Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Misleading

Misleading Quotes (21 quotes)

Access to more information isn’t enough—the information needs to be correct, timely, and presented in a manner that enables the reader to learn from it. The current network is full of inaccurate, misleading, and biased information that often crowds out the valid information. People have not learned that “popular” or “available” information is not necessarily valid.
Response to the Pew Research Center survey question, “Is Google making us stupid?” Posted 19 Feb 2010 on page 'Future of the Internet IV' at pewinternet.org website.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  Available (78)  |  Bias (20)  |  Correct (86)  |  Current (118)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enough (340)  |  Full (66)  |  Google (4)  |  Inaccurate (4)  |  Information (166)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Manner (58)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Need (290)  |  Network (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Popular (29)  |  Present (619)  |  Reader (40)  |  Timely (3)  |  Valid (11)

An educated person is one who has learned that information almost always turns out to be at best incomplete and very often false, misleading, fictitious, mendacious—just dead wrong.
'Sunday Observer: Terminal Education', New York Times Magazine (9 Nov 1980), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Education (378)  |  False (100)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Information (166)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mendacious (2)  |  Person (363)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wrong (234)

I am more and more convinced that the ant colony is not so much composed of separate individuals as that the colony is a sort of individual, and each ant like a loose cell in it. Our own blood stream, for instance, contains hosts of white corpuscles which differ little from free-swimming amoebae. When bacteria invade the blood stream, the white corpuscles, like the ants defending the nest, are drawn mechanically to the infected spot, and will die defending the human cell colony. I admit that the comparison is imperfect, but the attempt to liken the individual human warrior to the individual ant in battle is even more inaccurate and misleading. The colony of ants with its component numbers stands half way, as a mechanical, intuitive, and psychical phenomenon, between our bodies as a collection of cells with separate functions and our armies made up of obedient privates. Until one learns both to deny real individual initiative to the single ant, and at the same time to divorce one's mind from the persuasion that the colony has a headquarters which directs activity … one can make nothing but pretty fallacies out of the polity of the ant heap.
In An Almanac for Moderns (1935), 121
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Amoeba (20)  |  Ant (28)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Blood (134)  |  Both (493)  |  Cell (138)  |  Collection (64)  |  Colony (8)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Component (48)  |  Corpuscle (13)  |  Deny (66)  |  Differ (85)  |  Direct (225)  |  Divorce (6)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Free (232)  |  Function (228)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Individual (404)  |  Initiative (17)  |  Learn (629)  |  Little (707)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nest (23)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Obedient (9)  |  Persuasion (8)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Polity (2)  |  Private (23)  |  Separate (143)  |  Single (353)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stream (81)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Way (1217)  |  White (127)  |  Will (2355)

I argued that it was important not to place too much reliance on any single piece of experimental evidence. It might turn out to be misleading, as the 5.1 Å reflection undoubtedly was. Jim was a little more brash, stating that no good model ever accounted for all the facts, since some data was bound to be misleading if not plain wrong. A theory that did fit all the data would have been “carpentered” to do so and would thus be open to suspicion.
In What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 59-60.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Bound (119)  |  Carpenter (2)  |  Data (156)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fit (134)  |  Good (889)  |  Important (209)  |  Little (707)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Open (274)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Reliance (10)  |  Single (353)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Theory (970)  |  Turn (447)  |  James Watson (33)  |  Wrong (234)

I have just received copies of “To-day” containing criticisms of my letter. I am in no way surprised to find that these criticisms are not only unfair and misleading in the extreme. They are misleading in so far that anyone reading them would be led to believe the exact opposite of the truth. It is quite possible that I, an old and trained engineer and chronic experimenter, should put an undue value upon truth; but it is common to all scientific men. As nothing but the truth is of any value to them, they naturally dislike things that are not true. ... While my training has, perhaps, warped my mind so that I put an undue value upon truth, their training has been such as to cause them to abhor exact truth and logic.
[Replying to criticism by Colonel Acklom and other religious parties attacking Maxim's earlier contribution to the controversy about the modern position of Christianity.]
In G.K. Chesterton, 'The Maxims of Maxim', Daily News (25 Feb 1905). Collected in G. K. Chesterton and Dale Ahlquist (ed.), In Defense of Sanity: The Best Essays of G.K. Chesterton (2011), 86.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abhorrence (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chronic (5)  |  Common (436)  |  Content (69)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Copy (33)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Dislike (15)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Find (998)  |  Leading (17)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old (481)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reading (133)  |  Receive (114)  |  Religious (126)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undue (4)  |  Unfair (8)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)

Imagination and even sentiment play an important part in chemistry, and that if too narrowly and rigidly interpreted, facts may become very misleading factors.
In article 'Chemistry', Encyclopedia Britannica (1902), 714.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Factor (46)  |  Facts (553)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Important (209)  |  Narrowly (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Rigidly (4)  |  Sentiment (14)

