Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index K > Category: Known

Known Quotes (454 quotes)

... in time of war, soldiers, however sensible, care a great deal more on some occasions about slaking their thirst than about the danger of enteric fever.
[Better known as typhoid, the disease is often spread by drinking contaminated water.]
Parliamentaray Debate (21 Mar 1902). Quoted in Winston Churchill and Richard Langworth (ed.), Churchill by Himself: The Definitive Collection of Quotations (2008), 469.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Care (186)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deal (188)  |  Disease (328)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Fever (29)  |  Great (1574)  |  More (2559)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Spread (83)  |  Time (1877)  |  Typhoid (7)  |  War (225)  |  Water (481)

... one of the main functions of an analogy or model is to suggest extensions of the theory by considering extensions of the analogy, since more is known about the analogy than is known about the subject matter of the theory itself … A collection of observable concepts in a purely formal hypothesis suggesting no analogy with anything would consequently not suggest either any directions for its own development.
'Operational Definition and Analogy in Physical Theories', British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (Feb 1952), 2, No. 8, 291.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Collection (64)  |  Concept (221)  |  Development (422)  |  Direction (175)  |  Extension (59)  |  Function (228)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Matter (798)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Observable (21)  |  Purely (109)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theory (970)

230(231-1) ... is the greatest perfect number known at present, and probably the greatest that ever will be discovered; for; as they are merely curious without being useful, it is not likely that any person will attempt to find a number beyond it.
In An Elementary Investigation of the Theory of Numbers (1811), 43. The stated number, which evaluates as 2305843008139952128 was discovered by Euler in 1772 as the eighth known perfect number. It has 19 digits. By 2013, the 48th perfect number found had 34850340 digits.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Find (998)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Merely (316)  |  Number (699)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfect Number (6)  |  Person (363)  |  Present (619)  |  Unlikely (13)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Will (2355)

Bei solchen chemischen Untersuchungen, die man zersetzende oder zergliedernde nennt, kommt es zunächst darauf an, zu ermitteln, mit welchen Stoffen man es zu thun hat, oder um chemisch zu reden, welche Stoffe in einem bestimmten Gemenge oder Gemisch enthalten sind. Hierzu bedient man sich sogenannter gegenwirkender Mittel, d. h. Stoffe, die bestimmte Eigenschaften und Eigenthümlichkeiten besitzen und die man aus Ueberlieferung oder eigner Erfahrung genau kennt, so daß die Veränderungen, welche sie bewirken oder erleiden, gleichsam die Sprache sind, mit der sie reden und dadurch dem Forscher anzeigen, daß der und der bestimmte Stoff in der fraglichen Mischung enthalten sei.
In the case of chemical investigations known as decompositions or analyses, it is first important to determine exactly what ingredients you are dealing with, or chemically speaking, what substances are contained in a given mixture or composite. For this purpose we use reagents, i.e., substances that possess certain properties and characteristics, which we well know from references or personal experience, such that the changes which they bring about or undergo, so to say the language that they speak thereby inform the researcher that this or that specific substance is present in the mixture in question.
From Zur Farben-Chemie Musterbilder für Freunde des Schönen und zum Gebrauch für Zeichner, Maler, Verzierer und Zeugdrucker [On Colour Chemistry...] (1850), Introduction. Translation tweaked by Webmaster from version in Herbert and W. Roesky and Klaud Möckel, translated from the original German by T.N. Mitchell and W.E. Russey, Chemical Curiosities: Spectacular Experiments and Inspired Quotes (1996), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composite (4)  |  Contain (68)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Determination (78)  |  Determine (144)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Experience (467)  |  First (1283)  |  Inform (47)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Personal (67)  |  Possess (156)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Reference (33)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Use (766)

Ce grand ouvrage, toujours plus merveilleux à mesure qu’il est plus connu, nous donne une si grande idée de son ouvrier, que nous en sentons notre esprit accablé d’admiration et de respect.
[The Universe] This great work, always more amazing in proportion as it is better known, raises in us so grand an idea of its Maker, that we find our mind overwhelmed with feelings of wonder and adoration.
Original French and translation in Craufurd Tait Ramage (ed.) Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 119-120.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Adoration (4)  |  Amazing (35)  |  Better (486)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Find (998)  |  Grand (27)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Know (1518)  |  Maker (34)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Plus (43)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)

He who doth with the greatest exactness imaginable, weigh every individual thing that shall or hath hapned to his Patient, and may be known from the Observations of his own, or of others, and who afterwards compareth all these with one another, and puts them in an opposite view to such Things as happen in a healthy State; and lastly, from all this with the nicest and severest bridle upon his reasoning faculty riseth to the knowledge of the very first Cause of the Disease, and of the Remedies fit to remove them; He, and only He deserveth the Name of a true Physician.
Aphorism No. 13 in Boerhaave’s Aphorisms: Concerning The Knowledge and Cure of Diseases (1715), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Disease (328)  |  Exactness (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Fit (134)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Happen (274)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Name (333)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Remove (45)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Weigh (49)

La determination de la relation & de la dépendance mutuelle de ces données dans certains cas particuliers, doit être le premier but du Physicien; & pour cet effet, il falloit one mesure exacte qui indiquât d’une manière invariable & égale dans tous les lieux de la terre, le degré de l'électricité au moyen duquel les expéiences ont été faites… Aussi, l'histoire de l'électricité prouve une vérité suffisamment reconnue; c'est que le Physicien sans mesure ne fait que jouer, & qu'il ne diffère en cela des enfans, que par la nature de son jeu & la construction de ses jouets.
The determination of the relationship and mutual dependence of the facts in particular cases must be the first goal of the Physicist; and for this purpose he requires that an exact measurement may be taken in an equally invariable manner anywhere in the world… Also, the history of electricity yields a well-known truth—that the physicist shirking measurement only plays, different from children only in the nature of his game and the construction of his toys.
'Mémoire sur la mesure de force de l'électricité', Journal de Physique (1782), 21, 191. English version by Google Translate tweaked by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Construction (112)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Determination (78)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Equally (130)  |  Exact (68)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Game (101)  |  Goal (145)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invariable (4)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Particular (76)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Play (112)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Toy (19)  |  Truth (1057)  |  World (1774)  |  Yield (81)

Les grands ponts étant … des monuments qui peuvent servir à faire connoître la magnificence et le génie d’une nation, on ne sauroit trop s’occuper des moyens d’en perfectionner l’architecture, qui peut d’ailleurs être susceptible de variété, en conservant toujours, dans les formes et la décoration, le caractere de solidité qui lui est propre.
Great bridges being monuments which serve to make known the grandeur and genius of a nation, we cannot pay too much attention to means for perfecting their architecture; this may be varied in treatment, but there must ever be conserved, in form and in decoration, the indispensable character of solidity.
In Description des projets et de la construction des ponts de Neuilli, de Mantes, d'Orléans, de Louis XVI, etc. (1777, New ed. 1788), 630. Translated by D. B. Steinman, as quoted in 'Some Reflections on the architecture of Bridges', Engineering and Contracting (26 Dec 1917), 48, No. 26, 536. Also seen translated as, “A great bridge is a great monument which should serve to make known the splendour and genius of a nation; one should not occupy oneself with efforts to perfect it architecturally, for taste is always susceptible to change, but to conserve always in its form and decoration the character of solidity which is proper.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Character (243)  |  Decoration (2)  |  Form (959)  |  Genius (284)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Magnificence (13)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Monument (45)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfecting (6)  |  Solidity (2)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Taste (90)  |  Treatment (130)

Puisqu'on ne peut être universel en sachant tout ce qui se peut sur tout, il faut savoir peu de tout. Car il est bien plus beau de savoir quelque chose de tout que de savoir rout d'une chose; cette universalité est la plus belle. Si on pouvait avoir les deux, encore mieux.
Since we cannot be universal and know all that is to be known of everything, we ought to know a little about everything, For it is far better to know something about everything than to know all about one thing.
Pensées. Quoted in Nigel Rees, Brewer's Famous Quotations: 5000 Quotations and the Stories Behind Them (2006), 249.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Car (71)  |  Everything (476)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Plus (43)  |  Something (719)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Universal (189)

Question: Show how the hypothenuse face of a right-angled prism may be used as a reflector. What connection is there between the refractive index of a medium and the angle at which an emergent ray is totally reflected?
Answer: Any face of any prism may be used as a reflector. The con nexion between the refractive index of a medium and the angle at which an emergent ray does not emerge but is totally reflected is remarkable and not generally known.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 182-3, Question 29. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Angle (20)  |  Answer (366)  |  Connection (162)  |  Emergent (3)  |  Examination (98)  |  Face (212)  |  Howler (15)  |  Hypotenuse (4)  |  Index (4)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Medium (12)  |  Prism (7)  |  Question (621)  |  Ray (114)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Reflector (4)  |  Refraction (11)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Right (452)  |  Show (346)  |  Total (94)

Question: State what are the conditions favourable for the formation of dew. Describe an instrument for determining the dew point, and the method of using it.
Answer: This is easily proved from question 1. A body of gas as it ascends expands, cools, and deposits moisture; so if you walk up a hill the body of gas inside you expands, gives its heat to you, and deposits its moisture in the form of dew or common sweat. Hence these are the favourable conditions; and moreover it explains why you get warm by ascending a hill, in opposition to the well-known law of the Conservation of Energy.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 179, Question 12. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Ascension (4)  |  Body (537)  |  Common (436)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Conservation Of Energy (29)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Deposition (4)  |  Describe (128)  |  Description (84)  |  Determination (78)  |  Dew (9)  |  Easy (204)  |  Energy (344)  |  Examination (98)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Favor (63)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gas (83)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hill (20)  |  Howler (15)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Point (580)  |  Proof (287)  |  Question (621)  |  State (491)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Use (766)  |  Walk (124)  |  Warm (69)  |  Well-Known (4)  |  Why (491)

Qui ergo munitam vult habere navem habet etiam acum jaculo suppositam. Rotabitur enim et circumvolvetur acus, donec cuspis acus respiciat orientem sicque comprehendunt quo tendere debeant nautaw cum Cynosura latet in aeris turbatione; quamvis ad occasum numquam tendat, propter circuli brevitatem.
If then one wishes a ship well provided with all things, then one must have also a needle mounted on a dart. The needle will be oscillated and turn until the point of the needle directs itself to the East* [North], thus making known to sailors the route which they should hold while the Little Bear is concealed from them by the vicissitudes of the atmosphere; for it never disappears under the horizon because of the smallness of the circle it describes.
Latin text from Thomas Wright, 'De Utensilibus', A Volume of Vocabularies, (1857) as cited with translation in Park Benjamin, The Intellectual Rise in Electricity: A History (1895), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Bear (159)  |  Circle (110)  |  Compass (34)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Describe (128)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Little (707)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Making (300)  |  Mount (42)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Point (580)  |  Sailor (16)  |  Ship (62)  |  Smallness (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vicissitude (6)  |  Will (2355)

A bewildering assortment of (mostly microscopic) life-forms has been found thriving in what were once thought to be uninhabitable regions of our planet. These hardy creatures have turned up in deep, hot underground rocks, around scalding volcanic vents at the bottom of the ocean, in the desiccated, super-cold Dry Valleys of Antarctica, in places of high acid, alkaline, and salt content, and below many meters of polar ice. ... Some deep-dwelling, heat-loving microbes, genetic studies suggest, are among the oldest species known, hinting that not only can life thrive indefinitely in what appear to us totally alien environments, it may actually originate in such places.
In Life Everywhere: the Maverick Science of Astrobiology (2002), xi.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Alien (34)  |  Alkali (6)  |  Antarctica (7)  |  Assortment (5)  |  Bewilderment (8)  |  Cold (112)  |  Creature (233)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dry (57)  |  Environment (216)  |  Form (959)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Heat (174)  |  High (362)  |  Hot (60)  |  Ice (54)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life-Form (6)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Microbes (14)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Origin (239)  |  Originate (36)  |  Planet (356)  |  Polar (12)  |  Rock (161)  |  Salt (46)  |  Species (401)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Thriving (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Underground (11)  |  Valley (32)  |  Vent (2)  |  Volcano (39)

A celebrity is a person who is known for his well-knownness.
In The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America (1961), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Celebrity (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Person (363)

A chemical name should not be a phrase, it ought not to require circumlocutions to become definite; it should not be of the type “Glauber’s salt”, which conveys nothing about the composition of the substance; it should recall the constituents of a compound; it should be non-committal if nothing is known about the substance; the names should preferably be coined from Latin or Greek, so that their meaning can be more widely and easily understood; the form of the words should be such that they fit easily into the language into which they are to be incorporated.
(1782) As quoted in Archibald Clow, Chemical Revolution: A Contribution to Social Technology (1952, 1992), 618.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Become (815)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Definite (110)  |  Fit (134)  |  Form (959)  |  Greek (107)  |  Language (293)  |  Latin (38)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Require (219)  |  Salt (46)  |  Substance (248)  |  Type (167)  |  Understood (156)  |  Word (619)

A disease which new and obscure to you, Doctor, will be known only after death; and even then not without an autopsy will you examine it with exacting pains. But rare are those among the extremely busy clinicians who are willing or capable of doing this correctly.
In Atrocis, nee Descipti Prius, Morbi Historia as translated in Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (1944), 43, 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Autopsy (3)  |  Busy (28)  |  Capable (168)  |  Clinician (2)  |  Correct (86)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exacting (4)  |  Examine (78)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Pain (136)  |  Rare (89)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)

A DNA sequence for the genome of bacteriophage ΦX174 of approximately 5,375 nucleotides has been determined using the rapid and simple “plus and minus” method. The sequence identifies many of the features responsible for the production of the proteins of the nine known genes of the organism, including initiation and termination sites for the proteins and RNAs. Two pairs of genes are coded by the same region of DNA using different reading frames.
[Paper co-author]
Frederick Sanger, et al., 'Nucleotide Sequence of Bacteriophage ΦX174 DNA', Nature (1977), 265, 687.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (167)  |  Bacteriophage (2)  |  Code (31)  |  Determination (78)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  DNA (77)  |  Feature (44)  |  Frame (26)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genome (15)  |  Identification (16)  |  Initiation (7)  |  Method (505)  |  Nucleotide (6)  |  Organism (220)  |  Paper (182)  |  Plus (43)  |  Production (183)  |  Protein (54)  |  Reading (133)  |  Region (36)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Simple (406)  |  Site (14)  |  Termination (4)  |  Two (937)

A process which led from the amoeba to man appeared to the philosophers to be obviously a progress—though whether the amoeba would agree with this opinion is not known.
From 'Current Tendencies', delivered as the first of a series of Lowell Lectures in Boston (Mar 1914). Collected in Our Knowledge of the External World (1914), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Man (2251)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Unknown (182)

A research journal serves that narrow borderland which separates the known from the unknown.
Editorial, Vol. 1, Part 1, in the new statistics journal of the Indian Statistical Institute, Sankhayā (1933), as quoted and cited by MacTutor webpage for Mahalanobis. Also reprinted in Sankhyā: The Indian Journal of Statistics (Feb 2003), 65, No. 1, xii.
Science quotes on:  |  Borderland (6)  |  Journal (30)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Research (664)  |  Separate (143)  |  Serve (59)  |  Unknown (182)

A research laboratory jealous of its reputation has to develop less formal, more intimate ways of forming a corporate judgment of the work its people do. The best laboratories in university departments are well known for their searching, mutual questioning.
In Editorial, 'Is Science Really a Pack of Lies', Nature (1983), 303, 1257. As quoted and cited in Bradley P. Fuhrman, Jerry J. Zimmerman, Pediatric Critical Care (2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Corporate (3)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Do (1908)  |  Formal (33)  |  Forming (42)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Jealous (3)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  More (2559)  |  Mutual (52)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Question (621)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Research (664)  |  Searching (5)  |  University (121)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

A star is drawing on some vast reservoir of energy by means unknown to us. This reservoir can scarcely be other than the subatomic energy which, it is known exists abundantly in all matter; we sometimes dream that man will one day learn how to release it and use it for his service. The store is well nigh inexhaustible, if only it could be tapped. There is sufficient in the Sun to maintain its output of heat for 15 billion years.
Address to the British Association in Cardiff, (24 Aug 1920), in Observatory (1920), 43 353. Reprinted in Foreward to Arthur S. Eddington, The Internal Constitution of the Stars (1926, 1988), x.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Power (9)  |  Billion (95)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Dream (208)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Heat (174)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Other (2236)  |  Output (10)  |  Release (27)  |  Reservoir (7)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Service (110)  |  Star (427)  |  Store (48)  |  Subatomic (10)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tap (10)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Use (766)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

About weak points [of the Origin] I agree. The eye to this day gives me a cold shudder, but when I think of the fine known gradations, my reason tells me I ought to conquer the cold shudder.
Letter to Asa Gray, 8 or 9 February 1860. In F. Burkhardt and S. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin 1860 (1993), Vol. 8, 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Cold (112)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Species (42)  |  Point (580)  |  Reason (744)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Weak (71)

According to my derivative hypothesis, a change takes place first in the structure of the animal, and this, when sufficiently advanced, may lead to modifications of habits… . “Derivation” holds that every species changes, in time, by virtue of inherent tendencies thereto. “Natural Selection” holds that no such change can take place without the influence of altered external circumstances educing or selecting such change… . The hypothesis of “natural selection” totters on the extension of a conjectural condition, explanatory of extinction to the majority of organisms, and not known or observed to apply to the origin of any species.
In On the Anatomy of Vertebrates (1868), Vol. 3, 808.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Change (593)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Derivation (13)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extension (59)  |  External (57)  |  Extinction (74)  |  First (1283)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Lead (384)  |  Majority (66)  |  Modification (55)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Observed (149)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Selection (128)  |  Species (401)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Virtue (109)

According to our ancient Buddhist texts, a thousand million solar systems make up a galaxy. … A thousand million of such galaxies form a supergalaxy. … A thousand million supergalaxies is collectively known as supergalaxy Number One. Again, a thousand million supergalaxy Number Ones form a Supergalaxy Number Two. A thousand million supergalaxy Number Twos make up a supergalaxy Number Three, and of these, it is stated in the texts that there are a countless number in the universe.
In 'Reactions to Man’s Landing on the Moon Show Broad Variations in Opinions', The New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Buddhist (5)  |  Countless (36)  |  Form (959)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Million (114)  |  Number (699)  |  Solar System (77)  |  System (537)  |  Text (14)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)

All admit that the mountains of the globe are situated mostly along the border regions of the continents (taking these regions as 300 to 1000 miles or more in width), and that over these same areas the sedimentary deposits have, as a general thing, their greatest thickness. At first thought, it would seem almost incredible that the upliftings of mountains, whatever their mode of origin, should have taken place just where the earth’s crust, through these sedimentary accumulations, was the thickest, and where, therefore, there was the greatest weight to be lifted. … Earthquakes show that even now, in this last of the geological ages, the same border regions of the continents, although daily thickening from the sediments borne to the ocean by rivers, are the areas of the greatest and most frequent movements of the earth’s crust. (1866)
[Thus, the facts were known long ago; the explanation by tectonic activity came many decades later.]
In 'Observations on the Origin of Some of the Earth's Features', The American Journal of Science (Sep 1866), Second Series, 42, No. 125, 210-211.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Activity (210)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Border (9)  |  Continent (76)  |  Crust (38)  |  Daily (87)  |  Decade (59)  |  Deposit (12)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  General (511)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Last (426)  |  Lift (55)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Movement (155)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Origin (239)  |  Plate Tectonics (20)  |  River (119)  |  Sediment (8)  |  Show (346)  |  Thickness (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Uplift (6)  |  Weight (134)  |  Whatever (234)

