures. But, of course, man does not live by food and fiber alone; he also needs a balanced CO2-O2 atmosphere, the climactic buffer provided by oceans and masses of vegetation, and clean (that is, unproductive) water for cultural and industrial uses. Many essential life-cycle resources, not to mention recreational and esthetic needs, are best provided man by the less 'productive' landscapes. In other words, the landscape is not just a supply depot but is also the oikos—the home—in which we must live.
'The Strategy of Ecosystem Development. An Understanding of Ecological Succession Provides a Basis for Resolving Man's Conflict with Nature', Science (1969), 164, 266.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Best (459)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Clean (50)  |  Course (409)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Early (185)  |  Ecosystem (24)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fiber (16)  |  Fibre (5)  |  Food (199)  |  Home (170)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mention (82)  |  Monoculture (2)  |  Must (1526)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Possible (552)  |  Production (183)  |  Productive (32)  |  Succession (77)  |  Supply (93)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Water (481)  |  Word (619)

Man is no new-begot child of the ape, bred of a struggle for existence upon brutish lines—nor should the belief that such is his origin, oft dinned into his ears by scientists, influence his conduct. Were he to regard himself as an extremely ancient type, distinguished chiefly by the qualities of his mind, and to look upon the existing Primates as the failures of his line, as his misguided and brutish collaterals, rather than as his ancestors, I think it would be something gained for the ethical outlook of Homo—and also it would be consistent with present knowledge.
The Origin of Man (1918), a pamphlet published by The Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge, reprinted in Arthur Dendy (ed.), Animal Life and Human Progress (1919), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Ape (53)  |  Belief (578)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Child (307)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Ear (68)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Existence (456)  |  Failure (161)  |  Gain (145)  |  Himself (461)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Influence (222)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Man (9)  |  Outlook (30)  |  Present (619)  |  Primate (11)  |  Regard (305)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Something (719)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Think (1086)

Man … begins life as an ambiguous speck of matter which can in no way be distinguished from the original form of the lowest animal or plant. He next becomes a cell; his life is precisely that of the animalcule. Cells cluster round this primordial cell, and the man is so far advanced that he might be mistaken for an undeveloped oyster; he grows still more, and it is clear that he might even be a fish; he then passes into a stage which is common to all quadrupeds, and next assumes a form which can only belong to quadrupeds of the higher type. At last the hour of birth approaches; coiled within the dark womb he sits, the image of an ape; a caricature of the man that is to be. He is born, and for some time he walks only on all fours; he utters only inarticulate sounds; and even in his boyhood his fondness for climbing trees would seem to be a relic of the old arboreal life.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 393.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Ape (53)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belong (162)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Cell (138)  |  Climbing (4)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Common (436)  |  Dark (140)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Form (959)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hour (186)  |  Image (96)  |  Inarticulate (2)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Old (481)  |  Oyster (11)  |  Plant (294)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Relic (6)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speck (23)  |  Stage (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Undeveloped (6)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Womb (24)

Many persons have inquired concerning a recent message of mine that “a new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels.”
From interview with Michael Amrine, 'The Real Problem is in the Hearts of Men', New York Times Magazine, (23 Jun 1946), 7. See more of the message from which Einstein quoted himself, see the longer quote that begins, “Our world faces a crisis as yet unperceived…,” on the Albert Einstein Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (228)  |  Essential (199)  |  High (362)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Level (67)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Message (49)  |  Mine (76)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Person (363)  |  Recent (77)  |  Survive (79)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)

Mathematical proofs are essentially of three different types: pre-formal; formal; post-formal. Roughly the first and third prove something about that sometimes clear and empirical, sometimes vague and ‘quasi-empirical’ stuff, which is the real though rather evasive subject of mathematics.
In Mathematics, Science and Epistemology (1980), Vol. 2, 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (100)  |  Different (577)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Essential (199)  |  First (1283)  |  Formal (33)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Real (149)  |  Something (719)  |  Subject (521)  |  Vague (47)

Mathematicians are like a certain type of Frenchman: when you talk to them they translate it into their own language, and then it soon turns into something completely different.
Maxims and Reflections (1998), trans. E. Stopp, 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Completely (135)  |  Different (577)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Translate (19)  |  Turn (447)

Mathematics in its widest signification is the development of all types of formal, necessary, deductive reasoning.
In Universal Algebra (1898), Preface, vi.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Development (422)  |  Formal (33)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Signification (2)  |  Wide (96)

Mathematics is a type of thought which seems ingrained in the human mind, which manifests itself to some extent with even the primitive races, and which is developed to a high degree with the growth of civilization. … A type of thought, a body of results, so essentially characteristic of the human mind, so little influenced by environment, so uniformly present in every civilization, is one of which no well-informed mind today can be ignorant.
In Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary and the Secondary School (1906), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Degree (276)  |  Develop (268)  |  Environment (216)  |  Extent (139)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inform (47)  |  Informed (5)  |  Ingrained (5)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Present (619)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Race (268)  |  Result (677)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Uniform (18)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Well-Informed (5)

May not Music be described as the Mathematic of sense, Mathematic as Music of the reason? the soul of each the same! Thus the musician feels Mathematic, the mathematician thinks Music, Music the dream, Mathematic the working life each to receive its consummation from the other when the human intelligence, elevated to its perfect type, shall shine forth glorified in some future Mozart-Dirichlet or Beethoven-Gauss a union already not indistinctly foreshadowed in the genius and labours of a Helmholtz!
In paper read 7 Apr 1864, printed in 'Algebraical Researches Containing a Disquisition On Newton’s Rule for the Discovery of Imaginary Roots', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London (1865), 154, 613, footnote. Also in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 419.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Beethoven (13)  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (8)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Describe (128)  |  Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (3)  |  Dream (208)  |  Elevate (12)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foreshadow (5)  |  Future (429)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Genius (284)  |  Glorify (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indistinct (2)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Labour (98)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mozart_Amadeus (2)  |  Music (129)  |  Musician (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Reason (744)  |  Receive (114)  |  Sense (770)  |  Shine (45)  |  Soul (226)  |  Think (1086)  |  Union (51)  |  Work (1351)

May there not be methods of using explosive energy incomparably more intense than anything heretofore discovered? Might not a bomb no bigger than an orange be found to possess a secret power to destroy a whole block of buildings—nay, to concentrate the force of a thousand tons of cordite and blast a township at a stroke? Could not explosives even of the existing type be guided automatically in flying machines by wireless or other rays, without a human pilot, in ceaseless procession upon a hostile city, arsenal, camp or dockyard?
'Shall We All Commit Suicide?' Pall Mall (Sep 1924). Reprinted in Thoughts and Adventures (1932), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Blast (13)  |  Building (156)  |  Camp (10)  |  City (78)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dockyard (2)  |  Energy (344)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Force (487)  |  Human (1468)  |  Machine (257)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Missile (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Orange (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Procession (5)  |  Ray (114)  |  Secret (194)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Ton (21)  |  War (225)  |  Whole (738)

Men of science belong to two different types—the logical and the intuitive. Science owes its progress to both forms of minds. Mathematics, although a purely logical structure, nevertheless makes use of intuition. Among the mathematicians there are intuitives and logicians, analysts and geometricians. Hermite and Weierstrass were intuitives. Riemann and Bertrand, logicians. The discoveries of intuition have always to be developed by logic.
In Man the Unknown (1935), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Analyst (8)  |  Belong (162)  |  Joseph Bertrand (6)  |  Both (493)  |  Develop (268)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometrician (6)  |  Charles Hermite (10)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logician (17)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Owe (71)  |  Progress (465)  |  Pure (291)  |  Purely (109)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Structure (344)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)

Modern anthropology has taught us, through comparative investigation of so-called primitive cultures, that the social behavior of human beings may differ greatly, depending upon prevailing cultural patterns and the types of organisation which predominate in society. It is on this that those who are striving to improve the lot of man may ground their hopes: human beings are not condemned, because of their biological constitution, to annihilate each other or to be at the mercy of a cruel, self-inflicted fate.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Call (769)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Culture (143)  |  Depend (228)  |  Differ (85)  |  Fate (72)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Improve (58)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Modern (385)  |  Organisation (7)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Self (267)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Strive (46)  |  Teach (277)  |  Through (849)

