Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Competent

Competent Quotes (20 quotes)

A railroad may have to be carried over a gorge or arroya. Obviously it does not need an Engineer to point out that this may be done by filling the chasm with earth, but only a Bridge Engineer is competent to determine whether it is cheaper to do this or to bridge it, and to design the bridge which will safely and most cheaply serve.
From Address on 'Industrial Engineering' at Purdue University (24 Feb 1905). Reprinted by Yale & Towne Mfg Co of New York and Stamford, Conn. for the use of students in its works.
Science quotes on:  |  Bridge (30)  |  Chasm (8)  |  Cheaper (6)  |  Design (115)  |  Determine (76)  |  Earth (638)  |  Engineer (97)  |  Filling (6)  |  Gorge (2)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Railroad (27)  |  Safely (8)  |  Serve (58)

Besides a mathematical inclination, an exceptionally good mastery of one’s native tongue is the most vital asset of a competent programmer.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Asset (6)  |  Exceptionally (3)  |  Good (345)  |  Inclination (25)  |  Mastery (28)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Native (15)  |  Programmer (4)  |  Tongue (19)  |  Vital (39)

It is admitted by all that a finished or even a competent reasoner is not the work of nature alone; the experience of every day makes it evident that education develops faculties which would otherwise never have manifested their existence. It is, therefore, as necessary to learn to reason before we can expect to be able to reason, as it is to learn to swim or fence, in order to attain either of those arts. Now, something must be reasoned upon, it matters not much what it is, provided it can be reasoned upon with certainty. The properties of mind or matter, or the study of languages, mathematics, or natural history, may be chosen for this purpose. Now of all these, it is desirable to choose the one which admits of the reasoning being verified, that is, in which we can find out by other means, such as measurement and ocular demonstration of all sorts, whether the results are true or not. When the guiding property of the loadstone was first ascertained, and it was necessary to learn how to use this new discovery, and to find out how far it might be relied on, it would have been thought advisable to make many passages between ports that were well known before attempting a voyage of discovery. So it is with our reasoning faculties: it is desirable that their powers should be exerted upon objects of such a nature, that we can tell by other means whether the results which we obtain are true or false, and this before it is safe to trust entirely to reason. Now the mathematics are peculiarly well adapted for this purpose, on the following grounds:
1. Every term is distinctly explained, and has but one meaning, and it is rarely that two words are employed to mean the same thing.
2. The first principles are self-evident, and, though derived from observation, do not require more of it than has been made by children in general.
3. The demonstration is strictly logical, taking nothing for granted except self-evident first principles, resting nothing upon probability, and entirely independent of authority and opinion.
4. When the conclusion is obtained by reasoning, its truth or falsehood can be ascertained, in geometry by actual measurement, in algebra by common arithmetical calculation. This gives confidence, and is absolutely necessary, if, as was said before, reason is not to be the instructor, but the pupil.
5. There are no words whose meanings are so much alike that the ideas which they stand for may be confounded. Between the meaning of terms there is no distinction, except a total distinction, and all adjectives and adverbs expressing difference of degrees are avoided.
In On the Study and Difficulties of Mathematics (1898), chap. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Actual (48)  |  Adapt (28)  |  Adjective (2)  |  Admit (45)  |  Adverb (2)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Alike (22)  |  Alone (106)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Art (294)  |  Ascertain (15)  |  Attain (45)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Authority (66)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Calculation (100)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Child (252)  |  Choose (60)  |  Common (122)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Confidence (41)  |  Confound (14)  |  Degree (82)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  Derive (33)  |  Desirable (11)  |  Develop (107)  |  Difference (246)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Distinction (46)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Education (347)  |  Employ (35)  |  Entirely (33)  |  Evident (29)  |  Exert (14)  |  Existence (299)  |  Expect (44)  |  Experience (342)  |  Explain (107)  |  Express (65)  |  Faculty (70)  |  False (99)  |  Falsehood (26)  |  Far (154)  |  Fence (9)  |  Find Out (20)  |  Finish (25)  |  First (314)  |  Follow (124)  |  General (160)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Give (201)  |  Grant (32)  |  Ground (90)  |  Guide (65)  |  Idea (580)  |  Independent (67)  |  Instructor (5)  |  Know (556)  |  Language (228)  |  Learn (288)  |  Lodestone (6)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Matter (343)  |  Mean (101)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Means (176)  |  Measurement (161)  |  Mind (760)  |  Natural History (50)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Necessary (154)  |  New (496)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Object (175)  |  Observation (450)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Ocular (3)  |  Opinion (176)  |  Order (242)  |  Passage (20)  |  Peculiarly (4)  |  Port (2)  |  Power (366)  |  Principle (292)  |  Probability (106)  |  Property (126)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pupil (36)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Rarely (20)  |  Reason (471)  |  Rely (11)  |  Require (85)  |  Rest (93)  |  Result (389)  |  Safe (28)  |  Same (156)  |  Say (228)  |  Self-Evident (12)  |  Sort (49)  |  Stand (108)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Study (476)  |  Swim (16)  |  Tell (110)  |  Term (122)  |  Thought (546)  |  Total (36)  |  True (208)  |  Trust (49)  |  Truth (928)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Verify (17)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Word (302)  |  Work (635)

