Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Run

Run Quotes (33 quotes)

[Interviewer: If the building you are in now started to shake and you knew an earthquake was occurring, what would you do?]
I would walk - not run - to the nearest seismograph.
From interview in the Earthquake Information Bulletin (Jul-Aug 1971), 3, No. 4, as abridged in article on USGS website.
Science quotes on:  |  Building (51)  |  Earthquake (27)  |  Know (321)  |  Nearest (4)  |  Seismograph (4)  |  Shake (19)  |  Walk (56)

A work of genius is something like the pie in the nursery song, in which the four and twenty blackbirds are baked. When the pie is opened, the birds begin to sing. Hereupon three fourths of the company run away in a fright; and then after a time, feeling ashamed, they would fain excuse themselves by declaring, the pie stank so, they could not sit near it. Those who stay behind, the men of taste and epicures, say one to another, We came here to eat. What business have birds, after they have been baked, to be alive and singing? This will never do. We must put a stop to so dangerous an innovation: for who will send a pie to an oven, if the birds come to life there? We must stand up to defend the rights of all the ovens in England. Let us have dead birds..dead birds for our money. So each sticks his fork into a bird, and hacks and mangles it a while, and then holds it up and cries, Who will dare assert that there is any music in this bird’s song?
Co-author with his brother Augustus William Hare Guesses At Truth, By Two Brothers: Second Edition: With Large Additions (1848), Second Series, 86. (The volume is introduced as “more than three fourths new.” This quote is identified as by Julius; Augustus had died in 1833.)
Science quotes on:  |  Ashamed (2)  |  Assertion (23)  |  Baking (2)  |  Bird (96)  |  Blackbird (2)  |  Business (71)  |  Cry (13)  |  Dangerous (45)  |  Dare (22)  |  Death (270)  |  Defend (20)  |  Eating (21)  |  England (31)  |  Excuse (15)  |  Fork (2)  |  Fright (4)  |  Genius (186)  |  Hacking (2)  |  Holding (3)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Life (917)  |  Money (125)  |  Music (66)  |  Nursery (3)  |  Opening (15)  |  Oven (3)  |  Pie (3)  |  Right (144)  |  French Saying (61)  |  Sing (9)  |  Song (18)  |  Standing (11)  |  Stink (5)  |  Stop (56)  |  Taste (35)  |  Themself (3)

Any fool can destroy trees. They cannot run away; and if they could, they would still be destroyed,—chased and hunted down as long as fun or a dollar could be got out of their bark hides, branching horns, or magnificent bole backbones. Few that fell trees plant them; nor would planting avail much towards getting back anything like the noble primeval forests. During a man’s life only saplings can be grown, in the place of the old trees—tens of centuries old—that have been destroyed.
John Muir
In 'The American Forests', Atlantic Monthly (Aug 1897), Vol. 80, 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Backbone (8)  |  Bark (4)  |  Branch (61)  |  Chase (11)  |  Clear-Cut (7)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Deforestation (39)  |  Destruction (80)  |  Dollar (19)  |  Environment (138)  |  Fool (70)  |  Forest (88)  |  Fun (28)  |  Hide (36)  |  Horn (10)  |  Hunt (12)  |  Life (917)  |  Magnificence (4)  |  Noble (41)  |  Plant (173)  |  Primeval (8)  |  Tree (143)

Books won’t stay banned. They won’t burn. Ideas won’t go to jail. In the long run of history, the censor and the inquisitor have always lost. The only sure weapon against bad ideas is better ideas. The source of better ideas is wisdom. The surest path to wisdom is a liberal education.
From Essays on Education. In Alfred Whitney Griswold, 1906-1963: In Memoriam (1964), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (78)  |  Ban (9)  |  Book (181)  |  Burning (17)  |  Censor (2)  |  Education (280)  |  Good (228)  |  History (302)  |  Idea (440)  |  Inquisitor (6)  |  Jail (4)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Long (95)  |  Loss (62)  |  Path (59)  |  Sure (13)  |  Weapon (57)  |  Wisdom (151)

Encryption...is a powerful defensive weapon for free people. It offers a technical guarantee of privacy, regardless of who is running the government... It’s hard to think of a more powerful, less dangerous tool for liberty.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dangerous (45)  |  Free (59)  |  Government (85)  |  Guarantee (16)  |  Hard (70)  |  Less (54)  |  Liberty (17)  |  Offer (16)  |  People (269)  |  Powerful (51)  |  Privacy (6)  |  Regardless (3)  |  Technical (26)  |  Think (205)  |  Tool (70)  |  Weapon (57)

