Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index P > Category: Pleasant

Pleasant Quotes (16 quotes)

Omne tulit punctum qui miscuit utile dulci.
He gains everyone’s approval who mixes the pleasant with the useful.
Horace
In Ars Poetica (c. 18 BC), line 343. As translated and cited in Alan L. Mackay, A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1991), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Approval (6)  |  Mix (13)  |  Useful (66)

But how is one to determine what is pleasing to God? ... Whatever is unpleasant to man is pleasant to God. The test is the natural instinct of man. If there arises within one’s dark recesses a hot desire to do this or that, then it is the paramount duty of a Christian to avoid doing this or that. And if, on the contrary, one cherishes an abhorrence of the business, then one must tackle it forthwith, all the time shouting ‘Hallelujah!’ A simple enough religion, surely–simple, satisfying and idiotic.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (8)  |  Arise (32)  |  Avoid (34)  |  Business (71)  |  Cherish (6)  |  Christian (17)  |  Contrary (22)  |  Dark (49)  |  Desire (101)  |  Determine (45)  |  Duty (51)  |  Forthwith (2)  |  God (454)  |  Hot (17)  |  Instinct (50)  |  Natural (128)  |  Paramount (6)  |  Please (10)  |  Recess (5)  |  Religion (210)  |  Satisfy (14)  |  Shout (9)  |  Simple (111)  |  Surely (13)  |  Tackle (4)  |  Test (96)  |  Time (439)  |  Unpleasant (2)

Enhydros is a variety of geode. The name comes from the water it contains. It is always round, smooth, and very white but will sway back and forth when moved. Inside it is a liquid just as in an egg, as Pliny, our Albertus, and others believed, and it may even drip water. Liquid bitumen, sometimes with a pleasant odor, is found enclosed in rock just as in a vase.
As translated by Mark Chance Bandy and Jean A. Bandy from the first Latin Edition of 1546 in De Natura Fossilium: (Textbook of Mineralogy) (2004), 104. Originally published by Geological Society of America as a Special Paper (1955). There are other translations with different wording.
Science quotes on:  |  Saint Magnus Albertus (7)  |  Belief (400)  |  Contain (37)  |  Drip (2)  |  Egg (41)  |  Find (248)  |  Liquid (25)  |  Minerology (4)  |  Name (118)  |  Odor (7)  |  Pliny the Elder (17)  |  Rock (107)  |  Round (15)  |  Smooth (13)  |  Sway (2)  |  Water (244)  |  White (38)

Experience hobbles progress and leads to abandonment of difficult problems; it encourages the initiated to walk on the shady side of the street in the direction of experiences that have been pleasant. Youth without experience attacks the unsolved problems which maturer age with experience avoids, and from the labors of youth comes progress. Youth has dreams and visions, and will not be denied.
From speech 'In the Time of Henry Jacob Bigelow', given to the Boston Surgical Society, Medalist Meeting (6 Jun 1921). Printed in Journal of the Medical Association (1921), 77, 599.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Age (137)  |  Attack (29)  |  Avoid (34)  |  Denial (13)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Direction (56)  |  Dream (92)  |  Encouragement (17)  |  Experience (268)  |  Initiated (2)  |  Labor (53)  |  Mature (7)  |  Problem (362)  |  Progress (317)  |  Street (17)  |  Unsolved (7)  |  Vision (55)  |  Walk (56)  |  Youth (57)

I always love geology. In winter, particularly, it is pleasant to listen to theories about the great mountains one visited in the summer; or about the Flood or volcanoes; about great catastrophes or about blisters; above all about fossils … Everywhere there are hypotheses, but nowhere truths; many workmen, but no experts; priests, but no God. In these circumstances each man can bring his hypothesis like a candle to a burning altar, and on seeing his candle lit declare ‘Smoke for smoke, sir, mine is better than yours’. It is precisely for this reason that I love geology.
In Nouvelles Genevoises (1910), 306. First edition, 1841.
Science quotes on:  |  Altar (6)  |  Better (131)  |  Blister (2)  |  Bring (53)  |  Burning (17)  |  Candle (19)  |  Catastrophe (17)  |  Circumstance (48)  |  Expert (42)  |  Flood (26)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Geology (187)  |  God (454)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Light (246)  |  Listen (26)  |  Love (164)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Particularly (12)  |  Precisely (11)  |  Priest (16)  |  Reason (330)  |  Smoke (16)  |  Summer (26)  |  Theory (582)  |  Truth (750)  |  Visit (15)  |  Volcano (36)  |  Winter (22)  |  Workman (9)

