Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Carriage

Carriage Quotes (10 quotes)

A carriage (steam) will set out from Washington in the morning, the passengers will breakfast at Baltimore, dine at Philadelphia, and sup in New York the same day.
(about 1804). As quoted in Henry Howe, 'Oliver Evans', Memoirs of the Most Eminent American Mechanics: (1840), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Breakfast (9)  |  Dine (5)  |  Eat (104)  |  Morning (94)  |  New (1217)  |  New York (15)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Set (394)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (46)  |  Washington (5)  |  Will (2354)

About the year 1772, being then an apprentice to a wheel-wright, or wagon maker, I laboured to discover some means of propelling land carriages without animal power. … one of my brothers [told me of] blacksmith’s boys, who, for amusement, had stopped up the touch hole of a gun barrel, then put in about a gill of water, and rammed down a tight wad; after which they put the breech in the smith’s fire, when it discharged itself with as loud a crack as if it had been loaded with powder. It immediately occurred to me, that here was the power to propel any wagon, if I could only apply it.
From 'On the Origin of Steam Boats and Steam Wagons', Thomas Cooper (ed.), The Emporium of Arts and Sciences (Feb 1814), 2, No. 2, 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (33)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Apprentice (4)  |  Barrel (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biography (242)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Boy (94)  |  Brother (44)  |  Crack (15)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (785)  |  Down (455)  |  Fire (189)  |  Gill (3)  |  Gun (9)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Labour (98)  |  Loud (9)  |  Maker (34)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (580)  |  Powder (9)  |  Power (747)  |  Propulsion (10)  |  Ram (3)  |  Steam Power (9)  |  Touch (142)  |  Wad (2)  |  Wagon (8)  |  Water (482)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Year (932)

His Majesty has, with great skill, constructed a cart, containing a corn mill, which is worked by the motion of the carriage. He has also contrived a carriage of such a magnitude as to contain several apartments, with a hot bath; and it is drawn by a single elephant. This movable bath is extremely useful, and refreshing on a journey. … He has also invented several hydraulic machines, which are worked by oxen. The pulleys and wheels of some of them are so adjusted that a single ox will at once draw water out of two wells, and at the same time turn a millstone.
From Ain-i-Akbery (c.1590). As translated from the original Persian, by Francis Gladwin in 'Akbar’s Conduct and Administrative Rules', 'Of Machines', Ayeen Akbery: Or, The Institutes of the Emperor Akber (1783), Vol. 1, 284. Note: Akbar (Akber) was a great ruler and enlightened statesman.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjust (8)  |  Apartment (4)  |  Bath (10)  |  Cart (3)  |  Construct (124)  |  Corn (19)  |  Draw (137)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Great (1575)  |  Hot (60)  |  Hydraulic (5)  |  Invent (51)  |  Journey (42)  |  Machine (259)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Mill (16)  |  Motion (312)  |  Ox (4)  |  Oxen (8)  |  Pulley (2)  |  Refresh (4)  |  Single (354)  |  Skill (109)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Useful (250)  |  Water (482)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Will (2354)  |  Work (1351)

I do verily believe that the time will come when carriages propelled by steam will be in general use, as well for the transportation of passengers as goods, traveling at the rate of fifteen miles an hour, or 300 miles per day.
From 'On the Origin of Steam Boats and Steam Wagons', Thomas Cooper (ed.), The Emporium of Arts and Sciences (Feb 1814), 2, No. 2, 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Goods (8)  |  Hour (186)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Propulsion (10)  |  Speed (65)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Power (9)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transportation (18)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2354)

In modern Europe, the Middle Ages were called the Dark Ages. Who dares to call them so now? … Their Dante and Alfred and Wickliffe and Abelard and Bacon; their Magna Charta, decimal numbers, mariner’s compass, gunpowder, glass, paper, and clocks; chemistry, algebra, astronomy; their Gothic architecture, their painting,—are the delight and tuition of ours. Six hundred years ago Roger Bacon explained the precession of the equinoxes, and the necessity of reform in the calendar; looking over how many horizons as far as into Liverpool and New York, he announced that machines can be constructed to drive ships more rapidly than a whole galley of rowers could do, nor would they need anything but a pilot to steer; carriages, to move with incredible speed, without aid of animals; and machines to fly into the air like birds.
In 'Progress of Culture', an address read to the Phi Beta Kappa Society at Cambridge, 18 July 1867. Collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1883), 475.
Science quotes on:  |  Peter Abelard (3)  |  Age (499)  |  Aid (97)  |  Air (349)  |  Algebra (114)  |  Animal (617)  |  Announce (13)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Astronomy (231)  |  Roger Bacon (20)  |  Bird (150)  |  Calendar (9)  |  Call (769)  |  Chemistry (355)  |  Clock (47)  |  Compass (34)  |  Construct (124)  |  Dante Alighieri (10)  |  Dare (50)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dark Ages (10)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Delight (109)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drive (55)  |  Equinox (5)  |  Europe (43)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fly (146)  |  Glass (92)  |  Gothic (4)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Hundred (228)  |  Incredible (42)  |  Liverpool (3)  |  Looking (189)  |  Machine (259)  |  Magna Carta (3)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Middle Ages (12)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1217)  |  New York (15)  |  Number (701)  |  Painting (44)  |  Paper (183)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Precession (4)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Reform (22)  |  Ship (64)  |  Speed (65)  |  Steer (4)  |  Transportation (18)  |  Tuition (3)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (932)