Every morning in Africa, a Gazelle wakes up. It knows it must run faster than the fastest lion or it will be killed. Every morning a Lion wakes up. It knows it must outrun the slowest Gazelle or it will starve to death. It doesn't matter whether you are a Lion or a Gazelle; when the sun comes up, you'd better be running.
Anonymous
As seen in The Economist (1985), 296, 37. Sometimes cited in other sources as an African proverb. For example, referred as from a poster of an old African proverb in Venise T. Berry, So Good (1996), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (15)  |  Better (131)  |  Death (270)  |  Faster (10)  |  Gazelle (2)  |  Kill (37)  |  Know (321)  |  Lion (15)  |  Morning (31)  |  Outrun (2)  |  Starvation (9)  |  Sun (211)  |  Waking (4)

Every river appears to consist of a main trunk, fed from a variety of branches, each running in a valley proportional to its size, and all of them together forming a system of vallies, communicating with one another, and having such a nice adjustment of their declivities that none of them join the principal valley on too high or too low a level; a circumstance which would be infinitely improbable if each of these vallies were not the work of the stream that flows in it.
Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth (1802), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Adjustment (12)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Branch (61)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Communication (58)  |  Feeding (7)  |  Flow (31)  |  Improbability (7)  |  Level (51)  |  Principal (15)  |  River (68)  |  Size (47)  |  System (141)  |  Trunk (10)  |  Valley (16)  |  Variety (53)  |  Work (457)

Gold is found in our own part of the world; not to mention the gold extracted from the earth in India by the ants, and in Scythia by the Griffins. Among us it is procured in three different ways; the first of which is in the shape of dust, found in running streams. … A second mode of obtaining gold is by sinking shafts or seeking among the debris of mountains …. The third method of obtaining gold surpasses the labors of the giants even: by the aid of galleries driven to a long distance, mountains are excavated by the light of torches, the duration of which forms the set times for work, the workmen never seeing the light of day for many months together.
In Pliny and John Bostock (trans.), The Natural History of Pliny (1857), Vol. 6, 99-101.
Science quotes on:  |  Debris (7)  |  Dust (42)  |  Earth (487)  |  Excavate (3)  |  Gallery (2)  |  Gold (55)  |  India (15)  |  Labor (53)  |  Light (246)  |  Method (154)  |  Month (21)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Procure (4)  |  Seek (57)  |  Shaft (3)  |  Stream (27)  |  Surpass (12)  |  Torch (7)  |  Work (457)  |  Workman (9)  |  World (667)

Here are a few things to keep in mind the next time ants show up in the potato salad. The 8,800 known species of the family Formicidae make up from 10% to 15% of the world's animal biomass, the total weight of all fauna. They are the most dominant social insect in the world, found almost everywhere except in the polar regions. Ants turn more soil than earthworms; they prune, weed and police most of the earth's carrion. Among the most gregarious of creatures, they are equipped with a sophisticated chemical communications system. To appreciate the strength and speed of this pesky invertebrate, consider that a leaf cutter the size of a man could run repeated four-minute miles while carrying 750 lbs. of potato salad.
From book review, 'Nature: Splendor in The Grass', Time (3 Sep 1990).
Science quotes on:  |  Ant (19)  |  Carrion (4)  |  Carry (35)  |  Communication (58)  |  Creature (127)  |  Dominant (11)  |  Earthworm (5)  |  Equipment (26)  |  Fauna (10)  |  Gregarious (2)  |  Insect (57)  |  Invertebrate (3)  |  Mile (24)  |  Police (2)  |  Prune (5)  |  Soil (51)  |  Sophistication (8)  |  Species (181)  |  Speed (27)  |  Strength (63)  |  Weed (14)  |  Weight (61)

How mysterious this life was, how deep and muddy its waters ran, yet how clear and noble what emerged from them.
Narcissus and Goldmund. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 23
Science quotes on:  |  Clear (52)  |  Deep (81)  |  Emerge (16)  |  Life (917)  |  Muddy (2)  |  Mysterious (21)  |  Noble (41)  |  Water (244)