It is often assumed that because the young child is not competent to study geometry systematically he need be taught nothing geometrical; that because it would be foolish to present to him physics and mechanics as sciences it is useless to present to him any physical or mechanical principles.
An error of like origin, which has wrought incalculable mischief, denies to the scholar the use of the symbols and methods of algebra in connection with his early essays in numbers because, forsooth, he is not as yet capable of mastering quadratics! … The whole infant generation, wrestling with arithmetic, seek for a sign and groan and travail together in pain for the want of it; but no sign is given them save the sign of the prophet Jonah, the withered gourd, fruitless endeavor, wasted strength.
From presidential address (9 Sep 1884) to the General Meeting of the American Social Science Association, 'Industrial Education', printed in Journal of Social Science (1885), 19, 121. Collected in Francis Amasa Walker, Discussions in Education (1899), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (104)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Assume (38)  |  Capable (51)  |  Child (252)  |  Deny (42)  |  Endeavor (43)  |  Error (277)  |  Essay (14)  |  Foolish (22)  |  Fruitless (6)  |  Generation (141)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Groan (5)  |  Infant (15)  |  Mechanics (57)  |  Method (239)  |  Mischief (7)  |  Number (282)  |  Physics (348)  |  Quadratic (3)  |  Scholar (38)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seek (107)  |  Sign (58)  |  Strength (81)  |  Study (476)  |  Symbol (73)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Travail (5)  |  Waste (65)  |  Wrestle (2)  |  Young (100)

Look somewhere else for someone who can follow you in your researches about numbers. For my part, I confess that they are far beyond me, and I am competent only to admire them.
In Letter (27 Oct 1654), the third from Pascal to Fermat. As translated in George F. Simmons, Calculus Gems: Brief Lives and Memorable Mathematics (2007), 103. From the original French, “Cherchez ailleurs qui vous suive dans vos inventions numériques,… pour moi je vous confesse que cela me passé de bien loin: je ne fuis capable que de les admirer,” in Francis Maseres,Scriptores Logarithmici: Or, a Collection of Several Curious Tracts on the Nature and Construction of Logarithms (1801), Vol. 4, 495.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Beyond (105)  |  Confess (15)  |  Follow (124)  |  Number (282)  |  Research (590)

Men in most cases continue to be sexually competent until they are sixty years old, and if that limit be overpassed then until seventy years; and men have been actually known to procreate children at seventy years of age.
Aristotle
In The Works of Aristotle: Historia Animalium (350 BC), (The History of Animals), Book VII, Part 6, 585b5 translated in William David Ross and John Alexander Smith (eds.), D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson (trans.), (1910), Vol. 4, 4
Science quotes on:  |  Age (178)  |  Child (252)  |  Know (556)  |  Procreate (3)  |  Reproduction (61)  |  Seventy (2)  |  Sexuality (11)  |  Sixty (6)  |  Year (299)