In no subject is there a rule, compliance with which will lead to new knowledge or better understanding. Skilful observations, ingenious ideas, cunning tricks, daring suggestions, laborious calculations, all these may be required to advance a subject. Occasionally the conventional approach in a subject has to be studiously followed; on other occasions it has to be ruthlessly disregarded. Which of these methods, or in what order they should be employed is generally unpredictable. Analogies drawn from the history of science are frequently claimed to be a guide; but, as with forecasting the next game of roulette, the existence of the best analogy to the present is no guide whatever to the future. The most valuable lesson to be learnt from the history of scientific progress is how misleading and strangling such analogies have been, and how success has come to those who ignored them.
'Cosmology', in Arthur Beer (ed.), Vistas in Astronomy (1956), Vol. 2, 1722.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Approach (108)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Claim (146)  |  Compliance (7)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Cunning (16)  |  Daring (17)  |  Employ (113)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Follow (378)  |  Future (429)  |  Game (101)  |  Guide (97)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Required (108)  |  Rule (294)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientific Progress (14)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Trick (35)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unpredictable (17)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

It is high time that laymen abandoned the misleading belief that scientific enquiry is a cold dispassionate enterprise, bleached of imaginative qualities, and that a scientist is a man who turns the handle of discovery; for at every level of endeavour scientific research is a passionate undertaking and the Promotion of Natural Knowledge depends above all on a sortee into what can be imagined but is not yet known.
The Times Literary Supplement (London), 1963 October 25 (p. 850)
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bleach (3)  |  Cold (112)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dispassionate (8)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Layman (21)  |  Level (67)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Promotion (7)  |  Quality (135)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)

It was found after many troublesome experiments that when the vacuum within the lamp globe was good, and the contact between the carbon and the conductor which supported it sufficient, there was no blackening of the globes, and no appreciable wasting away of the carbons. Thus was swept away a pernicious error, which, like a misleading finger post proclaiming “No road this way,” tended to bar progress along a good thoroughfare. It only remained to perfect the details of the lamp, to find the best material from which to form the carbon, and to fix this material in the lamp in the best manner. These points, I think, I have now satisfactorily settled, and you see the result in the lamp before me on the table.
In Lecture (20 Oct 1880) at Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, as quoted in United States Courts of Appeals Reports: Cases Adjudged in the United States Circuit Court of Appeals (1894), Vol. 11, 419-420.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciable (2)  |  Bar (8)  |  Best (459)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Contact (65)  |  Detail (146)  |  Error (321)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  Fix (25)  |  Form (959)  |  Globe (47)  |  Good (889)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Manner (58)  |  Material (353)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Pernicious (7)  |  Point (580)  |  Progress (465)  |  Remain (349)  |  Result (677)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  See (1081)  |  Settle (19)  |  Settled (34)  |  Signpost (3)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Support (147)  |  Table (104)  |  Tend (124)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughfare (2)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Way (1217)

It’s misleading to suppose there’s any basic difference between education & entertainment. This distinction merely relieves people of the responsibility of looking into the matter.
In 'Classroom Without Walls', Explorations (May 1957), No. 7. Collected in Edmund Carpenter and Marshall McLuhan (eds.), Explorations in Communication, an Anthology (1960), 3.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Basic (138)  |  Difference (337)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Education (378)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Looking (189)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mislead (4)  |  People (1005)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Suppose (156)

Let people who have to observe sickness and death look back and try to register in their observation the appearances which have preceded relapse, attack or death, and not assert that there were none, or that there were not the right ones. A want of the habit of observing conditions and an inveterate habit of taking averages are each of them often equally misleading.
Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not (1860), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Assert (66)  |  Attack (84)  |  Average (82)  |  Back (390)  |  Condition (356)  |  Death (388)  |  Equally (130)  |  Habit (168)  |  Look (582)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  People (1005)  |  Register (21)  |  Relapse (5)  |  Right (452)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Try (283)  |  Want (497)

Mythology is wondrous, a balm for the soul. But its problems cannot be ignored. At worst, it buys inspiration at the price of physical impossibility ... At best, it purveys the same myopic view of history that made this most fascinating subject so boring and misleading in grade school as a sequential take of monarchs and battles.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Battle (34)  |  Best (459)  |  Boring (7)  |  Buy (20)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Grade (11)  |  History (673)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myopic (2)  |  Mythology (18)  |  Physical (508)  |  Price (51)  |  Problem (676)  |  Same (157)  |  School (219)  |  Sequential (2)  |  Soul (226)  |  Subject (521)  |  View (488)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  Worst (57)

Our ultimate task is to find interpretative procedures that will uncover each bias and discredit its claims to universality. When this is done the eighteenth century can be formally closed and a new era that has been here a long time can be officially recognised. The individual human being, stripped of his humanity, is of no use as a conceptual base from which to make a picture of human society. No human exists except steeped in the culture of his time and place. The falsely abstracted individual has been sadly misleading to Western political thought. But now we can start again at a point where major streams of thought converge, at the other end, at the making of culture. Cultural analysis sees the whole tapestry as a whole, the picture and the weaving process, before attending to the individual threads.
As co-author with Baron Isherwood, The World of Goods: Towards an Anthropology of Consumption (1979, 2002), 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Base (117)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bias (20)  |  Century (310)  |  Claim (146)  |  Closed (38)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Converge (8)  |  Culture (143)  |  Discredit (8)  |  End (590)  |  Era (51)  |  Exist (443)  |  Find (998)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Individual (404)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Long (790)  |  Major (84)  |  Making (300)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Picture (143)  |  Point (580)  |  Political (121)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Process (423)  |  Recognise (9)  |  See (1081)  |  Society (326)  |  Start (221)  |  Stream (81)  |  Strip (6)  |  Tapestry (5)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thread (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Universality (22)  |  Use (766)  |  Weaving (5)  |  Western (45)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