Natural selection based on the differential multiplication of variant types cannot exist before there is material capable of replicating itself and its own variations, that is, before the origination of specifically genetic material or gene-material.
'Genetic Nucleic Acid', Perspectives in Biology and Medicine (1961), 5, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Capable (168)  |  Difference (337)  |  DNA (77)  |  Exist (443)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Material (353)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Replicating (3)  |  Replication (9)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Variant (9)  |  Variation (90)

Now it is a well-known principle of zoological evolution that an isolated region, if large and sufficiently varied in its topography, soil, climate and vegetation, will give rise to a diversified fauna according to the law of adaptive radiation from primitive and central types. Branches will spring off in all directions to take advantage of every possible opportunity of securing food. The modifications which animals undergo in this adaptive radiation are largely of mechanical nature, they are limited in number and kind by hereditary, stirp or germinal influences, and thus result in the independent evolution of similar types in widely-separated regions under the law of parallelism or homoplasy. This law causes the independent origin not only of similar genera but of similar families and even of our similar orders. Nature thus repeats herself upon a vast scale, but the similarity is never complete and exact.
'The Geological and Faunal Relations of Europe and America during the Tertiary Period and the Theory of the Successive Invasions of an African Fauna', Science (1900), 11, 563-64.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Branch (150)  |  Cause (541)  |  Central (80)  |  Climate (97)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Direction (175)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Family (94)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Food (199)  |  Genus (25)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Independence (34)  |  Influence (222)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Parallelism (2)  |  Possible (552)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principle (507)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Region (36)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scale (121)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spring (133)  |  Variation (90)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zoology (36)

O. Hahn and F. Strassmann have discovered a new type of nuclear reaction, the splitting into two smaller nuclei of the nuclei of uranium and thorium under neutron bombardment. Thus they demonstrated the production of nuclei of barium, lanthanum, strontium, yttrium, and, more recently, of xenon and caesium. It can be shown by simple considerations that this type of nuclear reaction may be described in an essentially classical way like the fission of a liquid drop, and that the fission products must fly apart with kinetic energies of the order of hundred million electron-volts each.
'Products of the Fission of the Urarium Nucleus', Nature (1939), 143, 471.
Science quotes on:  |  Barium (4)  |  Bombardment (3)  |  Classical (45)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drop (76)  |  Electron (93)  |  Fission (10)  |  Fly (146)  |  Otto Hahn (2)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Kinetic (12)  |  Kinetic Energy (3)  |  Lanthanum (2)  |  Liquid (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neutron (17)  |  New (1216)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Reaction (2)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Order (632)  |  Product (160)  |  Production (183)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Simple (406)  |  Strontium (2)  |  Thorium (5)  |  Two (937)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Way (1217)  |  Xenon (5)  |  Yttrium (3)

One of the most immediate consequences of the electrochemical theory is the necessity of regarding all chemical compounds as binary substances. It is necessary to discover in each of them the positive and negative constituents... No view was ever more fitted to retard the progress of organic chemistry. Where the theory of substitution and the theory of types assume similar molecules, in which some of the elements can be replaced by others without the edifice becoming modified either in form or outward behaviour, the electrochemical theory divides these same molecules, simply and solely, it may be said, in order to find in them two opposite groups, which it then supposes to be combined with each other in virtue of their mutual electrical activity... I have tried to show that in organic chemistry there exist types which are capable, without destruction, of undergoing the most singular transformations according to the nature of the elements.
Traité de Chemie Appliquée aux Arts, Vol. I (1828), 53. Trans. J. R. Partington, A History of Chemistry, Vol. 4, 366.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Binary (12)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electrochemical (4)  |  Electrochemistry (5)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Negative (63)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Positive (94)  |  Progress (465)  |  Show (346)  |  Singular (23)  |  Substance (248)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Virtue (109)

Our studies have shown that all cases of typhoid of this type have arisen by contact, that is, carried directly from one person to another. There was no trace of a connection to drinking water.
'Die Bekämpfing des Typhus', Veröffentlichungen aus dem Gebiete des Militär-Sanitätswesens (1903), 21. Quoted in English in Thomas D. Brock, Robert Koch: A Life in Medicine and Bacteriology (1988), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Carrier (5)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contact (65)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Person (363)  |  Trace (103)  |  Typhoid (7)  |  Water (481)

Our world faces a crisis as yet unperceived by those possessing power to make great decisions for good or evil. The unleashed power of the atom has changed everything save our modes of thinking and we thus drift toward unparalleled catastrophe. We scientists who released this immense power have an overwhelming responsibility in this world life-and-death struggle to harness the atom for the benefit of mankind and not for humanity’s destruction. … We need two hundred thousand dollars at once for a nation-wide campaign to let people know that a new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move toward higher levels. This appeal is sent to you only after long consideration of the immense crisis we face. … We ask your help at this fateful moment as a sign that we scientists do not stand alone.
In 'Atomic Education Urged by Einstein', New York Times (25 May 1946), 13. Extract from a telegram (24 May 1946) to “several hundred prominent Americans”, signed by Albert Einstein as Chairman, with other members, of the Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists. It was also signed by the Federation of American Scientists.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alone (311)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atom (355)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Campaign (6)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Change (593)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Death (388)  |  Decision (91)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Drift (13)  |  Essential (199)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evil (116)  |  Face (212)  |  Fateful (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harness (23)  |  Help (105)  |  Higher Level (3)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Immense (86)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Moment (253)  |  Move (216)  |  Nation (193)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Release (27)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Save (118)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Send (22)  |  Sign (58)  |  Stand (274)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Unleash (2)  |  Wide (96)  |  World (1774)

Persons possessing great intellect and a capacity for excelling in the creative arts and also in the sciences are generally likely to have heavier brains than the ordinary individual. Arguing from this we might expect to find a corresponding lightness in the brain of the criminal, but this is not always the case ... Many criminals show not a single anomaly in their physical or mental make-up, while many persons with marked evidences of morphological aberration have never exhibited the criminal tendency.
Every attempt to prove crime to be due to a constitution peculiar only to criminals has failed signally. It is because most criminals are drawn from the ranks of the low, the degraded, the outcast, that investigators were ever deceived into attempting to set up a 'type' of criminal. The social conditions which foster the great majority of crimes are more needful of study and improvement.
From study of known normal brains we have learned that there is a certain range of variation. No two brains are exactly alike, and the greatest source of error in the assertions of Benedict and Lombroso has been the finding of this or that variation in a criminal’s brains, and maintaining such to be characteristic of the 'criminal constitution,' unmindful of the fact that like variations of structure may and do exist in the brains of normal, moral persons.
Address to the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia (28 Dec 1904), as quoted in 'Americans of Future Will Have Best Brains', New York Times (29 Dec 1904), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aberration (8)  |  Alike (60)  |  Anomaly (11)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Brain (270)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Crime (38)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Foster (12)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Low (80)  |  Majority (66)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Prove (250)  |  Range (99)  |  Rank (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  Social (252)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Two (937)  |  Variation (90)

Science cannot describe individuals, but only types. If human societies cannot be classified, they must remain inaccessible to scientific description.
'Montesquieu's Contribution to the Rise of Social Science' (1892), in Montesquieu and Rousseau. Forerunners of Sociology, trans. Ralph Manheim (1960), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Describe (128)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Individual (404)  |  Must (1526)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Society (326)

Science is intimately integrated with the whole social structure and cultural tradition. They mutually support one other—only in certain types of society can science flourish, and conversely without a continuous and healthy development and application of science such a society cannot function properly.
The Social System (1951, 1977), Chap. 8, 111. As a functionalist, Parsons argued that social practices had to be studied in terms of their function in maintaining society.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Certain (550)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Culture (143)  |  Development (422)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Flourishing (6)  |  Function (228)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Integrated (10)  |  Integration (19)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Structure (344)  |  Support (147)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Whole (738)

Segregationalists will even argue that God was the first segregationalist. “Red birds and blue birds don't fly together”, they contend. … They turn to some pseudo-scientific writing and argue that the Negro’s brain is smaller than the white man’s brain. They do not know, or they refuse to know that the idea of an inferior or superior race has been refuted by the best evidence of the science of anthropology. Great anthropologists, like Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, and Melville J. Herskovits, agree that, although there may be inferior and superior individuals within all races, there is no superior or inferior race. And segregationalists refuse to acknowledge that there are four types of blood, and these four types are found within every racial group.
'Love in Action', Strength To Love (1963, 1981), 45-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  All (4108)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Best (459)  |  Bigotry (4)  |  Bird (149)  |  Blood (134)  |  Brain (270)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evidence (248)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Negro (7)  |  Pseudoscience (16)  |  Race (268)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Superior (81)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writing (189)

