Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Dog

Dog Quotes (39 quotes)

Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor?
Doctor: Not so sick, my lord,
As she is troubled with thick-coming fancies,
That keep her from her rest.
Macbeth: Cure her of that.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
Raze out the written troubles of the brain,
And with some sweet oblivious antidote
Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff
Which weighs upon the heart?
Doctor: Therein the patient
Must minister to himself.
Macbeth: Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it.
Macbeth (1606), V, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Antidote (6)  |  Bosom (8)  |  Brain (181)  |  Cleanse (3)  |  Disease (257)  |  Heart (110)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mind (544)  |  Minister (6)  |  Oblivious (6)  |  Patient (116)  |  Peril (6)  |  Physic (5)  |  Pluck (4)  |  Psychiatry (19)  |  Root (48)  |  Sorrow (8)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Writing (72)

A Native American elder once described his own inner struggles in this manner: Inside of me there are two dogs. One of the dogs is mean and evil. The other dog is good. The mean dog fights the good dog all the time. When asked which dog wins, he reflected for a moment and replied, The one I feed the most.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (99)  |  Describe (38)  |  Elder (3)  |  Evil (67)  |  Feed (22)  |  Fight (37)  |  Good (228)  |  Inner (27)  |  Inside (16)  |  Manner (35)  |  Mean (63)  |  Moment (61)  |  Native American (3)  |  Reflect (17)  |  Reply (18)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Time (439)  |  Win (25)

As a career, the business of an orthodox preacher is about as successful as that of a celluloid dog chasing an asbestos cat through hell.
A Thousand & One Epigrams: Selected from the Writings of Elbert Hubbard (1911), 110. Celluloid, an early plastic, known by that name since 1872 and used for early film stock, is noted for its flammability.
Science quotes on:  |  Asbestos (3)  |  Business (71)  |  Career (54)  |  Cat (31)  |  Chase (11)  |  Clergyman (5)  |  Hell (29)  |  Orthodox (3)  |  Preacher (9)  |  Success (202)

At the present time all property is personal; the man owns his own ponies and other belongings he has personally acquired; the woman owns her horses, dogs, and all the lodge equipments; children own their own articles; and parents do not control the possessions of their children. There is no family property as we use the term. A wife is as independent as the most independent man in our midst. If she chooses to give away or sell all of her property, there is no one to gainsay her.
Speech on 'The Legal Conditions of Indian Women', delivered to Evening Session (Thur 29 Mar 1888), collected in Report of the International Council of Women: Assembled by the National Woman Suffrage Association, Washington, D.C., U.S. of America, March 25 to April 1, 1888 (1888), Vol. 1, 239-240.
Science quotes on:  |  Article (15)  |  Child (189)  |  Choose (35)  |  Control (93)  |  Dispute (15)  |  Equipment (26)  |  Family (37)  |  Give (117)  |  Horse (40)  |  Independent (41)  |  Lodge (2)  |  Man (345)  |  Parent (39)  |  Personal (49)  |  Pony (2)  |  Possession (37)  |  Property (96)  |  Sell (10)  |  Wife (18)  |  Woman (94)

Chief Seattle, of the Indians that inhabited the Seattle area, wrote a wonderful paper that has to do with putting oneself in tune with the universe. He said, “Why should I lament the disappearance of my people! All things end, and the white man will find this out also.” And this goes for the universe. One can be at peace with that. This doesn’t mean that one shouldn’t participate in efforts to correct the situation. But underlying the effort to change must be an “at peace.” To win a dog sled race is great. To lose is okay too.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Area (18)  |  Change (291)  |  Correct (53)  |  Disappearance (21)  |  Effort (94)  |  End (141)  |  Find (248)  |  Great (300)  |  Indian (17)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Lament (7)  |  Lose (53)  |  Mean (63)  |  Oneself (3)  |  Paper (52)  |  Participate (4)  |  Peace (58)  |  People (269)  |  Race (76)  |  Say (126)  |  Situation (41)  |  Sled (2)  |  Tune (9)  |  Underlying (14)  |  Universe (563)  |  White (38)  |  Win (25)  |  Wonderful (37)  |  Write (87)

