Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Spring

Spring Quotes (133 quotes)

... we might say that the earth has a spirit of growth; that its flesh is the soil, its bones the arrangement and connection of the rocks of which the mountains are composed, its cartilage the tufa, and its blood the springs of water.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Blood (134)  |  Bone (95)  |  Cartilage (2)  |  Compose (17)  |  Connection (162)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flesh (27)  |  Growth (187)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Rock (161)  |  Say (984)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Water (481)

But how shall we this union well expresse?
Naught tyes the soule: her subtiltie is such
She moves the bodie, which she doth possesse.
Yet no part toucheth, but by Vertue's touch.
Then dwels she not therein as in a tent;
Nor as a pilot in his Ship doth sit;
Nor as the spider in his web is pent;
Nor as the Waxe retaines the print in it;
Nor as a Vessell water doth containe;
Nor as one Liquor in another shed;
Nor as the heate dath in the fire remaine;
Nor as a voice throughout the ayre is spred;
But as the faire and cheerfull morning light,
Doth here, and there, her silver beames impart,
And in an instant doth her selfe unite
To the transparent Aire, in all, and part:
Still resting whole, when blowes the Aire devide;
Abiding pure, when th' Aire is most corrupted;
Throughout the Aire her beames dispersing wide,
And when the Aire is tost, not interrupted:
So doth the piercing Soule the body fill;
Being all in all, and all in part diffus'd;
Indivisible, incorruptible still,
Not forc't, encountred, troubled or confus'd.
And as the Sunne above the light doth bring,
Tough we behold it in the Aire below;
So from th'eternall light the Soule doth spring,
Though in the Bodie she her powers do show.
From 'Nosce Teipsum' (1599), in Claire Howard (ed.), The Poems of Sir John Davies (1941), 151-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fire (189)  |  Impart (23)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Instant (45)  |  Light (607)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Naught (10)  |  Power (746)  |  Pure (291)  |  Ship (62)  |  Show (346)  |  Silver (46)  |  Spider (14)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tent (11)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Touch (141)  |  Tough (19)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Union (51)  |  Unite (42)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)

In primis, hominis est propria VERI inquisitio atque investigato. Itaque cum sumus negotiis necessariis, curisque vacui, tum avemus aliquid videre, audire, ac dicere, cognitionemque rerum, aut occultarum aut admirabilium, ad benè beatéque vivendum necessariam ducimus; —ex quo intelligitur, quod VERUM, simplex, sincerumque sit, id esse naturæ hominis aptissimum. Huic veri videndi cupiditati adjuncta est appetitio quædam principatûs, ut nemini parere animus benè a naturâ informatus velit, nisi præcipienti, aut docenti, aut utilitatis causâ justè et legitimè imperanti: ex quo animi magnitudo existit, et humanarum rerum contemtio.
Before all other things, man is distinguished by his pursuit and investigation of TRUTH. And hence, when free from needful business and cares, we delight to see, to hear, and to communicate, and consider a knowledge of many admirable and abstruse things necessary to the good conduct and happiness of our lives: whence it is clear that whatsoever is TRUE, simple, and direct, the same is most congenial to our nature as men. Closely allied with this earnest longing to see and know the truth, is a kind of dignified and princely sentiment which forbids a mind, naturally well constituted, to submit its faculties to any but those who announce it in precept or in doctrine, or to yield obedience to any orders but such as are at once just, lawful, and founded on utility. From this source spring greatness of mind and contempt of worldly advantages and troubles.
In De Officiis, Book 1. Sect. 13. As given in epigraph to John Frederick William Herschel, A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1830), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Announce (13)  |  Business (149)  |  Care (186)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Communication (94)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Congenial (3)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Delight (108)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Free (232)  |  Good (889)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Hear (139)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Longing (19)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Precept (10)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  See (1081)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Utility (49)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Yield (81)

[About reading Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, age 14, in the back seat of his parents' sedan. I almost threw up. I got physically ill when I learned that ospreys and peregrine falcons weren't raising chicks because of what people were spraying on bugs at their farms and lawns. This was the first time I learned that humans could impact the environment with chemicals. [That a corporation would create a product that didn't operate as advertised] was shocking in a way we weren't inured to.
As quoted by Eliza Griswold, in 'The Wild Life of “Silent Spring”', New York Times (23 Sep 2012), Magazine 39.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Back (390)  |  Bug (10)  |  Rachel Carson (43)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chick (3)  |  Corporation (6)  |  Create (235)  |  Environment (216)  |  Falcon (2)  |  Farm (26)  |  First (1283)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impact (42)  |  Lawn (5)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Parent (76)  |  People (1005)  |  Product (160)  |  Reading (133)  |  Shock (37)  |  Sick (81)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

A little Learning is a dang’rous Thing;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian Spring:
There shallow Draughts intoxicate the Brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again.
In An Essay on Criticism (Written 1709, published 1711), 14. (Written in 1709). Misquoted in The Monthly Miscellany; or Gentleman and Lady’s Complete Magazine (1774), as “Mr. Pope says, very truly, ‘A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.’” This latter version of the quote has, in modern times, been misattributed to Albert Einstein.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (270)  |  Danger (115)  |  Deep (233)  |  Draught (2)  |  Drink (53)  |  Drinking (21)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Intoxication (5)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  Shallowness (2)  |  Sobriety (2)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thing (1915)

