Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Pain

Pain Quotes (136 quotes)

... we ought to have saints' days to commemorate the great discoveries which have been made for all mankind, and perhaps for all time—or for whatever time may be left to us. Nature ... is a prodigal of pain. I should like to find a day when we can take a holiday, a day of jubilation when we can fête good Saint Anaesthesia and chaste and pure Saint Antiseptic. ... I should be bound to celebrate, among others, Saint Penicillin...
Speech at Guildhall, London (10 Sep 1947). Collected in Winston Churchill and Randolph Spencer Churchill (ed.), Europe Unite: Speeches, 1947 and 1948 (1950), 138.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anaesthesia (4)  |  Anesthesia (5)  |  Antiseptic (8)  |  Bound (119)  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Commemorate (3)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Holiday (9)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Pure (291)  |  Saint (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whatever (234)

...on opening the incubator I experienced one of those rare moments of intense emotion which reward the research worker for all his pains: at first glance I saw that the broth culture, which the night before had been very turbid was perfectly clear: all the bacteria had vanished... as for my agar spread it was devoid of all growth and what caused my emotion was that in a flash I understood: what causes my spots was in fact an invisible microbe, a filterable virus, but a virus parasitic on bacteria. Another thought came to me also, If this is true, the same thing will have probably occurred in the sick man. In his intestine, as in my test-tube, the dysentery bacilli will have dissolved away under the action of their parasite. He should now be cured.
In Allan Chase, Magic Shots: A Human and Scientific Account of the Long and Continuing Struggle to Eradicated Infectious Diseases by Vaccination (1982), 249-250. Also in Allan J. Tobin and Jennie Dusheck, Asking About Life (2005), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bacteriophage (2)  |  Cause (541)  |  Culture (143)  |  Cure (122)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Flash (49)  |  Glance (34)  |  Growth (187)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Man (2251)  |  Microbe (28)  |  Moment (253)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Rare (89)  |  Research (664)  |  Reward (68)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sick (81)  |  Spread (83)  |  Test (211)  |  Test Tube (12)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understood (156)  |  Virus (27)  |  Will (2355)

Perché la vita è dolore e l’amore godimento è un anestetico
Life is pain and the enjoyment of love is an anesthetic.
In Il mestiere di vivere (1947), 78. Translated as The Burning Brand: Diaries 1935-1950 (1961), 90.
Science quotes on:  |  Anesthetic (3)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)

[Describing the effects of over-indulgence in wine:]
But most too passive, when the blood runs low
Too weakly indolent to strive with pain,
And bravely by resisting conquer fate,
Try Circe's arts; and in the tempting bowl
Of poisoned nectar sweet oblivion swill.
Struck by the powerful charm, the gloom dissolves
In empty air; Elysium opens round,
A pleasing frenzy buoys the lightened soul,
And sanguine hopes dispel your fleeting care;
And what was difficult, and what was dire,
Yields to your prowess and superior stars:
The happiest you of all that e'er were mad,
Or are, or shall be, could this folly last.
But soon your heaven is gone: a heavier gloom
Shuts o'er your head; and, as the thundering stream,
Swollen o'er its banks with sudden mountain rain,
Sinks from its tumult to a silent brook,
So, when the frantic raptures in your breast
Subside, you languish into mortal man;
You sleep, and waking find yourself undone,
For, prodigal of life, in one rash night
You lavished more than might support three days.
A heavy morning comes; your cares return
With tenfold rage. An anxious stomach well
May be endured; so may the throbbing head;
But such a dim delirium, such a dream,
Involves you; such a dastardly despair
Unmans your soul, as maddening Pentheus felt,
When, baited round Citheron's cruel sides,
He saw two suns, and double Thebes ascend.
The Art of Preserving Health: a Poem in Four Books (2nd. ed., 1745), Book IV, 108-110.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Bank (31)  |  Blood (134)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Despair (40)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dire (6)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Dream (208)  |  Drunk (10)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empty (80)  |  Fate (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Folly (43)  |  Frenzy (6)  |  Gloom (9)  |  Headache (5)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hope (299)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Low (80)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Night (120)  |  Open (274)  |  Poison (40)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Prodigal (2)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Rash (14)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Saw (160)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soon (186)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Stream (81)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sun (385)  |  Superior (81)  |  Support (147)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tempting (10)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Waking (17)  |  Wine (38)  |  Yield (81)

A disease which new and obscure to you, Doctor, will be known only after death; and even then not without an autopsy will you examine it with exacting pains. But rare are those among the extremely busy clinicians who are willing or capable of doing this correctly.
In Atrocis, nee Descipti Prius, Morbi Historia as translated in Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (1944), 43, 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Autopsy (3)  |  Busy (28)  |  Capable (168)  |  Clinician (2)  |  Correct (86)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doing (280)  |  Exacting (4)  |  Examine (78)  |  Known (454)  |  New (1216)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Rare (89)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)

A living speck—the merest dab of life—capable of pleasure and pain, is far more interesting to me than all the immensities of mere matter.
In Jean-Henri Fabre and Alexander Teixeira de Mattos (trans.), Fabre’s Book of Insects (1921, 1998), 120.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Capable (168)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mere (84)  |  More (2559)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Speck (23)

A New Arithmetic: “I am not much of a mathematician,” said the cigarette, “but I can add nervous troubles to a boy, I can subtract from his physical energy, I can multiply his aches and pains, I can divide his mental powers, I can take interest from his work and discount his chances for success.”
Anonymous
In Henry Ford, The Case Against the Little White Slaver (1914), Vol. 3, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Ache (7)  |  Addition (66)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Boy (94)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Divide (75)  |  Energy (344)  |  Interest (386)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Nerve (79)  |  New (1216)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Subtraction (4)  |  Success (302)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Work (1351)

A perfectionist is a man who takes infinite pains and gives them to others.
In Ashton Applewhite, William R. Evans and Andrew Frothingham, And I Quote (2003), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Infinite (231)  |  Man (2251)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfectionist (3)

A surgeon should give as little pain as possible while he is treating the patient, and no pain at all when he charges his fee.
Anonymous
‘FRCS’ in The Times, quoted by Reginald Pound in Harley Street (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Charge (59)  |  Little (707)  |  Money (170)  |  Patient (199)  |  Possible (552)  |  Surgeon (63)

A weird happening has occurred in the case of a lansquenet named Daniel Burghammer, of the squadron of Captain Burkhard Laymann Zu Liebenau, of the honorable Madrucci Regiment in Piadena, in Italy. When the same was on the point of going to bed one night he complained to his wife, to whom he had been married by the Church seven years ago, that he had great pains in his belly and felt something stirring therein. An hour thereafter he gave birth to a child, a girl. When his wife was made aware of this, she notified the occurrence at once. Thereupon he was examined and questioned. … He confessed on the spot that he was half man and half woman and that for more than seven years he had served as a soldier in Hungary and the Netherlands… . When he was born he was christened as a boy and given in baptism the name of Daniel… . He also stated that while in the Netherlands he only slept once with a Spaniard, and he became pregnant therefrom. This, however, he kept a secret unto himself and also from his wife, with whom he had for seven years lived in wedlock, but he had never been able to get her with child… . The aforesaid soldier is able to suckle the child with his right breast only and not at all on the left side, where he is a man. He has also the natural organs of a man for passing water. Both are well, the child is beautiful, and many towns have already wished to adopt it, which, however, has not as yet been arranged. All this has been set down and described by notaries. It is considered in Italy to be a great miracle, and is to be recorded in the chronicles. The couple, however, are to be divorced by the clergy.
Anonymous
'From Piadena in Italy, the 26th day of May 1601'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) The Fugger Newsletter (1970), 247-248. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg. This was footnoted in The Story of the Secret Service (1937), 698. https://books.google.com/books?id=YfssAAAAMAAJ Richard Wilmer Rowan - 1937
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Birth (147)  |  Both (493)  |  Boy (94)  |  Captain (14)  |  Child (307)  |  Church (56)  |  Confess (42)  |  Consider (416)  |  Divorce (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happening (58)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hungary (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Organ (115)  |  Passing (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Record (154)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Right (452)  |  Secret (194)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Something (719)  |  Water (481)  |  Wife (41)  |  Wish (212)  |  Woman (151)  |  Year (933)

According to the Boshongo people of central Africa, in the beginning, there was only darkness, water, and the great god Bumba. One day Bumba, in pain from a stomach ache, vomited up the sun. The sun dried up some of the water, leaving land. Still in pain, Bumba vomited up the moon, the stars, and then some animals. The leopard, the crocodile, the turtle, and finally, man. This creation myth, like many others, tries to answer the questions we all ask. Why are we here? Where did we come from?
Lecture (1987), 'The Origin of the Universe', collected in Black Holes And Baby Universes And Other Essays (1993), 99.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Africa (35)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Central (80)  |  Creation (327)  |  Crocodile (14)  |  Darkness (68)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Land (115)  |  Leopard (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moon (237)  |  Myth (56)  |  Origin Of Earth (9)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Question (621)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Still (613)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Stomachache (3)  |  Sun (385)  |  Turtle (8)  |  Vomit (3)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)

All our knowledge merely helps us to die a more painful death than the animals that know nothing. A day will come when science will turn upon its error and no longer hesitate to shorten our woes. A day will come when it will dare and act with certainty; when life, grown wiser, will depart silently at its hour, knowing that it has reached its term.
Our Eternity, translated by Alexander Teixeira de Mattos (1913), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Dare (50)  |  Death (388)  |  Error (321)  |  Hesitate (22)  |  Hour (186)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Merely (316)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Term (349)  |  Turn (447)  |  Will (2355)

All pain is one malady with many names.
The Doctor. In John Maxwell Edmonds (ed.),The Fragments of Attic Comedy After Meineke, Bergk, and Kock (1957), 211.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Malady (8)  |  Name (333)

Although a science fair can seem like a big “pain” it can help you understand important scientific principles, such as Newton’s First Law of Inertia, which states: “A body at rest will remain at rest until 8:45 p.m. the night before the science fair project is due, at which point the body will come rushing to the body’s parents, who are already in their pajamas, and shout, “I JUST REMEMBERED THE SCIENCE FAIR IS TOMORROW AND WE GOTTA GO TO THE STORE RIGHT NOW!”
'Science: It’s Just Not Fair', Miami Herald (22 Mar 1998)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Already (222)  |  Body (537)  |  Due (141)  |  First (1283)  |  Important (209)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Law (894)  |  Parent (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Principle (507)  |  Project (73)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rest (280)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fair (3)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Shout (25)  |  State (491)  |  Store (48)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

And so the great truth, now a paradox, may become a commonplace, that man is greater than his surroundings, and that the production of a breed of men and women, even in our great cities, less prone to disease, and pain, more noble in aspect, more rational in habits, more exultant in the pure joy of living, is not only scientifically possible, but that even the partial fulfillment of this dream, if dream it be, is the most worthy object towards which the lover of his kind can devote the best energies of his life.
In 'The Breed of Man', The Nineteenth Century, (Oct 1900), 669, as collected in Martin Polley (ed.), The History of Sport in Britain, 1880-1914: Sport, Education, and Improvement (2004), Vol. 2, 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (124)  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dream (208)  |  Fulfillment (18)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Habit (168)  |  Joy (107)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Noble (90)  |  Object (422)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Possible (552)  |  Production (183)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rational (90)  |  Truth (1057)

Anyone who understands algebraic notation, reads at a glance in an equation results reached arithmetically only with great labour and pains.
From Recherches sur les Principes Mathématiques de la Théorie des Richesses (1838), as translated by Nathaniel T. Bacon in 'Preface', Researches Into Mathematical Principles of the Theory of Wealth (1897), 4. From the original French, “Quiconque connaît la notation algébrique, lit d'un clin-d'œil dans une équation le résultat auquel on parvient péniblement par des règles de fausse position, dans l'arithmétique de Banque.”
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Equation (132)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Labour (98)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Notation (27)  |  Reach (281)  |  Read (287)  |  Result (677)  |  Understand (606)

Architects who have aimed at acquiring manual skill without scholarship have never been able to reach a position of authority to correspond to their pains, while those who relied only upon theories and scholarship were obviously hunting the shadow, not the substance. But those who have a thorough knowledge of both, like men armed at all points, have the sooner attained their object and carried authority with them.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 1, Sec. 2. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Arm (81)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Authority (95)  |  Both (493)  |  Education (378)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Manual (7)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Point (580)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rely (11)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Skill (109)  |  Substance (248)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thorough (40)