Computers and rocket ships are examples of invention, not of understanding. … All that is needed to build machines is the knowledge that when one thing happens, another thing happens as a result. It’s an accumulation of simple patterns. A dog can learn patterns. There is no “why” in those examples. We don’t understand why electricity travels. We don’t know why light travels at a constant speed forever. All we can do is observe and record patterns.
In God's Debris: A Thought Experiment (2004), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (29)  |  Building (51)  |  Computer (84)  |  Constant (40)  |  Electricity (121)  |  Example (57)  |  Forever (42)  |  Happening (32)  |  Invention (283)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  Light (246)  |  Need (211)  |  Observation (418)  |  Record (56)  |  Rocket (29)  |  Ship (33)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Speed (27)  |  Travel (40)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Why (6)

EFFECT, n. The second of two phenomena which always occur together in the same order. The first, called a Cause, is said to generate the other—which is no more sensible than it would be for one who has never seen a dog except in pursuit of a rabbit to declare the rabbit the cause of the dog.
The Cynic's Word Book (1906), 86. Later published as The Devil's Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Declare (18)  |  Effect (133)  |  Generate (11)  |  Occur (26)  |  Order (167)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Rabbit (6)  |  Same (92)  |  Sensible (22)  |  Together (48)

Essentially only one thing in life interests us: our psychical constitution, the mechanism of which was and is wrapped in darkness. All human resources, art, religion, literature, philosophy and historical sciences, all of them join in bringing lights in this darkness. But man has still another powerful resource: natural science with its strictly objective methods. This science, as we all know, is making huge progress every day. The facts and considerations which I have placed before you at the end of my lecture are one out of numerous attempts to employ a consistent, purely scientific method of thinking in the study of the mechanism of the highest manifestations of life in the dog, the representative of the animal kingdom that is man's best friend.
'Physiology of Digestion', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1904). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 134
Science quotes on:  |  Animal Kingdom (9)  |  Art (205)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Consistency (21)  |  Constitution (26)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Employment (22)  |  Essential (87)  |  Fact (609)  |  History (302)  |  Human (445)  |  Interest (170)  |  Lecture (54)  |  Life (917)  |  Literature (64)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Method (154)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Objective (49)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Progress (317)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Religion (210)  |  Representative (9)  |  Resource (47)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Strictness (2)  |  Study (331)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Wrap (4)

I cannot anyhow be contented to view this wonderful universe, and especially the nature of man, and to conclude that everything is the result of brute force. I am inclined to look at everything as resulting from designed laws, with the details, whether good or bad, left to the working out of what we call chance. Not that this notion at all satisfies me. I feel most deeply that the whole subject is too profound for the human intellect. A dog might as well speculate on the mind of Newton. Let each man hope and believe what he can.
Letter to Asa Gray (22 May 1860). In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 236.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Brute (12)  |  Brute Force (2)  |  Chance (122)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Content (39)  |  Design (92)  |  Detail (65)  |  Hope (129)  |  Inclination (20)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Law (418)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature Of Man (4)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Notion (32)  |  Profound (46)  |  Result (250)  |  Satisfaction (48)  |  Speculation (77)  |  Universe (563)  |  Wonder (134)

I have a friendly feeling towards pigs generally, and consider them the most intelligent of beasts, not excepting the elephant and the anthropoid ape—the dog is not to be mentioned in this connection. I also like his disposition and attitude towards all other creatures, especially man. He is not suspicious, or shrinkingly submissive, like horses, cattle, and sheep; nor an impudent devil-may-care like the goat; nor hostile like the goose; nor condescending like the cat; nor a flattering parasite like the dog. He views us from a totally different, a sort of democratic, standpoint as fellow-citizens and brothers, and takes it for granted, or grunted, that we understand his language, and without servility or insolence he has a natural, pleasant, camerados-all or hail-fellow-well-met air with us.
In The Book of a Naturalist (1919), 295-296.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropoid (4)  |  Ape (39)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Beast (32)  |  Brother (16)  |  Cat (31)  |  Comrade (3)  |  Cow (27)  |  Creature (127)  |  Democratic (7)  |  Disposition (14)  |  Elephant (16)  |  Flattery (5)  |  Goat (5)  |  Goose (9)  |  Grant (21)  |  Grunt (3)  |  Horse (40)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Language (155)  |  Natural (128)  |  Parasite (28)  |  Pig (7)  |  Pleasant (16)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Standpoint (8)  |  Understand (189)