A conflict arises when a religious community insists on the absolute truthfulness of all statements recorded in the Bible. This means an intervention on the part of religion into the sphere of science; this is where the struggle of the Church against the doctrines of Galileo and Darwin belongs. On the other hand, representatives of science have often made an attempt to arrive at fundamental judgments with respect to values and ends on the basis of scientific method, and in this way have set themselves in opposition to religion. These conflicts have all sprung from fatal errors.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Basis (173)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bible (91)  |  Church (56)  |  Community (104)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Darwin (14)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  End (590)  |  Error (321)  |  Fatal (12)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Insist (20)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Often (106)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Record (154)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Representative (14)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Set (394)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Statement (142)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truthfulness (2)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)

A number of years ago, when I was a freshly-appointed instructor, I met, for the first time, a certain eminent historian of science. At the time I could only regard him with tolerant condescension.
I was sorry of the man who, it seemed to me, was forced to hover about the edges of science. He was compelled to shiver endlessly in the outskirts, getting only feeble warmth from the distant sun of science- in-progress; while I, just beginning my research, was bathed in the heady liquid heat up at the very center of the glow.
In a lifetime of being wrong at many a point, I was never more wrong. It was I, not he, who was wandering in the periphery. It was he, not I, who lived in the blaze.
I had fallen victim to the fallacy of the “growing edge;” the belief that only the very frontier of scientific advance counted; that everything that had been left behind by that advance was faded and dead.
But is that true? Because a tree in spring buds and comes greenly into leaf, are those leaves therefore the tree? If the newborn twigs and their leaves were all that existed, they would form a vague halo of green suspended in mid-air, but surely that is not the tree. The leaves, by themselves, are no more than trivial fluttering decoration. It is the trunk and limbs that give the tree its grandeur and the leaves themselves their meaning.
There is not a discovery in science, however revolutionary, however sparkling with insight, that does not arise out of what went before. “If I have seen further than other men,” said Isaac Newton, “it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.”
Adding A Dimension: Seventeen Essays on the History of Science (1964), Introduction.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  Condescension (3)  |  Count (105)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Edge (47)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fad (10)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Giant (67)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Green (63)  |  Growing (98)  |  Halo (7)  |  Heat (174)  |  Historian (54)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Hover (8)  |  Insight (102)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mid-Air (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Newborn (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Point (580)  |  Progress (465)  |  Regard (305)  |  Research (664)  |  Revolutionary (31)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Sparkling (7)  |  Sun (385)  |  Surely (101)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Twig (14)  |  Vague (47)  |  Victim (35)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)

Abstractness, sometimes hurled as a reproach at mathematics, is its chief glory and its surest title to practical usefulness. It is also the source of such beauty as may spring from mathematics.
In 'General Prospectus', The Development of Mathematics (1940, 2017), Chap. 1, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Chief (97)  |  Glory (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Practical (200)  |  Reproach (3)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

Abstruse mathematical researches … are … often abused for having no obvious physical application. The fact is that the most useful parts of science have been investigated for the sake of truth, and not for their usefulness. A new branch of mathematics, which has sprung up in the last twenty years, was denounced by the Astronomer Royal before the University of Cambridge as doomed to be forgotten, on account of its uselessness. Now it turns out that the reason why we cannot go further in our investigations of molecular action is that we do not know enough of this branch of mathematics.
In 'Conditions of Mental Development', Lectures and Essays (1901), Vol. 1, 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (10)  |  Abuse (22)  |  Account (192)  |  Action (327)  |  Application (242)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Branch (150)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Denounce (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doom (32)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Far (154)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Molecular (7)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Often (106)  |  Part (222)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reason (744)  |  Research (664)  |  Royal (57)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turn Out (9)  |  University (121)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  Why (491)  |  Year (933)

After a short period spent in Brussels as a guest of a neurological institute, I returned to Turin on the verge of the invasion of Belgium by the German army, Spring 1940, to join my family. The two alternatives left then to us were either to emigrate to the United States, or to pursue some activity that needed neither support nor connection with the outside Aryan world where we lived. My family chose this second alternative. I then decided to build a small research unit at home and installed it in my bedroom.
Autobiography, Nobel Foundation
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Army (33)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Build (204)  |  Connection (162)  |  Family (94)  |  German (36)  |  Home (170)  |  Outside (141)  |  Period (198)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Research (664)  |  Return (124)  |  Short (197)  |  Small (477)  |  Spent (85)  |  State (491)  |  Support (147)  |  Turin (3)  |  Two (937)  |  Verge (10)  |  World (1774)

After the discovery of spectral analysis no one trained in physics could doubt the problem of the atom would be solved when physicists had learned to understand the language of spectra. So manifold was the enormous amount of material that has been accumulated in sixty years of spectroscopic research that it seemed at first beyond the possibility of disentanglement. An almost greater enlightenment has resulted from the seven years of Röntgen spectroscopy, inasmuch as it has attacked the problem of the atom at its very root, and illuminates the interior. What we are nowadays hearing of the language of spectra is a true 'music of the spheres' in order and harmony that becomes ever more perfect in spite of the manifold variety. The theory of spectral lines will bear the name of Bohr for all time. But yet another name will be permanently associated with it, that of Planck. All integral laws of spectral lines and of atomic theory spring originally from the quantum theory. It is the mysterious organon on which Nature plays her music of the spectra, and according to the rhythm of which she regulates the structure of the atoms and nuclei.
Atombau und Spektrallinien (1919), viii, Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines, trans. Henry L. Brose (1923), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Theory (15)  |  Attack (84)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  First (1283)  |  Greater (288)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Integral (26)  |  Interior (32)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Music Of The Spheres (3)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Order (632)  |  Organon (2)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Max Planck (64)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Root (120)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectral Analysis (4)  |  Spectral Line (5)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spite (55)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