Since it is proposed to regard chemical reactions as electrical transactions in which reagents act by reason of a constitutional affinity either for electrons or for atomic nuclei, it is important to be able to recognize which type of reactivity any given reagent exhibits.
'Principles of an Electronic Theory of Organic Reactions', Chemical Reviews (1934), 15, 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Affinity (27)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electron (93)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Regard (305)  |  Transaction (13)

Since my mother is the type that's called schizophrenogenic in the literature—she's the one who makes crazy people, crazy children—I was awfully curious to find out why I didn't go insane.
Quoted in Colin Wilson,New Pathways in Psychology: Maslow and the Post-Freudian Revolution (1972, 2001), 155-56.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Biography (240)  |  Call (769)  |  Children (200)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Find (998)  |  Insane (8)  |  Literature (103)  |  Mother (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Why (491)

Since natural selection demands only adequacy, elegance of design is not relevant; any combination of behavioural adjustment, physiological regulation, or anatomical accommodation that allows survival and reproduction may be favoured by selection. Since all animals are caught in a phylogenetic trap by the nature of past evolutionary adjustments, it is to be expected that a given environmental challenge will be met in a variety of ways by different animals. The delineation of the patterns of the accommodations of diverse types of organisms to the environment contributes much of the fascination of ecologically relevant physiology.
In 'The roles of physiology and behaviour in the maintenance of homeostasis in the desert environment.', Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology (1964), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (9)  |  Adequacy (9)  |  Adjustment (20)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Anatomical (3)  |  Animal (617)  |  Catch (31)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contribute (27)  |  Demand (123)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Favor (63)  |  Give (202)  |  Meet (31)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organism (220)  |  Past (337)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Phylogenetic (3)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Relevant (5)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Selection (128)  |  Survival (94)  |  Trap (6)  |  Variety (132)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Since science's competence extends to observable and measurable phenomena, not to the inner being of things, and to the means, not to the ends of human life, it would be nonsense to expect that the progress of science will provide men with a new type of metaphysics, ethics, or religion.
'Science and Ontology', Bulletin of Atomic Scientists (1949), 5, 200.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Competence (11)  |  End (590)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extend (128)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inner (71)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  New (1216)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Observable (21)  |  Observation (555)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

Since we think we understand when we know the explanation, and there are four types of explanation (one, what it is to be a thing; one, that if certain things hold it is necessary that this does; another, what initiated the change; and fourth, the aim), all these are proved through the middle term.
Aristotle
Posterior Analytics, 94a, 20-4. In Jonathan Barnes (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. I, 155.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Know (1518)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Term (349)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Understand (606)

Sodium thymonucleate fibres give two distinct types of X-ray diagram … [structures A and B]. The X-ray diagram of structure B (see photograph) shows in striking manner the features characteristic of helical structures, first worked out in this laboratory by Stokes (unpublished) and by Crick, Cochran and Vand2. Stokes and Wilkins were the first to propose such structures for nucleic acid as a result of direct studies of nucleic acid fibres, although a helical structure had been previously suggested by Furberg (thesis, London, 1949) on the basis of X-ray studies of nucleosides and nucleotides.
While the X-ray evidence cannot, at present, be taken as direct proof that the structure is helical, other considerations discussed below make the existence of a helical structure highly probable.
From Rosalind Franklin and R. G. Gosling,'Molecular Configuration in Sodium Thymonucleate', Nature (25 Apr 1953), 171, No. 4356, 740.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Basis (173)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Francis Crick (62)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Existence (456)  |  First (1283)  |  Helix (10)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Nucleic Acid (23)  |  Nucleotide (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proof (287)  |  Ray (114)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Striking (48)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Two (937)  |  Work (1351)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

Some recent work by E. Fermi and L. Szilard, which has been communicated to me in manuscript, leads me to expect that the element uranium may be turned into a new and important source of energy in the immediate future. Certain aspects of the situation seem to call for watchfulness and, if necessary, quick action on the part of the Administration. …
In the course of the last four months it has been made probable … that it may become possible to set up nuclear chain reactions in a large mass of uranium, by which vast amounts of power and large quantities of new radium-like elements would be generated. Now it appears almost certain that this could be achieved in the immediate future.
This new phenomenon would also lead to the construction of bombs, and it is conceivable—though much less certain—that extremely powerful bombs of a new type may thus be constructed. A single bomb of this type, carried by boat or exploded in a port, might well destroy the whole port altogether with some of the surrounding territory. However, such bombs might well prove to be too heavy for transportation by air.
Letter to President Franklin P. Roosevelt, (2 Aug 1939, delivered 11 Oct 1939). In Otto Nathan and Heinz Norden (Eds.) Einstein on Peace (1960, reprinted 1981), 294-95.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Air (347)  |  Amount (151)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Course (409)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Element (310)  |  Energy (344)  |  Expect (200)  |  Exploded (11)  |  Future (429)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mass (157)  |  Month (88)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Prove (250)  |  Radium (25)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Recent (77)  |  Set (394)  |  Single (353)  |  Situation (113)  |  Territory (24)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Turn (447)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Vast (177)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Suppose the results of a line of study are negative. It might save a lot of otherwise wasted money to know a thing won’t work. But how do you accurately evaluate negative results? ... The power plant in [the recently developed streamline trains] is a Diesel engine of a type which was tried out many [around 25] years ago and found to be a failure. … We didn’t know how to build them. The principle upon which it operated was sound. [Since then much has been] learned in metallurgy [and] the accuracy with which parts can be manufactured
When this type of engine was given another chance it was an immediate success [because now] an accuracy of a quarter of a tenth of a thousandth of an inch [prevents high-pressure oil leaks]. … If we had taken the results of past experience without questioning the reason for the first failure, we would never have had the present light-weight, high-speed Diesel engine which appears to be the spark that will revitalize the railroad business.
'Industrial Prospecting', an address to the Founder Societies of Engineers (20 May 1935). In National Research Council, Reprint and Circular Series of the National Research Council (1933), No. 107, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Build (204)  |  Business (149)  |  Chance (239)  |  Develop (268)  |  Do (1908)  |  Engine (98)  |  Experience (467)  |  Failure (161)  |  First (1283)  |  High (362)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leak (3)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Lot (151)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Metallurgy (3)  |  Money (170)  |  Negative (63)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oil (59)  |  Past (337)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Principle (507)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Save (118)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spark (31)  |  Speed (65)  |  Study (653)  |  Success (302)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Train (114)  |  Weight (134)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

That the great majority of those who leave school should have some idea of the kind of evidence required to substantiate given types of belief does not seem unreasonable. Nor is it absurd to expect that they should go forth with a lively interest in the ways in which knowledge is improved and a marked distaste for all conclusions reached in disharmony with the methods of scientific inquiry.
Address to Section L, Education, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, at Boston (1909), 'Science as Subject-Matter and as Method'. Published in Science (28 Jan 1910), N.S. Vol. 31, No. 787, 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Distaste (3)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Expect (200)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improve (58)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lively (17)  |  Majority (66)  |  Marked (55)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Reach (281)  |  Required (108)  |  School (219)  |  Science Education (15)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Substantiate (4)  |  Way (1217)

The advance of science is not comparable to the changes of a city, where old edifices are pitilessly torn down to give place to new, but to the continuous evolution of zoologic types which develop ceaselessly and end by becoming unrecognisable to the common sight, but where an expert eye finds always traces of the prior work of the centuries past. One must not think then that the old-fashioned theories have been sterile and vain.
The Value of Science (1905), in The Foundations of Science: Science and Hypothesis, The Value of Science, Science and Method(1946), trans. by George Bruce Halsted, 208.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  City (78)  |  Common (436)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Demolition (4)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Down (456)  |  Edifice (26)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expert (65)  |  Eye (419)  |  Find (998)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Old-Fashioned (8)  |  Past (337)  |  Pity (14)  |  Prior (5)  |  Replacement (12)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sterile (21)  |  Sterility (10)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Torn (17)  |  Trace (103)  |  Vain (83)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Work (1351)  |  Zoology (36)