All fossil anthropoids found hitherto have been known only from mandibular or maxillary fragments, so far as crania are concerned, and so the general appearance of the types they represented had been unknown; consequently, a condition of affairs where virtually the whole face and lower jaw, replete with teeth, together with the major portion of the brain pattern, have been preserved, constitutes a specimen of unusual value in fossil anthropoid discovery. Here, as in Homo rhodesiensis, Southern Africa has provided documents of higher primate evolution that are amongst the most complete extant. Apart from this evidential completeness, the specimen is of importance because it exhibits an extinct race of apes intermediate between living anthropoids and man ... Whether our present fossil is to be correlated with the discoveries made in India is not yet apparent; that question can only be solved by a careful comparison of the permanent molar teeth from both localities. It is obvious, meanwhile, that it represents a fossil group distinctly advanced beyond living anthropoids in those two dominantly human characters of facial and dental recession on one hand, and improved quality of the brain on the other. Unlike Pithecanthropus, it does not represent an ape-like man, a caricature of precocious hominid failure, but a creature well advanced beyond modern anthropoids in just those characters, facial and cerebral, which are to be anticipated in an extinct link between man and his simian ancestor. At the same time, it is equally evident that a creature with anthropoid brain capacity and lacking the distinctive, localised temporal expansions which appear to be concomitant with and necessary to articulate man, is no true man. It is therefore logically regarded as a man-like ape. I propose tentatively, then, that a new family of Homo-simidæ be created for the reception of the group of individuals which it represents, and that the first known species of the group be designated Australopithecus africanus, in commemoration, first, of the extreme southern and unexpected horizon of its discovery, and secondly, of the continent in which so many new and important discoveries connected with the early history of man have recently been made, thus vindicating the Darwinian claim that Africa would prove to be the cradle of mankind.
'Australopithicus africanus: The Man-Ape of South Africa', Nature, 1925, 115, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Ape (53)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Both (493)  |  Brain (270)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Character (243)  |  Claim (146)  |  Commemoration (2)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Concern (228)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continent (76)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Creature (233)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Early (185)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evident (91)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Face (212)  |  Failure (161)  |  Family (94)  |  First (1283)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fragment (54)  |  General (511)  |  History (673)  |  Hominid (4)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Importance (286)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Living (491)  |  Major (84)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Portion (84)  |  Present (619)  |  Primate (11)  |  Prove (250)  |  Quality (135)  |  Question (621)  |  Race (268)  |  Reception (15)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Species (401)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Value (365)  |  Whole (738)

All frescoes are as high finished as miniatures or enamels, and they are known to be unchangeable; but oil, being a body itself, will drink or absorb very little colour, and changing yellow, and at length brown, destroys every colour it is mixed with, especially every delicate colour. It turns every permanent white to a yellow and brown putty, and has compelled the use of that destroyer of colour, white lead, which, when its protecting oil is evaporated, will become lead again. This is an awful thing to say to oil painters ; they may call it madness, but it is true. All the genuine old little pictures, called cabinet pictures, are in fresco and not in oil. Oil was not used except by blundering ignorance till after Vandyke’s time ; but the art of fresco painting being lost, oil became a fetter to genius and a dungeon to art.
In 'Opinions', The Poems: With Specimens of the Prose Writings of William Blake (1885), 276-277.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Body (537)  |  Brown (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Color (137)  |  Compel (30)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Drink (53)  |  Evaporate (5)  |  Finish (59)  |  Genius (284)  |  Genuine (52)  |  High (362)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Lead (384)  |  Little (707)  |  Madness (33)  |  Miniature (7)  |  Oil (59)  |  Old (481)  |  Painter (29)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Picture (143)  |  Putty (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Use (766)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yellow (30)

All known living bodies are sharply divided into two special kingdoms, based upon the essential differences which distinguish animals from plants, and in spite of what has been said, I am convinced that these two kingdoms do not really merge into one another at any point.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Divided (50)  |  Do (1908)  |  Essential (199)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Living (491)  |  Organism (220)  |  Plant (294)  |  Point (580)  |  Special (184)  |  Spite (55)  |  Two (937)

All palaetiological sciences, all speculations which attempt to ascend from the present to the remote past, by the chain of causation, do also, by an inevitable consequence, urge us to look for the beginning of the state of things which we thus contemplate; but in none of these cases have men been able, by the aid of science, to arrive at a beginning which is homogeneous with the known course of events. The first origin of language, of civilization, of law and government, cannot be clearly made out by reasoning and research; and just as little, we may expect, will a knowledge of the origin of the existing and extinct species of plants and animals, be the result of physiological and geological investigation.
In History of the Inductive Sciences (1837), Vol. 3, 581.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Causation (14)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Do (1908)  |  Event (216)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extinct (21)  |  First (1283)  |  Geology (220)  |  Government (110)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Origin (239)  |  Palaetiology (2)  |  Past (337)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Plant (294)  |  Present (619)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remote (83)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Species (401)  |  Speculation (126)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

All the good experimental physicists I have known have had an intense curiosity that no Keep Out sign could mute.
In Adventures of a Physicist (1987), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimental Physicist (10)  |  Good (889)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Keep Out (2)  |  Mute (4)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Sign (58)

All the modern higher mathematics is based on a calculus of operations, on laws of thought. All mathematics, from the first, was so in reality; but the evolvers of the modern higher calculus have known that it is so. Therefore elementary teachers who, at the present day, persist in thinking about algebra and arithmetic as dealing with laws of number, and about geometry as dealing with laws of surface and solid content, are doing the best that in them lies to put their pupils on the wrong track for reaching in the future any true understanding of the higher algebras. Algebras deal not with laws of number, but with such laws of the human thinking machinery as have been discovered in the course of investigations on numbers. Plane geometry deals with such laws of thought as were discovered by men intent on finding out how to measure surface; and solid geometry with such additional laws of thought as were discovered when men began to extend geometry into three dimensions.
In Lectures on the Logic of Arithmetic (1903), Preface, 18-19.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Best (459)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Course (409)  |  Deal (188)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doing (280)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Extend (128)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Human (1468)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Number (699)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Present (619)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Reality (261)  |  Solid (116)  |  Surface (209)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Track (38)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wrong (234)

All things are hidden, obscure and debatable if the cause of the phenomena is unknown, but everything is clear if its cause be known.
In Louis Pasteur and Harold Clarence Ernst (trans), The Germ Theory and Its Application to Medicine and Surgery, Chap. 2. Reprinted in Charles W. Eliot (ed.), The Harvard Classics: Scientific Papers: Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology (1897, 1910), Vol. 38, 384. Cited as read before French Academy of Science (20 Apr 1878), published in Comptes Rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, 84, 1037-43.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Clear (100)  |  Debate (38)  |  Everything (476)  |  Hide (69)  |  Know (1518)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unknown (182)

Almost all the greatest discoveries in astronomy have resulted from what we have elsewhere termed Residual Phenomena, of a qualitative or numerical kind, of such portions of the numerical or quantitative results of observation as remain outstanding and unaccounted for, after subducting and allowing for all that would result from the strict application of known principles.
Outlines of Astronomy (1876), 626.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Allowing (2)  |  Application (242)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Numerical (39)  |  Observation (555)  |  Outstanding (16)  |  Phenomena (8)  |  Portion (84)  |  Principle (507)  |  Qualitative (14)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Remain (349)  |  Residual (5)  |  Result (677)  |  Term (349)  |  Unaccounted (2)

Almost all the world is natural chemicals, so it really makes you re-think everything. A cup of coffee is filled with chemicals. They've identified a thousand chemicals in a cup of coffee. But we only found 22 that have been tested in animal cancer tests out of this thousand. And of those, 17 are carcinogens. There are ten milligrams of known carcinogens in a cup of coffee and thats more carcinogens than youre likely to get from pesticide residues for a year!
Paper to the American Chemical Society, 'Pollution, Pesticides and Cancer Misconceptions.' As cited by Art Drysdale, 'Latest Insider News: Natural vs. Synthetic Chemical Pesticides' (14 Feb 1999), on the mitosyfraudes.org website. Bruce Ames has delivered a similar statistic in various other publications.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Cup (7)  |  Everything (476)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Pesticide (5)  |  Residue (9)  |  Test (211)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thousand (331)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Almost everyone... seems to be quite sure that the differences between the methodologies of history and of the natural sciences are vast. For, we are assured, it is well known that in the natural sciences we start from observation and proceed by induction to theory. And is it not obvious that in history we proceed very differently? Yes, I agree that we proceed very differently. But we do so in the natural sciences as well.
In both we start from myths—from traditional prejudices, beset with error—and from these we proceed by criticism: by the critical elimination of errors. In both the role of evidence is, in the main, to correct our mistakes, our prejudices, our tentative theories—that is, to play a part in the critical discussion, in the elimination of error. By correcting our mistakes, we raise new problems. And in order to solve these problems, we invent conjectures, that is, tentative theories, which we submit to critical discussion, directed towards the elimination of error.
The Myth of the Framework: In Defence of Science and Rationality (1993), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Correction (40)  |  Critical (66)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Difference (337)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Error (321)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Evidence (248)  |  History (673)  |  Induction (77)  |  Methodology (12)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Myth (56)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Order (632)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Role (86)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solve (130)  |  Start (221)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Vast (177)

Although it be a known thing subscribed by all, that the foetus assumes its origin and birth from the male and female, and consequently that the egge is produced by the cock and henne, and the chicken out of the egge, yet neither the schools of physicians nor Aristotle’s discerning brain have disclosed the manner how the cock and its seed doth mint and coin the chicken out of the egge.
As quoted in John Arthur Thomson, The Science of Life: An Outline of the History of Biology and Its Recent Advances (1899), 126.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Birth (147)  |  Brain (270)  |  Chicken (8)  |  Cock (6)  |  Coin (12)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Egg (69)  |  Female (50)  |  Foetus (5)  |  Hen (7)  |  Male (26)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mint (4)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Physician (273)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  School (219)  |  Seed (93)  |  Thing (1915)

Alvarez seemed to care less about the way the picture in the puzzle would look, when everything fit together, than about the fun of looking for pieces that fit. He loved nothing more than doing something that everybody else thought impossible. His designs were clever, and usually exploited some little-known principle that everyone else had forgotten.
As quoted in Walter Sullivan, 'Luis W. Alvarez, Nobel Physicist Who Explored Atom, Dies at 77: Obituary', New York Times (2 Sep 1988).
Science quotes on:  |  Luis W. Alvarez (24)  |  Care (186)  |  Clever (38)  |  Design (195)  |  Doing (280)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exploit (19)  |  Fit (134)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Fun (38)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Picture (143)  |  Piece (38)  |  Principle (507)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Something (719)  |  Thought (953)  |  Together (387)  |  Usually (176)  |  Way (1217)

An inventor is an opportunist, one who takes occasion by the hand; who, having seen where some want exists, successfully applies the right means to attain the desired end. The means may be largely, or even wholly, something already known, or there may be a certain originality or discovery in the means employed. But in every case the inventor uses the work of others. If I may use a metaphor, I should liken him to the man who essays the conquest of some virgin alp. At the outset he uses the beaten track, and, as he progresses in the ascent, he uses the steps made by those who have preceded him, whenever they lead in the right direction; and it is only after the last footprints have died out that he takes ice-axe in hand and cuts the remaining steps, few or many, that lift him to the crowning height which is his goal.
In Kenneth Raydon Swan, Sir Joseph Swan (1946), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Alp (9)  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Beaten Track (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Crown (38)  |  Cut (114)  |  Death (388)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Employ (113)  |  End (590)  |  Essay (27)  |  Exist (443)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Goal (145)  |  Height (32)  |  Ice (54)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leading (17)  |  Lift (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Opportunist (3)  |  Originality (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outset (7)  |  Preceded (2)  |  Progress (465)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Right (452)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Success (302)  |  Track (38)  |  Use (766)  |  Virgin (9)  |  Want (497)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Work (1351)

Ancient stars in their death throes spat out atoms like iron which this universe had never known. ... Now the iron of old nova coughings vivifies the redness of our blood.
Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st century (2003), 223. Quoted in Rob Brezsny, Pronoia Is the Antidote for Paranoia (2005), 228.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Atom (355)  |  Blood (134)  |  Cough (8)  |  Death (388)  |  Iron (96)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nova (6)  |  Old (481)  |  Redness (2)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Universe (857)

And this is a miracle of nature in part known, namely, that iron follows the part of a magnet that touches it, and flies from the other part of the same magnet. And the iron turns itself after moving to the part of the heavens conformed to the part of the magnet which it touched.
Science quotes on:  |  Follow (378)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Iron (96)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Mineralogy (20)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Touch (141)  |  Turn (447)

And we daily in our experiments electrise bodies plus or minus, as we think proper. [These terms we may use till your Philosophers give us better.] To electrise plus or minus, no more needs to be known than this, that the parts of the Tube or Sphere, that are rubb’d, do, in the Instant of Friction, attract the Electrical Fire, and therefore take it from the Thin rubbing; the same parts immediately, as the Friction upon them ceases, are disposed to give the fire they have received, to any Body that has less.
Letter 25 May 1747. Quoted in I. Bernard Cohen, Franklin and Newton: An Enquiry into Speculative Newtonian Experimental Science and Franklin’s Work in Electricity as an Example Thereof (1956), 439.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Body (537)  |  Cease (79)  |  Daily (87)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fire (189)  |  Friction (14)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Instant (45)  |  Minus (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plus (43)  |  Proper (144)  |  Spark (31)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Think (1086)  |  Use (766)

Another argument of hope may be drawn from this–that some of the inventions already known are such as before they were discovered it could hardly have entered any man's head to think of; they would have been simply set aside as impossible. For in conjecturing what may be men set before them the example of what has been, and divine of the new with an imagination preoccupied and colored by the old; which way of forming opinions is very fallacious, for streams that are drawn from the springheads of nature do not always run in the old channels.
Translation of Novum Organum, XCII. In Francis Bacon, James Spedding, The Works of Francis Bacon (1864), Vol. 8, 128.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Argument (138)  |  Channel (21)  |  Color (137)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Fallacious (12)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Forming (42)  |  Hope (299)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Run (174)  |  Set (394)  |  Stream (81)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Way (1217)

As a scientist, I am hostile to fundamentalist religion because it actively debauches the scientific enterprise. It teaches us not to change our minds, and not to want to know exciting things that are available to be known. It subverts science and saps the intellect.
In The God Delusion (2007), 321. As cited in John C. Weaver and John David Weaver, Christianity and Science (1973, 1984), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Available (78)  |  Change (593)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fundamentalist (4)  |  Hostile (8)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Subvert (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Want (497)

As a well-known sports announcer would have put it: “ATP is the most underrated molecule in the league today.”
In The Wine of Life, and other Essays on Societies, Energy & Living Things (1981), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  ATP (2)  |  League (2)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sport (22)  |  Today (314)  |  Underrated (3)

As for science and religion, the known and admitted facts are few and plain enough. All that the parsons say is unproved. All that the doctors say is disproved. That’s the only difference between science and religion…
In Manalive (1912), 146.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Admitted (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Difference (337)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Parson (3)  |  Plain (33)  |  Religion (361)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Unproved (2)

As I stood behind the coffin of my little son the other day, with my mind bent on anything but disputation, the officiating minister read, as part of his duty, the words, 'If the dead rise not again, let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.' I cannot tell you how inexpressibly they shocked me. Paul had neither wife nor child, or he must have known that his alternative involved a blasphemy against all that well best and noblest in human nature. I could have laughed with scorn. What! Because I am face to face with irreparable loss, because I have given back to the source from whence it came, the cause of a great happiness, still retaining through all my life the blessings which have sprung and will spring from that cause, I am to renounce my manhood, and, howling, grovel in bestiality? Why, the very apes know better, and if you shoot their young, the poor brutes grieve their grief out and do not immediately seek distraction in a gorge.
Letter to Charles Kingsley (23 Sep 1860). In L. Huxley, The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley (1903), Vol. 1, 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Ape (53)  |  Back (390)  |  Behind (137)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Blasphemy (7)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Brute (28)  |  Cause (541)  |  Child (307)  |  Coffin (7)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Face (212)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grief (18)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Involved (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Read (287)  |  Renounce (5)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shock (37)  |  Son (24)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Tell (340)  |  Through (849)  |  Why (491)  |  Wife (41)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Young (227)

As I strayed into the study of an eminent physicist, I observed hanging against the wall, framed like a choice engraving, several dingy, ribbon-like strips of, I knew not what... My curiosity was at once aroused. What were they? ... They might be shreds of mummy-wraps or bits of friable bark-cloth from the Pacific, ... [or] remnants from a grandmother’s wedding dress... They were none of these... He explained that they were carefully-prepared photographs of portions of the Solar Spectrum. I stood and mused, absorbed in the varying yet significant intensities of light and shade, bordered by mystic letters and symbolic numbers. As I mused, the pale legend began to glow with life. Every line became luminous with meaning. Every shadow was suffused with light shining from behind, suggesting some mighty achievement of knowledge; of knowledge growing more daring in proportion to the remoteness of the object known; of knowledge becoming more positive in its answers, as the questions which were asked seemed unanswerable. No Runic legend, no Babylonish arrowhead, no Egyptian hieroglyph, no Moabite stone, could present a history like this, or suggest thoughts of such weighty import or so stimulate and exalt the imagination.
The Sciences of Nature Versus the Science of Man: A Plea for the Science of Man (1871), 7-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arrowhead (4)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bark (18)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Behind (137)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Choice (110)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Daring (17)  |  Engraving (4)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Explain (322)  |  Growing (98)  |  Hieroglyph (2)  |  History (673)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Legend (17)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Mummy (7)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Observed (149)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Portion (84)  |  Positive (94)  |  Present (619)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Question (621)  |  Remnant (7)  |  Remoteness (9)  |  Shade (31)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Shining (35)  |  Significant (74)  |  Solar Spectrum (3)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Stone (162)  |  Study (653)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wall (67)  |  Wedding (7)

As is well known the principle of virtual velocities transforms all statics into a mathematical assignment, and by D'Alembert's principle for dynamics, the latter is again reduced to statics. Although it is is very much in order that in gradual training of science and in the instruction of the individual the easier precedes the more difficult, the simple precedes the more complicated, the special precedes the general, yet the min, once it has arrived at the higher standpoint, demands the reverse process whereby all statics appears only as a very special case of mechanics.
Collected Works (1877), Vol. 5, 25-26. Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 412.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Jean le Rond D’Alembert (11)  |  Demand (123)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easier (53)  |  General (511)  |  Individual (404)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  More (2559)  |  Order (632)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Special (184)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Statics (6)  |  Theory (970)  |  Training (80)  |  Transform (73)

As new areas of the world came into view through exploration, the number of identified species of animals and plants grew astronomically. By 1800 it had reached 70,000. Today more than 1.25 million different species, two-thirds animal and one-third plant, are known, and no biologist supposes that the count is complete.
In The Intelligent Man's Guide to Science: The Biological Sciences (1960), 654. Also in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 320.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Complete (204)  |  Count (105)  |  Different (577)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Identify (13)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Plant (294)  |  Reach (281)  |  Species (401)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Taxonomy (18)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

As soon as the circumstances of an experiment are well known, we stop gathering statistics. … The effect will occur always without exception, because the cause of the phenomena is accurately defined. Only when a phenomenon includes conditions as yet undefined,Only when a phenomenon includes conditions as yet undefined, can we compile statistics. … we must learn therefore that we compile statistics only when we cannot possibly help it; for in my opinion, statistics can never yield scientific truth.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 134-137.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Cause (541)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Compilation (3)  |  Condition (356)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exception (73)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Include (90)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Soon (186)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undefined (3)  |  Will (2355)  |  Yield (81)

As we look out into the Universe and identify the many accidents of physics and astronomy that have worked together to our benefit, it almost seems as if the Universe must in some sense have known that we were coming.
In The Anthropic Cosmological Principle by John D. Barrow and Frank J. Tipler (1986).
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Coming (114)  |  Look (582)  |  Must (1526)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Sense (770)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)  |  Work (1351)

At times the [radio telescope] records exhibited a feature characteristic of interference, occurring some time later than the passage of the two known sources. This intermittent feature was curious, and I recall saying once that we would have to investigate the origin of that interference some day. We joked that it was probably due to the faulty ignition of some farm hand returning from a date.
From address to the 101st Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, Gainesville, Florida (27 Dec 1958). Printed in 'An Account of the Discovery of Jupiter as a Radio Source', The Astronomical Journal (Mar 1959), 64, No. 2, 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Curious (91)  |  Date (13)  |  Due (141)  |  Farm (26)  |  Faulty (3)  |  Hand (143)  |  Ignition (3)  |  Interference (21)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Origin (239)  |  Passage (50)  |  Radio (50)  |  Radio Telescope (5)  |  Record (154)  |  Returning (2)  |  Source (93)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)

Being also in accord with Goethe that discoveries are made by the age and not by the individual, I should consider the instances to be exceedingly rare of men who can be said to be living before their age, and to be the repository of knowledge quite foreign to the thought of the time. The rule is that a number of persons are employed at a particular piece of work, but one being a few steps in advance of the others is able to crown the edifice with his name, or, having the ability to generalise already known facts, may become in time to be regarded as their originator. Therefore it is that one name is remembered whilst those of coequals have long been buried in obscurity.
In Historical Notes on Bright's Disease, Addison's Disease, and Hodgkin's Disease', Guy's Hospital Reports (1877), 22, 259-260.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  Already (222)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Coequal (2)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crown (38)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Employ (113)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (145)  |  Individual (404)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Name (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Originator (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Rare (89)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remember (179)  |  Repository (5)  |  Rule (294)  |  Step (231)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Work (1351)