In 1906 I indulged my temper by hurling invectives at Neo-Darwinians in the following terms. “I really do not wish to be abusive [to Neo-Darwinians]; but when I think of these poor little dullards, with their precarious hold of just that corner of evolution that a blackbeetle can understand—with their retinue of twopenny-halfpenny Torquemadas wallowing in the infamies of the vivisector’s laboratory, and solemnly offering us as epoch-making discoveries their demonstrations that dogs get weaker and die if you give them no food; that intense pain makes mice sweat; and that if you cut off a dog’s leg the three-legged dog will have a four-legged puppy, I ask myself what spell has fallen on intelligent and humane men that they allow themselves to be imposed on by this rabble of dolts, blackguards, imposters, quacks, liars, and, worst of all, credulous conscientious fools.”
In Back to Methuselah: A Metabiological Pentateuch (1921), lxi
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (9)  |  Conscientious (2)  |  Credulity (8)  |  Cut (36)  |  Death (270)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Dullard (2)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Fool (70)  |  Humane (5)  |  Impostor (3)  |  Infamy (2)  |  Inquisitor (6)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Leg (13)  |  Liar (5)  |  Mouse (24)  |  Pain (82)  |  Quack (12)  |  Starvation (9)  |  Sweat (12)  |  Temper (6)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Weakening (2)

In a manner of speaking, I can no longer hold my chemical water. I must tell you that I can make urea without the use of kidneys of any animal, be it man or dog. Ammonium cyanate is urea.
Letter from Wohler to Berzelius (22 Feb 1828). In O. Wallach (ed.), Briefwechsel zwischen J. Berzelius und F. Wohler (1901), Vol. 1, 206. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  Ammonia (11)  |  Animal (309)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Speaking (38)  |  Water (244)

In the dog two conditions were found to produce pathological disturbances by functional interference, namely, an unusually acute clashing of the excitatory and inhibitory processes, and the influence of strong and extraordinary stimuli. In man precisely similar conditions constitute the usual causes of nervous and psychic disturbances. Different conditions productive of extreme excitation, such as intense grief or bitter insults, often lead, when the natural reactions are inhibited by the necessary restraint, to profound and prolonged loss of balance in nervous and psychic activity.
Ivan Pavlov and G. V. Anrep (ed., trans.), Conditioned Reflexes—An Investigation of the Physiological Activity of the Cerebral Cortex (1927), 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Acuteness (2)  |  Balance (43)  |  Bitterness (3)  |  Cause (231)  |  Clash (7)  |  Condition (119)  |  Constitution (26)  |  Difference (208)  |  Disturbance (19)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Extreme (36)  |  Function (90)  |  Grief (6)  |  Inhibition (10)  |  Insult (5)  |  Intensity (19)  |  Interference (12)  |  Loss (62)  |  Man (345)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Nervousness (2)  |  Pathology (11)  |  Production (105)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Prolong (8)  |  Psychology (125)  |  Reaction (59)  |  Restraint (8)  |  Similarity (17)  |  Stimulus (18)  |  Unusual (13)

Is man a peculiar organism? Does he originate in a wholly different way from a dog, bird, frog, or fish? and does he thereby justify those who assert that he has no place in nature, and no real relationship with the lower world of animal life? Or does he develop from a similar embryo, and undergo the same slow and gradual progressive modifications? The answer is not for an instant doubtful, and has not been doubtful for the last thirty years. The mode of man’s origin and the earlier stages of his development are undoubtedly identical with those of the animals standing directly below him in the scale; without the slightest doubt, he stands in this respect nearer the ape than the ape does to the dog. (1863)
As quoted in Ernst Haeckel and E. Ray Lankester (trans.) as epigraph for Chap. 12, The History of Creation (1886), Vol. 1, 364.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal Life (4)  |  Answer (201)  |  Ape (39)  |  Assert (11)  |  Bird (96)  |  Develop (55)  |  Development (228)  |  Difference (208)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Doubtful (5)  |  Embryo (22)  |  Fish (85)  |  Frog (30)  |  Gradual (18)  |  Identical (17)  |  Justify (19)  |  Lower (11)  |  Modification (31)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nearer (8)  |  Organism (126)  |  Origin Of Man (7)  |  Originate (14)  |  Peculiar (24)  |  Place (111)  |  Progressive (13)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Similar (22)  |  Undergo (10)  |  World (667)

It doesn’t take a scientist to realize that a chimpanzee or a dog is an intelligent animal. Instead, it takes a bigoted human to suggest that it’s not.
In The Omni Interviews (1984), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Behavior (49)  |  Chimpanzee (12)  |  Human (445)  |  Instead (12)  |  Intelligent (35)