Ask a follower of Bacon what [science] the new philosophy, as it was called in the time of Charles the Second, has effected for mankind, and his answer is ready; “It has lengthened life; it has mitigated pain; it has extinguished diseases; it has increased the fertility of the soil; it has given new securities to the mariner; it has furnished new arms to the warrior; it has spanned great rivers and estuaries with bridges of form unknown to our fathers; it has guided the thunderbolt innocuously from heaven to earth; it has lighted up the night with the splendour of the day; it has extended the range of the human vision; it has multiplied the power of the human muscles; it has accelerated motion; it has annihilated distance; it has facilitated intercourse, correspondence, all friendly offices, all dispatch of business; it has enabled man to descend to the depths of the sea, to soar into the air, to penetrate securely into the noxious recesses of the earth, to traverse the land in cars which whirl along without horses, to cross the ocean in ships which run ten knots an hour against the wind. These are but a part of its fruits, and of its first-fruits; for it is a philosophy which never rests, which has never attained, which is never perfect. Its law is progress. A point which yesterday was invisible is its goal to-day, and will be its starting-point to-morrow.”
From essay (Jul 1837) on 'Francis Bacon' in Edinburgh Review. In Baron Thomas Babington Macaulay and Lady Trevelyan (ed.) The Works of Lord Macaulay Complete (1871), Vol. 6, 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Against (332)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Business (149)  |  Call (769)  |  Car (71)  |  Cave (15)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Depth (94)  |  Descend (47)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Estuary (3)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Extend (128)  |  Father (110)  |  Fertility (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Horse (74)  |  Hour (186)  |  Human (1468)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Knot (11)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Lighting (5)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mining (18)  |  Motion (310)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Noxious (6)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Office (71)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Progress (465)  |  Range (99)  |  Rest (280)  |  River (119)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Soar (23)  |  Soil (86)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Strength (126)  |  Telegraph (38)  |  Thunderbolt (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vision (123)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Yesterday (36)

Bacteria represent the world’s greatest success story. They are today and have always been the modal organisms on earth; they cannot be nuked to oblivion and will outlive us all. This time is their time, not the ‘age of mammals’ as our textbooks chauvinistically proclaim. But their price for such success is permanent relegation to a microworld, and they cannot know the joy and pain of consciousness. We live in a universe of trade-offs; complexity and persistence do not work well as partners.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Bacterium (5)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Live (628)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Microworld (2)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Organism (220)  |  Outlive (3)  |  Partner (5)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Price (51)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Relegation (3)  |  Represent (155)  |  Story (118)  |  Success (302)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Both died, ignored by most; they neither sought nor found public favour, for high roads never lead there. Laurent and Gerhardt never left such roads, were never tempted to peruse those easy successes which, for strongly marked characters, offer neither allure nor gain. Their passion was for the search for truth; and, preferring their independence to their advancement, their convictions to their interests, they placed their love for science above that of their worldly goods; indeed above that for life itself, for death was the reward for their pains. Rare example of abnegation, sublime poverty that deserves the name nobility, glorious death that France must not forget!
'Éloge de Laurent et Gerhardt', Moniteur Scientifique (1862), 4, 473-83, trans. Alan J. Rocke.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Allure (4)  |  Both (493)  |  Character (243)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Death (388)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Easy (204)  |  Fame (50)  |  Forget (115)  |  Gain (145)  |  Charles Gerhardt (3)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Good (889)  |  High (362)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Independence (34)  |  Interest (386)  |  Auguste Laurent (5)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  Marked (55)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Name (333)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nobility (4)  |  Offer (141)  |  Passion (114)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Rare (89)  |  Reward (68)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Success (302)  |  Truth (1057)

By firm immutable immortal laws Impress’d on Nature by the GREAT FIRST CAUSE,
Say, MUSE! how rose from elemental strife
Organic forms, and kindled into life;
How Love and Sympathy with potent charm
Warm the cold heart, the lifted hand disarm;
Allure with pleasures, and alarm with pains,
And bind Society in golden chains.
From 'Production of Life', The Temple of Nature; or, The Origin of Society: A Poem, with Philosophical Notes (1803), 3, Canto I, lines 1-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Alarm (18)  |  Allure (4)  |  Bind (25)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chain (50)  |  Charm (51)  |  Cold (112)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Golden (45)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Kindled (2)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Muse (10)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organic (158)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Poem (96)  |  Potent (12)  |  Rose (34)  |  Say (984)  |  Society (326)  |  Strife (9)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Warm (69)

By research in pure science I mean research made without any idea of application to industrial matters but solely with the view of extending our knowledge of the Laws of Nature. I will give just one example of the ‘utility’ of this kind of research, one that has been brought into great prominence by the War—I mean the use of X-rays in surgery. Now, not to speak of what is beyond money value, the saving of pain, or, it may be, the life of the wounded, and of bitter grief to those who loved them, the benefit which the state has derived from the restoration of so many to life and limb, able to render services which would otherwise have been lost, is almost incalculable. Now, how was this method discovered? It was not the result of a research in applied science starting to find an improved method of locating bullet wounds. This might have led to improved probes, but we cannot imagine it leading to the discovery of X-rays. No, this method is due to an investigation in pure science, made with the object of discovering what is the nature of Electricity. The experiments which led to this discovery seemed to be as remote from ‘humanistic interest’ —to use a much misappropriated word—as anything that could well be imagined. The apparatus consisted of glass vessels from which the last drops of air had been sucked, and which emitted a weird greenish light when stimulated by formidable looking instruments called induction coils. Near by, perhaps, were great coils of wire and iron built up into electro-magnets. I know well the impression it made on the average spectator, for I have been occupied in experiments of this kind nearly all my life, notwithstanding the advice, given in perfect good faith, by non-scientific visitors to the laboratory, to put that aside and spend my time on something useful.
In Speech made on behalf of a delegation from the Conjoint Board of Scientific Studies in 1916 to Lord Crewe, then Lord President of the Council. In George Paget Thomson, J. J. Thomson and the Cavendish Laboratory in His Day (1965), 167-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Application (242)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Average (82)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Call (769)  |  Consist (223)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Drop (76)  |  Due (141)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grief (18)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Impression (114)  |  Induction (77)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Iron (96)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Looking (189)  |  Magnet (20)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Method (505)  |  Money (170)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Non-Scientific (7)  |  Object (422)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Probe (12)  |  Prominence (5)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Ray (114)  |  Remote (83)  |  Render (93)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Service (110)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spend (95)  |  State (491)  |  Suck (8)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Utility (49)  |  Value (365)  |  Vessel (63)  |  View (488)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wire (35)  |  Word (619)  |  Wound (26)  |  X-ray (37)

Christian Science … is the direct denial both of science and of Christianity, for Science rests wholly on the recognition of truth and Christianity on the recognition of pain.
From The Illustrated London News (1 Nov 1930), 177, Part 2, 750. In 'More on American Optimism', Collected Works (1990), Vol. 35, 406-407.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Christian (43)  |  Christian Science (3)  |  Christianity (11)  |  Denial (17)  |  Direct (225)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Wholly (88)

Disease is an abnormal state of the body which primarily and independently produces a disturbance in the normal functions of the body. It may be an abnormality of temperament or form (structure). Symptom is a manifestation of some abnormal state in the body. It may be harmful as a colic pain or harmless as the flushing of cheeks in peripneumonia.
Avicenna
'A Discussion of the Cause of Disease and Symptoms', in The Canon of Medicine, adapted by L. Bakhtiar (1999), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Disease (328)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Health (193)  |  Independently (24)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Temperament (17)

Disinterestedness is as great a puzzle and paradox as ever. Indeed, strictly speaking, it is a species of irrationality, or insanity, as regards the individual’s self; a contradiction of the most essential nature of a sentient being, which is to move to pleasure and from pain.
In On the Study of Character: Including an Estimate of Phrenology (1861), 202.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Essential (199)  |  Great (1574)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Insanity (8)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Regard (305)  |  Self (267)  |  Sentient (7)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Species (401)

Doctors have been exposed—you always will be exposed—to the attacks of those persons who consider their own undisciplined emotions more important than the world's most bitter agonies—the people who would limit and cripple and hamper research because they fear research may be accompanied by a little pain and suffering.
Doctors (1908), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attack (84)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Consider (416)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Fear (197)  |  Limit (280)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Physician (273)  |  Research (664)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Everything that the human race has done and thought is concerned with the satisfaction of deeply felt needs and the assuagement of pain. One has to keep this constantly in mind if one wishes to understand spiritual movements and their development. Feeling and longing are the motive force behind all human endeavor and human creation, in however exalted a guise the latter may present themselves to us.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Concern (228)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Creation (327)  |  Deeply (17)  |  Development (422)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Force (487)  |  Guise (5)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Keep (101)  |  Latter (21)  |  Long (790)  |  Longing (19)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motive (59)  |  Movement (155)  |  Need (290)  |  Present (619)  |  Race (268)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Wish (212)

Farm animals feel pleasure and sadness, excitement and resentment, depression, fear, and pain. They are far more aware and intelligent than we ever imagined … They are individuals in their own right.
In preface contributed to Amy Hatkoff, The Inner World of Farm Animals (2009), 12-13.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aware (31)  |  Depression (24)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Farm (26)  |  Farming (8)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  More (2559)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Resentment (6)  |  Right (452)  |  Sadness (35)

First, it must be a pleasure to study the human body the most miraculous masterpiece of nature and to learn about the smallest vessel and the smallest fiber. But second and most important, the medical profession gives the opportunity to alleviate the troubles of the body, to ease the pain, to console a person who is in distress, and to lighten the hour of death of many a sufferer.
Reasons for his choice of medicine as a career, from essay written during his last year in the Gymnasium (high school). As quoted in Leslie Dunn, Rudolf Virchow: Now You Know His Name (2012), 8-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Alleviate (4)  |  Body (537)  |  Career (75)  |  Console (2)  |  Death (388)  |  Distress (9)  |  Ease (35)  |  Fiber (16)  |  First (1283)  |  Hour (186)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Importance (286)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lighten (2)  |  Masterpiece (9)  |  Medical (26)  |  Miraculous (11)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Person (363)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Profession (99)  |  Smallest (9)  |  Study (653)  |  Sufferer (7)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Vessel (63)

For thousands of years men have striven and suffered and begotten and woman have brought forth in pain. A hundred years ago, perhaps, another man sat on this spot; like you he gazed with awe and yearning in his heart at the dying light on the glaciers. Like you he was begotten of man and born of woman. He felt pain and brief joy as you do. Was he someone else? Was it not you yourself? What is this Self of yours? What was the necessary condition for making the thing conceived this time into you, just you and not someone else?
In Seek for the Road (1925). Quoted in Ken Wilber, Quantum Questions (1984), 96-97.
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (43)  |  Begotten (2)  |  Birth (147)  |  Brief (36)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Condition (356)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dying (2)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Joy (107)  |  Light (607)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Self (267)  |  Sit (48)  |  Strive (46)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Woman (151)  |  Year (933)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

Hence when a person is in great pain, the cause of which he cannot remove, he sets his teeth firmly together, or bites some substance between them with great vehemence, as another mode of violent exertion to produce a temporary relief. Thus we have the proverb where no help can be has in pain, 'to grin and abide;' and the tortures of hell are said to be attended with 'gnashing of teeth.'Describing a suggestion of the origin of the grin in the present form of a proverb, 'to grin and bear it.'
Zoonomia, Or, The Laws of Organic Life, in three parts (1803), Vol. 1, 330.
Science quotes on:  |  Attend (65)  |  Bear (159)  |  Bite (17)  |  Cause (541)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Origin (239)  |  Person (363)  |  Present (619)  |  Proverb (27)  |  Relief (30)  |  Remove (45)  |  Set (394)  |  Substance (248)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Together (387)  |  Torture (29)

Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999) 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bearable (2)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Corpse (6)  |  Crown (38)  |  Death (388)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Defy (11)  |  Effort (227)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Form (959)  |  Hero (42)  |  History (673)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Love (309)  |  More (2559)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Part (222)  |  Patriot (5)  |  Pedestal (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Prestige (14)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Render (93)  |  Represent (155)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Sake (58)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Statue (16)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Substantial (24)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triumph (73)

I am a strong advocate for free thought on all subjects, yet it appears to me (whether rightly or wrongly) that direct arguments against christianity & theism produce hardly any effect on the public; & freedom of thought is best promoted by the gradual illumination of men's minds, which follow[s] from the advance of science. It has, therefore, been always my object to avoid writing on religion, & I have confined myself to science. I may, however, have been unduly biassed by the pain which it would give some members of my family, if I aided in any way direct attacks on religion.
Letter to E.B. Aveling (13 Oct 1880).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Advocate (18)  |  Against (332)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attack (84)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Best (459)  |  Direct (225)  |  Effect (393)  |  Family (94)  |  Follow (378)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Object (422)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Strong (174)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)  |  Way (1217)  |  Writing (189)