All appearances to the contrary, the only watchmaker in nature is the blind forces of physics, albeit deployed in very special way. A true watchmaker has foresight: he designs his cogs springs, and plans their interconnections, with a future purpose in his mind's eye. Natural selection, the blind, unconscious, automatic process which Darwin discovered, and which we now know is the explanation for the existence and apparently purposeful form of all life, has no purpose in mind. It has no mind and no mind's eye. It does not plan for the future. It has no vision, no foresight, no sight at all. If it can be said to play the role of watchmaker in nature, it is the blind watchmaker.
The Blind Watchmaker (1986), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Blind (95)  |  Cog (7)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Design (195)  |  Discover (553)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Eye (419)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Interconnection (12)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plan (117)  |  Process (423)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Role (86)  |  Selection (128)  |  Sight (132)  |  Special (184)  |  Vision (123)  |  Watchmaker (3)  |  Way (1217)

An announcement of [Christopher] Zeeman’s lecture at Northwestern University in the spring of 1977 contains a quote describing catastrophe theory as the most important development in mathematics since the invention of calculus 300 years ago.
In book review of Catastrophe Theory: Collected Papers, 1972-1977, in Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society (Nov 1978), 84, No. 6, 1360. Reprinted in Stephen Smale, Roderick Wong(ed.), The Collected Papers of Stephen Smale (2000), Vol. 2, 814.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Announcement (15)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Catastrophe Theory (2)  |  Development (422)  |  Important (209)  |  Invention (369)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Quote (42)  |  Theory (970)  |  University (121)  |  Year (933)  |  Sir Erik Christopher Zeeman (4)

Applied research generates improvements, not breakthroughs. Great scientific advances spring from pure research. Even scientists renowned for their “useful” applied discoveries often achieved success only when they abandoned their ostensible applied-science goal and allowed their minds to soar—as when Alexander Fleming, “just playing about,” refrained from throwing away green molds that had ruined his experiment, studied them, and discovered penicillin. Or when C. A. Clarke, a physician affiliated with the University of Liverpool, became intrigued in the 1950s by genetically created color patterns that emerged when he cross-bred butterflies as a hobby. His fascination led him—“by the pleasant route of pursuing idle curiosity”—to the successful idea for preventing the sometimes fatal anemia that threatened babies born of a positive-Rhesus-factor father and a negative-Rhesus-factor mother.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 214-215.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Advance (280)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Research (2)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Color (137)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Father (110)  |  Sir Alexander Fleming (19)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Green (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Idle (33)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Intrigued (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mold (33)  |  Mother (114)  |  Negative (63)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Physician (273)  |  Playing (42)  |  Positive (94)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Refrain (9)  |  Research (664)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Soar (23)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Throwing (17)  |  University (121)  |  Useful (250)

As Crystallography was born of a chance observation by Haüy of the cleavage-planes of a single fortunately fragile specimen, … so out of the slender study of the Norwich Spiral has sprung the vast and interminable Calculus of Cyclodes, which strikes such far-spreading and tenacious roots into the profoundest strata of denumeration, and, by this and the multitudinous and multifarious dependent theories which cluster around it, reminds one of the Scriptural comparison of the Kingdom of Heaven “to a grain of mustard-seed which a man took and cast into his garden, and it grew and waxed a great tree, and the fowls of the air lodged in the branches of it.”
From 'Outline Trace of the Theory of Reducible Cyclodes', Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society (1869), 2, 155, collected in Collected Mathematical Papers of James Joseph Sylvester (1908), Vol. 2, 683-684.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Bird (149)  |  Branch (150)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Cast (66)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cleavage (2)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Crystallography (9)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Fortunate (26)  |  Fowl (5)  |  Fragile (21)  |  Garden (60)  |  Grain (50)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  René-Just Haüy (4)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Interminable (3)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Kingdom Of Heaven (3)  |  Lodge (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Multitudinous (4)  |  Mustard (2)  |  Observation (555)  |  Plane (20)  |  Profound (104)  |  Root (120)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Seed (93)  |  Single (353)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Spread (83)  |  Strata (35)  |  Stratum (10)  |  Strike (68)  |  Study (653)  |  Tenacious (2)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wax (13)

As I stood behind the coffin of my little son the other day, with my mind bent on anything but disputation, the officiating minister read, as part of his duty, the words, 'If the dead rise not again, let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.' I cannot tell you how inexpressibly they shocked me. Paul had neither wife nor child, or he must have known that his alternative involved a blasphemy against all that well best and noblest in human nature. I could have laughed with scorn. What! Because I am face to face with irreparable loss, because I have given back to the source from whence it came, the cause of a great happiness, still retaining through all my life the blessings which have sprung and will spring from that cause, I am to renounce my manhood, and, howling, grovel in bestiality? Why, the very apes know better, and if you shoot their young, the poor brutes grieve their grief out and do not immediately seek distraction in a gorge.
Letter to Charles Kingsley (23 Sep 1860). In L. Huxley, The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley (1903), Vol. 1, 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Ape (53)  |  Back (390)  |  Behind (137)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Blasphemy (7)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Brute (28)  |  Cause (541)  |  Child (307)  |  Coffin (7)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Face (212)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grief (18)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Involved (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Read (287)  |  Renounce (5)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shock (37)  |  Son (24)  |  Still (613)  |  Tell (340)  |  Through (849)  |  Why (491)  |  Wife (41)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Young (227)

Authority in science exists to be questioned, since heresy is the spring from which new ideas flow.
Address, the Canadian Journalists for Free Expression Awards Banquet, as printed in The Globe and Mail (27 Nov 2004).
Science quotes on:  |  Authority (95)  |  Exist (443)  |  Flow (83)  |  Idea (843)  |  New (1216)  |  Question (621)  |  Science (3879)