I want to argue that the ‘sudden’ appearance of species in the fossil record and our failure to note subsequent evolutionary change within them is the proper prediction of evolutionary theory as we understand it ... Evolutionary ‘sequences’ are not rungs on a ladder, but our retrospective reconstruction of a circuitous path running like a labyrinth, branch to branch, from the base of the bush to a lineage now surviving at its top.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (77)  |  Argue (17)  |  Base (43)  |  Branch (61)  |  Bush (8)  |  Change (291)  |  Evolutionary (16)  |  Failure (118)  |  Fossil Record (4)  |  Labyrinth (9)  |  Ladder (7)  |  Lineage (2)  |  Note (22)  |  Path (59)  |  Prediction (67)  |  Proper (27)  |  Reconstruction (13)  |  Retrospective (3)  |  Sequence (32)  |  Species (181)  |  Subsequent (11)  |  Sudden (21)  |  Survive (28)  |  Theory (582)  |  Top (20)  |  Understand (189)  |  Want (120)

It is science alone that can solve the problems of hunger and poverty, of insanitation and literacy, of superstition and tradition, of vast resources running to waste, of a rich country inhabited by starving people. ... The future belongs to science and to those who make friends with science.
Address to the Indian Institute of Science, Proceedings of the National Institute of Science of India (1960), 27, 564, cited in Mary Midgley, The myths We live By (2004), 14., x. In Vinoth Ramachandra, Subverting Global Myths: Theology and the Public Issues Shaping our World (2008), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (61)  |  Belong (33)  |  Country (121)  |  Friend (63)  |  Future (229)  |  Hunger (13)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Literacy (7)  |  People (269)  |  Poverty (29)  |  Problem (362)  |  Resource (47)  |  Rich (48)  |  Science (1699)  |  Solve (41)  |  Starvation (9)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Vast (56)  |  Waste (57)

It is sometimes as dangerous to be run into by a microbe as by a trolley car.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Car (20)  |  Dangerous (45)  |  Microbe (17)  |  Sometimes (27)

Like the lapwing being lately hatched, I do run as it were with the shell on my head.
In 'To the Reader', The Optick Glass of Humors (1607), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Hatch (2)  |  Head (52)  |  Shell (35)

Man has mounted science, and is now run away.
Letter to his brother (11 Apr 1862). In The Letters of Henry Adams: Vol 1: 1858-1868 (1982), 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Mount (7)  |  Science (1699)

Nature! … She tosses her creatures out of nothingness, and tells them not whence they came, nor whither they go. It is their business to run, she knows the road.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (71)  |  Creature (127)  |  Know (321)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Road (47)  |  Tell (67)  |  Toss (3)

New ideas seem like frightening ghosts to people at the beginning; they run away from them for a long time, but they get tired of it in the end!
From the play Galileo Galilei (2001) .
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (114)  |  End (141)  |  Fear (113)  |  Ghost (20)  |  Idea (440)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Tired (11)

Revenge is a kind of wild justice; which the more man’s nature runs to, the more ought law to weed it out.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Justice (24)  |  Kind (99)  |  Law (418)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Revenge (6)  |  Weed (14)  |  Wild (39)

Sometime in my early teens, I started feeling an inner urgency, ups and downs of excitement and frustration, caused by such unlikely occupations as reading Granville’s course of calculus ... I found this book in the attic of a friend’s apartment. Among other standard stuff, it contained the notorious epsilon-delta definition of continuous functions. After struggling with this definition for some time (it was the hot Crimean summer, and I was sitting in the shadow of a dusty apple tree), I got so angry that I dug a shallow grave for the book between the roots, buried it there, and left in disdain. Rain started in an hour. I ran back to the tree and exhumed the poor thing. Thus, I discovered that I loved it, regardless.
'Mathematics as Profession and vocation', in V. Arnold et al. (eds.), Mathematics: Frontiers and Perspectives (2000), 153. Reprinted in Mathematics as Metaphor: Selected Essays of Yuri I. Manin (2007), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  Anger (14)  |  Angry (5)  |  Apartment (2)  |  Apple (33)  |  Attic (3)  |  Back (55)  |  Biography (227)  |  Book (181)  |  Burial (7)  |  Bury (8)  |  Calculus (23)  |  Cause (231)  |  Contain (37)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Course (57)  |  Definition (152)  |  Dig (9)  |  Discover (115)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Disdain (4)  |  Down (44)  |  Dusty (3)  |  Early (39)  |  Excitement (33)  |  Feel (93)  |  Find (248)  |  Friend (63)  |  Frustration (9)  |  Function (90)  |  Grave (20)  |  Hot (17)  |  Hour (42)  |  Inner (27)  |  Leave (63)  |  Love (164)  |  Notorious (6)  |  Occupation (37)  |  Poor (46)  |  Rain (28)  |  Read (83)  |  Regardless (3)  |  Root (48)  |  Shadow (35)  |  Shallow (5)  |  Sit (24)  |  Sometime (3)  |  Standard (41)  |  Start (68)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Stuff (15)  |  Summer (26)  |  Teen (2)  |  Teenager (4)  |  Time (439)  |  Tree (143)  |  Unlikely (12)  |  Urgency (8)