I am patriot enough to take pains to bring this usefull invention [smallpox inoculation] into fashion in England, and I should not fail to write to some of our Doctors very particularly about it, if I knew anyone of 'em that I thought had Virtue enough to destroy such a considerable branch of Revenue for the good of Mankind, but that Distemper is too beneficial to them not to expose to all their Resentment the hardy wight that should undertake to put an end to it.
Letter to Sarah Chiswell (1 Apr 1717). In Robert Halsband (ed.), The Complete Letters of the Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1965), Vol. 1, 339.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Branch (150)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Distemper (5)  |  Doctor (187)  |  End (590)  |  England (40)  |  Enough (340)  |  Expose (23)  |  Fail (185)  |  Good (889)  |  Inoculation (9)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Patriot (5)  |  Resentment (6)  |  Revenue (3)  |  Smallpox (14)  |  Thought (953)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Write (230)

I am very astonished that the scientific picture of the real world around me is deficient. It gives a lot of factual information, puts all our experience in a magnificently consistent order, but it is ghastly silent about all and sundry that is really near to our heart, that really matters to us. It cannot tell us a word about red and blue, bitter and sweet, physical pain and physical delight; it knows nothing of beautiful and ugly, good or bad, God and eternity. Science sometimes pretends to answer questions in these domains, but the answers are very often so silly that we are not inclined to take them seriously.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonished (9)  |  Bad (180)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Blue (56)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Deficient (3)  |  Delight (108)  |  Domain (69)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Experience (467)  |  Factual (8)  |  Ghastly (5)  |  Give (202)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Heart (229)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Information (166)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lot (151)  |  Magnificently (2)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (632)  |  Physical (508)  |  Picture (143)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Question (621)  |  Real World (14)  |  Really (78)  |  Red (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Silent (29)  |  Silly (17)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Sundry (4)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Tell (340)  |  Ugly (14)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

I believe with Schopenhauer that one of the strongest motives that lead men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one’s own ever shifting desires. A finely tempered nature longs to escape from personal life into the world of objective perception and thought; this desire may be compared with the townsman’s irresistible longing to escape from his noisy, cramped surroundings into the silence of high mountains, where the eye ranges freely through the still, pure air and fondly traces out the restful contours apparently built for eternity.
Address at The Physical Society, Berlin (1918) for Max Planck’s 60th birthday, 'Principles of Research', collected in Essays in Science (1934) 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Apparently (20)  |  Art (657)  |  Belief (578)  |  Built (7)  |  Compared (8)  |  Contour (3)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dreariness (3)  |  Escape (80)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Finely (2)  |  Freely (13)  |  High (362)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Hopelessness (6)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Longing (19)  |  Motive (59)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noisy (2)  |  Objective (91)  |  Perception (97)  |  Personal (67)  |  Pure (291)  |  Range (99)  |  Restful (2)  |  Schopenhauer (6)  |  Arthur Schopenhauer (17)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Shifting (5)  |  Silence (56)  |  Still (613)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Tempered (2)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  World (1774)

I call that part of the human body irritable, which becomes shorter upon being touched; very irritable if it contracts upon a slight touch, and the contrary if by a violent touch it contracts but little. I call that a sensible part of the human body, which upon being touched transmits the impression of it to the soul; and in brutes, in whom the existence of a soul is not so clear, I call those parts sensible, the Irritation of which occasions evident signs of pain and disquiet in the animal. On the contrary, I call that insensible, which being burnt, tore, pricked, or cut till it is quite destroyed, occasions no sign of pain nor convulsion, nor any sort of change in the situation of the body.
'A Treatise on the Sensible and Irritable Parts of Animals' (Read 1752). Trans. 1755 and reprinted in Bulletin of the Institute of the History of Medicine, 1936, 4(2), 658-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Brute (28)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cut (114)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impression (114)  |  Little (707)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Situation (113)  |  Soul (226)  |  Touch (141)

I much condole with you on your late loss... pains and diseases of the mind are only cured by Forgetfulness;-—Reason but skins the wound, which is perpetually liable to fester again.
Letter to Richard Lovell Edgeworth, 24 April 1790. Quoted in Desmond King-Hele (ed.), The Letters of Erasmus Darwin (1981), 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Disease (328)  |  Forgetfulness (7)  |  Late (118)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Reason (744)  |  Skin (47)  |  Wound (26)

I should object to any experimentation which can justly be called painful, for the purpose of elementary instruction ... [but I regret] a condition of the law which permits a boy to troll for pike, or set lines with live frog bait, for idle amusement; and, at the same time, lays the teacher of that boy open to the penalty of fine and imprisonment, if he uses the same animal for the purpose of exhibiting one of the most beautiful and instructive of physiological spectacles, the circulation in the web of the foot. ... [Maybe the frog is] inconvenienced by being wrapped up in a wet rag, and having his toes tied out ... But you must not inflict the least pain on a vertebrated animal for scientific purposes (though you may do a good deal in that way for gain or for sport) without due licence of the Secretary of State for the Home Department, granted under the authority of the Vivisection Act.
... [Yet, in] 1877, two persons may be charged with cruelty to animals. One has impaled a frog, and suffered the creature to writhe about in that condition for hours; the other has pained the animal no more than one of us would be pained by tying strings round his fingers, and keeping him in the position of a hydropathic patient. The first offender says, 'I did it because I find fishing very amusing,' and the magistrate bids him depart in peace; nay, probably wishes him good sport. The second pleads, 'I wanted to impress a scientific truth, with a distinctness attainable in no other way, on the minds of my scholars,' and the magistrate fines him five pounds.
I cannot but think that this is an anomalous and not wholly creditable state of things.
'On Elementary Instruction in Physiology'. Science and Culture (1882), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Animal (617)  |  Authority (95)  |  Bait (2)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boy (94)  |  Call (769)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Creditable (3)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Deal (188)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Find (998)  |  Fine (33)  |  First (1283)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Frog (38)  |  Gain (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Home (170)  |  Hour (186)  |  Idle (33)  |  Impress (64)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Law (894)  |  Live (628)  |  Magistrate (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peace (108)  |  Permit (58)  |  Person (363)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Regret (30)  |  Say (984)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Set (394)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)  |  Sport (22)  |  State (491)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vivisection (7)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)

I, Galileo Galilei, son of the late Vincenzo Galilei, of Florence, aged seventy years, being brought personally to judgment, and kneeling before your Most Eminent and Most Reverend Lords Cardinals, General Inquisitors of the universal Christian republic against heretical depravity, having before my eyes the Holy Gospels, which I touch with my own hands, swear that I have always believed, and now believe, and with the help of God will in future believe, every article which the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of Rome holds, teaches, and preaches. But because I have been enjoined by this Holy Office altogether to abandon the false opinion which maintains that the sun is the centre and immovable, and forbidden to hold, defend, or teach the said false doctrine in any manner, and after it hath been signified to me that the said doctrine is repugnant with the Holy Scripture, I have written and printed a book, in which I treat of the same doctrine now condemned, and adduce reasons with great force in support of the same, without giving any solution, and therefore have been judged grievously suspected of heresy; that is to say, that I held and believed that the sun is the centre of the universe and is immovable, and that the earth is not the centre and is movable; willing, therefore, to remove from the minds of your Eminences, and of every Catholic Christian, this vehement suspicion rightfully entertained toward me, with a sincere heart and unfeigned faith, I abjure, curse, and detest the said errors and heresies, and generally every other error and sect contrary to Holy Church; and I swear that I will never more in future say or assert anything verbally, or in writing, which may give rise to a similar suspicion of me; but if I shall know any heretic, or anyone suspected of heresy, that I will denounce him to this Holy Office, or to the Inquisitor or Ordinary of the place where I may be; I swear, moreover, and promise, that I will fulfil and observe fully, all the penances which have been or shall be laid on me by this Holy Office. But if it shall happen that I violate any of my said promises, oaths, and protestations (which God avert!), I subject myself to all the pains and punishments which have been decreed and promulgated by the sacred canons, and other general and particular constitutions, against delinquents of this description. So may God help me, and his Holy Gospels which I touch with my own hands. I, the above-named Galileo Galilei, have abjured, sworn, promised, and bound myself as above, and in witness thereof with my own hand have subscribed this present writing of my abjuration, which I have recited word for word. At Rome, in the Convent of Minerva, June 22, 1633. I, Galileo Galilei, have abjured as above with my own hand.
Abjuration, 22 Jun 1633. In J.J. Fahie, Galileo, His Life and Work (1903), 319-321.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abjuration (2)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Bound (119)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Christian (43)  |  Church (56)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Curse (17)  |  Denounce (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Error (321)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Force (487)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heliocentric Model (7)  |  Heretic (8)  |  Holy (34)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Lord (93)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oath (10)  |  Observe (168)  |  Office (71)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remove (45)  |  Republic (15)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rome (19)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Say (984)  |  Solution (267)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Swear (6)  |  Teach (277)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Witness (54)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

If a man dies of cancer in fear and despair, then cry for his pain and celebrate his life. The other man, who fought like hell and laughed in the end, but also died, may have had an easier time in his final months, but took his leave with no more humanity.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (55)  |  Celebrate (19)  |  Cry (29)  |  Despair (40)  |  Die (86)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  End (590)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fight (44)  |  Final (118)  |  Hell (32)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Month (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Time (1877)

If Bacon erred here [in valuing mathematics only for its uses], we must acknowledge that we greatly prefer his error to the opposite error of Plato. We have no patience with a philosophy which, like those Roman matrons who swallowed abortives in order to preserve their shapes, takes pains to be barren for fear of being homely.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 396.
Science quotes on:  |  Abortive (2)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Barren (30)  |  Being (1278)  |  Error (321)  |  Fear (197)  |  Homely (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Patience (56)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Roman (36)  |  Shape (72)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)

If you could see what I almost daily see in my practice … persons … in the very last stages of wretched existence, emaciated to a skeleton, with both tables of the skull almost completely perforated in many places, half the nose gone, with rotten jaws, ulerated throats, breaths most pestiferous more intolerable than poisonous upas, limbs racked with the pains of the Inquisition, minds as imbecile as the puling babe, a grievous burden to themselves and a disgusting spectacle to others, you would exclaim as I have often done, 'O! the lamentable want of science that dictates the abuse (use) of that noxious drug calomel!'
[Calomel is the mercury compound, Hg2Cl2.]
Quoted in Wooster Beach, A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Health (1848), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Breath (59)  |  Completely (135)  |  Compound (113)  |  Daily (87)  |  Drug (57)  |  Emaciated (2)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Existence (456)  |  Inquisition (8)  |  Lamentable (5)  |  Last (426)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Noxious (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Poison (40)  |  Practice (204)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Skeleton (22)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Stage (143)  |  Table (104)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)  |  Wretched (8)

If you were going to risk all that, not just risk the hardship and the pain but risk your life. Put everything on line for a dream, for something that’s worth nothing, that can’t be proved to anybody. You just have the transient moment on a summit and when you come back down to the valley it goes. It is actually a completely illogical thing to do. It is not justifiable by any rational terms. That’s probably why you do it.
The Beckoning Silence
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Actually (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Anybody (42)  |  Back (390)  |  Completely (135)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Dream (208)  |  Everything (476)  |  Hardship (4)  |  Illogical (2)  |  Justifiable (3)  |  Life (1795)  |  Line (91)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Probably (49)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rational (90)  |  Risk (61)  |  Something (719)  |  Summit (25)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Transient (12)  |  Valley (32)  |  Why (491)  |  Worth (169)

Illness is the most heeded of doctors: to goodness and wisdom we only make promises; pain we obey.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (187)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Heed (12)  |  Illness (34)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obey (40)  |  Promise (67)  |  Wisdom (221)