Biological diversity is the key to the maintenance of the world as we know it. Life in a local site struck down by a passing storm springs back quickly: opportunistic species rush in to fill the spaces. They entrain the succession that circles back to something resembling the original state of the environment.
In 'Storm Over the Amazon', The Diversity of Life (1992), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biological Diversity (5)  |  Circle (110)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Down (456)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fill (61)  |  Key (50)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Local (19)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Original (58)  |  Passing (76)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Rush (18)  |  Site (14)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Storm (51)  |  Strike (68)  |  Succession (77)  |  World (1774)

Copious springs are found where there are mines of gold, silver, iron, copper, lead, and the like, but they are very harmful.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 7, Chap 3, Sec. 5. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Copious (5)  |  Copper (25)  |  Gold (97)  |  Harmful (12)  |  Iron (96)  |  Lead (384)  |  Mine (76)  |  Silver (46)  |  Water Pollution (11)

Could Hamlet have been written by a committee, or the “Mona Lisa” painted by a club? Could the New Testament have been composed as a conference report? Creative ideas do not spring from groups. They spring from individuals. The divine spark leaps from the finger of God to the finger of Adam, whether it takes ultimate shape in a law of physics or a law of the land, a poem or a policy, a sonata or a mechanical computer.
Baccalaureate address (9 Jun 1957), Yale University. In In the University Tradition (1957), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Adam (7)  |  Club (4)  |  Committee (15)  |  Composition (84)  |  Computer (127)  |  Conference (17)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Divine (112)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Do (1908)  |  Finger (44)  |  God (757)  |  Group (78)  |  Hamlet (7)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Land (115)  |  Law (894)  |  Leap (53)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  New (1216)  |  New Testament (3)  |  Painting (44)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Poem (96)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Report (38)  |  Shape (72)  |  Sonata (2)  |  Spark (31)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Writing (189)

During this [book preparation] time attacks have not been wanting—we must always be prepared for them. If they grow out of a scientific soil, they cannot but be useful, by laying bare weak points and stimulating to their correction; but if they proceed from that soil, from which the lilies of innocence and the palms of conciliation should spring up, where, however, nothing but the marsh-trefoil of credulity and the poisonous water-hemlock of calumniation grow, they deserve no attention.
Carl Vogt
From Carl Vogt and James Hunt (ed.), Lectures on Man: His Place in Creation, and in the History of the Earth (1861), Author's Preface, 2-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (84)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bare (33)  |  Book (392)  |  Correction (40)  |  Credulity (14)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Deserving (4)  |  Grow (238)  |  Innocence (13)  |  Lily (4)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Palm (5)  |  Point (580)  |  Poison (40)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Soil (86)  |  Stimulation (16)  |  Time (1877)  |  Useful (250)  |  Water (481)  |  Weak (71)  |  Weakness (48)

Early Greek astronomers, derived their first knowledge from the Egyptians, and these from the Chaldeans, among whom the science was studied, at a very early period. Their knowledge of astronomy, which gave their learned men the name of Magi, wise men, afterwards degenerated into astrology, or the art of consulting the position of the stars to foretel events—and hence sprung the silly occupation of sooth saying, for which the Chaldeans were noted to a proverb, in later ages.
In Elements of Useful Knowledge (1806), Vol. 1, 8-9. Note “foretel” is as printed in this text.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Art (657)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Chaldea (3)  |  Consult (6)  |  Degenerate (14)  |  Early (185)  |  Egyptian (5)  |  Event (216)  |  First (1283)  |  Foretell (11)  |  Greek (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Late (118)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Name (333)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Period (198)  |  Position (77)  |  Proverb (27)  |  Science (3879)  |  Silly (17)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Wise (131)

Electronic aids, particularly domestic computers, will help the inner migration, the opting out of reality. Reality is no longer going to be the stuff out there, but the stuff inside your head. It's going to be commercial and nasty at the same time, like 'Rite of Spring' in Disney's Fantasia ... our internal devils may destroy and renew us through the technological overload we've invoked.
Interview in Heavy Metal (Apr 1971). Reprinted in Re/Search, No. 8/9 (1984).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aid (97)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Computer (127)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Devil (31)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Electronics (11)  |  Inner (71)  |  Internal (66)  |  Migration (11)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nasty (7)  |  Reality (261)  |  Renew (19)  |  Technological (61)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

Enthusiasm for the global-warming scare also ensures that heatwaves make headlines, while contrary symptoms, such as this winter’s billion-dollar loss of Californian crops to unusual frost, are relegated to the business pages. The early arrival of migrant birds in spring provides colourful evidence for a recent warming of the northern lands. But did anyone tell you that in east Antarctica the Adélie penguins and Cape petrels are turning up at their spring nesting sites around nine days later than they did 50 years ago? While sea-ice has diminished in the Arctic since 1978, it has grown by 8% in the Southern Ocean.
In 'An experiment that hints we are wrong on climate change', The Sunday Times (11 Feb 2007).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Antarctica (7)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Arrival (15)  |  Billion (95)  |  Bird (149)  |  Business (149)  |  California (9)  |  Climate Change (61)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Crop (25)  |  Early (185)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Frost (14)  |  Global (35)  |  Headline (6)  |  Ice (54)  |  Iceberg (4)  |  Loss (110)  |  Migration (11)  |  Nest (23)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Penguin (4)  |  Recent (77)  |  Sea (308)  |  Symptom (34)  |  Tell (340)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Warming (23)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