BIRTH, n. The first and direst of all disasters. As to the nature of it there appears to be no uniformity. Castor and Pollux were born from the egg. Pallas came out of a skull. Galatea was once a block of stone. Peresilis, who wrote in the tenth century, avers that he grew up out of the ground where a priest had spilled holy water. It is known that Arimaxus was derived from a hole in the earth, made by a stroke of lightning. Leucomedon was the son of a cavern in Mount Etna, and I have myself seen a man come out of a wine cellar.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  38.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cavern (9)  |  Century (310)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Earth (996)  |  Egg (69)  |  Etna (5)  |  First (1283)  |  Ground (217)  |  Holy (34)  |  Humour (116)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mount (42)  |  Mount Etna (2)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Priest (28)  |  Stone (162)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Water (481)  |  Wine (38)

Botany is the science in which plants are known by their aliases.
Anonymous
Quoted in M. Goran, A Treasury of Science Jokes (1986), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Botany (57)  |  Plant (294)  |  Science (3879)

But concerning vision alone is a separate science formed among philosophers, namely, optics, and not concerning any other sense ... It is possible that some other science may be more useful, but no other science has so much sweetness and beauty of utility. Therefore it is the flower of the whole of philosophy and through it, and not without it, can the other sciences be known.
Opus Majus [1266-1268], Part V, distinction I, chapter I, trans. R. B. Burke, The Opus Maius of Roger Bacon (1928), Vol. 2, 420.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Flower (106)  |  Form (959)  |  More (2559)  |  Optics (23)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Possible (552)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Sweetness (12)  |  Through (849)  |  Useful (250)  |  Utility (49)  |  Vision (123)  |  Whole (738)

But I think that in the repeated and almost entire changes of organic types in the successive formations of the earth—in the absence of mammalia in the older, and their very rare appearance (and then in forms entirely. unknown to us) in the newer secondary groups—in the diffusion of warm-blooded quadrupeds (frequently of unknown genera) through the older tertiary systems—in their great abundance (and frequently of known genera) in the upper portions of the same series—and, lastly, in the recent appearance of man on the surface of the earth (now universally admitted—in one word, from all these facts combined, we have a series of proofs the most emphatic and convincing,—that the existing order of nature is not the last of an uninterrupted succession of mere physical events derived from laws now in daily operation: but on the contrary, that the approach to the present system of things has been gradual, and that there has been a progressive development of organic structure subservient to the purposes of life.
'Address to the Geological Society, delivered on the Evening of the 18th of February 1831', Proceedings of the Geological Society (1834), 1, 305-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Abundance (25)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Approach (108)  |  Blood (134)  |  Change (593)  |  Combination (144)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Daily (87)  |  Development (422)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Event (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Genus (25)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Great (1574)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operation (213)  |  Order (632)  |  Organic (158)  |  Physical (508)  |  Portion (84)  |  Present (619)  |  Progression (23)  |  Proof (287)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Rare (89)  |  Recent (77)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Series (149)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subservience (3)  |  Succession (77)  |  Successive (73)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  System (537)  |  Tertiary (4)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Type (167)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  Word (619)

But in its [the corpuscular theory of radiation] relation to the wave theory there is one extraordinary and, at present, insoluble problem. It is not known how the energy of the electron in the X-ray bulb is transferred by a wave motion to an electron in the photographic plate or in any other substance on which the X-rays fall. It is as if one dropped a plank into the sea from the height of 100 ft. and found that the spreading ripple was able, after travelling 1000 miles and becoming infinitesimal in comparison with its original amount, to act upon a wooden ship in such a way that a plank of that ship flew out of its place to a height of 100 ft. How does the energy get from one place to the other?
'Aether Waves and Electrons' (Summary of the Robert Boyle Lecture), Nature, 1921, 107, 374.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Amount (151)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Bulb (10)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Electron (93)  |  Energy (344)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fall (230)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Motion (310)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Ray (114)  |  Ripple (9)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Substance (248)  |  Theory (970)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  X-ray (37)

But psychology is a more tricky field, in which even outstanding authorities have been known to run in circles, ‘describing things which everyone knows in language which no one understands.’
From The Scientific Analysis of Personality (1965), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Circle (110)  |  Field (364)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  More (2559)  |  Outstanding (16)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Run (174)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tricky (3)  |  Understand (606)

But that which will excite the greatest astonishment by far, and which indeed especially moved me to call the attention of all astronomers and philosophers, is this: namely, that I have observed four planets, neither known nor observed by any one of the astronomers before my time, which have their orbits round a certain bright star [Jupiter], one of those previously known, like Venus or Mercury round the sun, and are sometimes in front of it, sometimes behind it, though they never depart from it beyond certain limits. All of which facts were discovered and observed a few days ago by the help of a telescope devised by me, through God’s grace first enlightening my mind.
In pamphlet, The Sidereal Messenger (1610), reprinted in The Sidereal Messenger of Galileo Galilei: And a Part of the Preface to the Preface to Kepler's Dioptrics Containing the Original Account of Galileo's Astronomical Discoveries (1880), 9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Attention (190)  |  Behind (137)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bright (79)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Discover (553)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightening (3)  |  Especially (31)  |  Excite (15)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Four (6)  |  Front (16)  |  God (757)  |  Grace (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Know (1518)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Planet (356)  |  Previously (11)  |  Star (427)  |  Sun (385)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Venus (20)  |  Will (2355)

But what exceeds all wonders, I have discovered four new planets and observed their proper and particular motions, different among themselves and from the motions of all the other stars; and these new planets move about another very large star [Jupiter] like Venus and Mercury, and perchance the other known planets, move about the Sun. As soon as this tract, which I shall send to all the philosophers and mathematicians as an announcement, is finished, I shall send a copy to the Most Serene Grand Duke, together with an excellent spyglass, so that he can verify all these truths.
Letter to the Tuscan Court, 30 Jan 1610. Quoted in Albert van Heiden (ed.), Siderius Nuncius or The Sidereal Messenger (1989), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Announcement (15)  |  Copy (33)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Finish (59)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Large (394)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Observed (149)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Planet (356)  |  Proper (144)  |  Soon (186)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Together (387)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Venus (20)  |  Verify (23)  |  Wonder (236)

Can a physicist visualize an electron? The electron is materially inconceivable and yet, it is so perfectly known through its effects that we use it to illuminate our cities, guide our airlines through the night skies and take the most accurate measurements. What strange rationale makes some physicists accept the inconceivable electrons as real while refusing to accept the reality of a Designer on the ground that they cannot conceive Him?
In letter to California State board of Education (14 Sep 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Airplane (41)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Designer (6)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electron (93)  |  God (757)  |  Ground (217)  |  Guide (97)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Material (353)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Rationale (7)  |  Reality (261)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Strange (157)  |  Through (849)  |  Use (766)

Casting off the dark fog of verbal philosophy and vulgar medicine, which inculcate names alone ... I tried a series of experiments to explain more clearly many phenomena, particularly those of physiology. In order that I might subject as far as possible the reasonings of the Galenists and Peripatetics to sensory criteria, I began, after trying experiments, to write dialogues in which a Galenist adduced the better-known and stronger reasons and arguments; these a mechanist surgeon refuted by citing to the contrary the experiments I had tried, and a third, neutral interlocutor weighed the reasons advanced by both and provided an opportunity for further progress.
'Malpighi at Pisa 1656-1659', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 1, 155-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Argument (138)  |  Better (486)  |  Both (493)  |  Casting (10)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Dark (140)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fog (10)  |  Galen (19)  |  Inculcate (6)  |  Mechanist (3)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Neutral (13)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Peripatetic (3)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Possible (552)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Series (149)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Subject (521)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Trying (144)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Write (230)

Clearly, we have compiled a record of serious failures in recent technological encounters with the environment. In each case, the new technology was brought into use before the ultimate hazards were known. We have been quick to reap the benefits and slow to comprehend the costs.
In 'Frail Reeds in a Harsh World', Natural History Journal of the American Museum of Natural History (Feb 1969), 79, No. 2, 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Compile (2)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Cost (86)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Environment (216)  |  Failure (161)  |  Hazard (18)  |  New (1216)  |  Reap (17)  |  Recent (77)  |  Record (154)  |  Serious (91)  |  Slow (101)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Use (766)

Colour, Figure, Motion, Extension and the like, considered only so many Sensations in the Mind, are perfectly known, there being nothing in them which is not perceived. But if they are looked on as notes or Images, referred to Things or Archetypes existing without the Mind, then are we involved all in Scepticism.
A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge [first published 1710], (1734), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Archetype (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Color (137)  |  Consider (416)  |  Extension (59)  |  Figure (160)  |  Image (96)  |  Involved (90)  |  Look (582)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)

Compared to the breadth of knowledge yet to be known, what does your life actually matter?
Movie
Europa Report (2013)
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  Breadth (15)  |  Compare (69)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)

Consciousness ... is the phenomenon whereby the universe's very existence is made known.
from The Emperor's New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (1989, 2002), 580.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Existence (456)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Universe (857)

Conservation is getting nowhere because it is incompatible with our Abrahamic concept of land. We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect. There is no other way for land to survive the impact of mechanized man, nor for us to reap from it the esthetic harvest it is capable, under science, of contributing to culture. That land is a community is the basic concept of ecology, but that land is to be loved and respected is an extension of ethics. That land yields a cultural harvest is a fact long known, but latterly often forgotten.
A Sand County Almanac, and Sketches Here and There (1949), viii-ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (22)  |  Basic (138)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belong (162)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Capable (168)  |  Commodity (5)  |  Community (104)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Culture (143)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Ethic (40)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Extension (59)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Impact (42)  |  Land (115)  |  Long (790)  |  Love (309)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reap (17)  |  Regard (305)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Survive (79)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Yield (81)

Consider the plight of a scientist of my age. I graduated from the University of California at Berkeley in 1940. In the 41 years since then the amount of biological information has increased 16 fold; during these 4 decades my capacity to absorb new information has declined at an accelerating rate and now is at least 50% less than when I was a graduate student. If one defines ignorance as the ratio of what is available to be known to what is known, there seems no alternative to the conclusion that my ignorance is at least 25 times as extensive as it was when I got my bachelor’s degree. Although I am sure that my unfortunate condition comes as no surprise to my students and younger colleagues, I personally find it somewhat depressing. My depression is tempered, however, by the fact that all biologists, young or old, developing or senescing, face the same melancholy situation because of an interlocking set of circumstances.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 228.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Accelerate (11)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Amount (151)  |  Available (78)  |  Bachelor (3)  |  Berkeley (3)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consider (416)  |  Decade (59)  |  Decline (26)  |  Define (49)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depressing (3)  |  Depression (24)  |  Develop (268)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Fold (8)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Graduate Student (11)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Increase (210)  |  Information (166)  |  Interlocking (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Least (75)  |  Less (103)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Personally (7)  |  Plight (4)  |  Rate (29)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Same (157)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Seem (145)  |  Set (394)  |  Situation (113)  |  Student (300)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Temper (9)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unfortunate (19)  |  University (121)  |  University Of California (2)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Younger (21)

Creation science has not entered the curriculum for a reason so simple and so basic that we often forget to mention it: because it is false, and because good teachers understand why it is false. What could be more destructive of that most fragile yet most precious commodity in our entire intellectual heritage—good teaching—than a bill forcing our honorable teachers to sully their sacred trust by granting equal treatment to a doctrine not only known to be false, but calculated to undermine any general understanding of science as an enterprise?.
In 'The Verdict on Creationism' The Sketical Inquirer (Winter 1987/88), 12, 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (138)  |  Bill (14)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Commodity (5)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creation Science (2)  |  Creationism (8)  |  Curriculum (10)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Enter (141)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equal (83)  |  False (100)  |  Forcing (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgetting (13)  |  Fragile (21)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Honor (54)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Precious (41)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Trust (66)  |  Undermining (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Why (491)

Cuvier had even in his address & manner the character of a superior Man, much general power & eloquence in conversation & great variety of information on scientific as well as popular subjects. I should say of him that he is the most distinguished man of talents I have ever known on the continent: but I doubt if He be entitled to the appellation of a Man of Genius.
J. Z. Fullmer, 'Davy's Sketches of his Contemporaries', Chymia, 1967, 12, 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Character (243)  |  Continent (76)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Doubt (304)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Great (1574)  |  Information (166)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Power (746)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superior (81)  |  Talent (94)  |  Variety (132)

Descended from the apes? My dear, we will hope it is not true. But if it is, let us pray that it may not become generally known.
Anonymous
Remark by the wife of a canon of Worcester Cathedral. Quoted in Ashley Montagu, Manʹs Most Dangerous Myth: the Fallacy of Race (1945), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Ape (53)  |  Become (815)  |  Descend (47)  |  Descent Of Man (6)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Hope (299)  |  Will (2355)

Despite the vision and the far-seeing wisdom of our wartime heads of state, the physicists felt a peculiarly intimate responsibility for suggesting, for supporting, and in the end, in large measure, for achieving the realization of atomic weapons. Nor can we forget that these weapons, as they were in fact used, dramatized so mercilessly the inhumanity and evil of modern war. In some sort of crude sense which no vulgarity, no humor, no overstatement can quite extinguish, the physicists have known sin; and this is a knowledge which they cannot lose.
In Arthur Dehon Little Memorial Lecture (25 Nov 1947) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 'Physics in the Contemporary World'. Collected in J. Robert Oppenheimer, The Open Mind (1955), 88.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Crude (31)  |  End (590)  |  Evil (116)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far-Seeing (3)  |  Forget (115)  |  Humour (116)  |  Inhumanity (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Lose (159)  |  Measure (232)  |  Merciless (3)  |  Modern (385)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Realization (43)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sin (42)  |  State (491)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Support (147)  |  Vision (123)  |  Vulgarity (2)  |  War (225)  |  Wartime (4)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Wisdom (221)

Doubtless the reasoning faculty, the mind, is the leading and characteristic attribute of the human race. By the exercise of this, man arrives at the properties of the natural bodies. This is science, properly and emphatically so called. It is the science of pure mathematics; and in the high branches of this science lies the truly sublime of human acquisition. If any attainment deserves that epithet, it is the knowledge, which, from the mensuration of the minutest dust of the balance, proceeds on the rising scale of material bodies, everywhere weighing, everywhere measuring, everywhere detecting and explaining the laws of force and motion, penetrating into the secret principles which hold the universe of God together, and balancing worlds against worlds, and system against system. When we seek to accompany those who pursue studies at once so high, so vast, and so exact; when we arrive at the discoveries of Newton, which pour in day on the works of God, as if a second fiat had gone forth from his own mouth; when, further, we attempt to follow those who set out where Newton paused, making his goal their starting-place, and, proceeding with demonstration upon demonstration, and discovery upon discovery, bring new worlds and new systems of worlds within the limits of the known universe, failing to learn all only because all is infinite; however we may say of man, in admiration of his physical structure, that “in form and moving he is express and admirable,” it is here, and here without irreverence, we may exclaim, “In apprehension how like a god!” The study of the pure mathematics will of course not be extensively pursued in an institution, which, like this [Boston Mechanics’ Institute], has a direct practical tendency and aim. But it is still to be remembered, that pure mathematics lie at the foundation of mechanical philosophy, and that it is ignorance only which can speak or think of that sublime science as useless research or barren speculation.
In Works (1872), Vol. 1, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Against (332)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Balance (77)  |  Barren (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Boston (7)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (769)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Detect (44)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Dust (64)  |  Emphatically (8)  |  Epithet (3)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fail (185)  |  Far (154)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Goal (145)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Institution (69)  |  Irreverence (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mensuration (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Pause (6)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Pour (10)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Properly (20)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remember (179)  |  Research (664)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Sublime (46)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Truly (116)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vast (177)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Each and every loss becomes an instance of ultimate tragedy–something that once was, but shall never be known to us. The hump of the giant deer–as a nonfossilizable item of soft anatomy–should have fallen into the maw of erased history. But our ancestors provided a wondrous rescue, and we should rejoice mightily. Every new item can instruct us; every unexpected object possesses beauty for its own sake; every rescue from history’s great shredding machine is–and I don’t know how else to say this–a holy act of salvation for a bit of totality.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Bit (22)  |  Deer (9)  |  Erase (6)  |  Fall (230)  |  Giant (67)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Holy (34)  |  Hump (3)  |  Instance (33)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Item (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Loss (110)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mightily (2)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Possess (156)  |  Provide (69)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Rescue (13)  |  Sake (58)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Say (984)  |  Shred (7)  |  Soft (29)  |  Something (719)  |  Totality (15)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Wondrous (21)

Each nerve cell receives connections from other nerve cells at six sites called synapses. But here is an astonishing fact—there are about one million billion connections in the cortical sheet. If you were to count them, one connection (or synapse) per second, you would finish counting some thirty-two million years after you began. Another way of getting a feeling for the numbers of connections in this extraordinary structure is to consider that a large match-head’s worth of your brain contains about a billion connections. Notice that I only mention counting connections. If we consider how connections might be variously combined, the number would be hyperastronomical—on the order of ten followed by millions of zeros. (There are about ten followed by eighty zero’s worth of positively charged particles in the whole known universe!)
Bright and Brilliant Fire, On the Matters of the Mind (1992), 17.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Astonishing (27)  |  Billion (95)  |  Brain (270)  |  Call (769)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Finish (59)  |  Follow (378)  |  Large (394)  |  Match (29)  |  Mention (82)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Neurobiology (4)  |  Notice (77)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Receive (114)  |  Structure (344)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)  |  Zero (37)

Edison was by far the most successful and, probably, the last exponent of the purely empirical method of investigation. Everything he achieved was the result of persistent trials and experiments often performed at random but always attesting extraordinary vigor and resource. Starting from a few known elements, he would make their combinations and permutations, tabulate them and run through the whole list, completing test after test with incredible rapidity until he obtained a clue. His mind was dominated by one idea, to leave no stone unturned, to exhaust every possibility.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Clue (17)  |  Combination (144)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Element (310)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Last (426)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perform (121)  |  Permutation (5)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Purely (109)  |  Random (41)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Resource (63)  |  Result (677)  |  Run (174)  |  Stone (162)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Tabulate (2)  |  Test (211)  |  Through (849)  |  Trial (57)  |  Vigor (9)  |  Whole (738)

Either one or the other [analysis or synthesis] may be direct or indirect. The direct procedure is when the point of departure is known-direct synthesis in the elements of geometry. By combining at random simple truths with each other, more complicated ones are deduced from them. This is the method of discovery, the special method of inventions, contrary to popular opinion.
Ampère gives this example drawn from geometry to illustrate his meaning for “direct synthesis” when deductions following from more simple, already-known theorems leads to a new discovery. In James R. Hofmann, André-Marie Ampère (1996), 159. Cites Académie des Sciences Ampère Archives, box 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Combination (144)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Complication (29)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Departure (9)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Element (310)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Popular (29)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Random (41)  |  Simple (406)  |  Special (184)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Truth (1057)

ELECTRICITY, n. The power that causes all natural phenomena not known to be caused by something else. It is the same thing as lightning, and its famous attempt to strike Dr. Franklin is one of the most picturesque incidents in that great and good man's career. The memory of Dr. Franklin is justly held in great reverence, particularly in France, where a waxen effigy of him was recently on exhibition, bearing the following touching account of his life and services to science:
Monsieur Franqulin, inventor of electricity. This illustrious savant, after having made several voyages around the world, died on the Sandwich Islands and was devoured by savages, of whom not a single fragment was ever recovered.
Electricity seems destined to play a most important part in the arts and industries. The question of its economical application to some purposes is still unsettled, but experiment has already proved that it will propel a street car better than a gas jet and give more light than a horse.
The Cynic's Word Book (1906), 87. Also published later as The Devil's Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Better (486)  |  Car (71)  |  Career (75)  |  Cause (541)  |  Destined (42)  |  Devour (29)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Exhibition (7)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Gas (83)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Horse (74)  |  Humour (116)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Island (46)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Power (746)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Service (110)  |  Single (353)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)  |  Strike (68)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touching (16)  |  Unsettled (3)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Ethnologists regard man as the primitive element of tribes, races, and peoples. The anthropologist looks at him as a member of the fauna of the globe, belonging to a zoölogical classification, and subject to the same laws as the rest of the animal kingdom. To study him from the last point of view only would be to lose sight of some of his most interesting and practical relations; but to be confined to the ethnologist’s views is to set aside the scientific rule which requires us to proceed from the simple to the compound, from the known to the unknown, from the material and organic fact to the functional phenomenon.
'Paul Broca and the French School of Anthropology'. Lecture delivered in the National Museum, Washington, D.C., 15 April 1882, by Dr. Robert Fletcher. In The Saturday Lectures (1882), 118.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Classification (97)  |  Compound (113)  |  Element (310)  |  Ethnology (7)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Look (582)  |  Lose (159)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organic (158)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Practical (200)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Race (268)  |  Regard (305)  |  Require (219)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Set (394)  |  Sight (132)  |  Simple (406)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Unknown (182)  |  View (488)