I have a friendly feeling towards pigs generally, and consider them the most intelligent of beasts, not excepting the elephant and the anthropoid ape—the dog is not to be mentioned in this connection. I also like his disposition and attitude towards all other creatures, especially man. He is not suspicious, or shrinkingly submissive, like horses, cattle, and sheep; nor an impudent devil-may-care like the goat; nor hostile like the goose; nor condescending like the cat; nor a flattering parasite like the dog. He views us from a totally different, a sort of democratic, standpoint as fellow-citizens and brothers, and takes it for granted, or grunted, that we understand his language, and without servility or insolence he has a natural, pleasant, camerados-all or hail-fellow-well-met air with us.
In The Book of a Naturalist (1919), 295-296.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropoid (4)  |  Ape (39)  |  Attitude (47)  |  Beast (32)  |  Brother (16)  |  Cat (31)  |  Comrade (3)  |  Cow (27)  |  Creature (127)  |  Democratic (7)  |  Disposition (14)  |  Dog (39)  |  Elephant (16)  |  Flattery (5)  |  Goat (5)  |  Goose (9)  |  Grant (21)  |  Grunt (3)  |  Horse (40)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Language (155)  |  Natural (128)  |  Parasite (28)  |  Pig (7)  |  Sheep (11)  |  Standpoint (8)  |  Understand (189)

It is not merely as an investigator and discoverer, but as a high-principled and unassuming man, that Scheele merits our warmest admiration. His aim and object was the discovery of truth. The letters of the man reveal to us in the most pleasant way his high scientific ideal, his genuinely philosophic temper, and his simple mode of thought. “It is the truth alone that we desire to know, and what joy there is in discovering it!” With these words he himself characterizes his own efforts.
From History of Chemistry (1899). As quoted in Victor Robinson, Pathfinders in Medicine (1912), 121.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (34)  |  Aim (58)  |  Characterize (9)  |  Desire (101)  |  Discover (115)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Effort (94)  |  Genuine (19)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Joy (61)  |  Know (321)  |  Letter (36)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reveal (32)  |  Carl Wilhelm Scheele (5)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Simple (111)  |  Temper (6)  |  Thought (374)  |  Truth (750)  |  Word (221)

It is obvious that man dwells in a splendid universe, a magnificent expanse of earth and sky and heaven, which manifestly is built on a majestic plan, maintains some mighty design, though man himself cannot grasp it. Yet for him it is not a pleasant or satisfying world. In his few moments of respite from labor or from his enemies, he dreams that this very universe might indeed be perfect, its laws operating just as now they seem to do, and yet he and it somehow be in full accord. The very ease with which he can frame this image to himself makes the reality all the more mocking. ... It is only too clear that man is not at home in this universe, and yet he is not good enough to deserve a better.
In The New England Mind: The Seventeenth Century (1939, 1954), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (21)  |  Better (131)  |  Clear (52)  |  Deserve (14)  |  Dream (92)  |  Dwelling (9)  |  Earth (487)  |  Ease (29)  |  Enemy (52)  |  Expanse (2)  |  Frame (17)  |  Grasp (43)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Himself (10)  |  Home (58)  |  Image (38)  |  Labor (53)  |  Law (418)  |  Magnificent (15)  |  Majestic (7)  |  Manifestly (4)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Mocking (4)  |  Moment (61)  |  Obvious (54)  |  Operating (4)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Plan (69)  |  Satisfying (5)  |  Seem (89)  |  Sky (68)  |  Splendid (8)  |  Universe (563)  |  World (667)

It is so easy to believe in pleasant impossibilities.
In novel, Half a Million of Money (1865), Vol. 2, 122.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Easy (56)  |  Impossibility (50)

Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It’s the transition that’s troublesome.
Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain (1987), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Death (270)  |  Life (917)  |  Transition (15)  |  Trouble (55)

Science which is acquired unwillingly, soon disappears; that which is instilled into the mind in a pleasant and agreeable manner, is more lasting.
Saint Basil (Bishop of Caesarea) ('The Great')
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (19)  |  Agreeable (6)  |  Disappear (22)  |  Instil (2)  |  Manner (35)  |  Mind (544)  |  Science (1699)  |  Soon (17)  |  Unwillingly (2)