It is curious to reflect on how history repeats itself the world over. Why, I remember the same thing was done when I was a boy on the Mississippi River. There was a proposition in a township there to discontinue public schools because they were too expensive. An old farmer spoke up and said if they stopped the schools they would not save anything, because every time a school was closed a jail had to be built.
It's like feeding a dog on his own tail. He'll never get fat. I believe it is better to support schools than jails.
Address at a meeting of the Berkeley Lyceum, New York (23 Nov 1900). Mark Twain's Speeches (2006), 69-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (80)  |  Close (40)  |  Discontinue (2)  |  Education (280)  |  Expensive (5)  |  Fat (10)  |  Feed (22)  |  Jail (4)  |  Public (82)  |  Save (46)  |  School (87)  |  Support (63)  |  Tail (13)

Man is the Reasoning Animal. Such is the claim. I think it is open to dispute. Indeed, my experiments have proven to me that he is the Unreasoning Animal. Note his history, as sketched above. It seems plain to me that whatever he is he is not a reasoning animal. His record is the fantastic record of a maniac. I consider that the strongest count against his intelligence is the fact that with that record back of him he blandly sets himself up as the head animal of the lot: whereas by his own standards he is the bottom one.
In truth, man is incurably foolish. Simple things which the other animals easily learn, he is incapable of learning. Among my experiments was this. In an hour I taught a cat and a dog to be friends. I put them in a cage. In another hour I taught them to be friends with a rabbit. In the course of two days I was able to add a fox, a goose, a squirrel and some doves. Finally a monkey. They lived together in peace; even affectionately.
Next, in another cage I confined an Irish Catholic from Tipperary, and as soon as he seemed tame I added a Scotch Presbyterian from Aberdeen. Next a Turk from Constantinople; a Greek Christian from Crete; an Armenian; a Methodist from the wilds of Arkansas; a Buddhist from China; a Brahman from Benares. Finally, a Salvation Army Colonel from Wapping. Then I stayed away two whole days. When I came back to note results, the cage of Higher Animals was all right, but in the other there was but a chaos of gory odds and ends of turbans and fezzes and plaids and bones and flesh—not a specimen left alive. These Reasoning Animals had disagreed on a theological detail and carried the matter to a Higher Court.
In Letters from the Earth: Uncensored Writings (),
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Arkansas (2)  |  Bone (57)  |  Bottom (28)  |  Brahman (2)  |  Cage (5)  |  Cat (31)  |  Catholic (5)  |  Chaos (63)  |  China (17)  |  Christian (17)  |  Disagreement (11)  |  Dispute (15)  |  Dove (2)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Flesh (22)  |  Fool (70)  |  Fox (8)  |  Friend (63)  |  Goose (9)  |  Greek (46)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Ireland (7)  |  Learning (174)  |  Methodist (2)  |  Monkey (37)  |  Peace (58)  |  Proof (192)  |  Rabbit (6)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Record (56)  |  Scotland (3)  |  Squirrel (7)  |  Tame (4)  |  Theology (35)  |  Think (205)  |  Truth (750)  |  Wild (39)

Men cannot help feeling a little ashamed of their cousin-german the Ape. His close yet grotesque and clumsy semblance of the human form is accompanied by no gleams of higher instinct. Our humble friend the dog, our patient fellow-labourer the horse, are nearer to us in this respect. The magnanimous and sagacious elephant, doomed though he be to all fours, is godlike compared with this spitefully ferocious creature. Strangely enough, too, the most repulsive and ferocious of all apekind, the recently discovered Gorilla is, the comparative anatomist assures us, nearest to us all: the most closely allied in structure to the human form.
In 'Our Nearest Relation', All Year Round (28 May 1859), 1, No. 5, 112. Charles Dickens was both the editor and publisher of this magazine. The author of the article remains unknown. The articles were by custom printed without crediting the author. Biographers have been able to use extant office records to identify various authors of other articles, but not this specific one. Dickens and Richard Owen were friends; they read each other’s work. Owen is known to have found at least a little time to write a few articles for Dickens’ magazines. Owen had given a talk at the Royal Institution (4 Feb 1859) titled 'On the Gorilla.' This would suggest why Dickens may have had a definite interest in publishing on this subject, regardless of who in fact wrote the article.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (14)  |  Ape (39)  |  Assurance (8)  |  Clumsy (4)  |  Comparative (8)  |  Cousin (3)  |  Creature (127)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Elephant (16)  |  Fellow (29)  |  Form (210)  |  Friend (63)  |  Gleam (9)  |  Gorilla (16)  |  Grotesque (3)  |  Horse (40)  |  Human (445)  |  Humble (23)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Nearest (4)  |  Patient (116)  |  Repulsive (7)  |  Sagacious (2)  |  Semblance (3)  |  Shame (12)  |  Structure (191)