Not seldom did he [Sir William Thomson], in his writings, set down some mathematical statement with the prefacing remark “it is obvious that” to the perplexity of mathematical readers, to whom the statement was anything but obvious from such mathematics as preceded it on the page. To him it was obvious for physical reasons that might not suggest themselves at all to the mathematician, however competent.
As given in Life of Lord Kelvin (1910), Vol. 2, 1136. [Note: William Thomson, later became Lord Kelvin —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (70)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Obvious (83)  |  Page (30)  |  Perplex (6)  |  Physical (134)  |  Precede (23)  |  Preface (8)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reason (471)  |  Remark (27)  |  Seldom (30)  |  Statement (76)  |  Suggest (33)  |  Writings (6)

Objections … inspired Kronecker and others to attack Weierstrass’ “sequential” definition of irrationals. Nevertheless, right or wrong, Weierstrass and his school made the theory work. The most useful results they obtained have not yet been questioned, at least on the ground of their great utility in mathematical analysis and its implications, by any competent judge in his right mind. This does not mean that objections cannot be well taken: it merely calls attention to the fact that in mathematics, as in everything else, this earth is not yet to be confused with the Kingdom of Heaven, that perfection is a chimaera, and that, in the words of Crelle, we can only hope for closer and closer approximations to mathematical truth—whatever that may be, if anything—precisely as in the Weierstrassian theory of convergent sequences of rationals defining irrationals.
In Men of Mathematics (1937), 431-432.
Science quotes on:  |  Approximation (22)  |  Attack (41)  |  Attention (121)  |  Chimera (8)  |  Close (67)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Convergent (3)  |  Define (49)  |  Definition (192)  |  Earth (638)  |  Great (534)  |  Ground (90)  |  Hope (174)  |  Implication (22)  |  Inspire (51)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Judge (63)  |  Kingdom Of Heaven (3)  |  Leopold Kronecker (6)  |  Mathematical Analysis (12)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Objection (18)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Perfection (89)  |  Precise (34)  |  Question (404)  |  Rational (57)  |  Result (389)  |  Right (197)  |  School (119)  |  Sequence (41)  |  Sequential (2)  |  Theory (696)  |  Truth (928)  |  Useful (100)  |  Utility (33)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Word (302)  |  Work (635)  |  Wrong (139)

Our highest claim to respect, as a nation, rests not in the gold, nor in the iron and the coal, nor in inventions and discoveries, nor in agricultural productions, nor in our wealth, grown so great that a war debt of billions fades out under ministrations of the revenue collector without fretting the people; nor, indeed, in all these combined. That claim finds its true elements in our systems of education and of unconstrained religious worship; in our wise and just laws, and the purity of their administration; in the conservative spirit with which the minority submits to defeat in a hotly-contested election; in a free press; in that broad humanity which builds hospitals and asylums for the poor, sick, and insane on the confines of every city; in the robust, manly, buoyant spirit of a people competent to admonish others and to rule themselves; and in the achievements of that people in every department of thought and learning.
From his opening address at an annual exhibition of the Brooklyn Industrial Institute. As quoted in biographical preface by T. Bigelow to Austin Abbott (ed.), Official Report of the Trial of Henry Ward Beecher (1875), Vol. 1, xiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (150)  |  Agriculture (66)  |  Asylum (5)  |  Buoyant (3)  |  City (48)  |  Coal (45)  |  Debt (8)  |  Department (47)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Education (347)  |  Election (7)  |  Gold (68)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Insane (8)  |  Invention (324)  |  Iron (65)  |  Learning (177)  |  Manly (2)  |  Nation (134)  |  Poor (58)  |  Religion (239)  |  Revenue (3)  |  Robust (7)  |  Sick (27)  |  Thought (546)  |  War (161)  |  Wealth (66)

Over the years it has become clear that adjustments to the physical environment are behavioral as well as physiological and are inextricably intertwined with ecology and evolution. Consequently, a student of the physiology of adaptation should not only be a technically competent physiologist, but also be familiar with the evolutionary and ecological setting of the phenomenon that he or she is studying.
From 'Interspecific comparison as a tool for ecological physiologists', collected in M.E. Feder, A.F. Bennett, W.W. Burggren, and R.B. Huey, (eds.), New Directions in Ecological Physiology (1987), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (49)  |  Adjustment (15)  |  Become (172)  |  Behavioral (4)  |  Clear (98)  |  Consequently (5)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Ecology (69)  |  Environment (181)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Inextricably (2)  |  Intertwine (4)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Physical (134)  |  Physiological (17)  |  Physiologist (17)  |  Physiology (83)  |  Set (99)  |  Student (203)  |  Study (476)  |  Technically (5)  |  Year (299)

