Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Diagram

Diagram Quotes (20 quotes)

A diagram is worth a thousand proofs.
In Mathematics Made Difficult (1971). As quoted in Michael Stueben and ‎Diane Sandford, Twenty Years Before the Blackboard (1998), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Proof (289)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Worth (169)

A noble, logical diagram once recorded will never die, but long after we are gone be a living thing, asserting itself with ever-growing insistency. Remember that our sons and our grandsons are going to do things that would stagger us.
(1907) As quoted in 'Closing In', Charles Moore, Daniel H. Burnham, Architect, Planner of Cities (1921), Vol. 2, 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Amaze (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Future (432)  |  Growing (98)  |  Live (629)  |  Living (491)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (789)  |  Never (1087)  |  Noble (90)  |  Record (154)  |  Recorded (2)  |  Remember (179)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2354)

As he [Clifford] spoke he appeared not to be working out a question, but simply telling what he saw. Without any diagram or symbolic aid he described the geometrical conditions on which the solution depended, and they seemed to stand out visibly in space. There were no longer consequences to be deduced, but real and evident facts which only required to be seen. … So whole and complete was his vision that for the time the only strange thing was that anybody should fail to see it in the same way. When one endeavored to call it up again, and not till then, it became clear that the magic of genius had been at work, and that the common sight had been raised to that higher perception by the power that makes and transforms ideas, the conquering and masterful quality of the human mind which Goethe called in one word das Dämonische.
In Leslie Stephen and Frederick Pollock (eds.), Lectures and Essays by William Kingdon Clifford(1879), Vol. 1, Introduction, 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Appear (118)  |  Call (769)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Common (436)  |  Complete (204)  |  Condition (357)  |  Conquer (38)  |  Consequence (207)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Depend (228)  |  Describe (128)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Evident (91)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fail (185)  |  Genius (285)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Goethe (5)  |  Higher (37)  |  Human (1470)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (845)  |  Magic (86)  |  Masterful (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Perception (97)  |  Power (747)  |  Quality (134)  |  Question (622)  |  Raise (35)  |  Real (149)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Saw (160)  |  See (1082)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sight (132)  |  Solution (269)  |  Space (501)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stand Out (5)  |  Strange (157)  |  Symbol (94)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transform (73)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (122)  |  Way (1216)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (622)  |  Work (1351)

I cannot tell you the efforts to which I was condemned to understand something of the diagrams of Descriptive Geometry, which I detest.
Epigraph, without citation, in E.T. Bell, Men of Mathematics (1937, 1965), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemned (5)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Detest (5)  |  Effort (227)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Something (719)  |  Tell (340)  |  Understand (607)

I did enjoy the [CCNY geology] field trips. We went upstate and clambered over formations of synclines and anticlines. We had to diagram them, and figure out their mirror images. If you had an anticline here, you should be able to predict a complementing syncline bulging out somewhere else. Very satisfying when I got it right. Geology allowed me to display my brilliance to my non-college friends. “You know, the Hudson really isn't a river.” “What are you talking about? … Everybody knows the Hudson River's a river.” I would explain that the Hudson was a “drowned” river, up to about Poughkeepsie. The Ice Age had depressed the riverbed to a depth that allowed the Atlantic Ocean to flood inland. Consequently, the lower Hudson was really a saltwater estuary.[Powell graduated with a B.S. degree in Geology.]
My American Journey (1996), 30-31.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Atlantic Ocean (7)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Brilliance (14)  |  College (68)  |  Degree (275)  |  Depth (94)  |  Display (56)  |  Estuary (3)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (365)  |  Figure (160)  |  Flood (50)  |  Formation (96)  |  Friend (168)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ice (54)  |  Ice Age (9)  |  Image (96)  |  Know (1519)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Ocean (203)  |  Predict (80)  |  Right (452)  |  River (121)  |  Talking (76)

I really see no harm which can come of giving our children a little knowledge of physiology. ... The instruction must be real, based upon observation, eked out by good explanatory diagrams and models, and conveyed by a teacher whose own knowledge has been acquired by a study of the facts; and not the mere catechismal parrot-work which too often usurps the place of elementary teaching.
Science and Culture (1882), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Catechism (2)  |  Child (309)  |  Children (200)  |  Education (379)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Good (889)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Little (708)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (560)  |  Physiology (95)  |  See (1082)  |  Study (656)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Work (1351)