Oh Diamond! Diamond! thou little knowest the mischief done! [Apocryphal]
Purportedly a rebuke to his pet dog, Diamond, which, in Newton's absence, upset a candle and set alight the papers recording much of Newton's work and 'destroyed the almost finished labours of some years'. The only source for this is Thomas Maude, in his poem, Wensley-Dale; or, Rural Contemplation (1780) written a half-century after Newton's death. According to D. Gjertsen, in The Newton Handbook (1986), 177, Maude's story must be regarded as baseless since no corroboration of such a dog's action exists in the writings of Newton's associates at the time.
Science quotes on:  |  Candle (19)  |  Fire (117)  |  Mischief (6)  |  Paper (52)  |  Work (457)

One never finds fossil bones bearing no resemblance to human bones. Egyptian mummies, which are at least three thousand years old, show that men were the same then. The same applies to other mummified animals such as cats, dogs, crocodiles, falcons, vultures, oxen, ibises, etc. Species, therefore, do not change by degrees, but emerged after the new world was formed. Nor do we find intermediate species between those of the earlier world and those of today's. For example, there is no intermediate bear between our bear and the very different cave bear. To our knowledge, no spontaneous generation occurs in the present-day world. All organized beings owe their life to their fathers. Thus all records corroborate the globe's modernity. Negative proof: the barbaritY of the human species four thousand years ago. Positive proof: the great revolutions and the floods preserved in the traditions of all peoples.
'Note prese al Corso di Cuvier. Corso di Geologia all'Ateneo nel 1805', quoted in Pietro Corsi, The Age of Lamarck, trans. J. Mandelbaum (1988), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Bear (28)  |  Bone (57)  |  Cat (31)  |  Change (291)  |  Crocodile (7)  |  Degree (48)  |  Egypt (18)  |  Emergence (21)  |  Falcon (2)  |  Find (248)  |  Flood (26)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Generation (111)  |  Human (445)  |  Human Species (6)  |  Intermediate (16)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Men (17)  |  Mummy (4)  |  Never (22)  |  New (340)  |  Ox (3)  |  People (269)  |  Positive (28)  |  Present Day (2)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Proof (192)  |  Resemblance (18)  |  Revolution (56)  |  Same (92)  |  Species (181)  |  Spontaneity (4)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Vulture (5)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

Since Pawlow [Pavlov] and his pupils have succeeded in causing the secretion of saliva in the dog by means of optic and acoustic signals, it no longer seems strange to us that what the philosopher terms an 'idea' is a process which can cause chemical changes in the body.
The Mechanistic Conception of Life (1912), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Biochemistry (46)  |  Idea (440)  |  Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (18)  |  Salivation (2)  |  Stimulus (18)

The argument of the ‘long view’ may be correct in some meaninglessly abstract sense, but it represents a fundamental mistake in categories and time scales. Our only legitimate long view extends to our children and our children’s children’s children–hundreds or a few thousands of years down the road. If we let the slaughter continue, they will share a bleak world with rats, dogs, cockroaches, pigeons, and mosquitoes. A potential recovery millions of years later has no meaning at our appropriate scale.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Appropriate (18)  |  Argument (59)  |  Category (10)  |  Child (189)  |  Cockroach (6)  |  Continue (38)  |  Correct (53)  |  Down (44)  |  Extend (20)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Hundreds (3)  |  Late (28)  |  Legitimate (8)  |  Let (30)  |  Long (95)  |  Mean (63)  |  Millions (13)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Pigeon (4)  |  Potential (34)  |  Rat (19)  |  Recovery (18)  |  Represent (27)  |  Road (47)  |  Scale (49)  |  Sense (240)  |  Share (30)  |  Slaughter (6)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Time (439)  |  View (115)  |  World (667)  |  Year (214)

The British Mathematical Colloquium consists of three days of mathematics with no dogs and no wives.
Quoted in Des MacHale, Comic Sections (1993)
Science quotes on:  |  Colloquium (2)  |  Day (38)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Wife (18)