In 1906 I indulged my temper by hurling invectives at Neo-Darwinians in the following terms. “I really do not wish to be abusive [to Neo-Darwinians]; but when I think of these poor little dullards, with their precarious hold of just that corner of evolution that a blackbeetle can understand—with their retinue of twopenny-halfpenny Torquemadas wallowing in the infamies of the vivisector’s laboratory, and solemnly offering us as epoch-making discoveries their demonstrations that dogs get weaker and die if you give them no food; that intense pain makes mice sweat; and that if you cut off a dog’s leg the three-legged dog will have a four-legged puppy, I ask myself what spell has fallen on intelligent and humane men that they allow themselves to be imposed on by this rabble of dolts, blackguards, imposters, quacks, liars, and, worst of all, credulous conscientious fools.”
In Back to Methuselah: A Metabiological Pentateuch (1921), lxi
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abuse (22)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Conscientious (7)  |  Corner (57)  |  Credulity (14)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Cut (114)  |  Death (388)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Dullard (2)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Food (199)  |  Fool (116)  |  Humane (18)  |  Hurling (2)  |  Impostor (3)  |  Infamy (2)  |  Inquisitor (6)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Invective (2)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Leg (34)  |  Liar (6)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Myself (212)  |  Poor (136)  |  Quack (18)  |  Retinue (3)  |  Starvation (13)  |  Sweat (15)  |  Temper (9)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Weakening (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Worst (57)

In its earliest development knowledge is self-sown. Impressions force themselves upon men’s senses whether they will or not, and often against their will. The amount of interest in which these impressions awaken is determined by the coarser pains and pleasures which they carry in their train or by mere curiosity; and reason deals with the materials supplied to it as far as that interest carries it, and no further. Such common knowledge is rather brought than sought; and such ratiocination is little more than the working of a blind intellectual instinct. It is only when the mind passes beyond this condition that it begins to evolve science. When simple curiosity passes into the love of knowledge as such, and the gratification of the æsthetic sense of the beauty of completeness and accuracy seems more desirable that the easy indolence of ignorance; when the finding out of the causes of things becomes a source of joy, and he is accounted happy who is successful in the search, common knowledge passes into what our forefathers called natural history, whence there is but a step to that which used to be termed natural philosophy, and now passes by the name of physical science.
In this final state of knowledge the phenomena of nature are regarded as one continuous series of causes and effects; and the ultimate object of science is to trace out that series, from the term which is nearest to us, to that which is at the farthest limit accessible to our means of investigation.
The course of nature as it is, as it has been, and as it will be, is the object of scientific inquiry; whatever lies beyond, above, or below this is outside science. But the philosopher need not despair at the limitation on his field of labor; in relation to the human mind Nature is boundless; and, though nowhere inaccessible, she is everywhere unfathomable.
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoölogy (1880), 2-3. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789-790.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Account (192)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Against (332)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Common (436)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deal (188)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Despair (40)  |  Determination (78)  |  Development (422)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Finding (30)  |  Force (487)  |  Forefather (4)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Ratiocination (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Successful (123)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tracing (3)  |  Train (114)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unfathomable (10)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

IN MEMORIAM: FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE
She whom we love, our Lady of Compassion,
Can never die, for Love forbids her death.
Love has bent down in his old kindly fashion,
And breathed upon her his immortal breath.
On wounded soldiers, in their anguish lying,
Her gentle spirit shall descend like rain.
Where the white flag with the red cross is flying,
There shall she dwell, the vanquisher of pain.
[In remembrance of 'The Lady of the Lamp' who died 13 Aug 1910.]
In New York Times (29 Aug 1910), 6. Collected in Summer of Love (1911), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Breath (59)  |  Compassion (11)  |  Death (388)  |  Descend (47)  |  Down (456)  |  Flag (11)  |  Flying (72)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Immortal (35)  |  In Memoriam (2)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Love (309)  |  Lying (55)  |  Never (1087)  |  Florence Nightingale (34)  |  Nurse (25)  |  Old (481)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Rain (62)  |  Remembrance (5)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Spirit (265)  |  White (127)  |  Wound (26)

In not a few the [opium-eating] habit has crept upon them almost unconsciously, during the medicinal use of opiates to soothe pain, to remove sleeplessness, or to arrest protracted bowel-complaint. The risk of this evil should therefore be carefully borne in mind, for life-long misery has often been caused by undue laxity in the prescribing of opiates.
In 'Clinical Lecture On The Treatment Of The Habit Of Opium-Eating', The British Medical Journal (15 Feb 1868), 1, No. 372, 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Addiction (5)  |  Arrest (8)  |  Bowel (16)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cause (541)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Creep (15)  |  Eating (45)  |  Evil (116)  |  Habit (168)  |  Laxity (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misery (30)  |  Opiate (2)  |  Opium (7)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Prescribing (5)  |  Protracted (2)  |  Remove (45)  |  Risk (61)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Use (766)

In the performance of our duty one feeling should direct us; the case we should consider as our own, and we should ask ourselves, whether, placed under similar circumstances, we should choose to submit to the pain and danger we are about to inflict.
Quoted in Bransby Blake Cooper, The Life of Sir Astley Cooper (1843), Vol. 2, 207.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Choose (112)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consider (416)  |  Danger (115)  |  Direct (225)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Performance (48)  |  Surgery (51)

Intellectual beauty is sufficient unto itself, and only for it rather than for the future good of humanity does the scholar condemn himself to arduous and painful labors.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Ardor (5)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemnation (15)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Itself (7)  |  Labor (107)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Sufficient (128)

It is a curious and painful fact that almost all the completely futile treatments that have been believed in during the long history of medical folly have been such as caused acute suffering to the patient. When anesthetics were discovered, pious people considered them an attempt to evade the will of God. It was pointed out, however, that when God extracted Adam's rib He put him into a deep sleep. This proved that anesthetics are all right for men; women, however, ought to suffer, because of the curse of Eve.
In An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1943), 13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acute (7)  |  Adam And Eve (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Anesthetic (3)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Completely (135)  |  Consider (416)  |  Curious (91)  |  Curse (17)  |  Deep (233)  |  Discover (553)  |  Extract (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Folly (43)  |  Futile (11)  |  God (757)  |  History (673)  |  Long (790)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  Pious (4)  |  Point (580)  |  Rib (6)  |  Right (452)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Will (2355)

It is as natural to man to die as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful as the other.
Of Death. In Carl Sagan, Broca’s Brain: Reflections on the Romance of Science (1979, 1986), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (147)  |  Death (388)  |  Infant (26)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Other (2236)

It is not failure but success that is forcing man off this earth. It is not sickness but the triumph of health... Our capacity to survive has expanded beyond the capacity of Earth to support us. The pains we are feeling are growing pains. We can solve growth problems in direct proportion to our capacity to find new worlds... If man stays on Earth, his extinction is sure even if he lasts till the sun expands and destroys him... It is no longer reasonable to assume that the meaning of life lies on this earth alone. If Earth is all there is for man, we are reaching the foreseeable end of man.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Assume (38)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Direct (225)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Failure (161)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Foreseeable (3)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Growth (187)  |  Health (193)  |  Last (426)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Solve (130)  |  Stay (25)  |  Success (302)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Survive (79)  |  Triumph (73)  |  World (1774)

It is often assumed that because the young child is not competent to study geometry systematically he need be taught nothing geometrical; that because it would be foolish to present to him physics and mechanics as sciences it is useless to present to him any physical or mechanical principles.
An error of like origin, which has wrought incalculable mischief, denies to the scholar the use of the symbols and methods of algebra in connection with his early essays in numbers because, forsooth, he is not as yet capable of mastering quadratics! … The whole infant generation, wrestling with arithmetic, seek for a sign and groan and travail together in pain for the want of it; but no sign is given them save the sign of the prophet Jonah, the withered gourd, fruitless endeavor, wasted strength.
From presidential address (9 Sep 1884) to the General Meeting of the American Social Science Association, 'Industrial Education', printed in Journal of Social Science (1885), 19, 121. Collected in Francis Amasa Walker, Discussions in Education (1899), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (113)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Assume (38)  |  Capable (168)  |  Child (307)  |  Competent (20)  |  Connection (162)  |  Deny (66)  |  Early (185)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Error (321)  |  Essay (27)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Fruitless (8)  |  Generation (242)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Groan (5)  |  Infant (26)  |  Mastering (11)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mischief (13)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Origin (239)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Quadratic (3)  |  Save (118)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sign (58)  |  Strength (126)  |  Study (653)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Together (387)  |  Travail (5)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)  |  Waste (101)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wrestle (2)  |  Young (227)

It is said to be the manner of hypochondriacs to change often their physician …For a physician who does not admit the reality of the disease cannot be supposed to take much pains to cure it.
First Lines of the Practice of Physic, (annoted by John Rotheram, 1796), Vol. 3, 297-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Cure (122)  |  Disease (328)  |  Hypochondriac (9)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Physician (273)  |  Reality (261)

It is the doctors who desert the dying and there is so much to be learned about pain.
Quoted in Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine (2001), 94, 430.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (388)  |  Desert (56)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Physician (273)

I’ll change my state with any wretch
Thou canst from gaol of dunghill fetch.
My pain’s past cure, another hell;
I may not in this torment dwell.
Now desperate I hate my life,
Lend me a halter or a knife!
All my griefs to this are jolly,
Naught so damned as melancholy.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Change (593)  |  Cure (122)  |  Grief (18)  |  Hate (64)  |  Jail (4)  |  Knife (23)  |  Life (1795)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Naught (10)  |  Past (337)  |  Psychology (154)  |  State (491)  |  Torment (18)  |  Wretch (5)

I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one.
Eighth stanza of poem 'On Turning 70'. The poem is printed in Michigan Office of Services to the Aging, Annual Report 2004 (2005), no page number.
Science quotes on:  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)

Knowing Pains
I studied parts
of a flower
to understand
its flowering.
I learned much
about my limits.
I had forgotten
Earth and climate.
Poem, in Starting Points: Poems (1971), 38. As quoted in Arthur Lerner, 'Poetry Therapy', The American Journal of Nursing (Aug 1973), 73, No. 8, 1338.
Science quotes on:  |  Botany (57)  |  Climate (97)  |  Earth (996)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Flower (106)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Limit (280)  |  Part (222)  |  Study (653)  |  Understand (606)

Let me tell you how at one time the famous mathematician Euclid became a physician. It was during a vacation, which I spent in Prague as I most always did, when I was attacked by an illness never before experienced, which manifested itself in chilliness and painful weariness of the whole body. In order to ease my condition I took up Euclid’s Elements and read for the first time his doctrine of ratio, which I found treated there in a manner entirely new to me. The ingenuity displayed in Euclid’s presentation filled me with such vivid pleasure, that forthwith I felt as well as ever.
Selbstbiographie (1875), 20. In Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath's Quotation-book (1914), 146.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Attack (84)  |  Biography (240)  |  Body (537)  |  Chill (9)  |  Condition (356)  |  Display (56)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Element (310)  |  Euclid (54)  |  First (1283)  |  Illness (34)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Physician (273)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Read (287)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Spent (85)  |  Tell (340)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vacation (4)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Weariness (6)  |  Whole (738)

Life spirals laboriously upward to higher and even higher levels, paying for every step.
As quoted in Mark Davidson, Uncommon Sense: The Life and Thought of Ludwig Von Bertalanffy (1901-1972), Father of General Systems Theory (1983), 220. Robert G.B. Reid follow this with an explanatory comment—Death was the price of the multicellular condition; pain the price of nervous integration; anxiety the price of consciousness—in Evolutionary Theory: The Unfinished Synthesis (1985), 236. Reid’s comment was not made in quotation marks. However, Bertanffy’s actually quote was concatenated with Reid's comment and attributed only to Bertanffy, in Michael Dowd, Thank God for Evolution: How the Marriage of Science and Religion (2008), 93, and subsequently requoted thusly by later authors.
Science quotes on:  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Condition (356)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Death (388)  |  Higher Level (3)  |  Integration (19)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Multicellular (4)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Pay (43)  |  Price (51)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Step (231)  |  Upward (43)

Like teeth husbands are hard to get and while we have them they give us a great deal of pain and trouble. But once we lose them they leave a wide gap.
Attributed (per W. H. Brock).
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (188)  |  Gap (33)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Husband (13)  |  Lose (159)  |  Loss (110)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Wide (96)

Medicine would be the ideal profession if it did not involve giving pain.
The Health Master (1913), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Ideal (99)  |  Involve (90)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Physician (273)  |  Profession (99)