If a mathematician of the past, an Archimedes or even a Descartes, could view the field of geometry in its present condition, the first feature to impress him would be its lack of concreteness. There are whole classes of geometric theories which proceed not only without models and diagrams, but without the slightest (apparent) use of spatial intuition. In the main this is due, to the power of the analytic instruments of investigations as compared with the purely geometric.
In 'The Present Problems in Geometry', Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1906), 286.
Science quotes on:  |  Analytic (10)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Archimedes (58)  |  Class (164)  |  Compare (70)  |  Concreteness (5)  |  Condition (357)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Due (141)  |  Feature (44)  |  Field (365)  |  First (1284)  |  Geometric (5)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Impress (65)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Investigation (231)  |  Lack (119)  |  Main (28)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Model (102)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Past (337)  |  Power (747)  |  Present (620)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Purely (110)  |  Slight (31)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Theory (972)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)

It has just occurred to me to ask if you are familiar with Lissajous’ experiments. I know nothing about them except what I found in Flammarion’s great “Astronomie Populaire.” One extraordinary chapter on numbers gives diagrams of the vibrations of harmonics—showing their singular relation to the geometrical designs of crystal-formation;—and the chapter is aptly closed by the Pythagorian quotation: Ἀεὶ ὁ θεὸς ὁ μέγας γεωμετρεῖ—“God geometrizes everywhere.” … I should imagine that the geometry of a fine opera would—were the vibrations outlined in similar fashion—offer a network of designs which for intricate beauty would double discount the arabesque of the Alhambra.
In letter to H.E. Krehbiel (1887), collected in Elizabeth Bisland The Writings of Lafcadio Hearn (1922), Vol. 14, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Beauty (300)  |  Closed (38)  |  Crystal (69)  |  Design (196)  |  Everywhere (95)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Camille Flammarion (5)  |  Formation (96)  |  Geometry (259)  |  God (758)  |  Great (1575)  |  Harmonic (4)  |  Imagine (165)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Know (1519)  |  Network (21)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Number (701)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opera (3)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Quotation (18)  |  Relation (157)  |  Singular (23)  |  Vibration (20)

It is not enough that you should understand about applied science in order that your work may increase man's blessings. Concern for man himself and his fate must always form the chief interest of all technical endeavours... in order that the creations of our minds shall be a blessing and not a curse to mankind. Never forget this in the midst of your diagrams and equations.
Address to students of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California (16 Feb 1931). In New York Times (17 Feb 1931), p. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Applied (176)  |  Applied Science (33)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Chief (97)  |  Concern (228)  |  Creation (329)  |  Curse (17)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Enough (341)  |  Equation (132)  |  Fate (72)  |  Forget (117)  |  Form (960)  |  Himself (461)  |  Increase (211)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (377)  |  Man (2249)  |  Mankind (340)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Science (3880)  |  Understand (607)  |  Work (1351)

No Roman ever died in contemplation over a geometrical diagram.
Referring to the death of Archimedes, to show the difference between the Greek and Roman mind. As quoted, without citation, in Howard W. Eves, Mathematical Circles Squared (1972), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (58)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Die (86)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Roman (36)

Nothing afflicted Marcellus so much as the death of Archimedes, who was then, as fate would have it, intent upon working out some problem by a diagram, and having fixed his mind alike and his eyes upon the subject of his speculation, he never noticed the incursion of the Romans, nor that the city was taken. In this transport of study and contemplation, a soldier, unexpectedly coming up to him, commanded him to follow to Marcellus, which he declined to do before he had worked out his problem to a demonstration; the soldier, enraged, drew his sword and ran him through. Others write, that a Roman soldier, running upon him with a drawn sword, offered to kill him; and that Archimedes, looking back, earnestly besought him to hold his hand a little while, that he might not leave what he was at work upon inconclusive and imperfect; but the soldier, nothing moved by his entreaty, instantly killed him. Others again relate, that as Archimedes was carrying to Marcellus mathematical instruments, dials, spheres, and angles, by which the magnitude of the sun might be measured to the sight, some soldiers seeing him, and thinking that he carried gold in a vessel, slew him. Certain it is, that his death was very afflicting to Marcellus; and that Marcellus ever after regarded him that killed him as a murderer; and that he sought for his kindred and honoured them with signal favours.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Afflict (4)  |  Alike (60)  |  Angle (21)  |  Archimedes (58)  |  Back (391)  |  Beseech (3)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  City (78)  |  Coming (114)  |  Command (58)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Death (391)  |  Decline (26)  |  Demonstration (114)  |  Dial (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earnestly (4)  |  Eye (423)  |  Fate (72)  |  Favor (64)  |  Fix (25)  |  Follow (379)  |  Gold (98)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hold (95)  |  Honour (56)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Inconclusive (3)  |  Incursion (2)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intent (9)  |  Kill (100)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Leave (130)  |  Little (708)  |  Looking (189)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Marcellus (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Measure (233)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Move (216)  |  Murderer (3)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Notice (77)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (679)  |  Regard (304)  |  Relate (21)  |  Roman (36)  |  Run (174)  |  Running (61)  |  See (1082)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sight (132)  |  Signal (27)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Study (656)  |  Subject (522)  |  Sun (387)  |  Sword (15)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (415)  |  Through (849)  |  Transport (30)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (231)