The dog writhing in the gutter, its back broken by a passing car, knows what it is to be alive. So too with the aged elk of the far north woods, slowly dying in the bitter cold of winter. The asphalt upon which the dog lies knows no pain. The snow upon which the elk has collapsed knows not the cold. But living beings do. … Are you conscious? Then you can feel more pain. … Perhaps we even suffer more than the dumb animals.
In The Symbiotic Universe: Life and Mind in the Cosmos (1988), 194-195. As quoted and cited in Robert E. Zinser, The Fascinated God: What Science Says to Faith and Faith to Scientists (2003), 521.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (38)  |  Animal (309)  |  Asphalt (2)  |  Back (55)  |  Bitter (12)  |  Broken (10)  |  Car (20)  |  Cold (38)  |  Collapse (16)  |  Conscious (25)  |  Die (46)  |  Dumb (7)  |  Feel (93)  |  Gutter (2)  |  Know (321)  |  Lie (80)  |  Life (917)  |  Pain (82)  |  Slowly (10)  |  Snow (15)  |  Suffer (25)  |  Winter (22)  |  Writhe (3)

The experiment of transfusing the blood of one dog into another was made before the Society by Mr King and Mr Thomas Coxe, upon a little mastiff and a spaniel, with very good success, the former bleeding to death, and the latter receiving the blood of the other, and emitting so much of his own as to make him capable of receiving the other.
From the Minutes of the Royal Society recording the first blood transfusion (14 Nov 1666). Quoted in Marjorie Hope Nicolson, Pepys's Diary and the New Science (1965), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Blood (95)  |  Capability (35)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Transfusion (2)

The great pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Fool (70)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Scold (5)

The laboratory was an unattractive half basement and low ceilinged room with an inner dark room for the galvanometer and experimental animals. It was dark, crowded with equipment and uninviting. Into it came patients for electrocardiography, dogs for experiments, trays with coffee and buns for lunch. It was hot and dusty in summer and cold in winter. True a large fire burnt brightly in the winter but anyone who found time to warm his backside at it was not beloved by [Sir Thomas] Lewis. It was no good to try and look out of the window for relaxation, for it was glazed with opaque glass. The scientific peaks were our only scenery, and it was our job to try and find the pathways to the top.
Magazine
'Tribute to Sir Thomas Lewis', University College Hospital Magazine (1955), 40, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Basement (2)  |  Coffee (10)  |  Equipment (26)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fire (117)  |  Galvanometer (4)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Lunch (2)  |  Pathway (11)  |  Peak (15)  |  Scenery (5)  |  Window (25)

The late James McNeil Whistler had a French poodle of which he was extravagantly fond. This poodle was seized with an affection of the throat, and Whistler had the audacity to send for the great throat specialist, Mackenzie. Sir Morell, when he saw that he had been called to treat a dog, didn't like it much, it was plain. But he said nothing. He prescribed, pocketed a big fee, and drove away.
The next day he sent posthaste for Whistler. And Whistler, thinking he was summoned on some matter connected with his beloved dog, dropped his work and rushed like the wind to Mackenzie's. On his arrival Sir Morell said, gravely: “How do you do, Mr. Whistler? I wanted to see you about having my front door painted.”
Attributed or merely a legend. This anecdote wording is from 'Turn About Is Fair Play', Collier's (26 Mar 1904), 32, No. 26, 24, the earliest version the Webmaster has found so far. It has been variously reworded and printed in a number of books and magazines over the decades since, and is still circulated in the present day. The wording of Mackenzie's remark changes from one version to another, but remains true to the sense of it. In Medical Record (4 Jan 1913), 83, No. 1, 46, a reprinted column from The Universal Medical Record says: “‘X’ relates that he ‘has recently been watching through the weekly papers, of a story anent the artist Whistler and Sir mrell Mackenzie, which, curiously enough, starting in Paris, has now reached the American medical Journals and seems embarked on a long and active career. ... Mr. Ben Trovato, the eminent raconteur, seems for the moment at fault. Still, the natural history of such legends as this leads us to suppose that the story of the laryngologist and the poodle will continue to circulate, till after having served its day it ‘falls on sleep,’ later to be revived by the journalists of the next generation about some heroes of to-day.” Examples of other versions are in La Vulgarisation scientifique: revue mensuelle illustrée (1906); Don C. Seitz Whistler Stories (1913); Lewis C. Henry, Humorous Anecdotes About Famous People (1948); Graeme Garden The Best Medicine (1984); The Reader's Digest (1986), 128, Nos. 765-769, 40. So, in fact, this anecdote has, indeed, been revived for over a century, but is still narrated about Whistler and Mackenzie. Meanwhile, the column in the Medical Record mentioned above comments: “Why Whistler—whose brother, by-the-bye, was almost equally celebrated in the same department of medicine—should have desired the services of a laryngologist for his poodle, heaven only knows.” So, whether to regard this as entirely legend, or perhaps having some foundation of truth, the Webmaster cannot say, but would like to hear from anyone with more historical background to add.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (20)  |  Audacity (4)  |  Doctor (100)  |  Examination (60)  |  Fee (9)  |  House (36)  |  Ill (11)  |  Infection (18)  |  Paint (17)  |  Physician (232)  |  Prescription (14)  |  Specialist (20)  |  Throat (10)  |  James Abbott McNeill Whistler (2)