Men ought to know that from the brain, and from the brain only, arise our pleasures, joys, laughter and jests, as well as our sorrows, pains, griefs and tears. Through it, in particular, we think, see, hear, and distinguish the ugly from the beautiful, the bad from the good, the pleasant from the unpleasant, in some cases using custom as a test, in others perceiving them from their utility. It is the same thing which makes us mad or delirious, inspires us with dread or fear, whether by night or by day, brings sleeplessness, inopportune mistakes, aimless anxieties, absent-mindedness, and acts that are contrary to habit. These things that we suffer all come from the brain, when it is not healthy, but becomes abnormally hot, cold, moist, or dry, or suffers any other unnatural affection to which it was not accustomed. Madness comes from its moistness.
The Sacred Disease, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. 2, 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Act (272)  |  Affection (43)  |  Aimless (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bad (180)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Become (815)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cold (112)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Custom (42)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Dry (57)  |  Fear (197)  |  Good (889)  |  Grief (18)  |  Habit (168)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hot (60)  |  Joy (107)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Mad (53)  |  Madness (33)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Moist (12)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  See (1081)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Tear (42)  |  Test (211)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Unnatural (15)  |  Unpleasant (12)  |  Utility (49)

Nature takes as much Pains in the Womb for the forming of a Beggar as an Emperor.
No. 3507 in Gnomologia: Adagies and Proverbs, Wise Sentences and Witty Sayings (1732), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Beggar (5)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Formation (96)  |  Forming (42)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Womb (24)

No anatomist ever discovered a system of organization, calculated to produce pain and disease; or, in explaining the parts of the human body, ever said, this is to irritate; this is to inflame; this duct is to convey the gravel to the kidneys; this gland to secrete the humour which forms the gout: if by chance he come at a part of which he knows not the use, the most he can say is, that it is useless; no one ever suspects that it is put there to incommode, to annoy, or torment.
The Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy (1785), Vol. 1, 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Annoyance (3)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Chance (239)  |  Conveyance (2)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Duct (2)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gland (14)  |  Gout (5)  |  Gravel (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Humour (116)  |  Irritation (2)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Know (1518)  |  Most (1731)  |  Organization (114)  |  Part (222)  |  Production (183)  |  Say (984)  |  Secretion (5)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  System (537)  |  Torment (18)  |  Use (766)  |  Uselessness (22)

Not only such Actions as were at first Indifferent to us, but even such as were Painful, will by Custom and Practice become Pleasant. Sir Francis Bacon observes in his Natural Philosophy, that our Taste is never pleased better, than with those things which at first created a Disgust in it. He gives particular Instances of Claret, Coffee, and other Liquors, which the Palate seldom approves upon the first Taste; but when it has once got a Relish of them, generally retains it for Life.
In The Spectator (2 Aug 1712), No. 447, collected in The Spectator (9th ed., 1728), Vol. 6, 225-226.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Addiction (5)  |  Alcoholism (6)  |  Approval (10)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Custom (42)  |  Disgust (10)  |  First (1283)  |  Indifference (13)  |  Life (1795)  |  Liquor (6)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Palate (3)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Practice (204)  |  Relish (4)  |  Retain (56)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

On the one hand, then, in the reproductive functions proper—menstruation, defloration, pregnancy and parturition—woman is biologically doomed to suffer. Nature seems to have no hesitation in administering to her strong doses of pain, and she can do nothing but submit passively to the regimen prescribed. On the other hand, as regards sexual attraction, which is necessary for the act of impregnation, and as regards the erotic pleasures experienced during the act itself, the woman may be on an equal footing with the man.
'Passivity, Masochism and Femininity', Journal of Psychoanalysis, 1935, 16, 327.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doom (32)  |  Dose (16)  |  Function (228)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Man (2251)  |  Menstruation (3)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Pregnancy (9)  |  Proper (144)  |  Regard (305)  |  Sex (69)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Strong (174)  |  Woman (151)

One cannot help a man to come to accept his impending death if he remains in severe pain, one cannot give spiritual counsel to a woman who is vomiting, or help a wife and children say their goodbyes to a father who is so drugged that he cannot respond.
'The Principles of Symptom Control', in Ina Ajemian, Balfour M. Mount. (eds.) The R.V.H. Manual on Palliative/Hospice Care (1980), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Children (200)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Death (388)  |  Drug (57)  |  Father (110)  |  Goodbye (3)  |  Impending (4)  |  Man (2251)  |  Remain (349)  |  Say (984)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Vomit (3)  |  Vomiting (3)  |  Wife (41)  |  Woman (151)

One of the biggest roles of science fiction is to prepare people to accept the future without pain and to encourage a flexibility of the mind. Politicians should read science fiction, not westerns and detective stories.
(1984) Quoted in Jerome Agel (ed.), The Making of Kubrick's 2001 (4th Ed. 1970), 300. In James E. Combs, Polpop: Politics and Popular Culture in America (1984), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Detective (10)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Flexibility (6)  |  Future (429)  |  Mind (1338)  |  People (1005)  |  Politician (38)  |  Read (287)  |  Role (86)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Story (118)  |  Western (45)

One of the greatest pains to human nature is the pain of a new idea.
In Physics and Politics (1869, 1916), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Greatest (328)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Idea (843)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)

One of the strongest motives that lead men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one's own ever-shifting desires. A finely tempered nature longs to escape from the personal life into the world of objective perception and thought.
Albert Einstein and Walter Shropshire (ed.), The Joys of Research (1981), 40.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Desire (204)  |  Dreariness (3)  |  Escape (80)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Everyday Life (14)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Hopeless (16)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Motive (59)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Objective (91)  |  Perception (97)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Thought (953)  |  World (1774)

Only by following out the injunction of our great predecessor [William Harvey] to search out and study the secrets of Nature by way of experiment, can we hope to attain to a comprehension of 'the wisdom of the body and the understanding of the heart,' and thereby to the mastery of disease and pain, which will enable us to relieve the burden of mankind.
'The Wisdom of the Body', The Lancet (1923), 205, 870.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Body (537)  |  Burden (27)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Disease (328)  |  Enable (119)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Following (16)  |  Great (1574)  |  William Harvey (29)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hope (299)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Relief (30)  |  Search (162)  |  Secret (194)  |  Study (653)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)

Our contemporary culture, primed by population growth and driven by technology, has created problems of environmental degradation that directly affect all of our senses: noise, odors and toxins which bring physical pain and suffering, and ugliness, barrenness, and homogeneity of experience which bring emotional and psychological suffering and emptiness. In short, we are jeopardizing our human qualities by pursuing technology as an end rather than a means. Too often we have failed to ask two necessary questions: First, what human purpose will a given technology or development serve? Second, what human and environmental effects will it have?
Report of the Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution (7 Aug 1969). 'Environmental Quality: Summary and Discussion of Major Provisions', U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Legal Compilation, (Jan 1973), Water, Vol. 3, 1365. EPA website.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Barrenness (2)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Culture (143)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Development (422)  |  Drive (55)  |  Effect (393)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Emptiness (11)  |  End (590)  |  Environment (216)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fail (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Growth (187)  |  Homogeneity (8)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Noise (37)  |  Odor (10)  |  Physical (508)  |  Population (110)  |  Population Growth (8)  |  Problem (676)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Question (621)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Technology (257)  |  Toxin (8)  |  Two (937)  |  Ugliness (3)  |  Will (2355)

Pain is a sensation produced by something contrary to the course of nature and this sensation is set up by one of two circumstances: either a very sudden change of the temperament (or the bad effect of a contrary temperament) or a solution of continuity.
Avicenna
'A General Discussion of the Causes of Pain', in The Canon of Medicine, adapted by L. Bakhtiar (1999), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Change (593)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Course (409)  |  Effect (393)  |  Health (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Produced (187)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Set (394)  |  Solution (267)  |  Something (719)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Temperament (17)  |  Two (937)

Physical pain is easily forgotten, but a moral chagrin lasts indefinitely.
In Charlas de Café: pensamientos, anécdotas y confidencias (1920). (Café Chats: Thoughts, Anecdotes and Confidences). As translated in Peter McDonald (ed.) Oxford Dictionary of Medical Quotations (2004), 83.
Science quotes on:  |  Chagrin (2)  |  Easily (35)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Last (426)  |  Moral (195)  |  Physical (508)

Physiological response to thinking and to pain is the same; and man is not given to hurting himself.
Science quotes on:  |  Himself (461)  |  Hurting (2)  |  Man (2251)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Response (53)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)

Rachel Carson was the best thing America is capable of producing: a modest person, concerned, courageous, and profoundly right—all at the same time. Troubled by knowledge of an emerging threat to the web of life, she took pains to become informed, summoned her courage, breached her confines, and conveyed a diligently constructed message with eloquence enough to catalyze a new social movement. Her life addressed the promise and premise of being truly human.
In his Foreward to Rachel Carson, The Sea Around Us (1950, 2003), xvi.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  America (127)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Capable (168)  |  Rachel Carson (43)  |  Concern (228)  |  Construct (124)  |  Courage (69)  |  Eloquence (7)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Enough (340)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inform (47)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Message (49)  |  Modest (15)  |  Movement (155)  |  New (1216)  |  Person (363)  |  Premise (37)  |  Promise (67)  |  Right (452)  |  Social (252)  |  Summon (10)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Threat (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truly (116)  |  Web Of Life (7)

Science is a wonderful thing, but it has not yet succeeded in maximizing pleasure and minimizing pain, and that's all we asked of it.
Anonymous
In Dr. N Sreedharan, Quotations of Wit and Wisdom (2007), 68.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Science (3879)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Wonderful (149)

Science tries to answer the question: ‘How?’ How do cells act in the body? How do you design an airplane that will fly faster than sound? How is a molecule of insulin constructed? Religion, by contrast, tries to answer the question: ‘Why?’ Why was man created? Why ought I to tell the truth? Why must there be sorrow or pain or death? Science attempts to analyze how things and people and animals behave; it has no concern whether this behavior is good or bad, is purposeful or not. But religion is precisely the quest for such answers: whether an act is right or wrong, good or bad, and why.
Science and Imagination, ch. 4, Basic Books (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Airplane (41)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Animal (617)  |  Answer (366)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bad (180)  |  Behave (17)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Body (537)  |  Cell (138)  |  Concern (228)  |  Construct (124)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Create (235)  |  Death (388)  |  Design (195)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Fly (146)  |  Good (889)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Man (2251)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  People (1005)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Quest (39)  |  Question (621)  |  Religion (361)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Sound (183)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wrong (234)

Science will never be able to reduce the value of a sunset to arithmetic. Nor can it reduce friendship or statesmanship to a formula. Laughter and love, pain and loneliness, the challenge of beauty and truth: these will always surpass the scientific mastery of nature.
Louis Orr
As President, American Medical Association. From Commencement address at Emory University, Atlanta, 6 Jun 60
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Formula (98)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Loneliness (5)  |  Love (309)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Statesmanship (2)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

Science, then, is the attentive consideration of common experience; it is common knowledge extended and refined. Its validity is of the same order as that of ordinary perception; memory, and understanding. Its test is found, like theirs, in actual intuition, which sometimes consists in perception and sometimes in intent. The flight of science is merely longer from perception to perception, and its deduction more accurate of meaning from meaning and purpose from purpose. It generates in the mind, for each vulgar observation, a whole brood of suggestions, hypotheses, and inferences. The sciences bestow, as is right and fitting, infinite pains upon that experience which in their absence would drift by unchallenged or misunderstood. They take note, infer, and prophesy. They compare prophesy with event, and altogether they supply—so intent are they on reality—every imaginable background and extension for the present dream.
The Life of Reason, or the Phases of Human Progress (1954), 393.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Actual (117)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Background (43)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Common (436)  |  Compare (69)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consist (223)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Dream (208)  |  Event (216)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Flight (98)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inference (45)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Intent (8)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Memory (134)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Perception (97)  |  Present (619)  |  Prophesy (10)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reality (261)  |  Refinement (17)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Supply (93)  |  Test (211)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Validity (47)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Whole (738)

Self-esteem must be earned! When you dare to dream, dare to follow that dream, dare to suffer through the pain, sacrifice, self-doubts, and friction from the world, you will genuinely impress yourself.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dare (50)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dream (208)  |  Earn (7)  |  Follow (378)  |  Friction (14)  |  Genuinely (4)  |  Impress (64)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Esteem (6)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The basic symptoms which occur in pneumonia and which are never lacking are acute fever, sticking pain in the side, short rapid breaths, serrated pulse, and cough, mostly with sputum.
As quoted in Robert Taylor, White Coat Tales: Medicine's Heroes, Heritage, and Misadventures (2010), 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (7)  |  Basic (138)  |  Breath (59)  |  Cough (8)  |  Fever (29)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occur (150)  |  Pneumonia (7)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Short (197)  |  Side (233)  |  Sticking (3)  |  Symptom (34)

The body of man has in itself blood, phlegm, yellow bile and black bile; these make up the nature of this body, and through these he feels pain or enjoys health. Now he enjoys the most perfect health when these elements are duly proportioned to one another in respect of compounding, power and bulk, and when they are perfectly mingled.
Nature of Man, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, II.
Science quotes on:  |  Bile (5)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Element (310)  |  Feel (367)  |  Health (193)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Power (746)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Respect (207)  |  Through (849)  |  Yellow (30)