Even bees, the little alms-men of spring bowers,
Know there is richest juice in poison-flowers.
From poem, 'Isabella', collected in The Poetical Works of John Keats (1885), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Bee (40)  |  Bower (2)  |  Entomology (9)  |  Flower (106)  |  Juice (7)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Poison (40)  |  Rich (62)

Even though the realms of religion and science in themselves are clearly marked off from each other, nevertheless there exist between the two strong reciprocal relationships and dependencies. Though religion may be that which determines the goal, it has, nevertheless, learned from science, in the broadest sense, what means will contribute to the attainment of the goals it has set up. But science can only be created by those who are thoroughly imbued with the aspiration toward truth and understanding. This source of feeling, however, springs from the sphere of religion. To this there also belongs the faith in the possibility that the regulations valid for the world of existence are rational, that is, comprehensible to reason. I cannot conceive of a genuine scientist without that profound faith. The situation may be expressed by an image: science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.
From paper 'Science, Philosophy and Religion', prepared for initial meeting of the Conference on Science, Philosophy and Religion in Their Relation to the Democratic Way of Life, at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, New York City (9-11 Sep 1940). Collected in Albert Einstein: In His Own Words (2000), 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blind (95)  |  Comprehensible (4)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Determine (144)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Express (186)  |  Faith (203)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Goal (145)  |  Image (96)  |  Lame (3)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Profound (104)  |  Rational (90)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reciprocal (7)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Regulations (3)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Situation (113)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Strong (174)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Every great scientist becomes a great scientist because of the inner self-abnegation with which he stands before truth, saying: “Not my will, but thine, be done.” What, then, does a man mean by saying, Science displaces religion, when in this deep sense science itself springs from religion?
In 'The Real Point of Conflict between Science and Religion', collected in Living Under Tension: Sermons On Christianity Today (1941), 148.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Deep (233)  |  Displace (8)  |  Done (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inner (71)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Religion (361)  |  French Saying (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Stand (274)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)

Every subject in Davy’s mind has the principle of Vitality. Living thoughts spring up like Turf under his feet.
Quoted in Joseph Cottle, Reminiscences of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey (1847), 329.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Living (491)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Principle (507)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vitality (23)

Far from attempting to control science, few among the general public even seem to recognize just what “science” entails. Because lethal technologies seem to spring spontaneously from scientific discoveries, most people regard dangerous technology as no more than the bitter fruit of science, the real root of all evil.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Control (167)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Entail (4)  |  Evil (116)  |  Fruit (102)  |  General (511)  |  Lethal (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Public (96)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Regard (305)  |  Research (664)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spontaneous (27)  |  Technology (257)

For the time of making Observations none can ever be amiss; there being no season, nor indeed hardly any place where in some Natural Thing or other does not present it self worthy of Remark: yea there are some things that require Observation all the Year round, as Springs, Rivers, &c. Nor is there any Season amiss for the gathering Natural Things. Bodies of one kind or other presenting themselves at all times, and in Winter as well as Summer.
In Brief Instructions for Making Observations in all Parts of the World (1696), 10-11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Kind (557)  |  Making (300)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Require (219)  |  River (119)  |  Season (47)  |  Self (267)  |  Summer (54)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Winter (44)  |  Year (933)

For three days now this angel, almost too heavenly for earth has been my fiancée … Life stands before me like an eternal spring with new and brilliant colours. Upon his engagement to Johanne Osthof of Brunswick; they married 9 Oct 1805.
Letter to Farkas Wolfgang Bolyai (1804). Quoted in Stephen Hawking, God Created the Integers: The Mathematical Breakthroughs (2005), 567.
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (44)  |  Biography (240)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Earth (996)  |  Engagement (8)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Life (1795)  |  Marriage (39)  |  New (1216)  |  Stand (274)

From Avarice thus, from Luxury and War
Sprang heavenly Science;
and from Science Freedom.
Science quotes on:  |  Avarice (2)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Heavenly (8)  |  Luxury (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  War (225)

Geology ... offers always some material for observation. ... [When] spring and summer come round, how easily may the hammer be buckled round the waist, and the student emerge from the dust of town into the joyous air of the country, for a few delightful hours among the rocks.
In The Story of a Boulder: or, Gleanings from the Note-book of a Field Geologist (1858), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Buckle (4)  |  Count (105)  |  Country (251)  |  Delight (108)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Dust (64)  |  Ease (35)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Hour (186)  |  Joy (107)  |  Material (353)  |  Observation (555)  |  Offer (141)  |  Rock (161)  |  Season (47)  |  Student (300)  |  Summer (54)  |  Town (27)  |  Waist (2)  |  Year (933)

Happy is he who bears a god within himself, an ideal of beauty, and obeys him: an ideal of art, an ideal of the virtues of the Gospel. These are the living springs of great thoughts and great actions. All are illuminated by reflections of the sublime.
Speech (27 Apr 1882) on his reception into the Académie Française, as translated in Maurice Benjamin Strauss, Familiar Medical Quotations (1968), 490.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beauty (299)  |  God (757)  |  Gospel (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Living (491)  |  Obey (40)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Thought (953)  |  Virtue (109)

HIBERNATE, v. i. To pass the winter season in domestic seclusion. There have been many singular popular notions about the hibernation of various animals. Many believe that the bear hibernates during the whole winter and subsists by mechanically sucking its paws. It is admitted that it comes out of its retirement in the spring so lean that it has to try twice before it can cast a shadow. 
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  137.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Bear (159)  |  Cast (66)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Hibernation (3)  |  Humour (116)  |  Notion (113)  |  Pass (238)  |  Retirement (7)  |  Season (47)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Singular (23)  |  Try (283)  |  Various (200)  |  Whole (738)  |  Winter (44)