Once you have learned to fly your plane, it is far less fatiguing to fly than it is to drive a car. You don’t have to watch every second for cats, dogs, children, lights, road signs, ladies with baby carriages and citizens who drive out in the middle of the block against the lights... Nobody who has not been up in the sky on a glorious morning can possibly imagine the way a pilot feels in free heaven.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Baby (28)  |  Block (12)  |  Car (71)  |  Cat (47)  |  Child (309)  |  Children (200)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Dog (70)  |  Drive (55)  |  Far (154)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Feel (366)  |  Fly (146)  |  Free (233)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Imagine (165)  |  Lady (11)  |  Learn (632)  |  Learned (235)  |  Less (103)  |  Light (609)  |  Middle (16)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Plane (20)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Road (64)  |  Second (62)  |  Sign (58)  |  Sky (163)  |  Watch (109)  |  Way (1216)

Television is too powerful a force for the public good to be stopped by misleading propaganda. No one can retard TV's advance any more than carriage makers could stop the automobile, the cable the wireless, or silent pictures the talkies.
Address to Stockholders, 30th Annual Meeting of RCA Corporation, printed in 'Television Outlook is Bright', Radio Age: Research, Manufacturing, Communications, Broadcasting, Television (Jul 1949), 8, No. 4, 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Cable (11)  |  Force (488)  |  Good (889)  |  Maker (34)  |  Misleading (21)  |  More (2559)  |  Picture (143)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Propaganda (13)  |  Public (96)  |  Silent (29)  |  Stop (80)  |  Television (30)  |  Wireless (5)

The more we resist the steam the greater is the effect of the engine. On these principles, very light, but powerful engines, can be made, suitable for propelling boats and land-carriages, without the great incumbrance of their own weight
From 'On the Origin of Steam Boats and Steam Wagons', Thomas Cooper (ed.), The Emporium of Arts and Sciences (Feb 1814), 2, No. 2, 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Boat (17)  |  Effect (394)  |  Encumbrance (5)  |  Engine (98)  |  Great (1575)  |  Greater (288)  |  Light (609)  |  More (2559)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Principle (510)  |  Propulsion (10)  |  Resist (15)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (46)  |  Suitable (8)  |  Weight (136)

The swelling and towering omnibuses, the huge trucks and wagons and carriages, the impetuous hansoms and the more sobered four-wheelers, the pony-carts, donkey-carts, hand-carts, and bicycles which fearlessly find their way amidst the turmoil, with foot-passengers winding in and out, and covering the sidewalks with their multitude, give the effect of a single monstrous organism, which writhes swiftly along the channel where it had run in the figure of a flood till you were tired of that metaphor. You are now a molecule of that vast organism.
Describing streets in London, from 'London Films', Harper’s Magazine (), 110, No. 655, 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Bicycle (10)  |  Cart (3)  |  Channel (21)  |  Covering (14)  |  Donkey (2)  |  Effect (394)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (999)  |  Flood (50)  |  Foot (60)  |  Hand (143)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Monstrous (7)  |  More (2559)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Omnibus (2)  |  Organism (220)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Pony (2)  |  Run (174)  |  Sidewalk (2)  |  Single (354)  |  Swelling (5)  |  Swiftly (5)  |  Tired (13)  |  Towering (11)  |  Truck (3)  |  Turmoil (8)  |  Vast (178)  |  Wagon (8)  |  Way (1216)  |  Winding (8)  |  Writhe (3)

Why may not the present generation, who have already good turnpikes, make the experiment of using steam carriages upon them? They will assuredly effect the movement of heavy burthens; with a slow motion of two and a half miles an hour, and as their progress need not be interrupted, they may travel fifty or sixty miles in the 24 hours.
From 'On the Origin of Steam Boats and Steam Wagons', Thomas Cooper (ed.), The Emporium of Arts and Sciences (Feb 1814), 2, No. 2, 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Effect (394)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Generation (242)  |  Good (889)  |  Hour (186)  |  Motion (312)  |  Movement (155)  |  Present (620)  |  Progress (468)  |  Slow (101)  |  Speed (65)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Power (9)  |  Transport (30)  |  Travel (114)  |  Turnpike (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2354)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.