The legends of fieldwork locate all important site s deep in inaccessible jungles inhabited by fierce beasts and restless natives, and surrounded by miasmas of putrefaction and swarms of tsetse flies. (Alternative models include the hundredth dune after the death of all camels, or the thousandth crevasse following the demise of all sled dogs.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (22)  |  Beast (32)  |  Camel (9)  |  Crevasse (2)  |  Death (270)  |  Deep (81)  |  Demise (2)  |  Dune (3)  |  Fieldwork (3)  |  Fierce (4)  |  Fly (65)  |  Follow (66)  |  Hundredth (2)  |  Important (124)  |  Inaccessible (8)  |  Include (27)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Jungle (13)  |  Legend (8)  |  Locate (4)  |  Model (64)  |  Native (11)  |  Putrefaction (4)  |  Restless (4)  |  Site (11)  |  Sled (2)  |  Surround (17)  |  Swarm (11)

The truth is, Pavlov's dog trained Pavlov to ring this bell just before the dog salivated.
Brain Droppings (1998), 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Bell (13)  |  Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (18)  |  Ring (14)  |  Saliva (2)  |  Truth (750)

The value the world sets upon motives is often grossly unjust and inaccurate. Consider, for example, two of them: mere insatiable curiosity and the desire to do good. The latter is put high above the former, and yet it is the former that moves some of the greatest men the human race has yet produced: the scientific investigators. What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep down in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows by life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. No man of self-respect could devote himself to pathology on such terms. What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity–his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. His prototype is not the liberator releasing slaves, the good Samaritan lifting up the fallen, but the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes.
Prejudices (1923), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Cure (88)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Desire (101)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Disease (257)  |  Good (228)  |  Harm (31)  |  Honesty (16)  |  Human Race (49)  |  Inaccurate (3)  |  Insatiable (4)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Liberator (2)  |  Life (917)  |  Observation (418)  |  Pathologist (4)  |  Pathology (11)  |  Praise (17)  |  Profit (28)  |  Prototype (5)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Save (46)  |  Scoundrel (6)  |  Secret (98)  |  Slave (21)  |  Society (188)  |  Soul (139)  |  Thirst (9)  |  Unjust (5)  |  Unknown (87)  |  Value (180)

Visualize yourself confronted with the task of killing, one after the other, a cabbage, a fly, a fish, a lizard, a guinea pig, a cat, a dog, a monkey and a baby chimpanzee. In the unlikely case that you should experience no greater inhibitions in killing the chimpanzee than in destroying the cabbage or the fly, my advice to you is to commit suicide at your earliest possible convenience, because you are a weird monstrosity and a public danger.
'The Enmity Between Generations and Its Probable Ethological Causes'. In Richard I. Evans, Konrad Lorenz: The Man and his Ideas (1975), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Cabbage (3)  |  Cat (31)  |  Chimpanzee (12)  |  Danger (62)  |  Fish (85)  |  Fly (65)  |  Inhibition (10)  |  Kill (37)  |  Lizard (4)  |  Monkey (37)  |  Monster (21)  |  Suicide (16)

Watching baseball under the lights is like observing dogs indoors, at a pedigree show. In both instances, the environment is too controlled to suit the species.
Baseball The Difference between Night and Day Christian Science Monitor, 3 Apr 85
Science quotes on:  |  Baseball (3)  |  Control (93)  |  Environment (138)  |  Indoors (2)  |  Light (246)  |  Observation (418)  |  Pedigree (3)  |  Show (55)  |  Species (181)  |  Suitable (6)  |  Watching (10)