High technology has done us one great service: It has retaught us the delight of performing simple and primordial tasks—chopping wood, building a fire, drawing water from a spring.
In 'Science and Technology', A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (Vox Clamantis in Deserto) (1989), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Chop (7)  |  Delight (108)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Fire (189)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Perform (121)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Service (110)  |  Simple (406)  |  Task (147)  |  Technology (257)  |  Water (481)  |  Wood (92)

How lavish nature has adorn’d the year
How the pale primrose and blue violet spring,
And birds essay their throats disus’d to sing.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (149)  |  Blue (56)  |  Essay (27)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Primrose (2)  |  Sing (26)  |  Throat (10)  |  Violet (11)  |  Year (933)

I came from Paris in the Spring of 1884, and was brought in intimate contact with him [Thomas Edison]. We experimented day and night, holidays not excepted. His existence was made up of alternate periods of work and sleep in the laboratory. He had no hobby, cared for no sport or amusement of any kind and lived in utter disregard of the most elementary rules of hygiene. There can be no doubt that, if he had not married later a woman of exceptional intelligence, who made it the one object of her life to preserve him, he would have died many years ago from consequences of sheer neglect. So great and uncontrollable was his passion for work.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (33)  |  Car (71)  |  Care (186)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Contact (65)  |  Death (388)  |  Disregard (8)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hobby (5)  |  Holiday (9)  |  Hygiene (12)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Kind (557)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Life (1795)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Night (120)  |  Object (422)  |  Passion (114)  |  Period (198)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Sport (22)  |  Uncontrollable (4)  |  Woman (151)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I can see him [Sylvester] now, with his white beard and few locks of gray hair, his forehead wrinkled o’er with thoughts, writing rapidly his figures and formulae on the board, sometimes explaining as he wrote, while we, his listeners, caught the reflected sounds from the board. But stop, something is not right, he pauses, his hand goes to his forehead to help his thought, he goes over the work again, emphasizes the leading points, and finally discovers his difficulty. Perhaps it is some error in his figures, perhaps an oversight in the reasoning. Sometimes, however, the difficulty is not elucidated, and then there is not much to the rest of the lecture. But at the next lecture we would hear of some new discovery that was the outcome of that difficulty, and of some article for the Journal, which he had begun. If a text-book had been taken up at the beginning, with the intention of following it, that text-book was most likely doomed to oblivion for the rest of the term, or until the class had been made listeners to every new thought and principle that had sprung from the laboratory of his mind, in consequence of that first difficulty. Other difficulties would soon appear, so that no text-book could last more than half of the term. In this way his class listened to almost all of the work that subsequently appeared in the Journal. It seemed to be the quality of his mind that he must adhere to one subject. He would think about it, talk about it to his class, and finally write about it for the Journal. The merest accident might start him, but once started, every moment, every thought was given to it, and, as much as possible, he read what others had done in the same direction; but this last seemed to be his real point; he could not read without finding difficulties in the way of understanding the author. Thus, often his own work reproduced what had been done by others, and he did not find it out until too late.
A notable example of this is in his theory of cyclotomic functions, which he had reproduced in several foreign journals, only to find that he had been greatly anticipated by foreign authors. It was manifest, one of the critics said, that the learned professor had not read Rummer’s elementary results in the theory of ideal primes. Yet Professor Smith’s report on the theory of numbers, which contained a full synopsis of Kummer’s theory, was Professor Sylvester’s constant companion.
This weakness of Professor Sylvester, in not being able to read what others had done, is perhaps a concomitant of his peculiar genius. Other minds could pass over little difficulties and not be troubled by them, and so go on to a final understanding of the results of the author. But not so with him. A difficulty, however small, worried him, and he was sure to have difficulties until the subject had been worked over in his own way, to correspond with his own mode of thought. To read the work of others, meant therefore to him an almost independent development of it. Like the man whose pleasure in life is to pioneer the way for society into the forests, his rugged mind could derive satisfaction only in hewing out its own paths; and only when his efforts brought him into the uncleared fields of mathematics did he find his place in the Universe.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Adhere (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Appear (118)  |  Article (22)  |  Author (167)  |  Beard (7)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Board (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (164)  |  Companion (19)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contain (68)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Critic (20)  |  Derive (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Error (321)  |  Example (94)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Figure (160)  |  Final (118)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forest (150)  |  Formula (98)  |  Full (66)  |  Function (228)  |  Genius (284)  |  Give (202)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hair (25)  |  Half (56)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hear (139)  |  Help (105)  |  Hew (3)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intention (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Ernst Eduard Kummer (3)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Notable (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Path (144)  |  Pause (6)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Place (177)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prime (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Read (287)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Report (38)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Rum (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smith (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Synopsis (2)  |  Talk (100)  |  Term (349)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  White (127)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

I hate science. It denies a man’s responsibility for his own deeds, abolishes the brotherhood that springs from God’s fatherhood. It is a hectoring, dictating expertise, which makes the least lovable of the Church Fathers seem liberal by contrast. It is far easier for a Hitler or a Stalin to find a mock-scientific excuse for persecution than it was for Dominic to find a mock-Christian one.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abolish (12)  |  Brotherhood (6)  |  Christian (43)  |  Church (56)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Deed (34)  |  Deny (66)  |  Dictate (11)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Excuse (25)  |  Expertise (8)  |  Far (154)  |  Father (110)  |  Fatherhood (2)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Hate (64)  |  Adolf Hitler (19)  |  Least (75)  |  Liberal (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mock (7)  |  Persecution (13)  |  Pseudoscience (16)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seem (145)  |  Stalin_Joseph (5)