Quite distinct from the theoretical question of the manner in which mathematics will rescue itself from the perils to which it is exposed by its own prolific nature is the practical problem of finding means of rendering available for the student the results which have been already accumulated, and making it possible for the learner to obtain some idea of the present state of the various departments of mathematics. … The great mass of mathematical literature will be always contained in Journals and Transactions, but there is no reason why it should not be rendered far more useful and accessible than at present by means of treatises or higher text-books. The whole science suffers from want of avenues of approach, and many beautiful branches of mathematics are regarded as difficult and technical merely because they are not easily accessible. … I feel very strongly that any introduction to a new subject written by a competent person confers a real benefit on the whole science. The number of excellent text-books of an elementary kind that are published in this country makes it all the more to be regretted that we have so few that are intended for the advanced student. As an example of the higher kind of text-book, the want of which is so badly felt in many subjects, I may mention the second part of Prof. Chrystal’s Algebra published last year, which in a small compass gives a great mass of valuable and fundamental knowledge that has hitherto been beyond the reach of an ordinary student, though in reality lying so close at hand. I may add that in any treatise or higher text-book it is always desirable that references to the original memoirs should be given, and, if possible, short historic notices also. I am sure that no subject loses more than mathematics by any attempt to dissociate it from its history.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A (1890), Nature, 42, 466.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (16)  |  Accumulate (26)  |  Add (40)  |  Advance (165)  |  Algebra (104)  |  Already (29)  |  Approach (54)  |  At Hand (4)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Available (25)  |  Avenue (6)  |  Badly (15)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Benefit (73)  |  Beyond (105)  |  Branch (107)  |  George Chrystal (8)  |  Close (67)  |  Compass (24)  |  Confer (11)  |  Contain (67)  |  Country (147)  |  Department (47)  |  Desirable (11)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Distinct (46)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Expose (16)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (167)  |  Find (408)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Give (201)  |  Great (534)  |  High (153)  |  Historic (7)  |  History (369)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Idea (580)  |  Intend (16)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Journal (19)  |  Kind (140)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Learner (10)  |  Lie (115)  |  Literature (79)  |  Lose (94)  |  Manner (57)  |  Mass (78)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Means (176)  |  Memoir (13)  |  Mention (23)  |  Merely (82)  |  Nature (1223)  |  New (496)  |  Notice (37)  |  Number (282)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Ordinary (73)  |  Original (57)  |  Part (222)  |  Peril (9)  |  Person (154)  |  Possible (158)  |  Practical (133)  |  Present (176)  |  Problem (497)  |  Prof (2)  |  Prolific (5)  |  Publish (34)  |  Question (404)  |  Reach (121)  |  Real (149)  |  Reality (190)  |  Reason (471)  |  Reference (33)  |  Regard (95)  |  Regret (21)  |  Render (33)  |  Rescue (10)  |  Result (389)  |  Science (2067)  |  Second (59)  |  Short (51)  |  Small (163)  |  State (137)  |  Strongly (9)  |  Student (203)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (240)  |  Suffer (40)  |  Technical (42)  |  Textbook (27)  |  Theory (696)  |  Transaction (6)  |  Treatise (34)  |  Useful (100)  |  Value (242)  |  Various (47)  |  Want (176)  |  Whole (192)  |  Write (154)  |  Year (299)

Religion is the antithesis of science; science is competent to illuminate all the deep questions of existence, and does so in a manner that makes full use of, and respects the human intellect. I see neither need nor sign of any future reconciliation.
In 'Religion - The Antithesis to Science', Chemistry & Industry (Feb 1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Antithesis (7)  |  Existence (299)  |  Future (287)  |  Human (550)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Intellect (192)  |  Need (287)  |  Question (404)  |  Reconciliation (10)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  See (369)  |  Sign (58)