The brain can be developed just the same as the muscles can be developed, if one will only take the pains to train the mind to think. Why do so many men never amount to anything? Because they don't think!
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (151)  |  Brain (270)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Do (1908)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  Think (1086)  |  Train (114)  |  Training (80)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

The brain of man, like that of all animals is double, being parted down its centre by a thin membrane. For this reason pain is not always felt in the same part of the head, but sometimes on one side, sometimes on the other, and occasionally all over.
The Sacred Disease, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. 2, 153.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Down (456)  |  Man (2251)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reason (744)  |  Side (233)

The crescendo of noise—whether it comes from truck or jackhammer, siren or airplane—is more than an irritating nuisance. It intrudes on privacy, shatters serenity, and can inflict pain. We dare not be complacent about this ever mounting volume of noise. In the years ahead, it can bring even more discomfort—and worse—to the lives of people.
In 'Special Message to the Congress on Conservation: “To Renew a Nation” (8 Mar 1968). Collected in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Lyndon B. Johnson: 1968-69 (1970), 363. https://books.google.com/books?isbn=1623768977 Johnson, Lyndon B. - 1970
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (41)  |  Complacent (6)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Dare (50)  |  Discomfort (3)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Environment (216)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inflict (4)  |  Intrude (3)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Noise (37)  |  Nuisance (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Privacy (7)  |  Serenity (9)  |  Shatter (8)  |  Siren (4)  |  Truck (3)  |  Volume (19)  |  Year (933)

The dog writhing in the gutter, its back broken by a passing car, knows what it is to be alive. So too with the aged elk of the far north woods, slowly dying in the bitter cold of winter. The asphalt upon which the dog lies knows no pain. The snow upon which the elk has collapsed knows not the cold. But living beings do. … Are you conscious? Then you can feel more pain. … Perhaps we even suffer more than the dumb animals.
In The Symbiotic Universe: Life and Mind in the Cosmos (1988), 194-195. As quoted and cited in Robert E. Zinser, The Fascinated God: What Science Says to Faith and Faith to Scientists (2003), 521.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Animal (617)  |  Asphalt (2)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Broken (56)  |  Car (71)  |  Cold (112)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Die (86)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Dumb (11)  |  Feel (367)  |  Gutter (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  More (2559)  |  Passing (76)  |  Slowly (18)  |  Snow (37)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Winter (44)  |  Wood (92)  |  Writhe (3)

The drinking of litharge causes oppression of the stomach, belly and intestines, with intense griping pains;… it suppresses the urine, while the body swells and acquires an unsightly leaden hue.
As quoted in H.A. Waldron, 'Lead Poisoning in the Ancient World', Medical History (Oct 1973). 17, No. 4, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Cause (541)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lead Poisoning (4)  |  Litharge (2)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Urine (16)

The feeling of understanding is as private as the feeling of pain. The act of understanding is at the heart of all scientific activity; without it any ostensibly scientific activity is as sterile as that of a high school student substituting numbers into a formula. For this reason, science, when I push the analysis back as far as I can, must be private.
Reflections of a Physicist (1950), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Back (390)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Formula (98)  |  Heart (229)  |  High (362)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Push (62)  |  Reason (744)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sterile (21)  |  Student (300)  |  Understanding (513)

The frequent allegation that the selective processes in the human species are no longer 'natural' is due to persistence of the obsolete nineteenth-century concept of 'natural' selection. The error of this view is made clear when we ask its proponents such questions as, why should the 'surviving fittest' be able to withstand cold and inclement weather without the benefit of fire and clothing? Is it not ludicrous to expect selection to make us good at defending ourselves against wild beasts when wild beasts are getting to be so rare that it is a privilege to see one outside of a zoo? Is it necessary to eliminate everyone who has poor teeth when our dentists stand ready to provide us with artificial ones? Is it a great virtue to be able to endure pain when anaesthetics are available?
[Co-author with American statistician Gordon Allen]
Theodosius Dobzhansky and Gordon Allen, 'Does Natural Selection Continue to Operate in Modern Mankind?', American Anthropologist, 1956, 58, 595.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Ask (411)  |  Author (167)  |  Available (78)  |  Beast (55)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Century (310)  |  Cold (112)  |  Concept (221)  |  Dentist (4)  |  Due (141)  |  Error (321)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fire (189)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ludicrous (7)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Obsolete (15)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Outside (141)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Poor (136)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Question (621)  |  Rare (89)  |  See (1081)  |  Selection (128)  |  Selective (19)  |  Species (401)  |  Stand (274)  |  Statistician (27)  |  Teeth (43)  |  View (488)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Weather (44)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (87)  |  Zoo (8)

The further away the chronic abdominal pain in a child is from the umbilicus the more likely an organic cause.
Attributed
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Child (307)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  More (2559)  |  Organic (158)

The great art of life is sensation, to feel that we exist, even in pain.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Exist (443)  |  Feel (367)  |  Great (1574)  |  Life (1795)  |  Sensation (57)

The greater part of it, I shall show, is nonsense, tricked out with a variety of tedious metaphysical conceits, and its author can be excused of dishonesty only on the grounds that before deceiving others he has taken great pains to deceive himself. … it is the style that creates the illusion of content, and which is a cause as well as merely a symptom of Teilhard's alarming apocalyptic seizures.
Medawar’s acerbic book review of The Phenomenon of Man by Teilhard de Chardin first appeared as 'Critical Notice' in the journal Mind (1961), 70, No. 277, 99. The book review was reprinted in The Art of the Soluble: Creativity and Originality in Science (1967), 71. Medawar thus strongly contradicted other reviewers of the book, which he said was “widely held to be of the utmost profundity and significance; it created something like a sensation upon its publication in France, and some reviewers hereabouts called it the Book of the Year—one, the Book of the Century.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alarming (4)  |  Author (167)  |  Cause (541)  |  Conceit (15)  |  Create (235)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Deceiving (5)  |  Dishonesty (9)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Merely (316)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Show (346)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (29)  |  Trick (35)  |  Variety (132)

The greatest evil is physical pain.
Soliloquies, I, 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Evil (116)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Physical (508)

The indescribable pleasure—which pales the rest of life's joys—is abundant compensation for the investigator who endures the painful and persevering analytical work that precedes the appearance of the new truth, like the pain of childbirth. It is true to say that nothing for the scientific scholar is comparable to the things that he has discovered. Indeed, it would be difficult to find an investigator willing to exchange the paternity of a scientific conquest for all the gold on earth. And if there are some who look to science as a way of acquiring gold instead of applause from the learned, and the personal satisfaction associated with the very act of discovery, they have chosen the wrong profession.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999), 50.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abundance (25)  |  Abundant (22)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Applause (9)  |  Childbirth (2)  |  Choice (110)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Comparable (6)  |  Compensation (7)  |  Conquest (28)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endurance (6)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Find (998)  |  Gold (97)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indescribable (2)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Joy (107)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pale (9)  |  Paternity (2)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Preceding (8)  |  Profession (99)  |  Rest (280)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Way (1217)  |  Willing (44)  |  Willingness (10)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

The moment after, I began to respire 20 quarts of unmingled nitrous oxide. A thrilling, extending from the chest to the extremities, was almost immediately produced. I felt a sense of tangible extension highly pleasurable in every limb; my visible impressions were dazzling, and apparently magnified, I heard distinctly every sound in the room and was perfectly aware of my situation. By degrees, as the pleasurable sensations increased, I last all connection with external things; trains of vivid visible images rapidly passed through my mind, and were connected with words in such a manner, as to produce perceptions perfectly novel. I existed in a world of newly connected and newly modified ideas. I theorised—I imagined that I made discoveries. When I was awakened from this semi-delirious trance by Dr. Kinglake, who took the bag from my mouth, indignation and pride were the first feelings produced by the sight of the persons about me. My emotions were enthusiastic and sublime; and for a minute I walked round the room, perfectly regardless of what was said to me. As I recovered my former state of mind, I felt an inclination to communicate the discoveries I had made during the experiment. I endeavoured to recall the ideas, they were feeble and indistinct; one collection of terms, however, presented itself: and with the most intense belief and prophetic manner, I exclaimed to Dr Kinglake, 'Nothing exists but thoughts!—the universe is composed of impressions, ideas, pleasures and pains!'
Researches, Chemical and Philosophical (1800), in J. Davy (ed.), The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy (1839-40), Vol 3, 289-90.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anaesthetic (2)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biography (240)  |  Collection (64)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Degree (276)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extension (59)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  First (1283)  |  Former (137)  |  Idea (843)  |  Image (96)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nitrous Oxide (4)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Novel (32)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perception (97)  |  Person (363)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Present (619)  |  Pride (78)  |  Produced (187)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sight (132)  |  Situation (113)  |  Sound (183)  |  State (491)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Train (114)  |  Universe (857)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Walk (124)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

The most general survey shows us that the two foes of human happiness are pain and boredom.
In Arthur Schopenhauer and T. Bailey Saunders (ed., trans), The Wisdom of Life (1897), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Boredom (11)  |  Foe (9)  |  General (511)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Most (1731)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Show (346)  |  Survey (33)  |  Two (937)

The name of medicine is thought to have been given from 'moderation', modus, that is, from a due proportion, which advises that things be done not to excess, but 'little by little', paulatim. For nature is pained by surfeit but rejoices in moderation. Whence also those who take drugs and antidotes constantly, or to the point of saturation, are sorely vexed, for every immoderation brings not health but danger.
Etymologies [c.600], Book IV, chapter 2, quoted in E. Grant (ed.), A Source Book in Medieval Science (1974), trans. W. D. Sharpe (1964), 701.
Science quotes on:  |  Antidote (9)  |  Danger (115)  |  Drug (57)  |  Due (141)  |  Excess (22)  |  Health (193)  |  Hypochondriac (9)  |  Little (707)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Moderation (2)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Point (580)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Saturation (9)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vex (9)

The ordinary patient goes to his doctor because he is in pain or some other discomfort and wants to be comfortable again; he is not in pursuit of the ideal of health in any direct sense. The doctor on the other hand wants to discover the pathological condition and control it if he can. The two are thus to some degree at cross purposes from the first, and unless the affair is brought to an early and happy conclusion this diversion of aims is likely to become more and more serious as the case goes on.
Address, opening of 1932-3 session of U.C.H. Medical School (4 Oct 1932), 'Art and Science in Medicine', The Collected Papers of Wilfred Trotter, FRS (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (29)  |  Aim (165)  |  Become (815)  |  Case (99)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Condition (356)  |  Control (167)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discomfort (3)  |  Discover (553)  |  Diversion (10)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Early (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Health (193)  |  Ideal (99)  |  More (2559)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Other Hand (2)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Patient (199)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serious (91)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)

The physical signs of measles are nearly the same as those of smallpox, but nausea and inflammation is more severe, though the pains in the back are less.
Avicenna
The Canon, Bk IV.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Inflammation (7)  |  Measles (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Physical (508)  |  Smallpox (14)

The power that produced Man when the monkey was not up to the mark, can produce a higher creature than Man if Man does not come up to the mark. What it means is that if Man is to be saved, Man must save himself. There seems no compelling reason why he should be saved. He is by no means an ideal creature. At his present best many of his ways are so unpleasant that they are unmentionable in polite society, and so painful that he is compelled to pretend that pain is often a good. Nature holds no brief for the human experiment: it must stand or fall by its results. If Man will not serve, Nature will try another experiment.
Back to Methuselah: a Metabiological Pentateuch (1921), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Another (7)  |  Best (459)  |  Brief (36)  |  Compelling (11)  |  Creature (233)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fall (230)  |  Good (889)  |  Higher (37)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Polite (9)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Produced (187)  |  Production (183)  |  Reason (744)  |  Result (677)  |  Save (118)  |  Serve (59)  |  Society (326)  |  Stand (274)  |  Try (283)  |  Unpleasant (12)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

The rich man, gasping for breath … feels at last the impotence of gold; that death which he dreaded at a distance as an enemy, he now hails when he is near, as a friend; a friend that alone can bring the peace his treasures cannot purchase, and remove the pain his physicians cannot cure.
In Lacon: Or Many Things in Few Words, Addressed to Those who Think (1832), 125. [Part of this quote (after the semicolon) is often seen attributed to Mortimer Collins, who was born in 1827. That date makes it clearly impossible for Collins to be the author of this quote, published in 1832 by Colton.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Breath (59)  |  Cure (122)  |  Death (388)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dread (13)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Feel (367)  |  Friend (168)  |  Gasp (6)  |  Gold (97)  |  Hail (4)  |  Impotence (8)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Peace (108)  |  Physician (273)  |  Purchase (7)  |  Remove (45)  |  Rich (62)  |  Treasure (57)