Even when all is known, the care of a man is not yet complete, because eating alone will not keep a man well; he must also take exercise. For food and exercise, while possessing opposite qualities, yet work together to produce health.
Regimen, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 229.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Care (186)  |  Complete (204)  |  Eating (45)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Food (199)  |  Health (193)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Together (387)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

Every discovery, every enlargement of the understanding, begins as an imaginative preconception of what the truth might be. The imaginative preconception—a “hypothesis”—arises by a process as easy or as difficult to understand as any other creative act of mind; it is a brainwave, an inspired guess, a product of a blaze of insight. It comes anyway from within and cannot be achieved by the exercise of any known calculus of discovery.
In Advice to a Young Scientist (1979), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Arise (158)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Creative (137)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enlargement (7)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Insight (102)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Other (2236)  |  Preconception (13)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Except for the rare cases of plastid inheritance, the inheritance of all known cooacters can be sufficiently accounted for by the presence of genes in the chromosomes. In a word the cytoplasm may be ignored genetically.
'Genetics and the Physiology of Development', The American Naturalist (1926), 60, 491.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Cytoplasm (6)  |  Gene (98)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Presence (63)  |  Rare (89)  |  Word (619)

Facts are certainly the solid and true foundation of all sectors of nature study ... Reasoning must never find itself contradicting definite facts; but reasoning must allow us to distinguish, among facts that have been reported, those that we can fully believe, those that are questionable, and those that are false. It will not allow us to lend faith to those that are directly contrary to others whose certainty is known to us; it will not allow us to accept as true those that fly in the face of unquestionable principles.
Memoires pour Servir a l'Histoire des Insectes (1736), Vol. 2, xxxiv. Quoted in Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, ed. Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Definite (110)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Face (212)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (203)  |  Falsity (16)  |  Find (998)  |  Fly (146)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Principle (507)  |  Questionable (3)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Report (38)  |  Sector (6)  |  Solid (116)  |  Solidity (2)  |  Study (653)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unquestionable (9)  |  Will (2355)

Facts, and facts alone, are the foundation of science... When one devotes oneself to experimental research it is in order to augment the sum of known facts, or to discover their mutual relations.
Precis elementaire de Physiologie (1816), ii. Trans. J. M. D. Olmsted, François Magendie: Pioneer in Experimental Physiology and Scientific Medicine in XIX Century France (1944), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Augment (12)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Order (632)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sum (102)

For a long time it has been known that the first systems of representations with which men have pictured to themselves the world and themselves were of religious origin. There is no religion that is not a cosmology at the same time that it is a speculation upon divine things. If philosophy and the sciences were born of religion, it is because religion began by taking the place of the sciences and philosophy.
The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life (1912), trans. J. W. Swain (2nd edition 1976), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Divine (112)  |  First (1283)  |  Long (790)  |  Origin (239)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Representation (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speculation (126)  |  System (537)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  World (1774)

For myself, I like a universe that, includes much that is unknown and, at the same time, much that is knowable. A universe in which everything is known would be static and dull, as boring as the heaven of some weak-minded theologians. A universe that is unknowable is no fit place for a thinking being. The ideal universe for us is one very much like the universe we inhabit. And I would guess that this is not really much of a coincidence.
Concluding paragraph, 'Can We know the Universe? Reflections on a Grain of Salt', Broca's Brain (1979, 1986), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Boredom (11)  |  Boring (7)  |  Coincidence (19)  |  Dull (54)  |  Dullness (4)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fit (134)  |  Guess (61)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Include (90)  |  Inhabitation (2)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Static (8)  |  Theologian (22)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Weak (71)

For the things of this world cannot be made known without a knowledge of mathematics.
(Sent to the Pope in 1267). As translated in Opus Majus (1928), Vol. 1, 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Thing (1915)  |  World (1774)

For there are two modes of acquiring knowledge, namely, by reasoning and experience. Reasoning draws a conclusion and makes us grant the conclusion, but does not make the conclusion certain, nor does it remove doubt so that the mind may rest on the intuition of truth, unless the mind discovers it by the path of experience; since many have the arguments relating to what can be known, but because they lack experience they neglect the arguments, and neither avoid what is harmful nor follow what is good. For if a man who has never seen fire should prove by adequate reasoning that fire burns and injures things and destroys them, his mind would not be satisfied thereby, nor would he avoid fire, until he placed his hand or some combustible substance in the fire, so that he might prove by experience that which reasoning taught. But when he has had actual experience of combustion his mind is made certain and rests in the full light of truth. Therefore reasoning does not suffice, but experience does.
Opus Majus [1266-1268], Part VI, chapter I, trans. R. B. Burke, The Opus Majus of Roger Bacon (1928), Vol. 2, 583.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Adequate (46)  |  Argument (138)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Burn (87)  |  Certain (550)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fire (189)  |  Follow (378)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lack (119)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Path (144)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remove (45)  |  Rest (280)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)

For [Richard] Feynman, the essence of the scientific imagination was a powerful and almost painful rule. What scientists create must match reality. It must match what is already known. Scientific creativity is imagination in a straitjacket.
In Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman (1992), 324.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Create (235)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Essence (82)  |  Richard P. Feynman (122)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Match (29)  |  Must (1526)  |  Painful (11)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Straitjacket (2)

For, every time a certain portion is destroyed, be it of the brain or of the spinal cord, a function is compelled to cease suddenly, and before the time known beforehand when it would stop naturally, it is certain that this function depends upon the area destroyed. It is in this way that I have recognized that the prime motive power of respiration has its seat in that part of the medulla oblongata that gives rise to the nerves of the eighth pair [vagi]; and it is by this method that up to a certain point it will be possible to discover the use of certain parts of the brain.
Expériences sur le Principe de la Vie, Notamment sur celui des Mouvements du Coeur, et sur le Siege de ce Principe (1812), 148-149. Translated in Edwin Clarke and L. S. Jacyna, Nineteenth Century Origins of Neuroscientific Concepts (1987), 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Cease (79)  |  Certain (550)  |  Depend (228)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discover (553)  |  Function (228)  |  Medulla Oblongata (2)  |  Method (505)  |  Motive (59)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Point (580)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Respiration (13)  |  Rise (166)  |  Spinal Cord (5)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Forces of nature act in a mysterious manner. We can but solve the mystery by deducing the unknown result from the known results of similar events.
In The Words of Gandhi (2001), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Event (216)  |  Force (487)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Result (677)  |  Similar (36)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Unknown (182)

From a drop of water a logician could predict an Atlantic or a Niagara without having seen or heard of one or the other. So all life is a great chain, the nature of which is known whenever we are shown a single link of it.
In A Study in Scarlet (1887, 1892), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atlantic (8)  |  Chain (50)  |  Drop (76)  |  Great (1574)  |  Life (1795)  |  Link (43)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logician (17)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Niagara (8)  |  Other (2236)  |  Predict (79)  |  Single (353)  |  Water (481)  |  Whenever (81)

From a mathematical standpoint it is possible to have infinite space. In a mathematical sense space is manifoldness, or combinations of numbers. Physical space is known as the 3-dimension system. There is the 4-dimension system, the 10-dimension system.
As quoted in 'Electricity Will Keep The World From Freezing Up', New York Times (12 Nov 1911), SM4.
Science quotes on:  |  Combination (144)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Number (699)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Sense (770)  |  Space (500)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  System (537)

From him [Wilard Bennett] I learned how different a working laboratory is from a student laboratory. The answers are not known!
[While an undergraduate, doing experimental measurements in the laboratory of his professor, at Ohio State University.]
From autobiography on Nobel Prize website.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Different (577)  |  Doing (280)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Professor (128)  |  State (491)  |  Student (300)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  University (121)

Furnished as all Europe now is with Academies of Science, with nice instruments and the spirit of experiment, the progress of human knowledge will be rapid and discoveries made of which we have at present no conception. I begin to be almost sorry I was born so soon, since I cannot have the happiness of knowing what will be known a hundred years hence.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Begin (260)  |  Conception (154)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Europe (43)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Nice (13)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Further study of the division phenomena requires a brief discussion of the material which thus far I have called the stainable substance of the nucleus. Since the term nuclear substance could easily result in misinterpretation..., I shall coin the term chromatin for the time being. This does not indicate that this substance must be a chemical compound of a definite composition, remaining the same in all nuclei. Although this may be the case, we simply do not know enough about the nuclear substances to make such an assumption. Therefore, we will designate as chromatin that substance, in the nucleus, which upon treatment with dyes known as nuclear stains does absorb the dye. From my description of the results of staining resting and dividing cells... it follows that the chromatin is distributed throughout the whole resting nucleus, mostly in the nucleoli, the network, and the membrane, but also in the ground-substance. In nuclear division it accumulates exclusively in the thread figures. The term achromatin suggests itself automatically for the unstainable substance of the nucleus. The terms chromatic and achromatic which will be used henceforth are thus explained.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brief (36)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chromatic (4)  |  Chromatin (4)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Definite (110)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dye (10)  |  Enough (340)  |  Explain (322)  |  Figure (160)  |  Follow (378)  |  Ground (217)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Know (1518)  |  Material (353)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Must (1526)  |  Network (21)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Require (219)  |  Result (677)  |  Study (653)  |  Substance (248)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thread (32)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

Gauss was not the son of a mathematician; Handel’s father was a surgeon, of whose musical powers nothing is known; Titian was the son and also the nephew of a lawyer, while he and his brother, Francesco Vecellio, were the first painters in a family which produced a succession of seven other artists with diminishing talents. These facts do not, however, prove that the condition of the nerve-tracts and centres of the brain, which determine the specific talent, appeared for the first time in these men: the appropriate condition surely existed previously in their parents, although it did not achieve expression. They prove, as it seems to me, that a high degree of endowment in a special direction, which we call talent, cannot have arisen from the experience of previous generations, that is, by the exercise of the brain in the same specific direction.
In 'On Heredity', Essays upon Heredity and Kindred Biological Problems (1889), Vol. 1, 96.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Artist (90)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brother (43)  |  Call (769)  |  Centre (28)  |  Condition (356)  |  Degree (276)  |  Determine (144)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endowment (16)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Family (94)  |  Father (110)  |  First (1283)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Generation (242)  |  High (362)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Music (129)  |  Nephew (2)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Painter (29)  |  Parent (76)  |  Power (746)  |  Previous (12)  |  Produced (187)  |  Prove (250)  |  Son (24)  |  Special (184)  |  Specific (95)  |  Succession (77)  |  Surely (101)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Talent (94)  |  Time (1877)

Gentlemen and ladies, this is ordinary alcohol, sometimes called ethanol; it is found in all fermented beverages. As you well know, it is considered by many to be poisonous, a belief in which I do not concur. If we subtract from it one CH2-group we arrive at this colorless liquid, which you see in this bottle. It is sometimes called methanol or wood alcohol. It is certainly more toxic than the ethanol we have just seen. Its formula is CH3OH. If, from this, we subtract the CH2-group, we arrive at a third colorless liquid, the final member of this homologous series. This compound is hydrogen hydroxide, best known as water. It is the most poisonous of all.
In Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 189.
Science quotes on:  |  Alcohol (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Beverage (2)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Compound (113)  |  Consider (416)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ethanol (2)  |  Final (118)  |  Formula (98)  |  Homologous (4)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Liquid (50)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Poison (40)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Toxicity (2)  |  Water (481)  |  Wood (92)

Geometric writings are not rare in which one would seek in vain for an idea at all novel, for a result which sooner or later might be of service, for anything in fact which might be destined to survive in the science; and one finds instead treatises on trivial problems or investigations on special forms which have absolutely no use, no importance, which have their origin not in the science itself but in the caprice of the author; or one finds applications of known methods which have already been made thousands of times; or generalizations from known results which are so easily made that the knowledge of the latter suffices to give at once the former. Now such work is not merely useless; it is actually harmful because it produces a real incumbrance in the science and an embarrassment for the more serious investigators; and because often it crowds out certain lines of thought which might well have deserved to be studied.
From 'On Some Recent Tendencies in Geometric Investigations', Rivista di Matematica (1891), 43. In Bulletin American Mathematical Society (1904), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Author (167)  |  Caprice (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Destined (42)  |  Embarrassment (5)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Former (137)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  In Vain (9)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Latter (21)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Novel (32)  |  Origin (239)  |  Problem (676)  |  Rare (89)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Serious (91)  |  Service (110)  |  Sooner Or Later (6)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Survive (79)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Use (766)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vain (83)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

God's Registrar.
[Referring to Carolus Linnaeus, who is also known as Father of Taxonomy.]
Anonymous
In Heinz Goerke Linnaeus (1966) trans. by Denver Lindley (1973), 89, Title of Chapter 8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Father (110)  |  God (757)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (31)  |  Taxonomy (18)

Guard well your spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. Discard them and their value will never be known. Improve them and they will become the brightest gems in a useful life.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Bright (79)  |  Brightest (12)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Discard (29)  |  Gem (16)  |  Guard (18)  |  Improve (58)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moment (253)  |  Never (1087)  |  Spare (9)  |  Useful (250)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

He had read much, if one considers his long life; but his contemplation was much more than his reading. He was wont to say that if he had read as much as other men he should have known no more than other men.
From 'Thomas Hobbes', in Andrew Clark (ed.) Brief Lives (1898), Vol. 1, 349.
Science quotes on:  |  Consider (416)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Thomas Hobbes (22)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Say (984)

He [Lord Bacon] appears to have been utterly ignorant of the discoveries which had just been made by Kepler’s calculations … he does not say a word about Napier’s Logarithms, which had been published only nine years before and reprinted more than once in the interval. He complained that no considerable advance had been made in Geometry beyond Euclid, without taking any notice of what had been done by Archimedes and Apollonius. He saw the importance of determining accurately the specific gravities of different substances, and himself attempted to form a table of them by a rude process of his own, without knowing of the more scientific though still imperfect methods previously employed by Archimedes, Ghetaldus and Porta. He speaks of the εὕρηκα of Archimedes in a manner which implies that he did not clearly appreciate either the problem to be solved or the principles upon which the solution depended. In reviewing the progress of Mechanics, he makes no mention either of Archimedes, or Stevinus, Galileo, Guldinus, or Ghetaldus. He makes no allusion to the theory of Equilibrium. He observes that a ball of one pound weight will fall nearly as fast through the air as a ball of two, without alluding to the theory of acceleration of falling bodies, which had been made known by Galileo more than thirty years before. He proposed an inquiry with regard to the lever,—namely, whether in a balance with arms of different length but equal weight the distance from the fulcrum has any effect upon the inclination—though the theory of the lever was as well understood in his own time as it is now. … He speaks of the poles of the earth as fixed, in a manner which seems to imply that he was not acquainted with the precession of the equinoxes; and in another place, of the north pole being above and the south pole below, as a reason why in our hemisphere the north winds predominate over the south.
From Spedding’s 'Preface' to De Interpretations Naturae Proœmium, in The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 3, 511-512. [Note: the Greek word “εὕρηκα” is “Eureka” —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  Apollonius (6)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Balance (77)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Complain (8)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Depend (228)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Equinox (5)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Eureka (11)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fast (45)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Fulcrum (3)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hemisphere (5)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Length (23)  |  Lever (13)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mention (82)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  John Napier (3)  |  Nearly (137)  |  North Pole (5)  |  North Wind (2)  |  Notice (77)  |  Observe (168)  |  Pole (46)  |  Pound (14)  |  Precession (4)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  South (38)  |  South Pole (3)  |  Speak (232)  |  Specific (95)  |  Specific Gravity (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Table (104)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Weight (134)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

HEART, n. An automatic, muscular blood- pump. Figuratively, this useful organ is said to be the seat of emotions and sentiments—a very pretty fancy which, however, is nothing but a survival of a once universal belief. It is now known that the sentiments and emotions reside in the stomach, being evolved from food by chemical action of the gastric fluid. The exact process by which a beefsteak becomes a feeling—tender or not, according to the age of the animal from which it was cut; the successive stages of elaboration through which a caviar sandwich is transmuted to a quaint fancy and reappears as a pungent epigram; the marvelous functional methods of converting a hard-boiled egg into religious contrition, or a cream-puff into a sigh of sensibility—these things have been patiently ascertained by M. Pasteur, and by him expounded with convincing lucidity. 
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  133-134.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  Age (499)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blood (134)  |  Boil (23)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Cut (114)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Egg (69)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Food (199)  |  Gastric (3)  |  Hard (243)  |  Heart (229)  |  Humour (116)  |  Lucidity (7)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Organ (115)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Process (423)  |  Quaint (7)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reside (25)  |  Stage (143)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Successive (73)  |  Survival (94)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Universal (189)  |  Useful (250)

Here are a few things to keep in mind the next time ants show up in the potato salad. The 8,800 known species of the family Formicidae make up from 10% to 15% of the world's animal biomass, the total weight of all fauna. They are the most dominant social insect in the world, found almost everywhere except in the polar regions. Ants turn more soil than earthworms; they prune, weed and police most of the earth's carrion. Among the most gregarious of creatures, they are equipped with a sophisticated chemical communications system. To appreciate the strength and speed of this pesky invertebrate, consider that a leaf cutter the size of a man could run repeated four-minute miles while carrying 750 lbs. of potato salad.
From book review, 'Nature: Splendor in The Grass', Time (3 Sep 1990).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ant (28)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Carrion (4)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Communication (94)  |  Consider (416)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthworm (6)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Family (94)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Gregarious (3)  |  Insect (77)  |  Invertebrate (4)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mile (39)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Polar (12)  |  Police (5)  |  Potato (10)  |  Prune (7)  |  Run (174)  |  Show (346)  |  Social (252)  |  Soil (86)  |  Sophistication (9)  |  Species (401)  |  Speed (65)  |  Strength (126)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Total (94)  |  Turn (447)  |  Weed (18)  |  Weight (134)  |  World (1774)

Hereafter we shall be compelled to acknowledge that the only distinction between species and well-marked varieties is, that the latter are known, or believed to be connected at the present day by intermediate gradations whereas species were formerly thus connected.
From On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection; or, The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (1861), 421.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Belief (578)  |  Compel (30)  |  Connect (125)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Hereafter (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Marked (55)  |  Present (619)  |  Species (401)  |  Variety (132)

Human knowledge and human power meet in one; for where the cause is not known the effect cannot be produced. Nature to be commanded must be obeyed; and that which in contemplation is as the cause is in operation as the rule.
From Novum Organum (1620), Book 1, Aphorism 3. Translated as The New Organon: Aphorisms Concerning the Interpretation of Nature and the Kingdom of Man), collected in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 4, 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Command (58)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Effect (393)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obey (40)  |  Operation (213)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rule (294)

I am of opinion, then, ... that, if there is any circumstance thoroughly established in geology, it is, that the crust of our globe has been subjected to a great and sudden revolution, the epoch of which cannot be dated much farther back than five or six thousand years ago; that this revolution had buried all the countries which were before inhabited by men and by the other animals that are now best known; that the same revolution had laid dry the bed of the last ocean, which now forms all the countries at present inhabited; that the small number of individuals of men and other animals that escaped from the effects of that great revolution, have since propagated and spread over the lands then newly laid dry; and consequently, that the human race has only resumed a progressive state of improvement since that epoch, by forming established societies, raising monuments, collecting natural facts, and constructing systems of science and of learning.
'Preliminary discourse', to Recherches sur les Ossemens Fossiles (1812), trans. R. Kerr Essay on the Theory of the Earth (1813), 171-2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Back (390)  |  Best (459)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Crust (38)  |  Dry (57)  |  Effect (393)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Farther (51)  |  Form (959)  |  Forming (42)  |  Geology (220)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Individual (404)  |  Last (426)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Monument (45)  |  Natural (796)  |  Number (699)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Race (268)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Spread (83)  |  State (491)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sudden (67)  |  System (537)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Year (933)