The assumption we have made … is that marriages and the union of gametes occur at random. The validity of this assumption may now be examined. “Random mating” obviously does not mean promiscuity; it simply means, as already explained above, that in the choice of mates for marriage there is neither preference for nor aversion to the union of persons similar or dissimilar with respect to a given trait or gene. Not all gentlemen prefer blondes or brunettes. Since so few people know what their blood type is, it is even safer to say that the chances of mates being similar or dissimilar in blood type are determined simply by the incidence of these blood types in a given Mendelian population.
[Co-author with Theodosius Dobzhansky]
In Radiation, Genes and Man (1960), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Author (167)  |  Aversion (8)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Chance (239)  |  Choice (110)  |  Determined (9)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Examined (3)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Gamete (5)  |  Gene (98)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Incidence (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Mate (6)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Occur (150)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Population (110)  |  Preference (28)  |  Promiscuity (3)  |  Random (41)  |  Respect (207)  |  Safety (54)  |  Say (984)  |  Similar (36)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Trait (22)  |  Union (51)  |  Validity (47)

The assumptions of population thinking are diametrically opposed to those of the typologist. The populationist stresses the uniqueness of everything in the organic world. What is true for the human species,–that no two individuals are alike, is equally true for all other species of animals and plants ... All organisms and organic phenomena are composed of unique features and can be described collectively only in statistical terms. Individuals, or any kind of organic entities, form populations of which we can determine the arithmetic mean and the statistics of variation. Averages are merely statistical abstractions, only the individuals of which the populations are composed have reality. The ultimate conclusions of the population thinker and of the typologist are precisely the opposite. For the typologist, the type (eidos) is real and the variation. an illusion, while for the populationist the type (average) is an abstraction and only the variation is real. No two ways of looking at nature could be more different.
Darwin and the Evolutionary Theory in Biology (1959), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Average (82)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Description (84)  |  Determine (144)  |  Diametrically (6)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Equally (130)  |  Everything (476)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Species (9)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Likeness (18)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mean (809)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Population (110)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Reality (261)  |  Species (401)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unique (67)  |  Uniqueness (11)  |  Variation (90)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

The automatic computing engine now being designed at N. P. L. [National Physics Laboratory] is atypical large scale electronic digital computing machine. In a single lecture it will not be possible to give much technical detail of this machine, and most of what I shall say will apply equally to any other machine of this type now being planned. From the point of view of the mathematician the property of being digital should be of greater interest than that of being electronic. That it is electronic is certainly important because these machines owe their high speed to this, and without the speed it is doubtful if financial support for their construction would be forthcoming. But this is virtually all that there is to be said on that subject. That the machine is digital however has more subtle significance. It means firstly that numbers are represented by sequences of digits which can be as long as one wishes. One can therefore work to any desired degree of accuracy. This accuracy is not obtained by more careful machining of parts, control of temperature variations, and such means, but by a slight increase in the amount of equipment in the machine.
Lecture to the London Mathematical Society, 20 February 1947. Quoted in B. E. Carpenter and R. W. Doran (eds.), A. M. Turing's Ace Report of 1946 and Other Papers (1986), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Apply (160)  |  Atypical (3)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Computer (127)  |  Construction (112)  |  Control (167)  |  Degree (276)  |  Design (195)  |  Designed (3)  |  Desired (6)  |  Detail (146)  |  Digital (10)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Engine (98)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Equally (130)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Increase (210)  |  Interest (386)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Long (790)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possible (552)  |  Property (168)  |  Represent (155)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Significance (113)  |  Single (353)  |  Speed (65)  |  Subject (521)  |  Support (147)  |  Technology (257)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Variation (90)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

The automatic computing engine now being designed at N.P.L. [National Physics Laboratory] is atypical large scale electronic digital computing machine. In a single lecture it will not be possible to give much technical detail of this machine, and most of what I shall say will apply equally to any other machine of this type now being planned. From the point of view of the mathematician the property of being digital should be of greater interest than that of being electronic. That it is electronic is certainly important because these machines owe their high speed to this, and without the speed it is doubtful if financial support for their construction would be forthcoming. But this is virtually all that there is to be said on that subject. That the machine is digital however has more subtle significance. It means firstly that numbers are represented by sequences of digits which can be as long as one wishes. One can therefore work to any desired degree of accuracy. This accuracy is not obtained by more careful machining of parts, control of temperature variations, and such means, but by a slight increase in the amount of equipment in the machine.
Lecture to the London Mathematical Society, 20 February 1947. Quoted in B. E. Carpenter and R. W. Doran (eds.), A. M. Turing's Ace Report of 1946 and Other Papers (1986), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Apply (160)  |  Atypical (3)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Computer (127)  |  Construction (112)  |  Control (167)  |  Degree (276)  |  Design (195)  |  Designed (3)  |  Desired (6)  |  Detail (146)  |  Digital (10)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Engine (98)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Equally (130)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Greater (288)  |  High (362)  |  Increase (210)  |  Interest (386)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Long (790)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Possible (552)  |  Property (168)  |  Represent (155)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Significance (113)  |  Single (353)  |  Speed (65)  |  Subject (521)  |  Support (147)  |  Technology (257)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Variation (90)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

The beauty of life is, therefore, geometrical beauty of a type that Plato would have much appreciated.
The Origin of Life (1967), xiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Life (1795)  |  Plato (76)

The book of Nature is the book of Fate. She turns the gigantic pages,—leaf after leaf,—never re-turning one. One leaf she lays down, a floor of granite; then a thousand ages, and a bed of slate; a thousand ages, and a measure of coal; a thousand ages, and a layer of marl and mud: vegetable forms appear; her first misshapen animals, zoophyte, trilobium, fish; then, saurians,—rude forms, in which she has only blocked her future statue, concealing under these unwieldy monsters the fine type of her coming king. The face of the planet cools and dries, the races meliorate, and man is born. But when a race has lived its term, it comes no more again.
From 'Fate', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume 6: The Conduct of Life (1860), 15. This paragraph is the prose version of his poem, 'Song of Nature'.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Bed (23)  |  Birth (147)  |  Block (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Book Of Fate (2)  |  Book Of Nature (12)  |  Coal (57)  |  Coming (114)  |  Concealing (2)  |  Cool (13)  |  Down (456)  |  Dry (57)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Face (212)  |  Fate (72)  |  Fine (33)  |  First (1283)  |  Fish (120)  |  Floor (20)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Granite (7)  |  King (35)  |  Layer (40)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measure (232)  |  Monster (31)  |  More (2559)  |  Mud (26)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Page (30)  |  Planet (356)  |  Race (268)  |  Returning (2)  |  Rude (6)  |  Saurian (2)  |  Slate (6)  |  Statue (16)  |  Term (349)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Trilobite (6)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unwieldy (2)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Zoophyte (4)

The evidence from both approaches, statistical and experimental, does not appear sufficiently significant to me to warrant forsaking the pleasure of smoking. As a matter of fact, if the investigations had been pointed toward some material that I thoroughly dislike, such as parsnips, I still would not feel that evidence of the type presented constituted a reasonable excuse for eliminating the things from my diet. I will still continue to smoke, and if the tobacco companies cease manufacturing their product, I will revert to sweet fern and grape leaves.
Introduction in Eric Northrup, Science Looks at Smoking (1957), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (108)  |  Both (493)  |  Cease (79)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Continue (165)  |  Diet (54)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fern (9)  |  Grape (4)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Manufacturer (10)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Product (160)  |  Revert (4)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Still (613)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  Warrant (8)  |  Will (2355)

The first acquaintance which most people have with mathematics is through arithmetic. That two and two make four is usually taken as the type of a simple mathematical proposition which everyone will have heard of. … The first noticeable fact about arithmetic is that it applies to everything, to tastes and to sounds, to apples and to angels, to the ideas of the mind and to the bones of the body.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Angel (44)  |  Apple (40)  |  Application (242)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Idea (843)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sound (183)  |  Taste (90)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

The fundamental characteristic of the scientific method is honesty. In dealing with any question, science asks no favors. ... I believe that constant use of the scientific method must in the end leave its impress upon him who uses it. ... A life spent in accordance with scientific teachings would be of a high order. It would practically conform to the teachings of the highest types of religion. The motives would be different, but so far as conduct is concerned the results would be practically identical.
Address as its retiring president, to the American Association for the Advancement of Science, St. Louis (28 Dec 1903). 'Scientific Investigation and Progress', Nature 928 Jan 1904), 69:1787, 309.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Constant (144)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  End (590)  |  Favor (63)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  High (362)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Identical (53)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impression (114)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Motive (59)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Question (621)  |  Religion (361)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Spent (85)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Use (766)