Nothing afflicted Marcellus so much as the death of Archimedes, who was then, as fate would have it, intent upon working out some problem by a diagram, and having fixed his mind alike and his eyes upon the subject of his speculation, he never noticed the incursion of the Romans, nor that the city was taken. In this transport of study and contemplation, a soldier, unexpectedly coming up to him, commanded him to follow to Marcellus, which he declined to do before he had worked out his problem to a demonstration; the soldier, enraged, drew his sword and ran him through. Others write, that a Roman soldier, running upon him with a drawn sword, offered to kill him; and that Archimedes, looking back, earnestly besought him to hold his hand a little while, that he might not leave what he was at work upon inconclusive and imperfect; but the soldier, nothing moved by his entreaty, instantly killed him. Others again relate, that as Archimedes was carrying to Marcellus mathematical instruments, dials, spheres, and angles, by which the magnitude of the sun might be measured to the sight, some soldiers seeing him, and thinking that he carried gold in a vessel, slew him. Certain it is, that his death was very afflicting to Marcellus; and that Marcellus ever after regarded him that killed him as a murderer; and that he sought for his kindred and honoured them with signal favours.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Back (391)  |  Certain (550)  |  City (78)  |  Coming (114)  |  Command (58)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Death (391)  |  Demonstration (114)  |  Dial (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eye (423)  |  Fate (72)  |  Follow (379)  |  Gold (98)  |  Honour (56)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Kill (100)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Little (708)  |  Looking (189)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (969)  |  Offer (141)  |  Other (2236)  |  Problem (679)  |  Regard (304)  |  Roman (36)  |  Running (61)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sight (132)  |  Signal (27)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Study (656)  |  Subject (522)  |  Sun (387)  |  Thinking (415)  |  Through (849)  |  Transport (30)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Work (1351)  |  Write (231)

Sodium thymonucleate fibres give two distinct types of X-ray diagram … [structures A and B]. The X-ray diagram of structure B (see photograph) shows in striking manner the features characteristic of helical structures, first worked out in this laboratory by Stokes (unpublished) and by Crick, Cochran and Vand2. Stokes and Wilkins were the first to propose such structures for nucleic acid as a result of direct studies of nucleic acid fibres, although a helical structure had been previously suggested by Furberg (thesis, London, 1949) on the basis of X-ray studies of nucleosides and nucleotides.
While the X-ray evidence cannot, at present, be taken as direct proof that the structure is helical, other considerations discussed below make the existence of a helical structure highly probable.
From Rosalind Franklin and R. G. Gosling,'Molecular Configuration in Sodium Thymonucleate', Nature (25 Apr 1953), 171, No. 4356, 740.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Basis (173)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Francis Crick (62)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Existence (460)  |  First (1284)  |  Helix (10)  |  Laboratory (197)  |  Nucleic Acid (23)  |  Nucleotide (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (620)  |  Probability (132)  |  Proof (289)  |  Ray (114)  |  Result (678)  |  See (1082)  |  Show (346)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Striking (48)  |  Structure (346)  |  Study (656)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Thesis (15)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Work (1351)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