I believe that the useful methods of mathematics are easily to be learned by quite young persons, just as languages are easily learned in youth. What a wondrous philosophy and history underlie the use of almost every word in every language—yet the child learns to use the word unconsciously. No doubt when such a word was first invented it was studied over and lectured upon, just as one might lecture now upon the idea of a rate, or the use of Cartesian co-ordinates, and we may depend upon it that children of the future will use the idea of the calculus, and use squared paper as readily as they now cipher. … When Egyptian and Chaldean philosophers spent years in difficult calculations, which would now be thought easy by young children, doubtless they had the same notions of the depth of their knowledge that Sir William Thomson might now have of his. How is it, then, that Thomson gained his immense knowledge in the time taken by a Chaldean philosopher to acquire a simple knowledge of arithmetic? The reason is plain. Thomson, when a child, was taught in a few years more than all that was known three thousand years ago of the properties of numbers. When it is found essential to a boy’s future that machinery should be given to his brain, it is given to him; he is taught to use it, and his bright memory makes the use of it a second nature to him; but it is not till after-life that he makes a close investigation of what there actually is in his brain which has enabled him to do so much. It is taken because the child has much faith. In after years he will accept nothing without careful consideration. The machinery given to the brain of children is getting more and more complicated as time goes on; but there is really no reason why it should not be taken in as early, and used as readily, as were the axioms of childish education in ancient Chaldea.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Actually (27)  |  Afterlife (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Belief (578)  |  Boy (94)  |  Brain (270)  |  Bright (79)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Careful (24)  |  Cartesian (3)  |  Chaldea (3)  |  Child (307)  |  Childish (20)  |  Children (200)  |  Cipher (2)  |  Close (69)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Coordinate (5)  |  Depend (228)  |  Depth (94)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Early (185)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Education (378)  |  Egyptian (5)  |  Enable (119)  |  Essential (199)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Give (202)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immense (86)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Paper (182)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plain (33)  |  Property (168)  |  Rate (29)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reason (744)  |  Same (157)  |  Second Nature (3)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Square (70)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

I call upon the scientific community in our country, those who gave us nuclear weapons, to turn their great talents now to the cause of mankind and world peace, to give us the means of rendering those nuclear weapons impotent and obsolete.
About his proposed Strategic Defense Initiative, later to be known as 'Star Wars.')
National address (23 Mar 1983)
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Community (104)  |  Country (251)  |  Defense (23)  |  Great (1574)  |  Initiative (17)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Weapon (17)  |  Obsolete (15)  |  Peace (108)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Star (427)  |  Talent (94)  |  Turn (447)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  World (1774)

I consider then, that generally speaking, to render a reason of an effect or Phaenomenon, is to deduce It from something else in Nature more known than it self, and that consequently there may be divers kinds of Degrees of Explication of the same thing. For although such Explications be the most satisfactory to the Understanding, wherein 'tis shewn how the effect is produc'd by the more primitive and Catholick Affection of Matter, namely bulk, shape and motion, yet are not these Explications to be despis'd, wherein particular effects are deduc'd from the more obvious and familiar Qualities or States of Bodies, ... For in the search after Natural Causes, every new measure of Discovery does both instinct and gratifie the Understanding.
Physiological Essays (1669), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Both (493)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Cause (541)  |  Consider (416)  |  Degree (276)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effect (393)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Kind (557)  |  Matter (798)  |  Measure (232)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Reason (744)  |  Render (93)  |  Research (664)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Speaking (119)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understanding (513)

I could never have known so well how paltry men are, and how little they care for really high aims, if I had not tested them by my scientific researches. Thus I saw that most men only care for science so far as they get a living by it, and that they worship even error when it affords them a subsistence.
Wed 12 Oct 1825. Johann Peter Eckermann, Conversations with Goethe, ed. J. K. Moorhead and trans. J. Oxenford (1971), 119-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Care (186)  |  Error (321)  |  High (362)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Paltry (4)  |  Research (664)  |  Saw (160)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Subsistence (9)  |  Test (211)  |  Worship (32)

I do ... humbly conceive (tho' some possibly may think there is too much notice taken of such a trivial thing as a rotten Shell, yet) that Men do generally rally too much slight and pass over without regard these Records of Antiquity which Nature have left as Monuments and Hieroglyphick Characters of preceding Transactions in the like duration or Transactions of the Body of the Earth, which are infinitely more evident and certain tokens than any thing of Antiquity that can be fetched out of Coins or Medals, or any other way yet known, since the best of those ways may be counterfeited or made by Art and Design, as may also Books, Manuscripts and Inscriptions, as all the Learned are now sufficiently satisfied, has often been actually practised; but those Characters are not to be Counterfeited by all the Craft in the World, nor can they be doubted to be, what they appear, by anyone that will impartially examine the true appearances of them: And tho' it must be granted, that it is very difficult to read them, and to raise a Chronology out of them, and to state the intervalls of the Times wherein such, or such Catastrophies and Mutations have happened; yet 'tis not impossible, but that, by the help of those joined to ' other means and assistances of Information, much may be done even in that part of Information also.
Lectures and Discourses of Earthquakes (1668). In The Posthumous Works of Robert Hooke, containing his Cutlerian Lectures and other Discourses read at the Meetings of the Illustrious Royal Society (1705), 411.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Art (657)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Best (459)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Certain (550)  |  Character (243)  |  Chronology (9)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Design (195)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evident (91)  |  Examine (78)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grant (73)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Humbly (8)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Information (166)  |  Inscription (11)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Monument (45)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notice (77)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Regard (305)  |  Shell (63)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Token (9)  |  Transaction (13)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I do not define time, space, place, and motion, as being well known to all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Define (49)  |  Do (1908)  |  Know (1518)  |  Motion (310)  |  Place (177)  |  Space (500)  |  Space-Time (17)  |  Time (1877)

I happened to read recently a remark by American nuclear physicist W. Davidson, who noted that the explosion of one hydrogen bomb releases a greater amount of energy than the explosions set off by all countries in all wars known in the entire history of mankind. And he, apparently, is right.
[The quoted physicist was, in fact, William Davidon, Argonne National Laboratory.]
Address to the United Nations, New York City, 18 Sep 1959. Quoted in 'Texts of Khrushchev's Address at United Nations and the Soviet Declaration', New York Times (19 Sep 1959), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Energy (344)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Greater (288)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Hydrogen Bomb (16)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physicist (5)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Read (287)  |  Release (27)  |  Right (452)  |  Set (394)  |  War (225)

I have been so constantly under the necessity of watching the movements of the most unprincipled set of pirates I have ever known, that all my time has been occupied in defense, in putting evidence into something like legal shape that I am the inventor of the Electro-Magnetic Telegraph.
From a letter to his brother describing the challenge of defending his patents (19 Apr 1848).
Samuel F. B. Morse, His Letters and Journals (1914), vol.2, 283.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Brother (43)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Defense (23)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Letter (109)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Patent (33)  |  Set (394)  |  Something (719)  |  Telegraph (38)  |  Time (1877)

I have hardly known a mathematician who was capable of reasoning.
Plato
The Republic. In Anton Bovier, Statistical Mechanics of Disordered Systems (2006), 159.
Science quotes on:  |  Capable (168)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Reasoning (207)

I have known silence: the cold earthy silence at the bottom of a newly dug well; the implacable stony silence of a deep cave; the hot, drugged midday silence when everything is hypnotised and stilled into silence by the eye of the sun;… I have heard summer cicadas cry so that the sound seems stitched into your bones. I have heard tree frogs in an orchestration as complicated as Bach singing in a forest lit by a million emerald fireflies. I have heard the Keas calling over grey glaciers that groaned to themselves like old people as they inched their way to the sea. I have heard the hoarse street vendor cries of the mating Fur seals as they sang to their sleek golden wives, the crisp staccato admonishment of the Rattlesnake, the cobweb squeak of the Bat and the belling roar of the Red deer knee-deep in purple heather.
Letter to Lee McGeorge (31 Jul 1978). Collected in Letters of Note: Volume 2: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence (2016), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Bach (7)  |  Bat (10)  |  Bone (95)  |  Cave (15)  |  Cicada (3)  |  Cobweb (6)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Cry (29)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deer (9)  |  Everything (476)  |  Eye (419)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Forest (150)  |  Frog (38)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Golden (45)  |  Groan (5)  |  Hot (60)  |  Implacable (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Midday (4)  |  Old (481)  |  Orchestration (2)  |  People (1005)  |  Rattlesnake (2)  |  Roar (5)  |  Sea (308)  |  Seal (18)  |  Silence (56)  |  Sing (26)  |  Singing (19)  |  Sound (183)  |  Squeak (2)  |  Staccato (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tree Frog (2)  |  Way (1217)

I have never seen the Philosopher's Stone that turns lead into Gold, but I have known the pursuit of it turn a Man's Gold into Lead.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1738).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Gold (97)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosopher’s Stone (7)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Stone (162)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turning (5)

I have no doubt that certain learned men, now that the novelty of the hypotheses in this work has been widely reported—for it establishes that the Earth moves, and indeed that the Sun is motionless in the middle of the universe—are extremely shocked, and think that the scholarly disciplines, rightly established once and for all, should not be upset. But if they are willing to judge the matter thoroughly, they will find that the author of this work has committed nothing which deserves censure. For it is proper for an astronomer to establish a record of the motions of the heavens with diligent and skilful observations, and then to think out and construct laws for them, or rather hypotheses, whatever their nature may be, since the true laws cannot be reached by the use of reason; and from those assumptions the motions can be correctly calculated, both for the future and for the past. Our author has shown himself outstandingly skilful in both these respects. Nor is it necessary that these hypotheses should be true, nor indeed even probable, but it is sufficient if they merely produce calculations which agree with the observations. … For it is clear enough that this subject is completely and simply ignorant of the laws which produce apparently irregular motions. And if it does work out any laws—as certainly it does work out very many—it does not do so in any way with the aim of persuading anyone that they are valid, but only to provide a correct basis for calculation. Since different hypotheses are sometimes available to explain one and the same motion (for instance eccentricity or an epicycle for the motion of the Sun) an astronomer will prefer to seize on the one which is easiest to grasp; a philosopher will perhaps look more for probability; but neither will grasp or convey anything certain, unless it has been divinely revealed to him. Let us therefore allow these new hypotheses also to become known beside the older, which are no more probable, especially since they are remarkable and easy; and let them bring with them the vast treasury of highly learned observations. And let no one expect from astronomy, as far as hypotheses are concerned, anything certain, since it cannot produce any such thing, in case if he seizes on things constructed for another other purpose as true, he departs from this discipline more foolish than he came to it.
Although this preface would have been assumed by contemporary readers to be written by Copernicus, it was unsigned. It is now believed to have been written and added at press time by Andreas Osiander (who was then overseeing the printing of the book). It suggests the earth’s motion as described was merely a mathematical device, and not to be taken as absolute reality. Text as given in 'To the Reader on the Hypotheses in this Work', Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), translated by ‎Alistair Matheson Duncan (1976), 22-3. By adding this preface, Osiander wished to stave off criticism by theologians. See also the Andreas Osiander Quotes page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Author (167)  |  Available (78)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Censure (5)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concern (228)  |  Construct (124)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Different (577)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Expect (200)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Future (429)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Judge (108)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Novelty (29)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Record (154)  |  Respect (207)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Shock (37)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Sun (385)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Universe (857)  |  Upset (18)  |  Use (766)  |  Vast (177)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Work (1351)

I have procured some of the mice mentioned in my former letters, a young one and a female with young, both of which I have preserved in brandy. From the colour, shape, size, and manner of nesting, I make no doubt but that the species is nondescript [not known to science]. They are much smaller and more slender than the mus domesticus medius of Ray; and have more of the squirrel or dormouse colour ... They never enter into houses; are carried into ricks and barns with the sheaves; abound in harvest, and build their nests amidst the straws of the corn above the ground, and sometimes in thistles.
[Part of his observations on the harvest mouse, which he was the first to describe as a new species.]
Letter XII (4 Nov 1767) in The Natural History of Selborne (1789, 1899), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Barn (5)  |  Both (493)  |  Brandy (2)  |  Build (204)  |  Corn (19)  |  Describe (128)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enter (141)  |  Female (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Ground (217)  |  Harvest (27)  |  House (140)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Nest (23)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Ray (114)  |  John Ray (8)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sheaf (2)  |  Species (401)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Straw (7)  |  Thistle (5)  |  Young (227)

I have recently read an article on handwriting and forgeries in which it is stated that ink eradicators do not remove ink: but merely bleach it, and that ink so bleached can be easily brought out by a process of fuming: known to all handwriting experts. Can you give me a description of this process, what chemicals are used: and how it is performed?
Showing his early interest in science, at age 16, while a student at Tulsa Central High School. From the first time Gardner’s writing appeared in print: a query printed in a magazine in Hugo Gernsback (ed.), 'Now It Is Now It Isn’t', Science and Invention (Apr 1930), 1119. As quoted and cited in Dana Richards, 'Martin Gardner: A “Documentary”', collected in Elwyn R. Berlekamp and Tom Rodgers (ed.) The Mathemagician and Pied Puzzler: A Collection in Tribute to Martin Gardner (1999), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Article (22)  |  Bleach (3)  |  Bring Out (4)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Description (84)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expert (65)  |  Forgery (3)  |  Fume (7)  |  Handwriting (2)  |  Ink (10)  |  Know (1518)  |  Merely (316)  |  Perform (121)  |  Process (423)  |  Read (287)  |  Remove (45)

I know of scarcely anything so apt to impress the imagination as the wonderful form of cosmic order expressed by the “Law of Frequency of Error.” The law would have been personified by the Greeks and deified, if they had known of it. It reigns with serenity and in complete self-effacement, amidst the wildest confusion. The huger the mob, and the greater the apparent anarchy, the more perfect is its sway. It is the supreme law of Unreason. Whenever a large sample of chaotic elements are taken in hand and marshaled in the order of their magnitude, an unsuspected and most beautiful form of regularity proves to have been latent all along.
In Natural Inheritance (1894), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anarchy (6)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Complete (204)  |  Confusion (57)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Element (310)  |  Error (321)  |  Express (186)  |  Form (959)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greek (107)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impress (64)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Latent (12)  |  Law (894)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mob (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Order (632)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Prove (250)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Reign (23)  |  Sample (19)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Self (267)  |  Serenity (9)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Unsuspected (7)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Wonderful (149)

I looked for it [heavy hydrogen, deuterium] because I thought it should exist. I didn't know it would have industrial applications or be the basic for the most powerful weapon ever known [the nuclear bomb] … I thought maybe my discovery might have the practical value of, say, neon in neon signs.
[He was awarded the 1931 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discovering deuterium.]
Quoted in 'Moon-Struck Scientist,' New York Times (27 Apr 1961), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Award (13)  |  Basic (138)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Exist (443)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Look (582)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neon (4)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Weapon (17)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Practical (200)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Thought (953)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Value (365)  |  Weapon (92)

I say it is impossible that so sensible a people [citizens of Paris], under such circumstances, should have lived so long by the smoky, unwholesome, and enormously expensive light of candles, if they had really known that they might have had as much pure light of the sun for nothing.
[Describing the energy-saving benefit of adopting daylight saving time. (1784)]
'An Economical Project', The Life and Miscellaneous Writings of Benjamin Franklin (1839), 58. A translation of this letter appeared in one of the Paris daily papers about 1784. He estimated, during six months, a saving of over 64 million pound weight of candles, worth over 96 million livres tournois.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Candle (30)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Daylight Saving Time (10)  |  Energy (344)  |  Expense (16)  |  Free (232)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Paris (11)  |  People (1005)  |  Pure (291)  |  Saving (20)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)

I shall explain a System of the World differing in many particulars from any yet known, answering in all things to the common Rules of Mechanical Motions: This depends upon three Suppositions. First, That all Cœlestial Bodies whatsoever, have an attraction or gravitating power towards their own Centers, whereby they attract not only their own parts, and keep them from flying from them, as we may observe the Earth to do, but that they do also attract all the other Cœlestial bodies that are within the sphere of their activity; and consequently that not only the Sun and Moon have an influence upon the body and motion the Earth, and the Earth upon them, but that Mercury also Venus, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter by their attractive powers, have a considerable influence upon its motion in the same manner the corresponding attractive power of the Earth hath a considerable influence upon every one of their motions also. The second supposition is this, That all bodies whatsoever that are put into a direct and simple motion, will continue to move forward in a streight line, till they are by some other effectual powers deflected and bent into a Motion, describing a Circle, Ellipse, or some other more compounded Curve Line. The third supposition is, That these attractive powers are so much the more powerful in operating, by how much the nearer the body wrought upon is to their own Centers. Now what these several degrees are I have not yet experimentally verified; but it is a notion, which if fully prosecuted as it ought to be, will mightily assist the Astronomer to reduce all the Cœlestial Motions to a certain rule, which I doubt will never be done true without it. He that understands the nature of the Circular Pendulum and Circular Motion, will easily understand the whole ground of this Principle, and will know where to find direction in Nature for the true stating thereof. This I only hint at present to such as have ability and opportunity of prosecuting this Inquiry, and are not wanting of Industry for observing and calculating, wishing heartily such may be found, having myself many other things in hand which I would first compleat and therefore cannot so well attend it. But this I durst promise the Undertaker, that he will find all the Great Motions of the World to be influenced by this Principle, and that the true understanding thereof will be the true perfection of Astronomy.
An Attempt to Prove the Motion of the Earth from Observations (1674), 27-8. Based on a Cutlerian Lecture delivered by Hooke at the Royal Society four years earlier.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circular (19)  |  Circular Motion (6)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Continue (165)  |  Curve (49)  |  Degree (276)  |  Depend (228)  |  Direct (225)  |  Direction (175)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ellipse (8)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Flying (72)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hint (21)  |  Industry (137)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mars (44)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Observe (168)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Promise (67)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Rule (294)  |  Saturn (13)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Sun (385)  |  Supposition (50)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Venus (20)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I think chemistry is being frittered away by the hairsplitting of the organic chemists; we have new compounds discovered, which scarcely differ from the known ones and when discovered are valueless—very illustrations perhaps of their refinements in analysis, but very little aiding the progress of true science.
Letter to William Grove (5 Jan 1845), The Letters of Faraday and Schoenbein, 1836-1862 (1899), Footnote, 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Compound (113)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Frittering (2)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  New (1216)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Progress (465)  |  Refinement (17)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Think (1086)  |  True Science (23)  |  Valueless (3)

I was working with a Crookes tube covered by a shield of black cardboard. A piece of barium platino-cyanide paper lay on the bench there. I had been passing a current through the tube, and I noticed a peculiar black line across the paper. …
The effect was one which could only be produced in ordinary parlance by the passage of light. No light could come from the tube because the shield which covered it was impervious to any light known even that of the electric arc. …
I did not think; I investigated. …
I assumed that the effect must have come from the tube since its character indicated that it could come from nowhere else. … It seemed at first a new kind of invisible light. It was clearly something new something unrecorded. …
There is much to do, and I am busy, very busy. [Describing to a journalist the discovery of X-rays that he had made on 8 Nov 1895.]
In H.J.W. Dam in 'The New Marvel in Photography", McClure's Magazine (Apr 1896), 4:5, 413.
Science quotes on:  |  Arc (12)  |  Barium (4)  |  Bench (8)  |  Busy (28)  |  Character (243)  |  Current (118)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electric (76)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Impervious (5)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Kind (557)  |  Light (607)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Paper (182)  |  Passage (50)  |  Passing (76)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Produced (187)  |  Ray (114)  |  Shield (6)  |  Something (719)  |  Test (211)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  X-ray (37)

I will not now discuss the Controversie betwixt some of the Modern Atomists, and the Cartesians; the former of whom think, that betwixt the Earth and the Stars, and betwixt these themselves there are vast Tracts of Space that are empty, save where the beams of Light do pass through them; and the later of whom tell us, that the Intervals betwixt the Stars and Planets (among which the Earth may perhaps be reckon'd) are perfectly fill'd, but by a Matter far subtiler than our Air, which some call Celestial, and others Æther. I shall not, I say, engage in this controversie, but thus much seems evident, That If there be such a Celestial Matter, it must ' make up far the Greatest part of the Universe known to us. For the Interstellar part of the world (If I may so stile it) bears so very great a proportion to the Globes, and their Atmospheres too, (If other Stars have any as well as the Earth,) that It Is almost incomparably Greater in respect of them, than all our Atmosphere is in respect of the Clouds, not to make the comparison between the Sea and the Fishes that swim in it.
A Continuation of New Experiments Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring and Weight of the Air, and their Effects (1669), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bear (159)  |  Call (769)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Dark Matter (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Empty (80)  |  Engage (39)  |  Ether (35)  |  Evident (91)  |  Former (137)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Interstellar (8)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Planet (356)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Respect (207)  |  Save (118)  |  Say (984)  |  Sea (308)  |  Space (500)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Swim (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I would not be confident in everything I say about the argument: but one thing I would fight for to the end, both in word and in deed if I were able—that if we believe we should try to find out what is not known, we should be better and braver and less idle than if we believed that what we do not know is impossible to find out and that we need not even try.
Socrates
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Belief (578)  |  Better (486)  |  Both (493)  |  Brave (12)  |  Confident (25)  |  Deed (34)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fight (44)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Idle (33)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Know (1518)  |  Less (103)  |  Need (290)  |  Say (984)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Try (283)  |  Word (619)