Science asks no questions about the ontological pedigree or a priori character of a theory, but is content to judge it by its performance; and it is thus that a knowledge of nature, having all the certainty which the senses are competent to inspire, has been attained—a knowledge which maintains a strict neutrality toward all philosophical systems and concerns itself not with the genesis or a priori grounds of ideas.
Originally published in North American Review (1865). 'The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer,' repr. In Philosophical Writings of Chauncey Wright (1963), p. 8.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (22)  |  Ask (160)  |  Attain (45)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Character (118)  |  Concern (110)  |  Content (69)  |  Genesis (17)  |  Ground (90)  |  Idea (580)  |  Inspire (51)  |  Judge (63)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Maintain (33)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Neutrality (4)  |  Pedigree (3)  |  Performance (33)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Question (404)  |  Science (2067)  |  Sense (321)  |  Strict (17)  |  System (191)  |  Theory (696)  |  Toward (45)

That mathematics “do not cultivate the power of generalization,”; … will be admitted by no person of competent knowledge, except in a very qualified sense. The generalizations of mathematics, are, no doubt, a different thing from the generalizations of physical science; but in the difficulty of seizing them, and the mental tension they require, they are no contemptible preparation for the most arduous efforts of the scientific mind. Even the fundamental notions of the higher mathematics, from those of the differential calculus upwards are products of a very high abstraction. … To perceive the mathematical laws common to the results of many mathematical operations, even in so simple a case as that of the binomial theorem, involves a vigorous exercise of the same faculty which gave us Kepler’s laws, and rose through those laws to the theory of universal gravitation. Every process of what has been called Universal Geometry—the great creation of Descartes and his successors, in which a single train of reasoning solves whole classes of problems at once, and others common to large groups of them—is a practical lesson in the management of wide generalizations, and abstraction of the points of agreement from those of difference among objects of great and confusing diversity, to which the purely inductive sciences cannot furnish many superior. Even so elementary an operation as that of abstracting from the particular configuration of the triangles or other figures, and the relative situation of the particular lines or points, in the diagram which aids the apprehension of a common geometrical demonstration, is a very useful, and far from being always an easy, exercise of the faculty of generalization so strangely imagined to have no place or part in the processes of mathematics.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1878), 612-13.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Admit (45)  |  Agreement (39)  |  Aid (42)  |  Apprehension (16)  |  Arduous (3)  |  Binomial Theorem (3)  |  Call (128)  |  Case (99)  |  Class (84)  |  Common (122)  |  Configuration (7)  |  Confuse (18)  |  Contemptible (8)  |  Creation (242)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Demonstration (86)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Diagram (13)  |  Difference (246)  |  Different (186)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Difficulty (146)  |  Diversity (51)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Easy (102)  |  Effort (144)  |  Elementary (45)  |  Exercise (69)  |  Faculty (70)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (69)  |  Fundamental (164)  |  Furnish (42)  |  Generalization (41)  |  Geometrical (10)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Give (201)  |  Gravitation (38)  |  Great (534)  |  Group (72)  |  High (153)  |  Higher Mathematics (6)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Inductive (10)  |  Involve (48)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Large (130)  |  Law (515)  |  Lesson (41)  |  Line (90)  |  Management (12)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mental (78)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Notion (59)  |  Object (175)  |  Operation (121)  |  Part (222)  |  Particular (76)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Person (154)  |  Physical Science (66)  |  Place (175)  |  Point (123)  |  Power (366)  |  Practical (133)  |  Preparation (43)  |  Problem (497)  |  Process (267)  |  Product (82)  |  Purely (28)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Reason (471)  |  Relative (39)  |  Require (85)  |  Result (389)  |  Rise (70)  |  Same (156)  |  Science (2067)  |  Scientific Mind (5)  |  Seize (15)  |  Sense (321)  |  Simple (178)  |  Single (120)  |  Situation (52)  |  Solve (78)  |  Strangely (5)  |  Successor (9)  |  Superior (41)  |  Tension (9)  |  Theory (696)  |  Train (45)  |  Triangle (11)  |  Universal (105)  |  Upwards (6)  |  Useful (100)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Whole (192)  |  Wide (28)