I have always liked horticulturists, people who make their living from orchards and gardens, whose hands are familiar with the feel of the bark, whose eyes are trained to distinguish the different varieties, who have a form memory. Their brains are not forever dealing with vague abstractions; they are satisfied with the romance which the seasons bring with them, and have the patience and fortitude to gamble their lives and fortunes in an industry which requires infinite patience, which raise hopes each spring and too often dashes them to pieces in fall. They are always conscious of sun and wind and rain; must always be alert lest they lose the chance of ploughing at the right moment, pruning at the right time, circumventing the attacks of insects and fungus diseases by quick decision and prompt action. They are manufacturers of a high order, whose business requires not only intelligence of a practical character, but necessitates an instinct for industry which is different from that required by the city dweller always within sight of other people and the sound of their voices. The successful horticulturist spends much time alone among his trees, away from the constant chatter of human beings.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Action (327)  |  Alert (13)  |  Alone (311)  |  Attack (84)  |  Bark (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Business (149)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  City (78)  |  Constant (144)  |  Decision (91)  |  Different (577)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fall (230)  |  Feel (367)  |  Forever (103)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Fungus (5)  |  Garden (60)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Horticulture (9)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Industry (137)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Insect (77)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Lose (159)  |  Memory (134)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patience (56)  |  People (1005)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prompt (14)  |  Pruning (7)  |  Rain (62)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Right (452)  |  Romance (15)  |  Season (47)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spend (95)  |  Successful (123)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vague (47)  |  Wind (128)

I have been driven to assume for some time, especially in relation to the gases, a sort of conducting power for magnetism. Mere space is Zero. One substance being made to occupy a given portion of space will cause more lines of force to pass through that space than before, and another substance will cause less to pass. The former I now call Paramagnetic & the latter are the diamagnetic. The former need not of necessity assume a polarity of particles such as iron has with magnetic, and the latter do not assume any such polarity either direct or reverse. I do not say more to you just now because my own thoughts are only in the act of formation, but this I may say: that the atmosphere has an extraordinary magnetic constitution, & I hope & expect to find in it the cause of the annual & diurnal variations, but keep this to yourself until I have time to see what harvest will spring from my growing ideas.
Letter to William Whewell, 22 Aug 1850. In L. Pearce Williams (ed.), The Selected Correspondence of Michael Faraday (1971), Vol. 2, 589.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Formation (96)  |  Former (137)  |  Growing (98)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Iron (96)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pass (238)  |  Polarity (5)  |  Portion (84)  |  Power (746)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Space (500)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zero (37)

If in our withered leaves you see
Hint of your own mortality:—
Think how, when they have turned to earth,
New loveliness from their rich worth
Shall spring to greet the light; then see
Death as the keeper of eternity,
And dying Life’s perpetual re-birth !
Anonymous
Poem attributed with initials W.L., epigraph for chapter on 'The Nitrogen Cycle', in Arthur E. Shipley, Life: A Book for Elementary Students (1925, 2013), 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Birth (147)  |  Death (388)  |  Decay (53)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Greet (6)  |  Hint (21)  |  Keeper (4)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Loveliness (6)  |  Mortality (15)  |  New (1216)  |  Nitrogen Cycle (2)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wither (8)  |  Worth (169)

If the kind of controversy which so often springs up between modernism and traditionalism in religion were applied to more commonplace affairs of life we might see some strange results. …It arises, let us say, from a passage in an obituary notice which mentions that the deceased had loved to watch the sunsets from his peaceful country home.. …it is forgotten that what the deceased man looked out for each evening was an experience and not a creed.
Swarthmore Lecture (1929) at Friends’ House, London, printed in Science and the Unseen World (1929), 84-85.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Arise (158)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Country (251)  |  Creed (27)  |  Experience (467)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Home (170)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mention (82)  |  More (2559)  |  Notice (77)  |  Passage (50)  |  Religion (361)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Strange (157)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Watch (109)

In human freedom in the philosophical sense I am definitely a disbeliever. Everybody acts not only under external compulsion but also in accordance with inner necessity. Schopenhauer’s saying, that ‘a man can do as he will, but not will as he will,’ has been an inspiration to me since my youth up, and a continual consolation and unfailing well-spring of patience in the face of the hardships of life, my own and others’. This feeling mercifully mitigates the sense of responsibility which so easily becomes paralysing, and it prevents us from taking ourselves and other people too seriously; it conduces to a view of life in which humour, above all, has its due place.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accordance (10)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Conduce (2)  |  Consolation (9)  |  Continual (43)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Easily (35)  |  Everybody (70)  |  External (57)  |  Face (212)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Hardship (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humour (116)  |  Inner (71)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mitigate (3)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Patience (56)  |  People (1005)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Place (177)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Say (984)  |  Schopenhauer (6)  |  Schopenhauers (2)  |  Sense (770)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Unfailing (5)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  Youth (101)