I've known rivers:
I've known rivers ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins.
My soul has grown deep like the rivers.
The Negro Speaks of Rivers (1926).
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Blood (134)  |  Deep (233)  |  Depth (94)  |  Flow (83)  |  Human (1468)  |  Old (481)  |  River (119)  |  Soul (226)  |  Vein (25)  |  World (1774)

If I had been taught from my youth all the truths of which I have since sought out demonstrations, and had thus learned them without labour, I should never, perhaps, have known any beyond these; at least, I should never have acquired the habit and the facility which I think I possess in always discovering new truths in proportion as I give myself to the search.
In Discours de la Méthode (1637). In English from John Veitch (trans.), A Discourse on Method (1912), 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Acquired (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Discover (553)  |  Facility (11)  |  Habit (168)  |  Know (1518)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Possess (156)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Search (162)  |  Seek (213)  |  Teach (277)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Youth (101)

If I may paraphrase Hobbes's well-known aphorism, I would say that 'books are the money of Literature, but only the counters of Science.'
'Universities: Actual and Ideal' (1874). In Collected Essays (1893), Vol. 3, 213.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aphorism (21)  |  Book (392)  |  Thomas Hobbes (22)  |  Literature (103)  |  Money (170)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)

If it were possible for us to have so deep an insight into a man's character as shown both in inner and in outer actions, that every, even the least, incentive to these actions and all external occasions which affect them were so known to us that his future conduct could be predicted with as great a certainty as the occurrence of a solar or lunar eclipse, we could nevertheless still assert that the man is free.
Critique of Practical Reason (1788). In L. W. Beck (ed. & trans.), Critique of Practical Reason and Other Writings in Moral Philosophy (1949), 204-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Both (493)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Character (243)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Deep (233)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Free (232)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Incentive (9)  |  Inner (71)  |  Insight (102)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Still (613)

If man were by nature a solitary animal, the passions of the soul by which he was conformed to things so as to have knowledge of them would be sufficient for him; but since he is by nature a political and social animal it was necessary that his conceptions be made known to others. This he does through vocal sound. Therefore there had to be significant vocal sounds in order that men might live together. Whence those who speak different languages find it difficult to live together in social unity.
As quoted in Jeffrey J. Maciejewski, Thomas Aquinas on Persuasion: Action, Ends, and Natural Rhetoric (2013), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Conception (154)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Find (998)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Linguistics (30)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  Political (121)  |  Significant (74)  |  Social (252)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Soul (226)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speak (232)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Unity (78)  |  Voice (52)

If there is a wrong way to do something, then someone will do it.
[Subsequently became known as Murphy's Law: “If anything can go wrong, it will.”]
As quoted in Robert L. Forward, 'Murphy Lives!', Science (Jan-Feb 1983), 83, 78. Short form in J.A. Simpson (ed), The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs (1982).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Error (321)  |  Law (894)  |  Murphy’s Law (4)  |  Something (719)  |  Technology (257)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

If there is one thing I’ve learned in my years on this planet, it’s that the happiest and most fulfilled people I’ve known are those who devoted themselves to something bigger and more profound than merely their own self interest.
From speech (3 Oct 1977) announcing he was donating his papers to Ohio State University. As quoted on the OSU website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bigger (5)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Fulfilled (2)  |  Happiest (2)  |  Interest (386)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Profound (104)  |  Self (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Year (933)

If there were some solitary or feral man, the passions of the soul would be sufficient for him; by them he would be conformed to things in order that he might have knowledge of them. But because man is naturally political and social, there is need for one man to make his conceptions known to others, which is done with speech. So significant speech was needed if men were to live together. Which is why those of different tongues do not easily live together.
Sententia super libri Perihermeneias (Commentary on Aristotle’s On Interpretation) [1270-1271], Book I, lesson 2, number 2, trans. R. McInerny, quoted in R. McInerny (ed.) Thomas Aquinas, Selected Writings (1998), 460.
Science quotes on:  |  Communication (94)  |  Conception (154)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  Political (121)  |  Significant (74)  |  Social (252)  |  Soul (226)  |  Speech (61)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Why (491)

If there’s more than one way to do a job and one of those ways will end in disaster, then somebody will do it that way.
[Early statement of what became known as Murphy's Law.]
As quoted in People (31 Jan 1983), 82. Also in Nick T. Spark, A History of Murphy's Law (2006), 47. Nick T. Spark - Humor - 2006
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Early (185)  |  End (590)  |  Failure (161)  |  Job (82)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  Murphy’s Law (4)  |  Somebody (8)  |  Statement (142)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

If these d'Hérelle bodies were really genes, fundamentally like our chromosome genes, they would give us an utterly new angle from which to attack the gene problem. They are filterable, to some extent isolable, can be handled in test-tubes, and their properties, as shown by their effects on the bacteria, can then be studied after treatment. It would be very rash to call these bodies genes, and yet at present we must confess that there is no distinction known between the genes and them. Hence we can not categorically deny that perhaps we may be able to grind genes in a mortar and cook them in a beaker after all. Must we geneticists become bacteriologists, physiological chemists and physicists, simultaneously with being zoologists and botanists? Let us hope so.
'Variation Due to Change in the Individual Gene', The American Naturalist (1922), 56, 48-9.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attack (84)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bacteriologist (5)  |  Beaker (4)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Confess (42)  |  Cook (17)  |  Deny (66)  |  Félix d’Hérelle (2)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Effect (393)  |  Extent (139)  |  Filter (9)  |  Gene (98)  |  Geneticist (16)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hope (299)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Property (168)  |  Rash (14)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Zoologist (12)

If this fire determined by the sun, be received on the blackest known bodies, its heat will be long retain'd therein; and hence such bodies are the soonest and the strongest heated by the flame fire, as also the quickest dried, after having been moisten'd with water; and it may be added, that they also burn by much the readiest: all which points are confirm'd by daily observations. Let a piece of cloth be hung in the air, open to the sun, one part of it dyed black, another part of a white colour, others of scarlet, and diverse other colours; the black part will always be found to heat the most, and the quickest of all; and the others will each be found to heat more slowly, by how much they reflect the rays more strongly to the eye; thus the white will warm the slowest of them all, and next to that the red, and so of the rest in proportion, as their colour is brighter or weaker.
A New Method of Chemistry, 2nd edition (1741), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Black Body (2)  |  Burn (87)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Daily (87)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Heat (174)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Ray (114)  |  Rest (280)  |  Retain (56)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Sun (385)  |  Warm (69)  |  Water (481)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)

If we assume that there is only one enzyme present to act as an oxidizing agent, we must assume for it as many different degrees of activity as are required to explain the occurrence of the various colors known to mendelize (three in mice, yellow, brown, and black). If we assume that a different enzyme or group of enzymes is responsible for the production of each pigment we must suppose that in mice at least three such enzymes or groups of enzymes exist. To determine which of these conditions occurs in mice is not a problem for the biologist, but for the chemist. The biologist must confine his attention to determining the number of distinct agencies at work in pigment formation irrespective of their chemical nature. These agencies, because of their physiological behavior, the biologist chooses to call 'factors,' and attempts to learn what he can about their functions in the evolution of color varieties.
Experimental Studies of the Inheritance of Color in Mice (1913), 17-18.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  Agent (70)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attention (190)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Brown (23)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Choose (112)  |  Color (137)  |  Condition (356)  |  Degree (276)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explain (322)  |  Factor (46)  |  Formation (96)  |  Function (228)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Pigment (8)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Production (183)  |  Required (108)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Variety (132)  |  Various (200)  |  Work (1351)  |  Yellow (30)

In 1892 one of us was able within the compass of a short article in a medical journal to give a résumé of our knowledge of the Trypanosomes. To-day it requires a whole volume to relate all that is known about these hæmatozoa and the diseases to which they give rise.
Opening lines from Introduction to Alphonse Laveran and Felix Etienne Pierre Mesnil Trypanosomes and Trypanosomiasis (1904), v. English edition translated and much enlarged by David Nabarro, (1907), xv. The article was footnoted as A. Laveran, Arch. Méd. Expérim. (1 Mar 1892).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Article (22)  |  Compass (34)  |  Disease (328)  |  Journal (30)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Medical (26)  |  Require (219)  |  Resume (3)  |  Rise (166)  |  Short (197)  |  Volume (19)  |  Whole (738)

In degenerating programmes, however, theories are fabricated only in order to accommodate known facts.
In Radio Lecture (30 Jun 1973) broadcast by the Open University, collected in Imre Lakatos, John Worrall (ed.) and Gregory Currie (ed.), 'Introduction: Science and Pseudoscience', The Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes (1978, 1980), Vol. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodate (15)  |  Degenerate (14)  |  Fabricate (6)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Know (1518)  |  Order (632)  |  Program (52)  |  Theory (970)

In describing the honourable mission I charged him with, M. Pernety informed me that he made my name known to you. This leads me to confess that I am not as completely unknown to you as you might believe, but that fearing the ridicule attached to a female scientist, I have previously taken the name of M. LeBlanc in communicating to you those notes that, no doubt, do not deserve the indulgence with which you have responded.
Explaining her use of a male psuedonym.
Letter to Carl Friedrich Gauss (1807)
Science quotes on:  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Biography (240)  |  Completely (135)  |  Confess (42)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Female (50)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Inform (47)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mission (21)  |  Name (333)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Use (766)

In early times, when the knowledge of nature was small, little attempt was made to divide science into parts, and men of science did not specialize. Aristotle was a master of all science known in his day, and wrote indifferently treatises on physics or animals. As increasing knowledge made it impossible for any one man to grasp all scientific subjects, lines of division were drawn for convenience of study and of teaching. Besides the broad distinction into physical and biological science, minute subdivisions arose, and, at a certain stage of development, much attention was, given to methods of classification, and much emphasis laid on the results, which were thought to have a significance beyond that of the mere convenience of mankind.
But we have reached the stage when the different streams of knowledge, followed by the different sciences, are coalescing, and the artificial barriers raised by calling those sciences by different names are breaking down. Geology uses the methods and data of physics, chemistry and biology; no one can say whether the science of radioactivity is to be classed as chemistry or physics, or whether sociology is properly grouped with biology or economics. Indeed, it is often just where this coalescence of two subjects occurs, when some connecting channel between them is opened suddenly, that the most striking advances in knowledge take place. The accumulated experience of one department of science, and the special methods which have been developed to deal with its problems, become suddenly available in the domain of another department, and many questions insoluble before may find answers in the new light cast upon them. Such considerations show us that science is in reality one, though we may agree to look on it now from one side and now from another as we approach it from the standpoint of physics, physiology or psychology.
In article 'Science', Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 402.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulated (2)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approach (108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attention (190)  |  Available (78)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cast (66)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Coalescence (2)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Data (156)  |  Deal (188)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Domain (69)  |  Down (456)  |  Early (185)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Experience (467)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Geology (220)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Master (178)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Question (621)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reality (261)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Show (346)  |  Side (233)  |  Significance (113)  |  Small (477)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Special (184)  |  Specialize (3)  |  Stage (143)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Stream (81)  |  Striking (48)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

In experimenting on the arc, my aim was not so much to add to the large number of isolated facts that had already been discovered, as to form some idea of the bearing of these upon one another, and thus to arrive at a clear conception of what takes place in each part of the arc and carbons at every moment. The attempt to correlate all the known phenomena, and to bind them together into one consistent whole, led to the deduction of new facts, which, when duly tested by experiment, became parts of the growing body, and, themselves, opened up fresh questions, to be answered in their turn by experiment.
In The Electric Arc (1902), Preface, iii. Ayrton described the growth of her published work on the electric arc, from a series of articles in The Electrician in 1895-6, to the full book, which “has attained to its present proportions almost with the growth of an organic body.”
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arc (12)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Body (537)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Growing (98)  |  Idea (843)  |  Large (394)  |  Moment (253)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Question (621)  |  Test (211)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Together (387)  |  Turn (447)  |  Whole (738)

In former times, … when ships buffeted by storms threw a portion of their cargo overboard, it was recognized that those whose goods were sacrificed had a claim in equity to indemnification at the expense of those whose goods were safely delivered. The value of the lost goods was paid for by agreement between all those whose merchandise had been in the same ship. This sea damage to cargo in transit was known as “havaria” and the word came naturally to be applied to the compensation money which each individual was called upon to pay. From this Latin word derives our modern word average.
In 'On the Average', Facts From Figures (1951), Chap. 4, 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Average (82)  |  Call (769)  |  Cargo (5)  |  Claim (146)  |  Compensation (7)  |  Damage (34)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Derive (65)  |  Equity (4)  |  Expense (16)  |  Former (137)  |  Good (889)  |  Goods (8)  |  Hazard (18)  |  Indemnification (2)  |  Individual (404)  |  Latin (38)  |  Lost (34)  |  Merchandise (2)  |  Modern (385)  |  Money (170)  |  Nomencalture (4)  |  Overboard (3)  |  Portion (84)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Safely (8)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Throw (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transit (2)  |  Value (365)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Word (619)

In future times Tait will be best known for his work in the quaternion analysis. Had it not been for his expositions, developments and applications, Hamilton’s invention would be today, in all probability, a mathematical curiosity.
In Bibliotheca Mathematica (1903), 3, 189. As cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 178. [Note: Tait is Peter Guthrie Tait; Hamilton is Sir William Rowan Hamilton. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Application (242)  |  Best (459)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Development (422)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Future (429)  |  Sir William Rowan Hamilton (10)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Probability (130)  |  Quaternion (9)  |  Peter Guthrie Tait (10)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

In general, art has preceded science. Men have executed great, and curious, and beautiful works before they had a scientific insight into the principles on which the success of their labours was founded. There were good artificers in brass and iron before the principles of the chemistry of metals were known; there was wine among men before there was a philosophy of vinous fermentation; there were mighty masses raised into the air, cyclopean walls and cromlechs, obelisks and pyramids—probably gigantic Doric pillars and entablatures—before there was a theory of the mechanical powers. … Art was the mother of Science.
Lecture (26 Nov 1851), to the London Society of Arts, 'The General Bearing of the Great Exhibition on the Progress of Art and Science', collected in Lectures on the Results of the Great Exhibition of 1851' (1852), 7-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Art (657)  |  Artificer (5)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Brass (5)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Construction (112)  |  Curious (91)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Founded (20)  |  General (511)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Insight (102)  |  Iron (96)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Metal (84)  |  Mother (114)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pillar (9)  |  Power (746)  |  Preceding (8)  |  Principle (507)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  Raised (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  Wall (67)  |  Wine (38)  |  Work (1351)

In its efforts to learn as much as possible about nature, modern physics has found that certain things can never be “known” with certainty. Much of our knowledge must always remain uncertain. The most we can know is in terms of probabilities.
In The Feynman Lectures on Physics (1963), Vol. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Effort (227)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Remain (349)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uncertain (44)

In its famous paradox, the equation of money and excrement, psychoanalysis becomes the first science to state what common sense and the poets have long known—that the essence of money is in its absolute worthlessness.
Life Against Death: the Psychoanalytical Meaning of History (1985), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Become (815)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Equation (132)  |  Essence (82)  |  Excrement (2)  |  First (1283)  |  Long (790)  |  Money (170)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Poet (83)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  State (491)  |  Worthlessness (3)

In medical practice a man may die when, scientifically speaking, he ought to have lived. I have actually known a man to die of a disease from which he was, scientifically speaking, immune. But that does not affect the fundamental truth of science.
B.B. character in The Doctor's Dilemma, Act 3 (First produced in 1906). In The Doctor's Dilemma: With a Preface on Doctors (1911), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Affect (19)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Immunity (8)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Practice (204)  |  Science (3879)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Truth (1057)

In my own view, some advice about what should be known, about what technical education should be acquired, about the intense motivation needed to succeed, and about the carelessness and inclination toward bias that must be avoided is far more useful than all the rules and warnings of theoretical logic.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Advice (55)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Bias (20)  |  Carelessness (6)  |  Education (378)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  More (2559)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Must (1526)  |  Rule (294)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Technical Education (2)  |  Technology (257)  |  Theory (970)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  View (488)  |  Warning (17)

In one department of his [Joseph Black’s] lecture he exceeded any I have ever known, the neatness and unvarying success with which all the manipulations of his experiments were performed. His correct eye and steady hand contributed to the one; his admirable precautions, foreseeing and providing for every emergency, secured the other. I have seen him pour boiling water or boiling acid from a vessel that had no spout into a tube, holding it at such a distance as made the stream’s diameter small, and so vertical that not a drop was spilt. While he poured he would mention this adaptation of the height to the diameter as a necessary condition of success. I have seen him mix two substances in a receiver into which a gas, as chlorine, had been introduced, the effect of the combustion being perhaps to produce a compound inflammable in its nascent state, and the mixture being effected by drawing some string or wire working through the receiver's sides in an air-tight socket. The long table on which the different processes had been carried on was as clean at the end of the lecture as it had been before the apparatus was planted upon it. Not a drop of liquid, not a grain of dust remained.
In Lives of Men of Letters and Science, Who Flourished in the Time of George III (1845), 346-7.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acid (83)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Being (1278)  |  Joseph Black (14)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Clean (50)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Compound (113)  |  Condition (356)  |  Department (92)  |  Diameter (28)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dust (64)  |  Effect (393)  |  Emergency (10)  |  End (590)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gas (83)  |  Grain (50)  |  Inflammable (5)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Long (790)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mixture (41)  |  Nascent (3)  |  Neatness (5)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Plant (294)  |  Remain (349)  |  Secured (18)  |  Side (233)  |  Small (477)  |  Spout (2)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Stream (81)  |  Substance (248)  |  Success (302)  |  Table (104)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Water (481)  |  Wire (35)

In place of science, the Eskimo has only magic to bridge the gap between what he can understand and what is not known. Without magic, his life would be one long panic.
In Man’s Rise to Civilization (1968), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Bridge (47)  |  Gap (33)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Magic (86)  |  Science (3879)  |  Understand (606)

In that same year [1932], the number of [known] particles was suddenly doubled. In two beautiful experiments, Chadwick showed that the neutron existed, and Anderson photographed the first unmistakable positron track.
In Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1968), 'Recent Developments in Particle Physics', collected in Nobel Lectures: Physics 1963-1970 (1972), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Sir James Chadwick (3)  |  Definitive (3)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Number (699)  |  Particle (194)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Positron (4)  |  Show (346)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Track (38)  |  Two (937)  |  Unmistakable (6)  |  Year (933)

In the benzene nucleus we have been given a soil out of which we can see with surprise the already-known realm of organic chemistry multiply, not once or twice but three, four, five or six times just like an equivalent number of trees. What an amount of work had suddenly become necessary, and how quickly were busy hands found to carry it out! First the eye moves up the six stems opening out from the tremendous benzene trunk. But already the branches of the neighbouring stems have become intertwined, and a canopy of leaves has developed which becomes more spacious as the giant soars upwards into the air. The top of the tree rises into the clouds where the eye cannot yet follow it. And to what an extent is this wonderful benzene tree thronged with blossoms! Everywhere in the sea of leaves one can spy the slender hydroxyl bud: hardly rarer is the forked blossom [Gabelblüte] which we call the amine group, the most frequent is the beautiful cross-shaped blossom we call the methyl group. And inside this embellishment of blossoms, what a richness of fruit, some of them shining in a wonderful blaze of color, others giving off an overwhelming fragrance.
A. W. Hofmann, after-dinner speech at Kekulé Benzolfest (Mar 1890). Trans. in W. H. Brock, O. Theodor Benfrey and Susanne Stark, 'Hofmann's Benzene Tree at the Kekulé Festivities', Journal of Chemical Education (1991), 68, 887-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Already (222)  |  Amine (2)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Become (815)  |  Benzene (7)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Call (769)  |  Canopy (6)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Develop (268)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Giant (67)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Radical (25)  |  Realm (85)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Shining (35)  |  Soar (23)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spy (8)  |  Stem (31)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Tree (246)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

In the month of August 678, in the eighth year of Egfrid’s reign, there appeared a star known as a comet, which remained visible for three months, rising in the morning and emitting what seemed to be a tall column of bright flame.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII., as translated by Leo Sherley-Price, revised by R.E. Latham, Ecclesiastical History of the English People (1955, 1990), 224.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bright (79)  |  Column (15)  |  Comet (54)  |  Emit (15)  |  Flame (40)  |  Month (88)  |  Morning (94)  |  Reign (23)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Star (427)  |  Tall (11)  |  Visible (84)  |  Year (933)