The history of philosophy is to a great extent that of a certain clash of human temperaments… I will write these traits down in two columns. I think you will practically recognize the two types of mental make-up that I mean if I head the columns by the titles “tender-minded” and “tough-minded” respectively.
THE TENDER-MINDED. Rationalistic (going by “principles”), Intellectualistic, Idealistic, Optimistic, Religious, Free-willist, Monistic, Dogmatical.
THE TOUGH-MINDED. Empiricist (going by “facts”), Sensationalistic, Materialistic, Pessimistic, Irreligious, Fatalistic, Pluralistic, Sceptical.
'The Present Dilemma in Philosophy', in Pragmatism: A New Way for Some Old Ways of Thinking, Popular Lectures on Philosophy (1907), 6, 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Down (456)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Free (232)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Principle (507)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Religious (126)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Temperament (17)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tough (19)  |  Trait (22)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

The human organism inherits so delicate an adjustment to climate that, in spite of man's boasted ability to live anywhere, the strain of the frozen North eliminates the more nervous and active types of mind.
The Red Man's Continent: A Chronicle of Aboriginal America (1919), 20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Active (76)  |  Adjustment (20)  |  America (127)  |  Climate (97)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Eskimo (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Organism (220)  |  Spite (55)

The inducing substance, on the basis of its chemical and physical properties, appears to be a highly polymerized and viscous form of sodium desoxyribonucleate. On the other hand, the Type m capsular substance, the synthesis of which is evoked by this transforming agent, consists chiefly of a non-nitrogenous polysaccharide constituted of glucose-glucuronic acid units linked in glycosidic union. The presence of the newly formed capsule containing this type-specific polysaccharide confers on the transformed cells all the distinguishing characteristics of Pneumococcus Type III. Thus, it is evident that the inducing substance and the substance produced in turn are chemically distinct and biologically specific in their action and that both are requisite in determining the type of specificity of the cell of which they form a part. The experimental data presented in this paper strongly suggest that nucleic acids, at least those of the desoxyribose type, possess different specificities as evidenced by the selective action of the transforming principle.
Oswald T. Avery (1877-1955), Colin Macleod (1909-72) and Maclyn McCarty (1911-2005), ‘Studies in the Chemical Nature of the Substance Inducing Transformation of Pneumococcal Types', Journal of Experimental Medicine 1944, 79, 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Action (327)  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Both (493)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Consist (223)  |  Data (156)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinct (97)  |  DNA (77)  |  Evident (91)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Form (959)  |  Glucose (2)  |  Nucleic Acid (23)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possess (156)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Produced (187)  |  Selective (19)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Transform (73)  |  Turn (447)  |  Union (51)

The Jewish scriptures admirably illustrate the development from the religion of fear to moral religion, a development continued in the New Testament. The religions of all civilized peoples, especially the peoples of the Orient, are primarily moral religions. The development from a religion of fear to moral religion is a great step in peoples’ lives. And yet, that primitive religions are based entirely on fear and the religions of civilized peoples purely on morality is a prejudice against which we must be on our guard. The truth is that all religions are a varying blend of both types, with this differentiation: that on the higher levels of social life the religion of morality predominates.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admirably (3)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Base (117)  |  Blend (9)  |  Both (493)  |  Civilized (18)  |  Continue (165)  |  Development (422)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Especially (31)  |  Fear (197)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guard (18)  |  High (362)  |  Illustrate (10)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Level (67)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  New Testament (3)  |  Orient (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Purely (109)  |  Religion (361)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Life (8)  |  Step (231)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vary (27)

The key to SETI is to guess the type of communication that an alien society would use. The best guesses so far have been that they would use radio waves, and that they would choose a frequency based on 'universal' knowledge—for instance, the 1420 MHz hydrogen frequency. But these are assumptions formulated by the human brain. Who knows what sort of logic a superadvanced nonhuman life form might use? ... Just 150 years ago, an eyeblink in history, radio waves themselves were inconceivable, and we were thinking of lighting fires to signal the Martians.
Quoted on PBS web page related to Nova TV program episode on 'Origins: Do Aliens Exist in the Milky Way'.
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (34)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Best (459)  |  Brain (270)  |  Choose (112)  |  Communication (94)  |  Extraterrestrial Life (20)  |  Fire (189)  |  Form (959)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Guess (61)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifeform (2)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mars (44)  |  Radio (50)  |  SETI (3)  |  Signal (27)  |  Society (326)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Wave (107)  |  Year (933)

The laboratory work was the province of Dr Searle, an explosive, bearded Nemesis who struck terror into my heart. If one made a blunder one was sent to ‘stand in the corner’ like a naughty child. He had no patience with the women students. He said they disturbed the magnetic equipment, and more than once I heard him shout ‘Go and take off your corsets!’ for most girls wore these garments then, and steel was beginning to replace whalebone as a stiffening agent. For all his eccentricities, he gave us excellent training in all types of precise measurement and in the correct handling of data.
In Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin: An Autobiography and Other Recollections (1996), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (70)  |  All (4108)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Child (307)  |  Corner (57)  |  Correct (86)  |  Data (156)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Eccentricity (3)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Garment (13)  |  Girl (37)  |  Handling (7)  |  Heart (229)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Measurement (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Patience (56)  |  Precise (68)  |  Province (35)  |  Shout (25)  |  Stand (274)  |  Steel (21)  |  Student (300)  |  Terror (30)  |  Training (80)  |  Woman (151)  |  Work (1351)

The longer I practise medicine, the more convinced I am there are only two types of cases: those that involve taking the trousers off and those that don't.
Spoken by character Dr. Wicksteed in play Habeas Corpus (1973).
Science quotes on:  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Involve (90)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Physician (273)  |  Trousers (5)  |  Two (937)

The mathematical intellectualism is henceforth a positive doctrine, but one that inverts the usual doctrines of positivism: in place of originating progress in order, dynamics in statics, its goal is to make logical order the product of intellectual progress. The science of the future is not enwombed, as Comte would have had it, as Kant had wished it, in the forms of the science already existing; the structure of these forms reveals an original dynamism whose onward sweep is prolonged by the synthetic generation of more and more complicated forms. No speculation on number considered as a category a priori enables one to account for the questions set by modern mathematics … space affirms only the possibility of applying to a multiplicity of any elements whatever, relations whose type the intellect does not undertake to determine in advance, but, on the contrary, it asserts their existence and nourishes their unlimited development.
As translated in James Byrnie Shaw, Lectures on the Philosophy of Mathematics (1918), 193. From Léon Brunschvicg, Les Étapes de La Philosophie Mathématique (1912), 567-568, “L’intellectualisme mathématique est désormais une doctrine positive, mais qui intervertira les formules habituelles du positivisme: au lieu de faire sortir le progrès de l’ordre, ou le dynamique du statique, il tend à faire de l'ordre logique le produit du progrès intellectuel. La science à venir n'est pas enfermée, comme l’aurait voulu Comte, comme le voulait déjà Kant, dans les formes de la science déjà faite; la constitution de ces formes révèle un dynamisme originel dont l’élan se prolonge par la génération synthétique de notions de plus en plus compliquées. Aucune spéculation sur le nombre, considéré comme catégorie a priori, ne permet de rendre compte des questions qui se sont posées pour la mathématique moderne … … l’espace ne fait qu'affirmer la possibilité d'appliquer sur une multiplicité d’éléments quelconques des relations dont l’intelligence ne cherche pas à déterminer d’avance le type, dont elle constate, au contraire, dont elle suscite le développement illimité.”
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (26)  |  Account (192)  |  Advance (280)  |  Already (222)  |  Assert (66)  |  Category (18)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Auguste Comte (21)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Determine (144)  |  Development (422)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dynamics (9)  |  Element (310)  |  Enable (119)  |  Existence (456)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Goal (145)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Immanuel Kant (49)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Original (58)  |  Positive (94)  |  Positivism (3)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Product (160)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Question (621)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Space (500)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Statics (6)  |  Structure (344)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Unlimited (22)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wish (212)