People are usually surprised to discover that I hate the phrase “constitutional rights.” I hate the phrase because it is terribly misleading. Most of the people who say it or hear it have the impression that the Constitution “grants” them their rights. Nothing could be further from the truth. Strictly speaking it is the Bill of Rights that enumerates our rights, but none of our founding documents bestow anything on you at all [...] The government can burn the Constitution and shred the Bill of Rights, but those actions wouldn’t have the slightest effect on the rights you’ve always had.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Bill (14)  |  Burn (87)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Discover (553)  |  Document (7)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Far (154)  |  Founding (5)  |  Government (110)  |  Grant (73)  |  Hate (64)  |  Hear (139)  |  Impression (114)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  People (1005)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Shred (7)  |  Slight (31)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)

Statistical analysis in cases involving small numbers can be particularly helpful because on many occasions intuition can be highly misleading.
In essay 'Statistical Proof of Employment Discrimination', collected in Judith M. Tanur et al. (eds.), Statistics, a Guide to the Unknown (3rd ed., 1989), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Helpful (16)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Number (699)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Small (477)  |  Statistics (155)

Television is too powerful a force for the public good to be stopped by misleading propaganda. No one can retard TV's advance any more than carriage makers could stop the automobile, the cable the wireless, or silent pictures the talkies.
Address to Stockholders, 30th Annual Meeting of RCA Corporation, printed in 'Television Outlook is Bright', Radio Age: Research, Manufacturing, Communications, Broadcasting, Television (Jul 1949), 8, No. 4, 21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Cable (11)  |  Carriage (10)  |  Force (487)  |  Good (889)  |  Maker (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Picture (143)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Propaganda (13)  |  Public (96)  |  Silent (29)  |  Stop (80)  |  Television (30)  |  Wireless (5)

The saying often quoted from Lord Kelvin… that “where you cannot measure your knowledge is meagre and unsatisfactory,” as applied in mental and social science, is misleading and pernicious. This is another way of saying that these sciences are not science in the sense of physical science and cannot attempt to be such without forfeiting their proper nature and function. Insistence on a concretely quantitative economics means the use of statistics of physical magnitudes, whose economic meaning and significance is uncertain and dubious. (Even wheat is approximately homogeneous only if measured in economic terms.) And a similar statement would even apply more to other social sciences. In this field, the Kelvin dictum very largely means in practice, “if you cannot measure, measure anyhow!”
'What is Truth' in Economics? (1956), 166.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Apply (160)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Concretely (4)  |  Dictum (9)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economics (37)  |  Field (364)  |  Function (228)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Insistence (12)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lord (93)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mental (177)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pernicious (7)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Practice (204)  |  Proper (144)  |  Quantitative (29)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significance (113)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Statement (142)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

This long run is a misleading guide to current affairs. In the long run we are all dead. Economists set themselves too easy, too useless a task if in tempestuous seasons they can only tell us that when the storm is long past the ocean is flat again.
A Tract on Monetary Reform (1923), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Current (118)  |  Death (388)  |  Easy (204)  |  Economics (37)  |  Flat (33)  |  Guide (97)  |  Long (790)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Past (337)  |  Run (174)  |  Season (47)  |  Set (394)  |  Storm (51)  |  Task (147)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)

When facts are insufficient, theorizing is ridiculous at best, misleading at worst.
The Queen of Air and Darkness (1971). Quoted in Gary Westfahl, Science Fiction Quotations (2005), 322.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Theory (970)  |  Worst (57)

[T]he idea of protoplasm, which was really a name for our ignorance, [is] only a little less misleading than the expression “Vital force”.
Adventures of a Biologist (1940), 118.
Science quotes on:  |  Expression (175)  |  Force (487)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Little (707)  |  Name (333)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Vital (85)  |  Vital Force (7)

… the embryological record, as it is usually presented to us, is both imperfect and misleading. It may be compared to an ancient manuscript, with many of the sheets lost, others displaced, and with spurious passages interpolated by a later hand. … Like the scholar with his manuscript, the embryologist has by a process of careful and critical examination to determine where the gaps are present, to detect the later insertions, and to place in order what has been misplaced.
A Treatise on Comparative Embryology (1885), Vol. 1, 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Both (493)  |  Careful (24)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Critical (66)  |  Detect (44)  |  Detection (16)  |  Determine (144)  |  Displace (8)  |  Embryologist (3)  |  Embryology (17)  |  Examination (98)  |  Gap (33)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Insertion (2)  |  Lost (34)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passage (50)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Record (154)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Sheet (7)  |  Spurious (3)  |  Usually (176)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.