The competent programmer is fully aware of the limited size of his own skull. He therefore approaches his task with full humility, and avoids clever tricks like the plague.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (54)  |  Avoid (55)  |  Aware (31)  |  Clever (19)  |  Full (63)  |  Fully (21)  |  Humility (23)  |  Limit (126)  |  Plague (35)  |  Programmer (4)  |  Size (60)  |  Skull (5)  |  Task (83)  |  Trick (24)

The fact is that up to now the free society has not been good for the intellectual. It has neither accorded him a superior status to sustain his confidence nor made it easy for him to acquire an unquestioned sense of social usefulness. For he derives his sense of usefulness mainly from directing, instructing, and planning-from minding other people’s business-and is bound to feel superfluous and neglected where people believe themselves competent to manage individual and communal affairs, and are impatient of supervision and regulation. A free society is as much a threat to the intellectual’s sense of worth as an automated economy is to the workingman’s sense of worth. Any social order that can function with a minimum of leadership will be anathema to the intellectual.
In 'Concerning Individual Freedom', The Ordeal of Change (1963), 141.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Affair (29)  |  Belief (504)  |  Bind (25)  |  Communal (7)  |  Confidence (41)  |  Derive (33)  |  Direct (84)  |  Easy (102)  |  Economy (54)  |  Fact (733)  |  Feel (167)  |  Free (92)  |  Function (131)  |  Good (345)  |  Impatient (3)  |  Individual (221)  |  Instruction (73)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Leadership (8)  |  Mainly (9)  |  Manage (15)  |  Mind (760)  |  Minimum (12)  |  Neglect (33)  |  People (390)  |  Regulation (20)  |  Sense (321)  |  Social (108)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (228)  |  Status (20)  |  Superfluous (11)  |  Superior (41)  |  Supervision (4)  |  Sustain (23)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Threat (29)  |  Unquestioned (6)  |  Usefulness (77)  |  Workingman (2)  |  Worth (99)

The infinitely competent can be uncreative.
In A Mathematician's Miscellany (1953). Reissued as Béla Bollobás (ed.), Littlewood’s Miscellany (1986), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Infinitely (13)  |  Uncreative (2)

There are exactly eight entomologists worldwide with the general competence to identify tropical ants and termites.
In 'Edward O. Wilson: The Biological Diversity Crisis: A Challenge to Science', Issues in Science and Technology (Fall 1985), 2, No. 1, 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Ant (24)  |  Entomologist (5)  |  Identify (13)  |  Termite (7)  |  Tropical (8)  |  Worldwide (9)

There are no physicists in the hottest parts of hell, because the existence of a ‘‘hottest part’’ implies a temperature difference, and any marginally competent physicist would immediately use this to run a heat engine and make some other part of hell comfortably cool. This is obviously impossible.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cool (13)  |  Difference (246)  |  Existence (299)  |  Heat Engine (4)  |  Hell (32)  |  Hot (20)  |  Immediately (23)  |  Imply (16)  |  Impossible (113)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Part (222)  |  Physicist (161)  |  Run (57)  |  Temperature (47)

Those who intend to practise Midwifery, ought first of all to make themselves masters of anatomy, and acquire a competent knowledge in surgery and physic; because of their connections with the obstetric art, if not always, at least in many cases. He ought to take the best opportunities he can find of being well instructed; and of practising under a master, before he attempts to deliver by himself. ... He should also embrace every occasion of being present at real labours, ... he will assist the poor as well as the rich, behaving always with charity and compassion.
In A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Midwifery (1766), 440-441.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Anatomy (63)  |  Assist (9)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Behave (17)  |  Charity (9)  |  Compassion (9)  |  Connection (111)  |  Deliver (10)  |  Embrace (33)  |  Instruction (73)  |  Intend (16)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Labour (47)  |  Master (98)  |  Obstetrics (3)  |  Occasion (23)  |  Physic (6)  |  Poor (58)  |  Practise (7)  |  Practising (2)  |  Present (176)  |  Rich (61)  |  Surgery (43)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.