That mathematics “do not cultivate the power of generalization,”; … will be admitted by no person of competent knowledge, except in a very qualified sense. The generalizations of mathematics, are, no doubt, a different thing from the generalizations of physical science; but in the difficulty of seizing them, and the mental tension they require, they are no contemptible preparation for the most arduous efforts of the scientific mind. Even the fundamental notions of the higher mathematics, from those of the differential calculus upwards are products of a very high abstraction. … To perceive the mathematical laws common to the results of many mathematical operations, even in so simple a case as that of the binomial theorem, involves a vigorous exercise of the same faculty which gave us Kepler’s laws, and rose through those laws to the theory of universal gravitation. Every process of what has been called Universal Geometry—the great creation of Descartes and his successors, in which a single train of reasoning solves whole classes of problems at once, and others common to large groups of them—is a practical lesson in the management of wide generalizations, and abstraction of the points of agreement from those of difference among objects of great and confusing diversity, to which the purely inductive sciences cannot furnish many superior. Even so elementary an operation as that of abstracting from the particular configuration of the triangles or other figures, and the relative situation of the particular lines or points, in the diagram which aids the apprehension of a common geometrical demonstration, is a very useful, and far from being always an easy, exercise of the faculty of generalization so strangely imagined to have no place or part in the processes of mathematics.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 612-13.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (126)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Admit (45)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Aid (97)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Being (1278)  |  Binomial (6)  |  Binomial Theorem (5)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Competent (20)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Confuse (20)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Creation (329)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Demonstration (114)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential Calculus (11)  |  Difficulty (198)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (305)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fundamental (251)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Give (202)  |  Gravitation (71)  |  Great (1575)  |  Group (78)  |  High (363)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Imagine (165)  |  Inductive (20)  |  Involve (90)  |  Johannes Kepler (92)  |  Knowledge (1536)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (895)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Line (91)  |  Management (21)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1339)  |  Most (1729)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Place (177)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (747)  |  Practical (200)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Problem (679)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Purely (110)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Relative (39)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (678)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rose (34)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3880)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Seize (16)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (354)  |  Situation (113)  |  Solve (130)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Successor (14)  |  Superior (82)  |  Tension (24)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (972)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Triangle (19)  |  Universal (189)  |  Upward (43)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Useful (250)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2354)

The speculative propositions of mathematics do not relate to facts; … all that we are convinced of by any demonstration in the science, is of a necessary connection subsisting between certain suppositions and certain conclusions. When we find these suppositions actually take place in a particular instance, the demonstration forces us to apply the conclusion. Thus, if I could form a triangle, the three sides of which were accurately mathematical lines, I might affirm of this individual figure, that its three angles are equal to two right angles; but, as the imperfection of my senses puts it out of my power to be, in any case, certain of the exact correspondence of the diagram which I delineate, with the definitions given in the elements of geometry, I never can apply with confidence to a particular figure, a mathematical theorem. On the other hand, it appears from the daily testimony of our senses that the speculative truths of geometry may be applied to material objects with a degree of accuracy sufficient for the purposes of life; and from such applications of them, advantages of the most important kind have been gained to society.
In Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind (1827), Vol. 3, Chap. 1, Sec. 3, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Advantage (135)  |  All (4107)  |  Angle (21)  |  Appear (118)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (176)  |  Apply (160)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conclusion (255)  |  Confidence (68)  |  Connection (162)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Daily (87)  |  Definition (224)  |  Degree (275)  |  Demonstration (114)  |  Do (1908)  |  Element (310)  |  Equal (84)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (999)  |  Force (488)  |  Form (960)  |  Gain (145)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1799)  |  Line (91)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1333)  |  Most (1729)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (747)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Right (452)  |  Right Angle (3)  |  Science (3880)  |  Sense (770)  |  Side (232)  |  Society (325)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Triangle (19)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Two (937)

These machines [used in the defense of the Syracusans against the Romans under Marcellus] he [Archimedes] had designed and contrived, not as matters of any importance, but as mere amusements in geometry; in compliance with king Hiero’s desire and request, some time before, that he should reduce to practice some part of his admirable speculation in science, and by accommodating the theoretic truth to sensation and ordinary use, bring it more within the appreciation of people in general. Eudoxus and Archytas had been the first originators of this far-famed and highly-prized art of mechanics, which they employed as an elegant illustration of geometrical truths, and as means of sustaining experimentally, to the satisfaction of the senses, conclusions too intricate for proof by words and diagrams. As, for example, to solve the problem, so often required in constructing geometrical figures, given the two extremes, to find the two mean lines of a proportion, both these mathematicians had recourse to the aid of instruments, adapting to their purpose certain curves and sections of lines. But what with Plato’s indignation at it, and his invectives against it as the mere corruption and annihilation of the one good of geometry,—which was thus shamefully turning its back upon the unembodied objects of pure intelligence to recur to sensation, and to ask help (not to be obtained without base supervisions and depravation) from matter; so it was that mechanics came to be separated from geometry, and, repudiated and neglected by philosophers, took its place as a military art.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodate (15)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Against (332)  |  Aid (97)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Archimedes (58)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Back (391)  |  Base (117)  |  Both (494)  |  Bring (90)  |  Certain (550)  |  Compliance (7)  |  Conclusion (255)  |  Construct (124)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Corruption (15)  |  Curve (49)  |  Defense (24)  |  Design (196)  |  Desire (204)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Embody (16)  |  Employ (113)  |  Example (94)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (999)  |  First (1284)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (259)  |  Good (889)  |  Help (106)  |  Hiero (2)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Importance (287)  |  Indignation (4)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intelligence (213)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Invective (2)  |  King (35)  |  Line (91)  |  Machine (259)  |  Marcellus (2)  |  Mathematician (389)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (801)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (580)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (132)  |  Mere (84)  |  Military (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Object (422)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Originator (6)  |  Part (222)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosopher (259)  |  Place (177)  |  Plato (76)  |  Practice (204)  |  Problem (679)  |  Proof (289)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Pure (292)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Recur (4)  |  Reduce (95)  |  Repudiate (7)  |  Request (7)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Roman (36)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3880)  |  Section (11)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Shameful (3)  |  Solve (130)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Supervision (4)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Syracuse (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (622)