In the pursuit of the physical sciences, the imagination supplies the hypothesis which bridges over the gulf that separates the known from the unknown.
Presidential Address to Anniversary meeting of the Royal Society (30 Nov 1859), Proceedings of the Royal Society of London (1860), 10, 165-166.
Science quotes on:  |  Bridge (47)  |  Gulf (18)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  Unknown (182)

In the year of our Lord’s incarnation 729, two comets appeared about the sun, to the great terror of the beholders. One of them went before the rising sun in the morning, the other followed him when he set at night, as it were presaging much destruction to the east and west; one was the forerunner of the day, and the other of the night, to signify that mortals were threatened with calamities at both times. They carried their flaming tails towards the north, as it were ready to set the world on fire. They appeared in January, and continued nearly a fortnight. At which time a dreadful plague of Saracens ravaged France with miserable slaughter; … the beginning and progress of Ceolwulf’s reign were so filled with commotions, that it cannot yet be known what is to be said concerning them, or what end they will have.
Bede
From Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, Book V, Chap. XXIII, as translated in J.A. Giles (ed.), The Venerable Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of England. Also the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (1894), 291-292. The editor reprinted the translation based on the 1723 work of John Stevens into modern English. Note: The observation likely was on a single comet seen twice each day. The event is also in both the Laud and Parker manuscripts of The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Appear (118)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beholder (2)  |  Both (493)  |  Calamity (11)  |  Comet (54)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Dreadful (14)  |  End (590)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forerunner (3)  |  Fortnight (3)  |  France (27)  |  Great (1574)  |  Lord (93)  |  Miserable (7)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Night (120)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plague (41)  |  Progress (465)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Reign (23)  |  Rising (44)  |  Saracen (2)  |  Set (394)  |  Signify (17)  |  Slaughter (7)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tail (18)  |  Terror (30)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

In the years since 1932, the list of known particles has increased rapidly, but not steadily. The growth has instead been concentrated into a series of spurts of activity.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1968). Collected in Yong Zhou (ed.), Nobel Lecture: Physics, 1963-1970 (2013), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Growth (187)  |  Increase (210)  |  Particle (194)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Series (149)  |  Steadily (6)  |  Year (933)

In the years since man unlocked the power stored up within the atom, the world has made progress, halting, but effective, toward bringing that power under human control. The challenge may be our salvation. As we begin to master the destructive potentialities of modern science, we move toward a new era in which science can fulfill its creative promise and help bring into existence the happiest society the world has ever known.
From Address to the Centennial Convocation of the National Academy of Sciences (22 Oct 1963), 'A Century of Scientific Conquest.' Online at The American Presidency Project.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Begin (260)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Control (167)  |  Creative (137)  |  Effective (59)  |  Era (51)  |  Existence (456)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Power (746)  |  Progress (465)  |  Promise (67)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Society (326)  |  Unlock (10)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

Indeed, we need not look back half a century to times which many now living remember well, and see the wonderful advances in the sciences and arts which have been made within that period. Some of these have rendered the elements themselves subservient to the purposes of man, have harnessed them to the yoke of his labors and effected the great blessings of moderating his own, of accomplishing what was beyond his feeble force, and extending the comforts of life to a much enlarged circle, to those who had before known its necessaries only.
From paper 'Report of the Commissioners Appointed to Fix the Site of the University of Virginia' (Dec 1818), reprinted in Annual Report of the Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia for the Fiscal Year Ending May 31, 1879 (1879), 10. Collected in Commonwealth of Virginia, Annual Reports of Officers, Boards, and Institutions of the Commonwealth of Virginia, for the Year Ending September 30, 1879 (1879).
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Advance (280)  |  Art (657)  |  Back (390)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Century (310)  |  Circle (110)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Effect (393)  |  Element (310)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harness (23)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Labor (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Period (198)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Remember (179)  |  Render (93)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  See (1081)  |  Subservient (4)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Yoke (2)

Induction is the process of generalizing from our known and limited experience, and framing wider rules for the future than we have been able to test fully. At its simplest, then, an induction is a habit or an adaptation—the habit of expecting tomorrow’s weather to be like today’s, the adaptation to the unwritten conventions of community life.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Community (104)  |  Experience (467)  |  Future (429)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Habit (168)  |  Induction (77)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Logic (287)  |  Process (423)  |  Rule (294)  |  Test (211)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Weather (44)

Inductive inference is the only process known to us by which essentially new knowledge comes into the world.
In The Design of Experiments (1935, 1971), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Inductive (20)  |  Inference (45)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  New (1216)  |  Process (423)  |  World (1774)

Influenza is something unique. It behaves epidemiologically in a way different from that of any other known infection.
In W.I.B . Beveridge, Influenza: The Last Great Plague (1977), ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Different (577)  |  Infection (27)  |  Influenza (3)  |  Other (2236)  |  Something (719)  |  Unique (67)  |  Virus (27)  |  Way (1217)

It has been asserted … that the power of observation is not developed by mathematical studies; while the truth is, that; from the most elementary mathematical notion that arises in the mind of a child to the farthest verge to which mathematical investigation has been pushed and applied, this power is in constant exercise. By observation, as here used, can only be meant the fixing of the attention upon objects (physical or mental) so as to note distinctive peculiarities—to recognize resemblances, differences, and other relations. Now the first mental act of the child recognizing the distinction between one and more than one, between one and two, two and three, etc., is exactly this. So, again, the first geometrical notions are as pure an exercise of this power as can be given. To know a straight line, to distinguish it from a curve; to recognize a triangle and distinguish the several forms—what are these, and all perception of form, but a series of observations? Nor is it alone in securing these fundamental conceptions of number and form that observation plays so important a part. The very genius of the common geometry as a method of reasoning—a system of investigation—is, that it is but a series of observations. The figure being before the eye in actual representation, or before the mind in conception, is so closely scrutinized, that all its distinctive features are perceived; auxiliary lines are drawn (the imagination leading in this), and a new series of inspections is made; and thus, by means of direct, simple observations, the investigation proceeds. So characteristic of common geometry is this method of investigation, that Comte, perhaps the ablest of all writers upon the philosophy of mathematics, is disposed to class geometry, as to its method, with the natural sciences, being based upon observation. Moreover, when we consider applied mathematics, we need only to notice that the exercise of this faculty is so essential, that the basis of all such reasoning, the very material with which we build, have received the name observations. Thus we might proceed to consider the whole range of the human faculties, and find for the most of them ample scope for exercise in mathematical studies. Certainly, the memory will not be found to be neglected. The very first steps in number—counting, the multiplication table, etc., make heavy demands on this power; while the higher branches require the memorizing of formulas which are simply appalling to the uninitiated. So the imagination, the creative faculty of the mind, has constant exercise in all original mathematical investigations, from the solution of the simplest problems to the discovery of the most recondite principle; for it is not by sure, consecutive steps, as many suppose, that we advance from the known to the unknown. The imagination, not the logical faculty, leads in this advance. In fact, practical observation is often in advance of logical exposition. Thus, in the discovery of truth, the imagination habitually presents hypotheses, and observation supplies facts, which it may require ages for the tardy reason to connect logically with the known. Of this truth, mathematics, as well as all other sciences, affords abundant illustrations. So remarkably true is this, that today it is seriously questioned by the majority of thinkers, whether the sublimest branch of mathematics,—the infinitesimal calculus—has anything more than an empirical foundation, mathematicians themselves not being agreed as to its logical basis. That the imagination, and not the logical faculty, leads in all original investigation, no one who has ever succeeded in producing an original demonstration of one of the simpler propositions of geometry, can have any doubt. Nor are induction, analogy, the scrutinization of premises or the search for them, or the balancing of probabilities, spheres of mental operations foreign to mathematics. No one, indeed, can claim preeminence for mathematical studies in all these departments of intellectual culture, but it may, perhaps, be claimed that scarcely any department of science affords discipline to so great a number of faculties, and that none presents so complete a gradation in the exercise of these faculties, from the first principles of the science to the farthest extent of its applications, as mathematics.
In 'Mathematics', in Henry Kiddle and Alexander J. Schem, The Cyclopedia of Education, (1877.) As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 27-29.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Act (272)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Arise (158)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attention (190)  |  Auxiliary (11)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Build (204)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Child (307)  |  Claim (146)  |  Class (164)  |  Common (436)  |  Complete (204)  |  Auguste Comte (21)  |  Conception (154)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constant (144)  |  Count (105)  |  Counting (26)  |  Creative (137)  |  Culture (143)  |  Curve (49)  |  Demand (123)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Department (92)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Essential (199)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Induction (77)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Infinitesimal Calculus (2)  |  Inspection (7)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Logic (287)  |  Majority (66)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memorize (4)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiplication Table (16)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  New (1216)  |  Notice (77)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perception (97)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Preeminence (3)  |  Premise (37)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Push (62)  |  Question (621)  |  Range (99)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Recondite (8)  |  Representation (53)  |  Require (219)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scope (45)  |  Scrutinize (7)  |  Search (162)  |  Series (149)  |  Simple (406)  |  Solution (267)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Step (231)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Suppose (156)  |  System (537)  |  Table (104)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Today (314)  |  Triangle (18)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Verge (10)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Writer (86)

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Better (486)  |  Blue (56)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Character (243)  |  Cherish (22)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Deal (188)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Distant (33)  |  Dot (16)  |  Experience (467)  |  Folly (43)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humble (50)  |  Image (96)  |  Kindly (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  More (2559)  |  Pale (9)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Tiny (72)  |  World (1774)

It has long been known that one horse can run faster than another—but which one? Differences are crucial.
In 'From the Notebooks of Lazarus Long', Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 257.
Science quotes on:  |  Crucial (9)  |  Difference (337)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Horse (74)  |  Long (790)  |  Run (174)

It has occurred to me that possibly the white corpuscles may have the office of picking up and digesting bacterial organisms when by any means they find their way into the blood. The propensity exhibited by the leukocytes for picking up inorganic granules is well known, and that they may be able not only to pick up but to assimilate, and so dispose of, the bacteria which come in their way does not seem to me very improbable in view of the fact that amoebae, which resemble them so closely, feed upon bacteria and similar organisms.
'A Contribution to the Study of the Bacterial Organisms Commonly Found Upon Exposed Mucous Surfaces and in the Alimentary Canal of Healthy Individuals', Studies from the Biological Laboratory (1883), 2, 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Blood (134)  |  Corpuscle (13)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Disposal (5)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Find (998)  |  Granule (3)  |  Improbability (11)  |  Inorganic (13)  |  Leukocyte (2)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Office (71)  |  Organism (220)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Propensity (9)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Resemble (63)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  White (127)

It is admitted by all that a finished or even a competent reasoner is not the work of nature alone; the experience of every day makes it evident that education develops faculties which would otherwise never have manifested their existence. It is, therefore, as necessary to learn to reason before we can expect to be able to reason, as it is to learn to swim or fence, in order to attain either of those arts. Now, something must be reasoned upon, it matters not much what it is, provided it can be reasoned upon with certainty. The properties of mind or matter, or the study of languages, mathematics, or natural history, may be chosen for this purpose. Now of all these, it is desirable to choose the one which admits of the reasoning being verified, that is, in which we can find out by other means, such as measurement and ocular demonstration of all sorts, whether the results are true or not. When the guiding property of the loadstone was first ascertained, and it was necessary to learn how to use this new discovery, and to find out how far it might be relied on, it would have been thought advisable to make many passages between ports that were well known before attempting a voyage of discovery. So it is with our reasoning faculties: it is desirable that their powers should be exerted upon objects of such a nature, that we can tell by other means whether the results which we obtain are true or false, and this before it is safe to trust entirely to reason. Now the mathematics are peculiarly well adapted for this purpose, on the following grounds:
1. Every term is distinctly explained, and has but one meaning, and it is rarely that two words are employed to mean the same thing.
2. The first principles are self-evident, and, though derived from observation, do not require more of it than has been made by children in general.
3. The demonstration is strictly logical, taking nothing for granted except self-evident first principles, resting nothing upon probability, and entirely independent of authority and opinion.
4. When the conclusion is obtained by reasoning, its truth or falsehood can be ascertained, in geometry by actual measurement, in algebra by common arithmetical calculation. This gives confidence, and is absolutely necessary, if, as was said before, reason is not to be the instructor, but the pupil.
5. There are no words whose meanings are so much alike that the ideas which they stand for may be confounded. Between the meaning of terms there is no distinction, except a total distinction, and all adjectives and adverbs expressing difference of degrees are avoided.
In On the Study and Difficulties of Mathematics (1898), chap. 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Actual (117)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adjective (2)  |  Admit (45)  |  Adverb (2)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arithmetical (11)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Authority (95)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Choose (112)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Common (436)  |  Competent (20)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Confound (21)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Derive (65)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Develop (268)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Employ (113)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Evident (91)  |  Exert (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experience (467)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Faculty (72)  |  False (100)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Far (154)  |  Fence (11)  |  Find (998)  |  Find Out (21)  |  Finish (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  General (511)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Grant (73)  |  Ground (217)  |  Guide (97)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Independent (67)  |  Instructor (5)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Ocular (3)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Peculiarly (4)  |  Port (2)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Probability (130)  |  Property (168)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rarely (21)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rely (11)  |  Require (219)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Safe (54)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Evident (21)  |  Something (719)  |  Sort (49)  |  Stand (274)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Study (653)  |  Swim (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Total (94)  |  True (212)  |  Trust (66)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Verify (23)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

It is another aphorism that no one knows everything about anything. That need not dull the pleasure and fascination of the fact that a great deal is known about some things.
In Splendid Isolation (1980), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Aphorism (21)  |  Deal (188)  |  Dull (54)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Thing (1915)

It is better to have a few forms well known than to teach a little about many hundred species. Better a dozen specimens thoroughly studied as the result of the first year’s work, than to have two thousand dollars’ worth of shells and corals bought from a curiosity-shop. The dozen animals would be your own.
Lecture at a teaching laboratory on Penikese Island, Buzzard's Bay. Quoted from the lecture notes by David Starr Jordan, Science Sketches (1911), 147.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Animal (617)  |  Better (486)  |  Buy (20)  |  Coral (10)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Dozen (10)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Result (677)  |  Shell (63)  |  Shop (11)  |  Species (401)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)  |  Year (933)

It is evident, therefore, that one of the most fundamental problems of psychology is that of investigating the laws of mental growth. When these laws are known, the door of the future will in a measure be opened; determination of the child's present status will enable us to forecast what manner of adult he will become.
In The Intelligence of School Children: How Children Differ in Ability, the Use of Mental Tests in School Grading and the Proper Education of Exceptional Children (1919), 136
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adult (19)  |  Become (815)  |  Child (307)  |  Determination (78)  |  Door (93)  |  Enable (119)  |  Evident (91)  |  Forecast (13)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Future (429)  |  Growth (187)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Law (894)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mental (177)  |  Most (1731)  |  Open (274)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Status (35)  |  Will (2355)

It is for such inquiries the modern naturalist collects his materials; it is for this that he still wants to add to the apparently boundless treasures of our national museums, and will never rest satisfied as long as the native country, the geographical distribution, and the amount of variation of any living thing remains imperfectly known. He looks upon every species of animal and plant now living as the individual letters which go to make up one of the volumes of our earth’s history; and, as a few lost letters may make a sentence unintelligible, so the extinction of the numerous forms of life which the progress of cultivation invariably entails will necessarily render obscure this invaluable record of the past. It is, therefore, an important object, which governments and scientific institutions should immediately take steps to secure, that in all tropical countries colonised by Europeans the most perfect collections possible in every branch of natural history should be made and deposited in national museums, where they may be available for study and interpretation. If this is not done, future ages will certainly look back upon us as a people so immersed in the pursuit of wealth as to be blind to higher considerations. They will charge us with having culpably allowed the destruction of some of those records of Creation which we had it in our power to preserve; and while professing to regard every living thing as the direct handiwork and best evidence of a Creator, yet, with a strange inconsistency, seeing many of them perish irrecoverably from the face of the earth, uncared for and unknown.
In 'On the Physical Geography of the Malay Archipelago', Journal of the Royal Geographical Society (1863), 33, 234.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Add (40)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Allowed (3)  |  Amount (151)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparently (20)  |  Available (78)  |  Back (390)  |  Best (459)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Branch (150)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Charge (59)  |  Collect (16)  |  Collection (64)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Country (251)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Earth (996)  |  Entail (4)  |  European (5)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Face (212)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Geographical (6)  |  Government (110)  |  Handiwork (6)  |  Higher (37)  |  History (673)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Imperfectly (2)  |  Important (209)  |  Inconsistency (4)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Institution (69)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Invaluable (11)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Lost (34)  |  Made (14)  |  Material (353)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Museum (31)  |  National (26)  |  Native (38)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Never (1087)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Object (422)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Past (337)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perish (50)  |  Person (363)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Professing (2)  |  Progress (465)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Record (154)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Render (93)  |  Rest (280)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Secure (22)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sentence (29)  |  Species (401)  |  Step (231)  |  Still (613)  |  Strange (157)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Tropical (8)  |  Unintelligible (15)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Variation (90)  |  Volume (19)  |  Want (497)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Will (2355)

It is high time that laymen abandoned the misleading belief that scientific enquiry is a cold dispassionate enterprise, bleached of imaginative qualities, and that a scientist is a man who turns the handle of discovery; for at every level of endeavour scientific research is a passionate undertaking and the Promotion of Natural Knowledge depends above all on a sortee into what can be imagined but is not yet known.
The Times Literary Supplement (London), 1963 October 25 (p. 850)
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bleach (3)  |  Cold (112)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dispassionate (8)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Layman (21)  |  Level (67)  |  Man (2251)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Natural (796)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Promotion (7)  |  Quality (135)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)

It is imperative in the design process to have a full and complete understanding of how failure is being obviated in order to achieve success. Without fully appreciating how close to failing a new design is, its own designer may not fully understand how and why a design works. A new design may prove to be successful because it has a sufficiently large factor of safety (which, of course, has often rightly been called a “factor of ignorance”), but a design's true factor of safety can never be known if the ultimate failure mode is unknown. Thus the design that succeeds (ie, does not fail) can actually provide less reliable information about how or how not to extrapolate from that design than one that fails. It is this observation that has long motivated reflective designers to study failures even more assiduously than successes.
In Design Paradigms: Case Histories of Error and Judgment in Engineering (1994), 31. books.google.comHenry Petroski - 1994
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Complete (204)  |  Course (409)  |  Design (195)  |  Extrapolation (6)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Imperative (15)  |  Information (166)  |  Large (394)  |  Long (790)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Motivated (14)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Reliability (17)  |  Safety (54)  |  Study (653)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

It is important that students bring a certain ragamuffin, barefoot irreverence to their studies; they are not here to worship what is known, but to question it.
The Ascent of Man (1973), 360.
Science quotes on:  |  Barefoot (2)  |  Certain (550)  |  Importance (286)  |  Irreverence (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Question (621)  |  Ragamuffin (2)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Worship (32)

It is interesting to observe the result of habit in the peculiar shape and size of the giraffe (Camelo-pardalis): this animal, the largest of the mammals, is known to live in the interior of Africa in places where the soil is nearly always arid and barren, so that it is obliged to browse on the leaves on the trees and to make constant efforts to reach them. From this habit long maintained in all its race, it has resulted that the animal's fore-legs have become longer than its hind legs, and that its neck is lengthened to such a degree that the giraffe, without standing up on its hind legs, attains a height of six metres (nearly 20 feet).
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 256, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 122.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Africa (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arid (6)  |  Attain (125)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Constant (144)  |  Degree (276)  |  Effort (227)  |  Giraffe (4)  |  Habit (168)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Interior (32)  |  Largest (39)  |  Leg (34)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Neck (15)  |  Observe (168)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Soil (86)  |  Tree (246)

It is known that knowledge is power, and power is energy, and energy is matter, and matter is mass, and therefore large accumulations of knowledge distort time and space.
In Terry Pratchett, Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen, The Science of Discworld (2014), 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Distort (22)  |  Energy (344)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Power (746)  |  Space (500)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)

It is known that the mathematics prescribed for the high school [Gymnasien] is essentially Euclidean, while it is modern mathematics, the theory of functions and the infinitesimal calculus, which has secured for us an insight into the mechanism and laws of nature. Euclidean mathematics is indeed, a prerequisite for the theory of functions, but just as one, though he has learned the inflections of Latin nouns and verbs, will not thereby be enabled to read a Latin author much less to appreciate the beauties of a Horace, so Euclidean mathematics, that is the mathematics of the high school, is unable to unlock nature and her laws.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 37-38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Author (167)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Enable (119)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Function (228)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Horace (12)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Inflection (3)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Latin (38)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Less (103)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noun (3)  |  Prerequisite (9)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Read (287)  |  School (219)  |  Secure (22)  |  Secured (18)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unable (24)  |  Unlock (10)  |  Will (2355)