The centipede was happy quite, until a toad in fun
Said, 'Pray which leg goes after which?'
That work'd her mind to such a pitch,
She lay distracted in a ditch, considering how to run.
Pinafore Poems in Cassell's Weekly (1871). In Steven Vogel and Rosemary Anne Calvert Life's Devices (1988), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Distraction (5)  |  Insect (57)  |  Leg (13)  |  Mind (544)  |  Poem (85)  |  Toad (7)

The human brain is a machine which alone accounts for all our actions, our most private thoughts, our beliefs. ... To choose a spouse, a job, a religious creed—or even choose to rob a bank—is the peak of a causal chain that runs back to the origin of life and down to the nature of atoms and molecules.
The Mind Machine (1998), 145. In Vinoth Ramachandra, Subverting Global Myths: Theology and the Public Issues Shaping our World (2008), 179.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Action (151)  |  Alone (61)  |  Atom (251)  |  Back (55)  |  Bank (8)  |  Belief (400)  |  Causal (6)  |  Chain (38)  |  Choose (35)  |  Creed (10)  |  Down (44)  |  Human Brain (3)  |  Job (33)  |  Machine (133)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Origin Of Life (32)  |  Peak (15)  |  Private (17)  |  Religious (44)  |  Rob (3)  |  Thought (374)

The intellectual craves a social order in which uncommon people perform uncommon tasks every day. He wants a society throbbing with dedication, reverence, and worshiHe sees it as scandalous that the discoveries of science and the feats of heroes should have as their denouement the comfort and affluence of common folk. A social order run by and for the people is to him a mindless organism motivated by sheer physiologism.
In 'Concerning Individual Freedom', The Ordeal of Change (1963, 1990), 100.
Science quotes on:  |  Affluence (3)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Common (92)  |  Crave (6)  |  Dedication (10)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Feat (4)  |  Folk (6)  |  Hero (29)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Mindless (3)  |  Motivate (4)  |  Organism (126)  |  People (269)  |  Perform (27)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Scandalous (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  See (197)  |  Sheer (6)  |  Social Order (7)  |  Society (188)  |  Task (68)  |  Throb (4)  |  Uncommon (7)  |  Want (120)

The so-called science of poll-taking is not a science at all but mere necromancy. People are unpredictable by nature, and although you can take a nation's pulse, you can't be sure that the nation hasn't just run up a flight of stairs, and although you can take a nation's blood pressure, you can’t be sure that if you came back in twenty minutes you’d get the same reading. This is a damn fine thing. .
In 'Polling' (13 Nov 1948), collected in Writings from The New Yorker, 1925-1976 (1976, 2006), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Error (230)  |  Mere (41)  |  Nation (111)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Necromancy (2)  |  People (269)  |  Pulse (8)  |  Reading (51)  |  Same (92)  |  Stairs (2)  |  Statistics (125)  |  Unpredictable (10)

The stone age did not end for lack of stone, and the oil age will end long before the world runs out of oil.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  End (141)  |  Lack (52)  |  Long (95)  |  Oil (37)  |  Stone (57)  |  Stone Age (8)  |  World (667)

The swelling and towering omnibuses, the huge trucks and wagons and carriages, the impetuous hansoms and the more sobered four-wheelers, the pony-carts, donkey-carts, hand-carts, and bicycles which fearlessly find their way amidst the turmoil, with foot-passengers winding in and out, and covering the sidewalks with their multitude, give the effect of a single monstrous organism, which writhes swiftly along the channel where it had run in the figure of a flood till you were tired of that metaphor. You are now a molecule of that vast organism.
Describing streets in London, from 'London Films', Harper’s Magazine (), 110, No. 655, 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Bicycle (8)  |  Carriage (8)  |  Cart (2)  |  Channel (17)  |  Covering (3)  |  Donkey (2)  |  Effect (133)  |  Flood (26)  |  Foot (39)  |  Hand (103)  |  Metaphor (19)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Monstrous (7)  |  Multitude (14)  |  Omnibus (2)  |  Organism (126)  |  Passenger (8)  |  Pony (2)  |  Sidewalk (2)  |  Single (72)  |  Swelling (5)  |  Swiftly (4)  |  Tired (11)  |  Towering (4)  |  Truck (3)  |  Turmoil (5)  |  Vast (56)  |  Wagon (4)  |  Winding (4)  |  Writhe (3)