The scientific world-picture vouchsafes a very complete understanding of all that happens–it makes it just a little too understandable. It allows you to imagine the total display as that of a mechanical clockwork which, for all that science knows, could go on just the same as it does, without there being consciousness, will, endeavor, pain and delight and responsibility connected with it–though they actually are. And the reason for this disconcerting situation is just this: that for the purpose of constructing the picture of the external world, we have used the greatly simplifying device of cutting our own personality out, removing it; hence it is gone, it has evaporated, it is ostensibly not needed.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Being (1278)  |  Clockwork (7)  |  Complete (204)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Construct (124)  |  Cut (114)  |  Delight (108)  |  Device (70)  |  Disconcerting (3)  |  Display (56)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Evaporate (5)  |  External (57)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Happen (274)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Need (290)  |  Personality (62)  |  Picture (143)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remove (45)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simplify (13)  |  Situation (113)  |  Total (94)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vouchsafe (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The signs of liver inflammation [hepatitis] are eight in number, as follows: high fever, thirst, complete anorexia, a tongue which is initially red and then turns black, biliary vomitus initially yellow egg yolk in color, which later turns dark green, pain on the right side which ascends up to the clavicle. … Occasionally a mild cough may occur and a sensation of heaviness which is first felt on the right side and then spreads widely.
As quoted in Fred Rosner, The Medical Legacy of Moses Maimonides (1998), 53-54.
Science quotes on:  |  Ascend (30)  |  Color (137)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cough (8)  |  Dark (140)  |  Egg (69)  |  Fever (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Green (63)  |  High (362)  |  Inflammation (7)  |  Liver (19)  |  Mild (7)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Right (452)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Side (233)  |  Spread (83)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vomit (3)  |  Yellow (30)

The soft minded man always fears change. He feels security in the status quo and he has an almost morbid fear of the new. For him, the greatest pain is the pain of a new idea.
In Strength to Love (1963, 1977), 15. Compare the earlier quote by Walter Bagehot, “One of the greatest pains to human nature is the pain of a new idea,” in 'The Age of Discussion', Physics and Politics (1869, 1916), 163.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Idea (843)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Morbid (3)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Security (47)  |  Soft (29)  |  Status (35)  |  Status Quo (5)

The steam-engine in its manifold applications, the crime-decreasing gas-lamp, the lightning conductor, the electric telegraph, the law of storms and rules for the mariner's guidance in them, the power of rendering surgical operations painless, the measures for preserving public health, and for preventing or mitigating epidemics,—such are among the more important practical results of pure scientific research, with which mankind have been blessed and States enriched.
President's Address to the British Association, Leeds (1858). In Charles W. Vincent and James Mason (eds.), The Year-book of Facts in Science and Art (1859), title page.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anesthetic (3)  |  Application (242)  |  Bless (25)  |  Blessed (20)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Crime (38)  |  Electric (76)  |  Engine (98)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Epidemic (7)  |  Gas (83)  |  Gas Lamp (2)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Health (193)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Law (894)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Measure (232)  |  More (2559)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Public Health (10)  |  Pure (291)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scientific (941)  |  State (491)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Telegraph (38)

The uncertainty where to look for the next opening of discovery brings the pain of conflict and the debility of indecision.
In Appendix, 'Art of Discovery', Logic: Deduction (1870), Vol. 2, 422.
Science quotes on:  |  Conflict (73)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Indecision (3)  |  Look (582)  |  Next (236)  |  Opening (15)  |  Uncertainty (56)

The vast spread
Of darkness
That speaks of mystery
The darkness that reveals
The beauty that lies beneath
In the form of glittering
Stars, a countless beauty
That seemed to conceal
A million stories
That can make the mankind
Take a new look at life
And the majestic moon
That silently looks at mankind
Wondering how its serenity
Was disturbed by the little steps
Of a man from the beautiful earth
Yet softly smiling back
And let the world sleep
In its magical glow
A glow that soothes
The world’s senses
And forget the pain of reality
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Countless (36)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Disturb (28)  |  Disturbed (15)  |  Earth (996)  |  Forget (115)  |  Form (959)  |  Glitter (8)  |  Glow (14)  |  Let (61)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Magic (86)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Million (114)  |  Moon (237)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serenity (9)  |  Silently (4)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Smile (31)  |  Softly (6)  |  Soothe (2)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spread (83)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Step (231)  |  Story (118)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

There are some arts which to those that possess them are painful, but to those that use them are helpful, a common good to laymen, but to those that practise them grievous. Of such arts there is one which the Greeks call medicine. For the medical man sees terrible sights, touches unpleasant things, and the misfortunes of others bring a harvest of sorrows that are peculiarly his; but the sick by means of the art rid themselves of the worst of evils, disease, suffering, pain and death.
Breaths, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. 2, 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Call (769)  |  Common (436)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Evil (116)  |  Good (889)  |  Greek (107)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Misfortune (12)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physician (273)  |  Possess (156)  |  See (1081)  |  Sick (81)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Unpleasant (12)  |  Use (766)  |  Worst (57)

There are those who will say “unless we announce disasters, no one will listen”, but I’m not one of them. It’s not the sort of thing I would ever say. It’s quite the opposite of what I think and it pains me to see this quote being used repeatedly in this way. I would never say we should hype up the risk of climate disasters in order to get noticed.
In Steve Connor, 'Fabricated quote used to discredit climate scientist', The Independent (10 Feb 2010).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Announce (13)  |  Being (1278)  |  Climate (97)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Listen (73)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notice (77)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Order (632)  |  Quote (42)  |  Repeated (5)  |  Risk (61)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

There is no fundamental difference between man and the higher animals in their mental faculties ... The lower animals, like man, manifestly feel pleasure and pain, happiness, and misery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Difference (337)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Happiness (115)  |  High (362)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestly (11)  |  Mental (177)  |  Misery (30)  |  Pleasure (178)

This compassion, or sympathy with the pains of others, ought also to extend to the brute creation, as far as our necessities will admit; for we cannot exist long without the destruction of other animal or vegetable beings either in their mature or embryon state. Such is the condition of mortality, that the first law of nature is “eat, or be eaten.” Hence for the preservation of our existence we may be supposed to have a natural right to kill those brute creatures, which we want to eat, or which want to eat us; but to destroy even insects wantonly shows an unreflecting mind, or a depraved heart.
In A Plan for the Conduct of Female Education in Boarding Schools (1797), 48.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brute (28)  |  Compassion (11)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creature (233)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Eat (104)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Extend (128)  |  First (1283)  |  Heart (229)  |  Insect (77)  |  Kill (100)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Long (790)  |  Mature (16)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Right (452)  |  Show (346)  |  State (491)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

This sense of the unfathomable beautiful ocean of existence drew me into science. I am awed by the universe, puzzled by it and sometimes angry at a natural order that brings such pain and suffering, Yet an emotion or feeling I have toward the cosmos seems to be reciprocated by neither benevolence nor hostility but just by silence. The universe appears to be a perfectly neutral screen unto which I can project any passion or attitude, and it supports them all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Angry (8)  |  Appear (118)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Awe (43)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Bring (90)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Draw (137)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Order (4)  |  Neutral (13)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Order (632)  |  Passion (114)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Project (73)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Science (3879)  |  Screen (7)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Silence (56)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Support (147)  |  Toward (45)  |  Unfathomable (10)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unto (8)

Thou to whom the sick and dying
Ever came, nor came in vain,
With thy healing hands replying
To their wearied cry of pain.
Anonymous
The New English Hymnal (1986), 331.
Science quotes on:  |  Cry (29)  |  Death (388)  |  Disease (328)  |  Healing (25)  |  Sick (81)  |  Vain (83)

Throw out opium, which the Creator himself seems to prescribe, for we often see the scarlet poppy growing in the cornfields, as if it were foreseen that wherever there is hunger to be fed there must also be a pain to be soothed; throw out a few specifics which our art did not discover, and it is hardly needed to apply; throw out wine, which is a food, and the vapors which produce the miracle of anaesthesia, and I firmly believe that if the whole materia medica [medical drugs], as now used, could be sunk to the bottom of the sea, it would be all the better for mankind,—and all the worse for the fishes.
'Currents and Counter-Currents in Medical Science', Address to Massachusetts Medical Society (30 May 1860). In Medical Essays 1842-1882 (1891), 202-3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anaesthesia (4)  |  Apply (160)  |  Art (657)  |  Better (486)  |  Creator (91)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drug (57)  |  Food (199)  |  Growing (98)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Must (1526)  |  Opium (7)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Specific (95)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wine (38)

Thus it might be said, that the vegetable is only the sketch, nor rather the ground-work of the animal; that for the formation of the latter, it has only been requisite to clothe the former with an apparatus of external organs, by which it might be connected with external objects.
From hence it follows, that the functions of the animal are of two very different classes. By the one (which is composed of an habitual succession of assimilation and excretion) it lives within itself, transforms into its proper substance the particles of other bodies, and afterwards rejects them when they are become heterogeneous to its nature. By the other, it lives externally, is the inhabitant of the world, and not as the vegetable of a spot only; it feels, it perceives, it reflects on its sensations, it moves according to their influence, and frequently is enabled to communicate by its voice its desires, and its fears, its pleasures, and its pains.
The aggregate of the functions of the first order, I shall name the organic life, because all organized beings, whether animal or vegetable, enjoy it more or less, because organic texture is the sole condition necessary to its existence. The sum of the functions of the second class, because it is exclusively the property of the animal, I shall denominate the animal life.
Physiological Researches on Life and Death (1815), trans. P. Gold, 22-3.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Assimilation (13)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Class (164)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Condition (356)  |  Connect (125)  |  Desire (204)  |  Different (577)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Formation (96)  |  Former (137)  |  Function (228)  |  Ground (217)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Move (216)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organic (158)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Plant (294)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Proper (144)  |  Property (168)  |  Reject (63)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sole (49)  |  Substance (248)  |  Succession (77)  |  Sum (102)  |  Transform (73)  |  Two (937)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

To be born, to live and to die is merely to change forms... And what does one form matter any more than another?... Each form has its own sort of happiness and unhappiness. From the elephant down to the flea... from the flea down to the sensitive and living molecule which is the origin of all, there is not a speck in the whole of nature that does not feel pain or pleasure.
D'Alembert's Dream (1769), in Rameau's Nephew and D' Alembert's Dream, trans. Leonard Tancock (Penguin edition 1966), 182.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Change (593)  |  Down (456)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Feel (367)  |  Flea (11)  |  Form (959)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Merely (316)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Speck (23)  |  Unhappiness (9)  |  Whole (738)

To me, cruelty is the worst of human sins. Once we accept that a living creature has feelings and suffers pain, then by knowingly and deliberately inflicting suffering on that creature, we are guilty, whether it be human or animal.
As given, without further citation, in Bollimuntha Venkata Ramana Rao, The Book of Uncommon Quips and Quotations (2003), 12. Please contact Webmaster if you know the primary source.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Animal (617)  |  Creature (233)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Deliberately (6)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Guilt (14)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inflicting (2)  |  Living (491)  |  Sin (42)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Worst (57)

To show, therefore, that we are capable of knowing, i.e. being certain that there is a God, and how we may come by this certainty, I think we need go no further than ourselves, and that undoubted knowledge we have of our own existence... For man knows that he himself exists... If any one pretends to be so sceptical as to deny his own existence, (for really to doubt of it is manifestly impossible,) let him for me enjoy his beloved happiness of being nothing, until hunger or some other pain convince him of the contrary... He knows also that nothing cannot produce a being; therefore something must have existed from eternity... Next, it is evident, that what had its being and beginning from another, must also have all that which is in and belongs to its being from another too. All the powers it has must be owing to and received from the same source. This eternal source, then, of all being must also be the source and original of all power; and so this eternal Being must be also the most powerful... And most knowing. Again, a man finds in himself perception and knowledge. We have then got one step further; and we are certain now that there is not only some being, but some knowing, intelligent being in the world. There was a time, then, when there was no knowing being, and when knowledge began to be; or else there has been also a knowing being from eternity...And therefore God.
Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), book 4, ch. 10, sec 19.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belong (162)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Convince (41)  |  Deny (66)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Evident (91)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestly (11)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Next (236)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Owing (39)  |  Perception (97)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Show (346)  |  Something (719)  |  Step (231)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  World (1774)