It is known that there are an infinite number of worlds, simply because there is an infinite amount of space for them to be in. However, not every one of them is inhabited. Therefore, there must be a finite number of inhabited worlds. Any finite number divided by infinity is as near to nothing as makes no odds, so the average population of all the planets in the Universe can be said to be zero. From this it follows that the population of the whole Universe is also zero, and that any people you may meet from time to time are merely the products of a deranged imagination.
In The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (1980, 2005), 142-143. Slightly revised from 'Fit the Fifth', The Original Hitchhiker Radio Scripts (1985), 102. The show was recorded for the BBC on 21 Feb 1978.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Average (82)  |  Deranged (3)  |  Divided (50)  |  Division (65)  |  Finite (59)  |  Follow (378)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Meet (31)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Population (110)  |  Product (160)  |  Space (500)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)  |  Zero (37)

It is not surprising, in view of the polydynamic constitution of the genuinely mathematical mind, that many of the major heros of the science, men like Desargues and Pascal, Descartes and Leibnitz, Newton, Gauss and Bolzano, Helmholtz and Clifford, Riemann and Salmon and Plücker and Poincaré, have attained to high distinction in other fields not only of science but of philosophy and letters too. And when we reflect that the very greatest mathematical achievements have been due, not alone to the peering, microscopic, histologic vision of men like Weierstrass, illuminating the hidden recesses, the minute and intimate structure of logical reality, but to the larger vision also of men like Klein who survey the kingdoms of geometry and analysis for the endless variety of things that flourish there, as the eye of Darwin ranged over the flora and fauna of the world, or as a commercial monarch contemplates its industry, or as a statesman beholds an empire; when we reflect not only that the Calculus of Probability is a creation of mathematics but that the master mathematician is constantly required to exercise judgment—judgment, that is, in matters not admitting of certainty—balancing probabilities not yet reduced nor even reducible perhaps to calculation; when we reflect that he is called upon to exercise a function analogous to that of the comparative anatomist like Cuvier, comparing theories and doctrines of every degree of similarity and dissimilarity of structure; when, finally, we reflect that he seldom deals with a single idea at a tune, but is for the most part engaged in wielding organized hosts of them, as a general wields at once the division of an army or as a great civil administrator directs from his central office diverse and scattered but related groups of interests and operations; then, I say, the current opinion that devotion to mathematics unfits the devotee for practical affairs should be known for false on a priori grounds. And one should be thus prepared to find that as a fact Gaspard Monge, creator of descriptive geometry, author of the classic Applications de l’analyse à la géométrie; Lazare Carnot, author of the celebrated works, Géométrie de position, and Réflections sur la Métaphysique du Calcul infinitesimal; Fourier, immortal creator of the Théorie analytique de la chaleur; Arago, rightful inheritor of Monge’s chair of geometry; Poncelet, creator of pure projective geometry; one should not be surprised, I say, to find that these and other mathematicians in a land sagacious enough to invoke their aid, rendered, alike in peace and in war, eminent public service.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 32-33.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  A Priori (26)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Administrator (11)  |  Admit (45)  |  Affair (29)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Application (242)  |  François Arago (14)  |  Army (33)  |  Attain (125)  |  Author (167)  |  Balance (77)  |  Behold (18)  |  Bernhard Bolzano (2)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Lazare-Nicolas-Marguerite Carnot (4)  |  Celebrated (2)  |  Central (80)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chair (24)  |  Civil (26)  |  Classic (11)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Compare (69)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Current (118)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Division (65)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Due (141)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Empire (14)  |  Endless (56)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enough (340)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  False (100)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Field (364)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Flora (9)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Function (228)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  General (511)  |  Genuinely (4)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ground (217)  |  Group (78)  |  Hero (42)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Histology (3)  |  Host (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Industry (137)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Inheritor (2)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Felix Klein (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Land (115)  |  Large (394)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Major (84)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Gaspard Monge (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Office (71)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Peace (108)  |  Peer (12)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Henri Poincaré (96)  |  Jean-Victor Poncelet (2)  |  Position (77)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Probability (130)  |  Projective Geometry (3)  |  Public Service (5)  |  Pure (291)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Recess (8)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reducible (2)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Relate (21)  |  Render (93)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Rightful (3)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Service (110)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Single (353)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Survey (33)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tune (19)  |  Unfit (12)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (123)  |  War (225)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Wield (10)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

It is only the unimaginative who ever invents. The true artist is known by the use he makes of what he annexes, and he annexes everything
'Olivia at the Lyceum', Dramatic Review (30 May 1885). In Reviews (1908), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (90)  |  Everything (476)  |  Invention (369)  |  Use (766)

It is rigid dogma that destroys truth; and, please notice, my emphasis is not on the dogma, but on the rigidity. When men say of any question, “This is all there is to be known or said of the subject; investigation ends here,” that is death. It may be that the mischief comes not from the thinker but for the use made of his thinking by late-comers. Aristotle, for example, gave us our scientific technique … yet his logical propositions, his instruction in sound reasoning which was bequeathed to Europe, are valid only within the limited framework of formal logic, and, as used in Europe, they stultified the minds of whole generations of mediaeval Schoolmen. Aristotle invented science, but destroyed philosophy.
Dialogues of Alfred North Whitehead, as recorded by Lucien Price (1954, 2001), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Death (388)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Dogma (48)  |  End (590)  |  Framework (31)  |  Generation (242)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Late (118)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mischief (13)  |  Notice (77)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Please (65)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Rigidity (5)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Sound (183)  |  Subject (521)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)

It is the unknown that excites the ardor of scholars, who, in the known alone, would shrivel up with boredom.
John Mitchinson and John Lloyd, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?: Smart Quotes for Dumb Times (2009), 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Ardor (5)  |  Boredom (11)  |  Excite (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Shrivel (2)  |  Unknown (182)

It is true that Fourier had the opinion that the principal end of mathematics was public utility and the explanation of natural phenomena; but a philosopher as he is should have known that the unique end of science is the honor of the human mind and that from this point of view a question of [the theory of] number is as important as a question of the system of the world.
From letter to Legendre, translation as given in F.R. Moulton, 'The Influence of Astronomy on Mathematics', Science (10 Mar 1911), N.S. Vol. 33, No. 845, 359. A different translation begins, “It is true that M. Fourier believed…” on the Karl Jacobi Quotes web page on this site.
Science quotes on:  |  End (590)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Honor (54)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Important (209)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Of View (80)  |  Principal (63)  |  Public (96)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Unique (67)  |  Utility (49)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)

It is true that M. Fourier believed that the main aim of mathematics was public utility and the explanation of natural phenomena; but a philosopher of his ability ought to have known that the sole aim of science is the honour of the human intellect, and that on this ground a problem in numbers is as important as a problem on the system of the world.
In Letter to Legendre, as quoted in an Address by Emile Picard to the Congress of Science and Art, St. Louis (22 Sep 1904), translated in 'Development of Mathematical Analysis', The Mathematical Gazette (Jul 1905), 3, No. 52, 200. A different translation begins, “It is true that Fourier had the opinion…” on the Karl Jacobi Quotes web page on this site.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Aim (165)  |  End (590)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Fourier (5)  |  Ground (217)  |  Honor (54)  |  Honour (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Natural (796)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Principal (63)  |  Problem (676)  |  Public (96)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sole (49)  |  System (537)  |  Title (18)  |  True (212)  |  Utility (49)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

It is well known that the man who first made public the theory of irrationals perished in a shipwreck in order that the inexpressible and unimaginable should ever remain veiled. And so the guilty man, who fortuitously touched on and revealed this aspect of living things, was taken to the place where he began and there is for ever beaten by the waves.
Proclus
In scholium to Book X of Euclid t. V, 417 as quoted and cited in Ettore Carruccio and Isabel Quigly (trans.), Mathematics And Logic in History And in Contemporary Thought (1964), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (124)  |  Beat (41)  |  Begin (260)  |  First (1283)  |  Fortuitous (11)  |  Guilty (9)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Know (1518)  |  Living (491)  |  Living Thing (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Order (632)  |  Perish (50)  |  Place (177)  |  Public (96)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Shipwreck (7)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (141)  |  Unimaginable (7)  |  Veil (26)  |  Wave (107)

It is well known that theoretical physicists cannot handle experimental equipment; it breaks whenever they touch it. Pauli was such a good theoretical physicist that something usually broke in the lab whenever he merely stepped across the threshold. A mysterious event that did not seem at first to be connected with Pauli's presence once occurred in Professor J. Franck's laboratory in Göttingen. Early one afternoon, without apparent cause, a complicated apparatus for the study of atomic phenomena collapsed. Franck wrote humorously about this to Pauli at his Zürich address and, after some delay, received an answer in an envelope with a Danish stamp. Pauli wrote that he had gone to visit Bohr and at the time of the mishap in Franck's laboratory his train was stopped for a few minutes at the Göttingen railroad station. You may believe this anecdote or not, but there are many other observations concerning the reality of the Pauli Effect!
From Thirty Years That Shook Physics: The Story of Quantum Theory (1966), 64. Note the so-called Pauli Effect is merely anecdotal to provide humor about supposed parapsychology phenomena in coincidences involving Pauli; it should not be confused with scientifically significant Pauli Exclusion Principle.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belief (578)  |  Break (99)  |  Cause (541)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Delay (20)  |  Early (185)  |  Effect (393)  |  Envelope (6)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  First (1283)  |  James Franck (2)  |  Good (889)  |  Handle (28)  |  Humor (8)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Merely (316)  |  Minute (125)  |  Mishap (2)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Wolfgang Pauli (16)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Presence (63)  |  Professor (128)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Reality (261)  |  Something (719)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Station (29)  |  Step (231)  |  Stopped (3)  |  Study (653)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Train (114)  |  Usually (176)  |  Visit (26)  |  Whenever (81)

It is well known, that on the Ohio, and in many parts of America further north, tusks, grinders, and skeletons of unparalleled magnitude are found in great numbers, some lying on the surface of the earth, and some a little below it ... But to whatever animal we ascribe these remains, it is certain that such a one has existed in America, and that it has been the largest of all terrestrial beings.
Notes on the State of Virginia (1782), 71, 77.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Certain (550)  |  Earth (996)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Exist (443)  |  Great (1574)  |  Largest (39)  |  Little (707)  |  Lying (55)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  Number (699)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Remain (349)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Whatever (234)

It is well-known that both rude and civilized peoples are capable of showing unspeakable, and as it is erroneously termed, inhuman cruelty towards each other. These acts of cruelty, murder and rapine are often the result of the inexorable logic of national characteristics, and are unhappily truly human, since nothing like them can be traced in the animal world. It would, for instance, be a grave mistake to compare a tiger with the bloodthirsty exectioner of the Reign of Terror, since the former only satisfies his natural appetite in preying on other mammals. The atrocities of the trials for witchcraft, the indiscriminate slaughter committed by the negroes on the coast of Guinea, the sacrifice of human victims made by the Khonds, the dismemberment of living men by the Battas, find no parallel in the habits of animals in their savage state. And such a comparision is, above all, impossible in the case of anthropoids, which display no hostility towards men or other animals unless they are first attacked. In this respect the anthropid ape stands on a higher plane than many men.
Robert Hartmann, Anthropoid Apes, 294-295.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Anthropoid (9)  |  Ape (53)  |  Appetite (17)  |  Attack (84)  |  Both (493)  |  Capable (168)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Compare (69)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Display (56)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Grave (52)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inexorable (10)  |  Living (491)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parallel (43)  |  People (1005)  |  Reign (23)  |  Respect (207)  |  Result (677)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Stand (274)  |  State (491)  |  Term (349)  |  Terror (30)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truly (116)  |  Victim (35)  |  Witchcraft (6)  |  World (1774)

It is well-known that those who have charge of young infants, that it is difficult to feel sure when certain movements about their mouths are really expressive; that is when they really smile. Hence I carefully watched my own infants. One of them at the age of forty-five days, and being in a happy frame of mind, smiled... I observed the same thing on the following day: but on the third day the child was not quite well and there was no trace of a smile, and this renders it probable that the previous smiles were real.
The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Being (1278)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Certain (550)  |  Charge (59)  |  Child (307)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Expressive (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Frame Of Mind (3)  |  Happy (105)  |  Infant (26)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Movement (155)  |  Observed (149)  |  Render (93)  |  Smile (31)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)  |  Watch (109)  |  Young (227)

It may be observed of mathematicians that they only meddle with such things as are certain, passing by those that are doubtful and unknown. They profess not to know all things, neither do they affect to speak of all things. What they know to be true, and can make good by invincible arguments, that they publish and insert among their theorems. Of other things they are silent and pass no judgment at all, chusing [choosing] rather to acknowledge their ignorance, than affirm anything rashly. They affirm nothing among their arguments or assertions which is not most manifestly known and examined with utmost rigour, rejecting all probable conjectures and little witticisms. They submit nothing to authority, indulge no affection, detest subterfuges of words, and declare their sentiments, as in a Court of Judicature [Justice], without passion, without apology; knowing that their reasons, as Seneca testifies of them, are not brought to persuade, but to compel.
Mathematical Lectures (1734), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Affection (43)  |  Affirm (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Apology (7)  |  Argument (138)  |  Authority (95)  |  Certain (550)  |  Choose (112)  |  Compel (30)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Court (33)  |  Declare (45)  |  Detest (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Good (889)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Indulge (14)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Justice (39)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Manifestly (11)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Meddle (3)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Passion (114)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Probable (20)  |  Profess (20)  |  Publish (36)  |  Rashly (2)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rigour (21)  |  Lucius Annaeus Seneca (20)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Silent (29)  |  Speak (232)  |  Submit (18)  |  Testify (5)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Witticism (2)  |  Word (619)

It must be gently but firmly pointed out that analogy is the very corner-stone of scientific method. A root-and-branch condemnation would invalidate any attempt to explain the unknown in terms of the known, and thus prune away every hypothesis.
In 'On Analogy', The Cambridge Magazine (2 Mar 1918), 476. As quoted in Robert Scott Root-Bernstein and Michèle Root-Bernstein, Sparks of Genius: The Thirteen Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative (2001), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Analogy (71)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Branch (150)  |  Condemnation (15)  |  Corner (57)  |  Cornerstone (6)  |  Explain (322)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Know (1518)  |  Method (505)  |  Must (1526)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Out (8)  |  Prune (7)  |  Root (120)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Stone (162)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Unknown (182)

It surely can be no offence to state, that the progress of science has led to new views, and that the consequences that can be deduced from the knowledge of a hundred facts may be very different from those deducible from five. It is also possible that the facts first known may be the exceptions to a rule and not the rule itself, and generalisations from these first-known facts, though useful at the time, may be highly mischievous, and impede the progress of the science if retained when it has made some advance.
Sections and Views Illustrative of Geological Phenomena (1830), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Different (577)  |  Exception (73)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mischievous (11)  |  New (1216)  |  Possible (552)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Retain (56)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  State (491)  |  Surely (101)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Useful (250)  |  View (488)

It was noted long ago that the front row of burlesque houses was occupied predominantly by bald-headed men. In fact, such a row became known as the bald-headed row. It might be assumed from this on statistical evidence that the continued close observation of chorus girls in tights caused loss of hair from the top of the head.
[Disputing a statistical study for the American Cancer Society showing smoking to be a cancer causative.]
In Bess Furman, '2 Cite Extraction of Cigarette Tar', New York Times (26 Jul 1957), 21. The article reported on testimony before the Legal and Monetary Affairs Subcommittee of the House Government Operations Committee.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (92)  |  Burlesque (2)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Chorus (6)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Front (16)  |  Girl (37)  |  Hair (25)  |  Head (81)  |  House (140)  |  Long (790)  |  Loss (110)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Predominantly (4)  |  Row (9)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Society (326)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Study (653)  |  Top (96)

It... [can] be easily shown:
1. That all present mountains did not exist from the beginning of things.
2. That there is no growing of mountains.
3. That the rocks or mountains have nothing in common with the bones of animals except a certain resemblance in hardness, since they agree in neither matter nor manner of production, nor in composition, nor in function, if one may be permitted to affirm aught about a subject otherwise so little known as are the functions of things.
4. That the extension of crests of mountains, or chains, as some prefer to call them, along the lines of certain definite zones of the earth, accords with neither reason nor experience.
5. That mountains can be overthrown, and fields carried over from one side of a high road across to the other; that peaks of mountains can be raised and lowered, that the earth can be opened and closed again, and that other things of this kind occur which those who in their reading of history wish to escape the name of credulous, consider myths.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 232-4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aught (6)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bone (95)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Closed (38)  |  Common (436)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consider (416)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Definite (110)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extension (59)  |  Field (364)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Function (228)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Kind (557)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Myth (56)  |  Name (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrown (8)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reason (744)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Rock (161)  |  Side (233)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wish (212)

I’ve known a lot of famous scientists. But the only one I thought was really a genius was McClintock.
Quoted in Evelyn Fox Keller, A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock (1984), 50
Science quotes on:  |  Genius (284)  |  Lot (151)  |  Barbara McClintock (15)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thought (953)

Judging from our experience upon this planet, such a history, that begins with elementary particles, leads perhaps inevitably toward a strange and moving end: a creature that knows, a science-making animal, that turns back upon the process that generated him and attempts to understand it. Without his like, the universe could be, but not be known, and this is a poor thing. Surely this is a great part of our dignity as men, that we can know, and that through us matter can know itself; that beginning with protons and electrons, out of the womb of time and the vastnesses of space, we can begin to understand; that organized as in us, the hydrogen, the carbon, the nitrogen, the oxygen, those 16-21 elements, the water, the sunlight—all having become us, can begin to understand what they are, and how they came to be.
In 'The Origins of Life', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1964), 52, 609-110.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Electron (93)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  End (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moving (11)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Organized (9)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Particle (194)  |  Planet (356)  |  Poor (136)  |  Process (423)  |  Proton (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vastness (15)  |  Water (481)  |  Womb (24)

Just as the arts of tanning and dyeing were practiced long before the scientific principles upon which they depend were known, so also the practice of Chemical Engineering preceded any analysis or exposition of the principles upon which such practice is based.
In William H. Walker, Warren K. Lewis and William H. MacAdams, The Principles of Chemical Engineering (1923), Preface to 1st. edition, v.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Art (657)  |  Base (117)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Engineering (4)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dyeing (2)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  Practice (204)  |  Precede (23)  |  Principle (507)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Tanning (3)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (100)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Declare (45)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (65)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Error (321)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Join (26)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (607)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (790)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rise (166)  |  Run (174)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Step (231)  |  Succession (77)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Therefrom (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  True (212)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Vary (27)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whereby (2)  |  Why (491)

Littlewood, on Hardy’s own estimate, is the finest mathematician he has ever known. He was the man most likely to storm and smash a really deep and formidable problem; there was no one else who could command such a combination of insight, technique and power.
(1943). In Béla Bollobás, Littlewood's Miscellany (1986), Foreward, 22.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Biography (240)  |  Combination (144)  |  Command (58)  |  Deep (233)  |  Estimate (57)  |  G. H. Hardy (71)  |  Insight (102)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Most (1731)  |  Power (746)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proof (287)  |  Smash (4)  |  Storm (51)  |  Technique (80)

Mainstream biology may be suffering from what I call 'Physics envy' in aiming to reduce life to nothing but well known, typically Newtonian principles of physics and chemistry.
'From the Editor's Desk', Frontier Perspectives (1991), 2, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  Biology (216)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Envy (15)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mainstream (3)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Suffering (67)

Man carries the world in his head, the whole astronomy and chemistry suspended in a thought. Because the history of nature is charactered in his brain, therefore he is the prophet and discoverer of her secrets. Every known fact in natural science was divined by the presentiment of somebody, before it was actually verified.
Essay, 'Nature', in Ralph Waldo Emerson, Alfred Riggs Ferguson (ed.) and Jean Ferguson Carr (ed.), The Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume III, Essays: Second Series (1984), 106-107.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Brain (270)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Fact (1210)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Presentiment (2)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Secret (194)  |  Thought (953)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Mathematics … certainly would never have come into existence if mankind had known from the beginning that in all nature there is no perfectly straight line, no true circle, no standard of measurement.
From 'Of the First and Last Things', All Too Human: A Book For Free Spirits (1878, 1908), Part 1, section 11, 31.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Circle (110)  |  Existence (456)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Line (91)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Standard (57)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  True (212)

Mathematics, the science of the ideal, becomes the means of investigating, understanding and making known the world of the real. The complex is expressed in terms of the simple. From one point of view mathematics may be defined as the science of successive substitutions of simpler concepts for more complex.