Lord Byron Quote: Newton declared himself “like a youth Picking up shells by the great ocean—Truth.”
Background of ocean and rocky outcrop with kelp on sandy shore in foreground, at Channel Islands NMS, California. , Photo by Claire Fackler, NOAA (source)
Socrates said, our only knowledge was
“To know that nothing could be known;” a pleasant
Science enough, which levels to an ass
Each Man of Wisdom, future, past, or present.
Newton, (that Proverb of the Mind,) alas!
Declared, with all his grand discoveries recent,
That he himself felt only “like a youth
Picking up shells by the great Ocean—Truth.”
From poem, 'Don Juan,' (1822), canto 7, verse V. In Lord Byron, Don Juan: Cantos VI, VII and VIII (1823), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Ass (3)  |  Declaration (5)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Future (229)  |  Grand (15)  |  Great (300)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Mind (544)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Past (109)  |  Pick (14)  |  Present (103)  |  Proverb (23)  |  Recent (23)  |  Shell (35)  |  Socrates (14)  |  Truth (750)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Youth (57)

The power that produced Man when the monkey was not up to the mark, can produce a higher creature than Man if Man does not come up to the mark. What it means is that if Man is to be saved, Man must save himself. There seems no compelling reason why he should be saved. He is by no means an ideal creature. At his present best many of his ways are so unpleasant that they are unmentionable in polite society, and so painful that he is compelled to pretend that pain is often a good. Nature holds no brief for the human experiment: it must stand or fall by its results. If Man will not serve, Nature will try another experiment.
Back to Methuselah: a Metabiological Pentateuch (1921), xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Another (7)  |  Best (129)  |  Brief (14)  |  Compelling (7)  |  Creature (127)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fall (89)  |  Good (228)  |  Higher (28)  |  Himself (10)  |  Human (445)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Man (345)  |  Mark (28)  |  Monkey (37)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pain (82)  |  Polite (6)  |  Power (273)  |  Present (103)  |  Pretend (14)  |  Production (105)  |  Reason (330)  |  Result (250)  |  Save (46)  |  Serve (34)  |  Society (188)  |  Stand (60)

Upon the whole, Chymistry is as yet but an opening science, closely connected with the usefull and ornamental arts, and worthy the attention of the liberal mind. And it must always become more and more so: for though it is only of late, that it has been looked upon in that light, the great progress already made in Chymical knowledge, gives us a pleasant prospect of rich additions to it. The Science is now studied on solid and rational grounds. While our knowledge is imperfect, it is apt to run into error: but Experiment is the thread that will lead us out of the labyrinth.
In Alexander Law, Notes of Black's Lectures, vol. 3, 88. Cited in Charles Coulston Gillispie, Dictionary of Scientific Biography: Volumes 1-2 (1981), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (22)  |  Attention (76)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Error (230)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Grounds (2)  |  Imperfection (19)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Labyrinth (9)  |  Lead (101)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Mind (544)  |  Ornament (12)  |  Progress (317)  |  Prospect (19)  |  Rational (42)  |  Science (1699)  |  Solid (34)  |  Study (331)  |  Thread (14)  |  Useful (66)  |  Worth (74)

We must protect each other against the attacks of those self-appointed watchdogs of patriotism now abroad in the land who irresponsibly pin red labels on anyone whom they wish to destroy. ... [Academic professionals are the only person competant to differentiate between honest independents and the Communists.] This is our responsibility. It is not a pleasant task. But if it is left to outsiders, the distinction is not likely to be made and those independent critics of social institutions among us who are one of the glories of a true university could be silenced.
As quoted by William L. Laurence in 'Professors Urged to Guard Freedom', New York Times (19 Sep 1952), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Appointment (5)  |  Attack (29)  |  Communist (6)  |  Critic (17)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Glory (44)  |  Institution (32)  |  Irresponsibility (4)  |  Label (11)  |  Like (18)  |  Outsider (5)  |  Patriotism (6)  |  Pin (6)  |  Protect (26)  |  Red (25)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Self (39)  |  Silence (32)  |  Social (93)  |  Task (68)  |  University (51)

When coming to close quarters with a skunk … one has to fear from an encounter; the worst is that effluvium, after which crushed garlic is lavender, which tortures the olfactory nerves, and appears to pervade the whole system like a pestilent ether, nauseating one until sea-sickness seems almost a pleasant sensation in comparison.
In The Naturalist in La Plata (1892, 1895), 116-117.
Science quotes on:  |  Comparison (53)  |  Crushed (2)  |  Effluvium (2)  |  Encounter (14)  |  Ether (24)  |  Fear (113)  |  Garlic (3)  |  Nerve (66)  |  Olfactory (2)  |  Pervade (4)  |  Pestilent (2)  |  Sensation (22)  |  Skunk (2)  |  Torture (13)  |  Worst (14)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.