Trace Science, then, with Modesty thy guide,
First strip off all her equipage of Pride,
Deduct what is but Vanity or Dress,
Or Learning's Luxury or idleness,
Or tricks, to show the stretch of the human brain
Mere curious pleasure or ingenious pain.
'Essay On Man', The Works of Alexander Pope (1751), Vol. 3, 31-32.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Brain (270)  |  Curious (91)  |  First (1283)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idleness (13)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Learning (274)  |  Luxury (21)  |  Modesty (17)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Pride (78)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Trace (103)  |  Trick (35)

Unhappily for the physiologist, the subjects of the principal department of his science, that of animal physiology, are sentient beings; and every experiment, every new or unusual situation of such a being, is necessarily attended by pain or suffering of a bodily or mental kind.
A Critical and Experimental Essay on the Circulation of the Blood (1831), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Attend (65)  |  Being (1278)  |  Department (92)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Kind (557)  |  Mental (177)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  New (1216)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Principal (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sentient (7)  |  Situation (113)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Unusual (37)

We all know, from what we experience with and within ourselves, that our conscious acts spring from our desires and our fears. Intuition tells us that that is true also of our fellows and of the higher animals. We all try to escape pain and death, while we seek what is pleasant. We are all ruled in what we do by impulses; and these impulses are so organized that our actions in general serve for our self preservation and that of the race. Hunger, love, pain, fear are some of those inner forces which rule the individual’s instinct for self preservation. At the same time, as social beings, we are moved in the relations with our fellow beings by such feelings as sympathy, pride, hate, need for power, pity, and so on. All these primary impulses, not easily described in words, are the springs of man’s actions. All such action would cease if those powerful elemental forces were to cease stirring within us. Though our conduct seems so very different from that of the higher animals, the primary instincts are much alike in them and in us. The most evident difference springs from the important part which is played in man by a relatively strong power of imagination and by the capacity to think, aided as it is by language and other symbolical devices. Thought is the organizing factor in man, intersected between the causal primary instincts and the resulting actions. In that way imagination and intelligence enter into our existence in the part of servants of the primary instincts. But their intervention makes our acts to serve ever less merely the immediate claims of our instincts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Causal (7)  |  Cease (79)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Death (388)  |  Describe (128)  |  Desire (204)  |  Device (70)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Escape (80)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hate (64)  |  High (362)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Important (209)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inner (71)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Less (103)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Need (290)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Part (222)  |  Pity (14)  |  Play (112)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Pride (78)  |  Primary (80)  |  Race (268)  |  Relation (157)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Same (157)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seem (145)  |  Self (267)  |  Servant (39)  |  Serve (59)  |  Social (252)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stir (21)  |  Strong (174)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  True (212)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

We are apt to think we know what time is because we can measure it, but no sooner do we reflect upon it than that illusion goes. So it appears that the range of the measureable is not the range of the knowable. There are things we can measure, like time, but yet our minds do not grasp their meaning. There are things we cannot measure, like happiness or pain, and yet their meaning is perfectly clear to us.
The Elements of Social Science (1921), 15-16
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (100)  |  Do (1908)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Measure (232)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Range (99)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)

We are as yet got little farther than to the surface of things: yet ought we not to be discouraged; though we can never hope to attain to the complete knowledge of the texture, or constituent frame and nature of bodies, yet may we reasonably expect by this method of experiments, to make farther and farther advances abundantly sufficient to reward our pains.
In 'Preface', Statical Essays: Containing Hæmastatics (1769), Vol. 2, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Attain (125)  |  Body (537)  |  Complete (204)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Expect (200)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Farther (51)  |  Frame (26)  |  Hope (299)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Reward (68)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Surface (209)  |  Texture (7)  |  Thing (1915)

We have no knowledge, that is, no general principles drawn from the contemplation of particular facts, but what has been built up by pleasure, and exists in us by pleasure alone. The Man of Science, the Chemist and Mathematician, whatever difficulties and disgusts they may have had to struggle with, know and feel this. However painful may be the objects with which the Anatomist's knowledge is connected, he feels that his knowledge is pleasure; and where he has no pleasure he has no knowledge.
In Lyrical Ballads: With Pastoral and Other Poems (3rd Ed., 1802), Vol. 1, Preface, xxxiv.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alone (311)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Connect (125)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Disgust (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feel (367)  |  General (511)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Object (422)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Principle (507)  |  Science (3879)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Whatever (234)

We may, I think, draw a yet higher and deeper teaching from the phenomena of degeneration. We seem to learn from it the absolute necessity of labour and effort, of struggle and difficulty, of discomfort and pain, as the condition of all progress, whether physical or mental, and that the lower the organism the more need there is of these ever-present stimuli, not only to effect progress, but to avoid retrogression. And if so, does not this afford us the nearest attainable solution of the great problem of the origin of evil? What we call evil is the essential condition of progress in the lower stages of the development of conscious organisms, and will only cease when the mind has become so thoroughly healthy, so well balanced, and so highly organised, that the happiness derived from mental activity, moral harmony, and the social affections, will itself be a sufficient stimulus to higher progress and to the attainment of a more perfect life.
In 'Two Darwinian Essays', Nature (1880), 22, 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Activity (210)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Cease (79)  |  Condition (356)  |  Degeneration (10)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Draw (137)  |  Effect (393)  |  Effort (227)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evil (116)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Labour (98)  |  Learn (629)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Retrogression (6)  |  Social (252)  |  Solution (267)  |  Stage (143)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Will (2355)

We must painfully acknowledge that, precisely because of its great intellectual developments, the best of man's domesticated animals—the dog—most often becomes the victim of physiological experiments. Only dire necessity can lead one to experiment on cats—on such impatient, loud, malicious animals. During chronic experiments, when the animal, having recovered from its operation, is under lengthy observation, the dog is irreplaceable; moreover, it is extremely touching. It is almost a participant in the experiments conducted upon it, greatly facilitating the success of the research by its understanding and compliance.
'Vivisection' (1893), as translated in Daniel P. Todes, Pavlov’s Physiology Factory: Experiment, Interpretation, Laboratory Enterprise (2002), 123.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  Animal (617)  |  Become (815)  |  Best (459)  |  Cat (47)  |  Chronic (5)  |  Compliance (7)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Development (422)  |  Dire (6)  |  Dog (70)  |  Domestication (5)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Facilitation (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Irreplaceable (2)  |  Lead (384)  |  Loudness (3)  |  Malice (5)  |  Malicious (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observation (555)  |  Operation (213)  |  Participant (6)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Precision (68)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Research (664)  |  Success (302)  |  Touching (16)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Victim (35)

While reading in a textbook of chemistry, … I came across the statement, “nitric acid acts upon copper.” I was getting tired of reading such absurd stuff and I determined to see what this meant. Copper was more or less familiar to me, for copper cents were then in use. I had seen a bottle marked “nitric acid” on a table in the doctor’s office where I was then “doing time.” I did not know its peculiarities, but I was getting on and likely to learn. The spirit of adventure was upon me. Having nitric acid and copper, I had only to learn what the words “act upon” meant … I put one of them [cent] on the table, opened the bottle marked “nitric acid”; poured some of the liquid on the copper; and prepared to make an observation. But what was this wonderful thing which I beheld? The cent was already changed, and it was no small change either. A greenish blue liquid foamed and fumed over the cent and over the table. The air in the neighborhood of the performance became colored dark red. A great colored cloud arose. This was disagreeable and suffocating—how should I stop this? I tried to get rid of the objectionable mess by picking it up and throwing it out of the window, which I had meanwhile opened. I learned another fact—nitric acid not only acts upon copper but it acts upon fingers. The pain led to another unpremeditated experiment. I drew my fingers across my trousers and another fact was discovered. Nitric acid acts upon trousers. Taking everything into consideration, that was the most impressive experiment, and, relatively, probably the most costly experiment I have ever performed.
In F.H. Getman, The Life of Ira Remsen (1940), 9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absurd (59)  |  Absurdity (32)  |  Acid (83)  |  Act (272)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Air (347)  |  Already (222)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Cent (5)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Color (137)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Copper (25)  |  Cost (86)  |  Dark (140)  |  Disagreeable (5)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doing (280)  |  Everything (476)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Finger (44)  |  Foam (3)  |  Fume (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Impressiveness (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Marked (55)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mess (13)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  Nitric Acid (2)  |  Observation (555)  |  Office (71)  |  Open (274)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Reading (133)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Statement (142)  |  Suffocation (2)  |  Table (104)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trousers (5)  |  Use (766)  |  Window (58)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Word (619)

Who gathers knowledge gathers pain.
Bible
In Ecclesiastes 1:18. A condensed version of the verse, “For in much wisdom is much grief and he that increaseth knowledge, increaseth sorrow.”
Science quotes on:  |  Gather (72)  |  Knowledge (1529)

With every throb of the climatic pulse which we have felt in Central Asia,, the centre of civilisation has moved this way and that. Each throb has sent pain and decay to the lands whose day was done, life and vigour to those whose day was yet to be.
Final sentence in his book, The Pulse of Asia (1907), 385.
Science quotes on:  |  Asia (5)  |  Central (80)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Climate (97)  |  Decay (53)  |  Life (1795)  |  Pulse (20)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Way (1217)

[John Scott Haldane] preferred to work on himself or other human beings who were sufficiently interested in the work to ignore pain or fear … [His] object was not to achieve this state of [pain or fear] but to achieve knowledge which could save other men's lives. His attitute was much more like a good soldier who will risk his life and endure wounds in order to gain victory than that of an ascetic who deliberately undergoes pain. The soldier does not get himself wounded deliberately, and my father did not seek pain in his work though he greeted pain which would have made some people writhe or groan, with laughter.
In R.W. Clark, JBS: The Life and Work of J.B.S. Haldane (1968), quoted in Lawrence K. Altman, Who Goes First? (1986), 215.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biography (240)  |  Father (110)  |  Fear (197)  |  Gain (145)  |  Good (889)  |  John Scott Haldane (3)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Ignore (45)  |  Interest (386)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Risk (61)  |  Save (118)  |  Seek (213)  |  Soldier (26)  |  State (491)  |  Victory (39)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wound (26)

… (T)he same cause, such as electricity, can simultaneously affect all sensory organs, since they are all sensitive to it; and yet, every sensory nerve reacts to it differently; one nerve perceives it as light, another hears its sound, another one smells it; another tastes the electricity, and another one feels it as pain and shock. One nerve perceives a luminous picture through mechanical irritation, another one hears it as buzzing, another one senses it as pain… He who feels compelled to consider the consequences of these facts cannot but realize that the specific sensibility of nerves for certain impressions is not enough, since all nerves are sensitive to the same cause but react to the same cause in different ways… (S)ensation is not the conduction of a quality or state of external bodies to consciousness, but the conduction of a quality or state of our nerves to consciousness, excited by an external cause.
Law of Specific Nerve Energies.
Handbuch der Physiologie des Menschen für Vorlesungen, 2nd Ed. translation by Edwin Clarke and Charles Donald O'Malley
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conduction (8)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Different (577)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Feel (367)  |  Hear (139)  |  Impression (114)  |  Law (894)  |  Light (607)  |  Luminous (18)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Organ (115)  |  Picture (143)  |  Quality (135)  |  Realize (147)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Shock (37)  |  Smell (27)  |  Sound (183)  |  Specific (95)  |  State (491)  |  Taste (90)  |  Through (849)  |  Way (1217)

“These changes in the body,” he wrote in the review paper he sent to the American Journal of Physiology late in 1913, “are, each one of them, directly serviceable in making the organism more efficient in the struggle which fear or rage or pain may involve; for fear and rage are organic preparations for action, and pain is the most powerful known stimulus to supreme exertion. The organism which with the aid of increased adrenal secretion can best muster its energies, can best call forth sugar to supply the labouring muscles, can best lessen fatigue, and can best send blood to the parts essential in the run or the fight for life, is most likely to survive. Such, according to the view here propounded, is the function of the adrenal medulla at times of great emergency.”
Quoted in S. Benison, A. C. Barger and E. L. Wolfe, Walter B Cannon: The Life and Times of a Young Scientist (1987), 311.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Action (327)  |  Adrenaline (5)  |  Aid (97)  |  Best (459)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Emergency (10)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Fear (197)  |  Function (228)  |  Great (1574)  |  Involve (90)  |  Journal (30)  |  Known (454)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Paper (182)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Review (26)  |  Run (174)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Sugar (23)  |  Supply (93)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survive (79)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.