The mathematics clearly called for a set of underlying elementary objects—at that time we needed three types of them—elementary objects that could be combined three at a time in different ways to make all the heavy particles we knew. ... I needed a name for them and called them quarks, after the taunting cry of the gulls, “Three quarks for Muster mark,” from Finnegan's Wake by the Irish writer James Joyce.
From asppearance in the BBC-TV program written by Nigel Calder, 'The Key to the Universe,' (27 Jan 1977). As cited in Arthur Lewis Caso, 'The Production of New Scientific Terms', American Speech (Summer 1980), 55, No. 2, 101-102.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Cry (29)  |  Different (577)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Object (422)  |  Particle (194)  |  Quark (7)  |  Set (394)  |  Time (1877)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Way (1217)  |  Writer (86)

The name is not the thing named but is of different logical type, higher than that of the thing named.
In Angels Fear: Towards an Epistemology of the Sacred (1979, 1987), 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Different (577)  |  Logic (287)  |  Name (333)  |  Thing (1915)

The original Upper Paleolithic people would, if they appeared among us today, be called Caucasoid, in the sense that they lacked the particular traits we associate with Negroid and Mongoloid types.
From The Structure of Personality in its Environment (1979), 341.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeared (4)  |  Associate (25)  |  Call (769)  |  Called (9)  |  Lack (119)  |  Original (58)  |  Paleolithic (2)  |  Particular (76)  |  People (1005)  |  Sense (770)  |  Today (314)  |  Trait (22)

The Patent-Office Commissioner knows that all machines in use have been invented and re-invented over and over; that the mariner’s compass, the boat, the pendulum, glass, movable types, the kaleidoscope, the railway, the power-loom, etc., have been many times found and lost, from Egypt, China and Pompeii down; and if we have arts which Rome wanted, so also Rome had arts which we have lost; that the invention of yesterday of making wood indestructible by means of vapor of coal-oil or paraffine was suggested by the Egyptian method which has preserved its mummy-cases four thousand years.
In Lecture, second in a series given at Freeman Place Chapel, Boston (Mar 1859), 'Quotation and Originality', Letters and Social Aims (1875, 1917), 178-179.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Boat (16)  |  China (23)  |  Coal (57)  |  Commissioner (2)  |  Compass (34)  |  Down (456)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Find (998)  |  Glass (92)  |  Indestructible (12)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kaleidoscope (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  Loom (20)  |  Lost (34)  |  Machine (257)  |  Make (25)  |  Making (300)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Movable (2)  |  Mummy (7)  |  Office (71)  |  Oil (59)  |  Patent (33)  |  Patent Office (3)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Pompeii (4)  |  Power (746)  |  Power Loom (2)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Railway (18)  |  Rome (19)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Want (497)  |  Wood (92)  |  Year (933)  |  Yesterday (36)

The plant cell, like the animal cell, is a type of laboratory of cellular tissues that organize themselves and develop within its innermost substance; its imperforate walls, to judge from our strongest magnifying instruments, have the property of drawing out by aspiration from the ambient liquid the elements necessary for its elaboration. They thus have the property of acting as a sorter, of admitting certain substances and preventing the passage of others, and consequently of separating the elements of certain combinations in order to admit only a portion of them.
As quoted in article Marc Klein,'François-Vincent Raspail', in Charles Coulston Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975). Vol.11, 300.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Cell (2)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Certain (550)  |  Combination (144)  |  Develop (268)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Element (310)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Judge (108)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Order (632)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Plant (294)  |  Portion (84)  |  Property (168)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Substance (248)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Wall (67)

The processes concerned in simple descent are those of Family Variability and Reversion. It is well to define these words clearly. By family variability is meant the departure of the children of the same or similarly descended families from the ideal mean type of all of them. Reversion is the tendency of that ideal mean type to depart from the parent type, 'reverting' towards what may be roughly and perhaps fairly described as the average ancestral type. If family variability had been the only process in simple descent, the dispersion of the race would indefinitely increase with the number of the generations, but reversion checks this increase, and brings it to a standstill.
Typical Laws of Heredity (1877), 513.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Average (82)  |  Children (200)  |  Concern (228)  |  Descend (47)  |  Descent (27)  |  Dispersion (2)  |  Family (94)  |  Generation (242)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Increase (210)  |  Mean (809)  |  Number (699)  |  Parent (76)  |  Process (423)  |  Race (268)  |  Simple (406)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Word (619)

The reactions follow a pattern, which is valid for the blood of all humans... Basically, in fact, there are four different types of human blood, the so-called blood groups. The number of the groups follows from the fact that the erythrocytes evidently contain substances (iso-agglutinogens) with two different structures, of which both may be absent, or one or both present, in the erythrocytes of a person. This alone would still not explain the reactions; the active substances of the sera, the iso-agglutinins, must also be present in a specific distribution. This is actually the case, since every serum contains those agglutinins which react with the agglutinogens not present in the cells—a remarkable phenomenon, the cause of which is not yet known for certain.
'On Individual Differences in Human Blood', Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1930). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1922-1941 (1965), 235.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Agglutinin (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Blood (134)  |  Both (493)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Different (577)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  Human (1468)  |  Known (454)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Person (363)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Present (619)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Serum (11)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Specific (95)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Two (937)

The reasoning of mathematics is a type of perfect reasoning.
In Common Sense in Education and Teaching (1905), 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Reasoning (207)

The scientist discovers a new type of material or energy and the engineer discovers a new use for it.
The Development of Design (1981), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Discover (553)  |  Energy (344)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Material (353)  |  New (1216)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Engineering (16)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Use (766)  |  Usefulness (86)

The skeletal striated muscle cell of amphibia therefore resembles the cardiac striated muscle cell in the property of “all or none” contraction. The difference which renders it possible to obtain 'submaximal' contractions from a whole skeletal muscle but not from a whole heart is not a difference in the functional capabilities of the two types of cell; it depends upon the fact that cardiac muscle cells are connected one with another, whereas skeletal muscle cells are isolated by their sarcolemma. The 'submaximal' contraction of a skeletal muscle is the maximal contraction of less than all its fibres.
'The “All or None” Contraction of the Amphibian Skeletal Muscle Fibre', Journal of Physiology (1909), 38, 133.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amphibian (6)  |  Cell (138)  |  Connect (125)  |  Contraction (15)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difference (337)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Heart (229)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Possible (552)  |  Property (168)  |  Render (93)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)

The value of mathematical instruction as a preparation for those more difficult investigations, consists in the applicability not of its doctrines but of its methods. Mathematics will ever remain the past perfect type of the deductive method in general; and the applications of mathematics to the simpler branches of physics furnish the only school in which philosophers can effectually learn the most difficult and important of their art, the employment of the laws of simpler phenomena for explaining and predicting those of the more complex. These grounds are quite sufficient for deeming mathematical training an indispensable basis of real scientific education, and regarding with Plato, one who is … as wanting in one of the most essential qualifications for the successful cultivation of the higher branches of philosophy
In System of Logic, Bk. 3, chap. 24, sect. 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicability (6)  |  Application (242)  |  Art (657)  |  Basis (173)  |  Branch (150)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Deem (6)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Education (378)  |  Effectually (2)  |  Employment (32)  |  Essential (199)  |  Explain (322)  |  Furnish (96)  |  General (511)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  Important (209)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plato (76)  |  Predict (79)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Real (149)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  School (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simple (406)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Training (80)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

The varieties of chemical substances actually found in living things are vastly more restricted than the possible varieties. A striking illustration is that if one molecule each of all the possible types of proteins were made, they would together weigh more than the observable universe. Obviously there are a fantastically large number of protein types that are not made by living cells.
In The Closing Circle: Nature, Man, and Technology (2014).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  Observable (21)  |  Possible (552)  |  Protein (54)  |  Restricted (2)  |  Striking (48)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)  |  Variety (132)  |  Vast (177)  |  Weigh (49)

Theology, Mr. Fortune found, is a more accommodating subject than mathematics; its technique of exposition allows greater latitude. For instance when you are gravelled for matter there is always the moral to fall back upon. Comparisons too may be drawn, leading cases cited, types and antetypes analysed and anecdotes introduced. Except for Archimedes mathematics is singularly naked of anecdotes.
In Mr. Fortune’s Maggot (1927), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Analyze (10)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Back (390)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Greater (288)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Subject (521)  |  Technique (80)  |  Theology (52)

There are now three types of scientists: experimental, theoretical, and computational.
Quoted by Victor F. Weisskopf, 'One Hundred Years of the Physical Review', in H. Henry Stroke, Physical Review: The First Hundred Years: a Selection of Seminal Papers and Commentaries, Vol. 1, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Computation (24)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Theory (970)