There are no physicists in the hottest parts of hell, because the existence of a ‘‘hottest part’’ implies a temperature difference, and any marginally competent physicist would immediately use this to run a heat engine and make some other part of hell comfortably cool. This is obviously impossible.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Competent (10)  |  Cool (9)  |  Difference (208)  |  Existence (254)  |  Heat Engine (4)  |  Hell (29)  |  Hot (17)  |  Immediately (9)  |  Imply (12)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Obviously (9)  |  Part (146)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Temperature (42)

This minding of other people’s business expresses itself in gossip, snooping and meddling, and also in feverish interest in communal, national and racial affairs. In running away from ourselves we either fall on our neighbor’s shoulder or fly at his throat.
In The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (24)  |  Business (71)  |  Communal (7)  |  Express (32)  |  Fall (89)  |  Feverish (2)  |  Fly (65)  |  Gossip (5)  |  Interest (170)  |  Meddle (3)  |  Mind (544)  |  National (20)  |  Neighbor (10)  |  Ourselves (34)  |  People (269)  |  Racial (2)  |  Shoulder (13)  |  Throat (10)

This political movement has patently demonstrated that it will not defend the integrity of science in any case in which science runs afoul of its core political constituencies. In so doing, it has ceded any right to govern a technologically advanced and sophisticated nation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Case (64)  |  Cede (2)  |  Constituency (2)  |  Core (11)  |  Defend (20)  |  Demonstrate (25)  |  Govern (13)  |  Integrity (11)  |  Movement (65)  |  Nation (111)  |  Patently (2)  |  Political (31)  |  Right (144)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sophisticated (11)  |  Technologically (2)

Thurst [thrust] out nature with a croche [crook], yet woll she styll runne back agayne.
From Proverbs or Adagies out of Erasmus (1539), 44, given with other English variants, in George Latimer Apperson and Martin H. Manser, The Concise Dictionary of English Etymology (1993, 2006), 158. The dictionary also gives the original sentiment expressed by Horace: “Naturam expelles furca, tamen usque recurret” in Epistles, i, 10, 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Again (3)  |  Back (55)  |  Nature (1029)

Water runs down hill concisely. There is no quibbling about it. It does not have to run up hill in order to be entertaining.
As quoted in Gabe Huck (ed.), A Sourcebook about Liturgy (1994), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Downhill (2)  |  Entertain (5)  |  Uphill (2)  |  Water (244)

Were I to make the announcement and to run, the reasons I would run is because I have a great belief in this country [America]. … There’s more natural resources than any nation in the world; the greatest education population in the world; the greatest technology of any country in the world; the greatest capacity for innovation in the world; and the greatest political system in the world.
Answer to “Why do you want to be President,” interview with Roger Mudd, CBS TV documentary (12 Oct 1979). In Jim Lehrer and James Lehrer, Tension City: Inside the Presidential Debates (2011), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  America (74)  |  Announcement (8)  |  Belief (400)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Education (280)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Nation (111)  |  Natural Resource (17)  |  Politics (77)  |  Population (71)  |  Reason (330)  |  Technology (199)  |  World (667)

With highly civilised nations continued progress depends in a subordinate degree on natural selection; for such nations do not supplant and exterminate one another as do savage tribes. Nevertheless the more intelligent members within the same community will succeed better in the long run than the inferior, and leave a more numerous progeny, and this is a form of natural selection.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Better (131)  |  Civilised (3)  |  Community (65)  |  Continue (38)  |  Degree (48)  |  Depend (56)  |  Exterminate (7)  |  Form (210)  |  Highly (8)  |  Inferior (14)  |  Intelligent (35)  |  Leave (63)  |  Long (95)  |  Member (27)  |  Nation (111)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Numerous (21)  |  Progeny (6)  |  Progress (317)  |  Same (92)  |  Savage (23)  |  Subordinate (6)  |  Succeed (11)  |  Supplant (2)  |  Tribe (10)

Wood was the main source of energy in the world until the eighteen-fifties, and it still could be. Roughly a tenth of the annual growth of all the trees on earth could yield alcohol enough to run everything that now uses coal and petroleum—every airplane, every industry, every automobile.
Pieces of the Frame
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (32)  |  Alcohol (16)  |  Annual (5)  |  Automobile (19)  |  Coal (41)  |  Earth (487)  |  Energy (185)  |  Everything (120)  |  Growth (111)  |  Industry (91)  |  Main (16)  |  Petroleum (7)  |  Source (71)  |  Tree (143)  |  Wood (33)  |  World (667)  |  Yield (23)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.