We do not belong to this material world that science constructs for us. We are not in it; we are outside. We are only spectators. The reason why we believe that we are in it, that we belong to the picture, is that our bodies are in the picture. Our bodies belong to it. Not only my own body, but those of my friends, also of my dog and cat and horse, and of all the other people and animals. And this is my only means of communicating with them.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Belief (400)  |  Belong (33)  |  Body (193)  |  Cat (31)  |  Communicate (10)  |  Construct (25)  |  Friend (63)  |  Horse (40)  |  Material World (4)  |  Means (109)  |  Outside (37)  |  People (269)  |  Picture (55)  |  Reason (330)  |  Science (1699)  |  Spectator (6)

We must painfully acknowledge that, precisely because of its great intellectual developments, the best of man's domesticated animals—the dog—most often becomes the victim of physiological experiments. Only dire necessity can lead one to experiment on cats—on such impatient, loud, malicious animals. During chronic experiments, when the animal, having recovered from its operation, is under lengthy observation, the dog is irreplaceable; moreover, it is extremely touching. It is almost a participant in the experiments conducted upon it, greatly facilitating the success of the research by its understanding and compliance.
'Vivisection' (1893), as translated in Daniel P. Todes, Pavlov’s Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise (2002), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledgment (10)  |  Animal (309)  |  Cat (31)  |  Chronic (5)  |  Compliance (3)  |  Conduct (23)  |  Development (228)  |  Domestication (2)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Facilitation (2)  |  Impatience (11)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Irreplaceable (2)  |  Loudness (3)  |  Malice (5)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Operation (96)  |  Pain (82)  |  Participant (3)  |  Precision (38)  |  Recovery (18)  |  Research (517)  |  Success (202)  |  Touching (4)  |  Understanding (317)

What a weak, credulous, incredulous, unbelieving, superstitious, bold, frightened, what a ridiculous world ours is, as far as concerns the mind of man. How full of inconsistencies, contradictions and absurdities it is. I declare that taking the average of many minds that have recently come before me ... I should prefer the obedience, affections and instinct of a dog before it.
Letter to C. Schoenbein, 25 Jul 1853. In Georg W. A. Kahlbaum and Francis Darbishire (eds.), The Letters of Faraday and Schoenbein, 1836-1862 (1899), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Autobiography (55)

What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows from life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. ... What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity—his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. ... [like] the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes. ... And yet he stands in the very front rank of the race
In 'The Scientist', Prejudices: third series (1922), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Cure (88)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Desire (101)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Disease (257)  |  Good (228)  |  Harm (31)  |  Honesty (16)  |  Infinity (59)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Motivation (21)  |  Observation (418)  |  Pathologist (4)  |  Penetration (13)  |  Praiseworthy (2)  |  Rank (19)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Saving (19)  |  Scoundrel (6)  |  Secret (98)  |  Soul (139)  |  Thirst (9)  |  Uncovering (2)  |  Unknown (87)

Why should a lobster be any more ridiculous than a dog? ... or a cat, or a gazelle, or a lion, or any other animal one chooses to take for a walk? I have a liking for lobsters. They are peaceful, serious creatures. ... Goethe had an aversion to dogs, and he wasn't mad. They know the secrets of the sea, they don't bark.
[By walking a lobster at the end of a blue silk ribbon in the gardens of the Palais-Royal, he mocked middle-class pretensions, but caused concern for his sanity.]
Quoted by his friend, Théophile Gautier, in Portraits et souvenirs littéraires (1875). In Théophile Gautier, My Fantoms, translated by Richard Holmes (1976), 150.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Aversion (7)  |  Cat (31)  |  Choice (64)  |  Creature (127)  |  Gazelle (2)  |  Liking (4)  |  Lion (15)  |  Lobster (4)  |  Madness (26)  |  Peace (58)  |  Ridicule (13)  |  Sanity (7)  |  Seriousness (9)  |  Walk (56)

“Try another Subtraction sum. Take a bone from a dog: what remains?” [asked the Red Queen]
Alice considered. “The bone wouldn't remain, of course, if I took it—and the dog wouldn’t remain; it would come to bite me—and I’m sure I shouldn’t remain!”
“Then you think nothing would remain?” said the Red Queen.
“I think that’s the answer.”
“Wrong, as usual,” said the Red Queen, “the dog's temper would remain.”
Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1871, 1897), 190-191.
Science quotes on:  |  Alice (4)  |  Answer (201)  |  Asked (2)  |  Bite (11)  |  Bone (57)  |  Considered (10)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Red Queen (2)  |  Remain (77)  |  Subtraction (4)  |  Sum (30)  |  Temper (6)  |  Think (205)  |  Try (103)  |  Wrong (116)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.