There are two objectionable types of believers: those who believe the incredible and those who believe that 'belief' must be discarded and replaced by 'the scientific method'.
Max Born
Natural Philosophy of Cause and Chance (1964), 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Discard (29)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Method (505)  |  Must (1526)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Two (937)

There are two types of mind … the mathematical, and what might be called the intuitive. The former arrives at its views slowly, but they are firm and rigid; the latter is endowed with greater flexibility and applies itself simultaneously to the diverse lovable parts of that which it loves.
In Discours sur les passions de l’amour (1653).
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Call (769)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Firm (47)  |  Flexibility (6)  |  Former (137)  |  Greater (288)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Love (309)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Part (222)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)

There can be no greater issue than that of conservation in this country. Just as we must conserve our men, women and children, so we must conserve the resources of the land on which they live. We must conserve the soil so that our children shall have a land that is more and not less fertile than our fathers dwelt in. We must conserve the forests, not by disuse, but by use, making them more valuable at the same time that we use them. We must conserve the mines. Moreover, we must insure so far as possible the use of certain types of great natural resources for the benefit of the people as a whole.
Confession of Faith Speech, Progressive National Convention, Chicago, Illinois, 6 Aug 1912. In Marion Mills Miller (Ed.) Great Debates in American History (1913), Vol. 10, 111-112.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Certain (550)  |  Children (200)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Country (251)  |  Father (110)  |  Fertile (29)  |  Forest (150)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Live (628)  |  Making (300)  |  Mine (76)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Resource (22)  |  People (1005)  |  Possible (552)  |  Soil (86)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)

There is only one type of science and the various fields are chapters of the same book.
As quoted in Lewis Wolpert and Alison Richards (eds.), Passionate Minds: The Inner World of Scientists (1997), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Chapter (11)  |  Field (364)  |  Science (3879)  |  Various (200)

They tend to be suspicious, bristly, paranoid-type people with huge egos they push around like some elephantiasis victim with his distended testicles in a wheelbarrow terrified no doubt that some skulking ingrate of a clone student will sneak into his very brain and steal his genius work.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Clone (8)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Ego (17)  |  Genius (284)  |  Huge (25)  |  People (1005)  |  Push (62)  |  Skulk (2)  |  Sneak (3)  |  Steal (13)  |  Student (300)  |  Suspicious (3)  |  Tend (124)  |  Terrified (4)  |  Testicle (2)  |  Victim (35)  |  Wheelbarrow (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

This fundamental discovery that all bodies owe their origin to arrangements of single initial corpuscular type is the beacon that lights the history of the universe to our eyes. In its own way, matter obeyed from the beginning that great law of biology to which we shall have to recur time and time again, the law of “complexification.”
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 48. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Beacon (8)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biology (216)  |  Body (537)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Initial (17)  |  Law (894)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  Obey (40)  |  Origin (239)  |  Owe (71)  |  Recur (4)  |  Single (353)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)

This monkey mythology of Darwin is the cause of permissiveness, promiscuity, pills, prophylactics, perversions, abortions, pornography, pollution, poisoning, and proliferation of crimes of all types.
Georgia Court of Appeals, 1981. Quoted in K. M. Pierce, 'Putting Darwin back in the Dock', Time, 16 March 1981, 51-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Abortion (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Crime (38)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Promiscuity (3)

To undertake a great work, and especially a work of a novel type, means carrying out an experiment. It means taking up a struggle with the forces of nature without the assurance of emerging as the victor of the first attack.
As quoted in Hans Straub and Erwin Rockwell (trans.), A History of Civil Engineering: An Outline From Ancient to Modern Times (1952), 157-158. Translated from Die Geschickte der Bauingenieurkunst (1949).
Science quotes on:  |  Assurance (17)  |  Attack (84)  |  Carrying Out (13)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Force Of Nature (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Novel (32)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Victor (5)  |  Work (1351)

To write the true natural history of the world, we should need to be able to follow it from within. It would thus appear no longer as an interlocking succession of structural types replacing one another, but as an ascension of inner sap spreading out in a forest of consolidated instincts. Right at its base, the living world is constituted by conscious clothes in flesh and bone.
In Teilhard de Chardin and Bernard Wall (trans.), The Phenomenon of Man (1959, 2008), 151. Originally published in French as Le Phénomene Humain (1955).
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Ascension (4)  |  Base (117)  |  Bone (95)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constituted (5)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forest (150)  |  History (673)  |  Inner (71)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Interlocking (2)  |  Living (491)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Need (290)  |  Right (452)  |  Sap (3)  |  Spreading (5)  |  Structural (29)  |  Succession (77)  |  True (212)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

We come back then to our records of nervous messages with a reasonable assurance that they do tell us what the message is like. It is a succession of brief waves of surface breakdown, each allowing a momentary leakage of ions from the nerve fibre. The waves can be set up so that they follow one another in rapid or in slow succession, and this is the only form of gradation of which the message is capable. Essentially the same kind of activity is found in all sorts of nerve fibres from all sorts of animals and there is no evidence to suggest that any other kind of nervous transmission is possible. In fact we may conclude that the electrical method can tell us how the nerve fibre carries out its function as the conducting unit of the nervous system, and that it does so by reactions of a fairly simple type.
The Mechanism of Nervous Action (1932), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Back (390)  |  Brief (36)  |  Capable (168)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Ion (21)  |  Kind (557)  |  Message (49)  |  Method (505)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Record (154)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Slow (101)  |  Succession (77)  |  Surface (209)  |  System (537)  |  Tell (340)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Wave (107)

We dissect nature along lines laid down by our native languages. The categories and types that we isolate from the world of phenomena we do not find there because they stare every observer in the face; on the contrary, the world is presented in a kaleidoscopic flux of impressions which has to be organized by our minds—and this means largely by the linguistic systems in our minds.
In Four Articles on Metalinguistics (1950), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Category (18)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Dissect (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Face (212)  |  Find (998)  |  Flux (21)  |  Impression (114)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Kaleidoscope (5)  |  Language (293)  |  Linguistics (30)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Native (38)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observer (43)  |  Organize (29)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Present (619)  |  Stare (9)  |  System (537)  |  World (1774)

What a type of happy family is the family of the Sun! With what order, with what harmony, with what blessed peace, do his children the planets move around him, shining with light which they drink in from their parent’s in at once upon him and on one another!
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bless (25)  |  Blessed (20)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drink (53)  |  Family (94)  |  Happy (105)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Light (607)  |  Move (216)  |  Order (632)  |  Parent (76)  |  Peace (108)  |  Planet (356)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Sun (385)

What I then got hold of, something frightful and dangerous, a problem with horns but not necessarily a bull, in any case a new problem—today I should say that it was the problem of science itself, science considered for the first time as problematic, as questionable. But the book in which my youthful courage and suspicion found an outlet—what an impossible book had to result from a task so uncongenial to youth! Constructed from a lot of immature, overgreen personal experiences, all of them close to the limits of communication, presented in the context of art—for the problem of science cannot be recognized in the context of science—a book perhaps for artists who also have an analytic and retrospective penchant (in other words, an exceptional type of artist for whom one might have to look far and wide and really would not care to look) …
In The Birth of Tragedy (1872). Collected in Friedrich Nietzsche and Walter Kaufmann (trans.), The Birth of Tragedy and The Case of Wagner (1967), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Art (657)  |  Artist (90)  |  Book (392)  |  Bull (3)  |  Care (186)  |  Communication (94)  |  Consider (416)  |  Construct (124)  |  Context (29)  |  Courage (69)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Frightful (3)  |  Horn (18)  |  Immature (4)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outlet (3)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Questionable (3)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Task (147)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Uncongenial (2)  |  Wide (96)  |  Word (619)  |  Youth (101)

What is a scientist?… We give the name scientist to the type of man who has felt experiment to be a means guiding him to search out the deep truth of life, to lift a veil from its fascinating secrets, and who, in this pursuit, has felt arising within him a love for the mysteries of nature, so passionate as to annihilate the thought of himself.
The Montessori Method, trans. Anne E. George,(1964), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Arising (22)  |  Deep (233)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Guide (97)  |  Himself (461)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Passion (114)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Search (162)  |  Secret (194)  |  Self (267)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Veil (26)