We speak of it [astrology] as an extinct science; yet let but an eclipse of the sun happen, or a comet visit the evening sky, and in a moment we all believe in astrology. In vain do you tell the gazers on such spectacles that a solar eclipse is only the moon acting for the time as a candle-extinguisher to the sun, and give them bits of smoked glass to look through, and draw diagrams on the blackboard to explain it all. They listen composedly, and seem convinced, but in their secret hearts they are saying—“What though you can see it through a glass darkly, and draw it on a blackboard, does that show that it has no moral significance? You can draw a gallows or a guillotine, or write the Ten Commandments on a blackboard, but does that deprive them of meaning?” And so with the comet. No man will believe that the splendid stranger is hurrying through the sky solely on a momentous errand of his own. No! he is plainly signalling, with that flashing sword of his, something of importance to men,—something at all events that, if we could make it out, would be found of huge concern to us.
From 'Introductory Lecture on Technology for 1858-59', published as The Progress of the Telegraph (1859), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Astrology (44)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Candle (30)  |  Comet (61)  |  Commandment (8)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deprive (12)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Event (216)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Glass (92)  |  Guillotine (5)  |  Happen (275)  |  Heart (230)  |  Importance (287)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2249)  |  Meaning (235)  |  Moment (254)  |  Momentous (5)  |  Moon (238)  |  Moral (195)  |  Science (3880)  |  Secret (195)  |  See (1082)  |  Show (346)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sky (163)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Sun (387)  |  Tell (340)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vain (83)  |  Will (2354)  |  Write (231)

We wish to put forward a radically different structure for the salt of deoxyribose nucleic acid. This structure has two helical chains each coiled round the same axis (see diagram).
[Co-author with Francis Crick]
From James Watson and Francis Crick, 'Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids: A Structure for Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid', Nature (25 Apr 1953), 171, No. 4356, 737.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Author (168)  |  Axis (9)  |  Chain (50)  |  Coil (3)  |  Francis Crick (62)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  DNA (77)  |  Forward (102)  |  Nucleic Acid (23)  |  Radical (25)  |  Salt (46)  |  See (1082)  |  Structure (346)  |  Two (937)  |  Wish (212)

When I heard the learn’d astronomer,
When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them,
When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room,
How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
Till rising and gliding out I wander’d by myself,
In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,
Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.
In Leaves of Grass (1881, 1882), 214.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (349)  |  Applause (9)  |  Astronomer (94)  |  Chart (6)  |  Column (15)  |  Divide (76)  |  Figure (160)  |  Learn (632)  |  Lecture (106)  |  Look (582)  |  Measure (233)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Moist (12)  |  Myself (212)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Proof (289)  |  Rising (44)  |  Sick (81)  |  Silence (56)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Soon (186)  |  Star (430)  |  Stars (304)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tired (13)  |  Wander (37)

[Richard Feynman] would be standing in front of the hall smiling at us all as we came in, his fingers tapping out a complicated rhythm on the black top of the demonstration bench that crossed the front of the lecture hall. As latecomers took their seats, he picked up the chalk and began spinning it rapidly through his fingers in a manner of a professional gambler playing with a poker chip, still smiling happily as if at some secret joke. And then—still smiling—he talked to us about physics, his diagrams and equations helping us to share his understanding. It was no secret joke that brought the smile and the sparkle in his eye, it was physics. The joy of physics!
Describing his experience as a student attending Feynman lectures, in Introduction to Richard P. Feynman Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! : Adventures of a Curious Character (1986, 2010), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Bench (8)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Demonstration (114)  |  Equation (132)  |  Eye (423)  |  Joke (84)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lecture (106)  |  Physic (516)  |  Physics (533)  |  Playing (42)  |  Professional (70)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Secret (195)  |  Share (75)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Still (613)  |  Through (849)  |  Top (96)  |  Understanding (514)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.