What is terrorism? Terrorism in some sense is a reaction against the creation of a type one [planet-wide advanced] civilization. Now most terrorists cannot articulate this. … What they’re reacting to is not modernism. What they’re reacting to is the fact that we’re headed toward a multicultural tolerant scientific society and that is what they don’t want. They don’t want science. They want a theocracy. They don’t want multiculturalism. They want monoculturalism. So instinctively they don’t like the march toward a type one civilization. Now which tendency will win? I don’t know, but I hope that we emerge as a type one civilization.
From transcript of online video interview (29 Sep 2010) with Paul Hoffman, 'What is the likelihood that mankind will destroy itself?', on bigthink.com website.
Science quotes on:  |  Advanced (11)  |  Against (332)  |  Articulate (7)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Creation (327)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Hope (299)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Know (1518)  |  March (46)  |  Most (1731)  |  Planet (356)  |  React (7)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Terrorism (3)  |  Tolerant (3)  |  Want (497)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)  |  Win (52)

What was once called the objective world is a sort of Rorschach ink blot, into which each culture, each system of science and religion, each type of personality, reads a meaning only remotely derived from the shape and color of the blot itself.
In 'Orientation to Life,' The Conduct of Life (1951).
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Color (137)  |  Culture (143)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Objective (91)  |  Personality (62)  |  Read (287)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  System (537)  |  World (1774)

While the method of the natural sciences is... analytic, the method of the social sciences is better described as compositive or synthetic. It is the so-called wholes, the groups of elements which are structurally connected, which we learn to single out from the totality of observed phenomena... Insofar as we analyze individual thought in the social sciences the purpose is not to explain that thought, but merely to distinguish the possible types of elements with which we shall have to reckon in the construction of different patterns of social relationships. It is a mistake... to believe that their aim is to explain conscious action ... The problems which they try to answer arise only insofar as the conscious action of many men produce undesigned results... If social phenomena showed no order except insofar as they were consciously designed, there would indeed be no room for theoretical sciences of society and there would be, as is often argued, only problems of psychology. It is only insofar as some sort of order arises as a result of individual action but without being designed by any individual that a problem is raised which demands a theoretical explanation... people dominated by the scientistic prejudice are often inclined to deny the existence of any such order... it can be shown briefly and without any technical apparatus how the independent actions of individuals will produce an order which is no part of their intentions... The way in which footpaths are formed in a wild broken country is such an instance. At first everyone will seek for himself what seems to him the best path. But the fact that such a path has been used once is likely to make it easier to traverse and therefore more likely to be used again; and thus gradually more and more clearly defined tracks arise and come to be used to the exclusion of other possible ways. Human movements through the region come to conform to a definite pattern which, although the result of deliberate decision of many people, has yet not be consciously designed by anyone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Aim (165)  |  Analytic (10)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Answer (366)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Argue (23)  |  Arise (158)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Break (99)  |  Briefly (5)  |  Broken (56)  |  Call (769)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conform (13)  |  Connect (125)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Consciously (6)  |  Construction (112)  |  Country (251)  |  Decision (91)  |  Define (49)  |  Definite (110)  |  Deliberate (18)  |  Demand (123)  |  Deny (66)  |  Describe (128)  |  Design (195)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Element (310)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Group (78)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Independent (67)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instance (33)  |  Intention (46)  |  Learn (629)  |  Likely (34)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Path (144)  |  Pattern (110)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Produce (104)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Raise (35)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Region (36)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Result (677)  |  Room (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seem (145)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Society (326)  |  Sort (49)  |  Structurally (2)  |  Synthetic (26)  |  Technical (43)  |  Theoretical (22)  |  Theoretical Science (4)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Totality (15)  |  Track (38)  |  Traverse (5)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)

Within the last five or six years [from 1916], from a common wild species of fly, the fruit fly, Drosophila ampelophila, which we have brought into the laboratory, have arisen over a hundred and twenty-five new types whose origin is completely known.
In A Critique of the Theory of Evolution (1916), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Common (436)  |  Completely (135)  |  Drosophila (7)  |  Fly (146)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Fruit Fly (6)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  New (1216)  |  Origin (239)  |  Species (401)  |  Wild (87)  |  Year (933)

[A plant] does not change itself gradually, but remains unaffected during all succeeding generations. It only throws off new forms, which are sharply contrasted with the parent, and which are from the very beginning as perfect and as constant, as narrowly defined, and as pure of type as might be expected of any species.
In Species and Varieties: Their Origin and Mutation (1905), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Change (593)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Defined (4)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Narrow (84)  |  New (1216)  |  Parent (76)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pure (291)  |  Remain (349)  |  Sharply (4)  |  Species (401)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Throw (43)  |  Unaffected (6)

[An outsider views a scientist] as a type of unscrupulous opportunist: he appears as a realist, insofar as he seeks to describe the world independent of the act of perception; as idealist insofar as he looks upon the concepts and theories as the free inventions of the human spirit (not logically derivable from that which is empirically given); as positivist insofar as he considers his concepts and theories justified only to the extent to which they furnish a logical representation of relations among sense experiences. He may even appear as Platonist or Pythagorean insofar as he considers the viewpoint of logical simplicity as an indispensable and effective tool of his research.
In 'Reply to Critcisms', Paul Arthur Schilpp (ed.), Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist (1949, 1959), Vol. 2, 684.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Appear (118)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consider (416)  |  Describe (128)  |  Effective (59)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extent (139)  |  Free (232)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Spirit (12)  |  Idealist (3)  |  Independent (67)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Invention (369)  |  Justify (24)  |  Logical (55)  |  Look (582)  |  Opportunist (3)  |  Outsider (6)  |  Perception (97)  |  Platonist (2)  |  Positivist (5)  |  Realist (2)  |  Relation (157)  |  Representation (53)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tool (117)  |  Unscrupulous (2)  |  View (488)  |  Viewpoint (12)  |  World (1774)

[Consider] a fence or gate erected across a road] The more modern type of reformer goes gaily up to it and says, “I don't see the use of this; let us clear it away.” To which the more intelligent type of reformer will do well to answer: “If you don't see the use of it, I certainly won't let you clear it away. Go away and think. Then, when you can come back and tell me that you do see the use of it, I may allow you to destroy it.”
In The Thing (1929). Excerpt in Gilbert Keith Chesterton and Alvaro De Silva (ed.), Brave New Family: G.K. Chesterton on Men and Women, Children, Sex, Divorce (1990), 53. Note: This passage may be the source which John F. Kennedy had in mind when he wrote in his personal notebook, “Don't ever take a fence down until you know the reason why it was put up.” (see John F. Kennedy quotes on this site). The words in that terse paraphrase are those of Kennedy, and are neither those of Chesterton, or, as often attributed, Robert Frost (q.v.).
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Answer (366)  |  Back (390)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Clear (100)  |  Consider (416)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fence (11)  |  Gate (32)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reformer (5)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

[From uranium] there are present at least two distinct types of radiation one that is very readily absorbed, which will be termed for convenience the α radiation, and the other of a more penetrative character, which will be termed the β radiation.
Originating the names for these two types of radiation. In 'Uranium Radiation and the Electrical Conduction Produced by It', Philosophical Magazine (1899), 47, 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Alpha Ray (3)  |  Character (243)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinction (72)  |  More (2559)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Present (619)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Term (349)  |  Two (937)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Will (2355)

[On suburbia] We’re bringing up our children in one-class areas. When they grow up and move to a city or go abroad, they’re not accustomed to variety and they get uncertain and insecure. We should bring up our children where they’re exposed to all types of people.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  City (78)  |  Class (164)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Grow (238)  |  Insecure (5)  |  Move (216)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Variety (132)

[The] subjective [historical] element in geologic studies accounts for two characteristic types that can be distinguished among geologists: one considering geology as a creative art, the other regarding geology as an exact science.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 453.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Art (657)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Considering (6)  |  Creative (137)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Element (310)  |  Exact (68)  |  Geologic (2)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Historical (70)  |  Other (2236)  |  Regarding (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Two (937)

[Zoophytes (Protists, or simple life forms) are] the primitive types from which all the organisms of the higher classes had arisen by gradual development.
Entry for Gottfried Reinhold Treviranus in Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), Vol. 27, 255-256.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Class (164)  |  Definition (221)  |  Development (422)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Form (959)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Higher (37)  |  Life (1795)  |  Organism (220)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Protist (3)  |  Simple (406)  |  Zoophyte (4)

“Auto erotism,” … spontaneous solitary sexual phenomena of which genital excitement during sleep may be said to be the type.
Psychology of Sex (1933), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Excitement (50)  |  Sex (69)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Spontaneous (27)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.