In order that an inventory of plants may be begun and a classification of them correctly established, we must try to discover criteria of some sort for distinguishing what are called “species”. After a long and considerable investigation, no surer criterion for determining species had occurred to me than distinguishing features that perpetuate themselves in propagation from seed. Thus, no matter what variations occur in the individuals or the species, if they spring from the seed of one and the same plant, they are accidental variations and not such as to distinguish a species. For these variations do not perpetuate themselves in subsequent seeding. Thus, for example, we do not regard caryophylli with full or multiple blossoms as a species distinct from caryophylli with single blossoms, because the former owe their origin to the seed of the latter and if the former are sown from their own seed, they once more produce single-blossom caryophylli. But variations that never have as their source seed from one and the same species may finally be regarded as distinct species. Or, if you make a comparison between any two plants, plants which never spring from each other's seed and never, when their seed is sown, are transmuted one into the other, these plants finally are distinct species. For it is just as in animals: a difference in sex is not enough to prove a difference of species, because each sex is derived from the same seed as far as species is concerned and not infrequently from the same parents; no matter how many and how striking may be the accidental differences between them; no other proof that bull and cow, man and woman belong to the same species is required than the fact that both very frequently spring from the same parents or the same mother. Likewise in the case of plants, there is no surer index of identity of species than that of origin from the seed of one and the same plant, whether it is a matter of individuals or species. For animals that differ in species preserve their distinct species permanently; one species never springs from the seed of another nor vice versa.
John Ray
Historia Plantarum (1686), Vol. 1, 40. Trans. Edmund Silk. Quoted in Barbara G. Beddall, 'Historical Notes on Avian Classification', Systematic Zoology (1957), 6, 133-4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Accidental (27)  |  Animal (617)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Both (493)  |  Bull (3)  |  Call (769)  |  Classification (97)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Concern (228)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Cow (39)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Differ (85)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Former (137)  |  Identity (19)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inventory (7)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Likewise (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Mother (114)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Parent (76)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Perpetuate (10)  |  Perpetuation (4)  |  Plant (294)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Production (183)  |  Proof (287)  |  Propagation (14)  |  Prove (250)  |  Regard (305)  |  Required (108)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sex (69)  |  Single (353)  |  Species (401)  |  Striking (48)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Variation (90)  |  Vice (40)  |  Woman (151)

In scientific investigations it is grievously wrong to pander to the public’s impatience for results, or to let them think that for discovery it is necessary only to set up a great manufactory and a system of mass production. If in treatment team work is effective, in research it is the individual who counts first and above all. No great thought has ever sprung from anything but a single mind, suddenly conceiving. Throughout the whole world there has been too violent a forcing of the growth of ideas; too feverish a rush to perform experiments and publish conclusions. A year of vacation for calm detachment with all the individual workers thinking it all over in a desert should be proclaimed.
In Viewless Winds: Being the Recollections and Digressions of an Australian Surgeon (1939), 286.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Calm (31)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Count (105)  |  Desert (56)  |  Detachment (8)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effective (59)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feverish (6)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grievous (3)  |  Growth (187)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Individual (404)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Manufactory (2)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mass Production (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Pander (3)  |  Perform (121)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Production (183)  |  Public (96)  |  Publish (36)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Rush (18)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Up (3)  |  Single (353)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  System (537)  |  Team (15)  |  Teamwork (5)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vacation (4)  |  Violent (17)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)

In the fall of 1967, [I was invited] to a conference … on pulsars. … In my talk, I argued that we should consider the possibility that the center of a pulsar is a gravitationally completely collapsed object. I remarked that one couldn't keep saying “gravitationally completely collapsed object” over and over. One needed a shorter descriptive phrase. “How about black hole?” asked someone in the audience. I had been searching for the right term for months, mulling it over in bed, in the bathtub, in my car, whenever I had quiet moments. Suddenly this name seemed exactly right. When I gave a more formal Sigma Xi-Phi Beta Kappa lecture … on December 29, 1967, I used the term, and then included it in the written version of the lecture published in the spring of 1968. (As it turned out, a pulsar is powered by “merely” a neutron star, not a black hole.)
[Although John Wheeler is often identified as coining the term “black hole,” he in fact merely popularized the expression. In his own words, this is his explanation of the true origin: a suggestion from an unidentified person in a conference audience.]
In Geons, Black Holes, and Quantum Foam (2000), 296-297.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Audience (26)  |  Black Hole (17)  |  Car (71)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conference (17)  |  Consider (416)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fall (230)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Merely (316)  |  Moment (253)  |  Month (88)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Neutron Star (3)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Object (422)  |  Origin (239)  |  Person (363)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Power (746)  |  Pulsar (3)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Right (452)  |  Small (477)  |  Star (427)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Term (349)  |  Turn (447)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Word (619)

In the history of science and throughout the whole course of its progress we see certain epochs following one another more or less rapidly. Some important view is expressed, it may be original or only revived; sooner or later it receives recognition; fellow-Workers spring up; the outcome of it finds its way into the schools; it is taught and handed down; and we observe, unhappily, that it does not in the least matter whether the view be true or false. In either case its course is the same; in either case it comes in the end to he a mere phrase, a lifeless word stamped on the memory.
In The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe (1906), 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Course (409)  |  Down (456)  |  End (590)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Express (186)  |  False (100)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Find (998)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Important (209)  |  Lifeless (14)  |  Matter (798)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mere (84)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Observe (168)  |  Original (58)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Receive (114)  |  Recognition (88)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Teach (277)  |  Throughout (98)  |  True (212)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)

In the spring of 1760, [I] went to William and Mary college, where I continued two years. It was my great good fortune, and what probably fixed the destinies of my life, that Dr. William Small of Scotland, was then Professor of Mathematics, a man profound in most of the useful branches of science, with a happy talent of communication, correct and gentlemanly manners, and an enlarged and liberal mind. He, most happily for me, became soon attached to me, and made me his daily companion when not engaged in the school; and from his conversation I got my first views of the expansion of science, and of the system of things in which we are placed.
In Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Adgate Lipscomb (ed.), The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1904), Vol. 1, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Biography (240)  |  College (66)  |  Communication (94)  |  Companion (19)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Daily (87)  |  Expansion (41)  |  First (1283)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Professor (128)  |  Profound (104)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scotland (5)  |  Small (477)  |  Soon (186)  |  System (537)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Useful (250)  |  View (488)  |  Year (933)

INVENTOR, n. A person who makes an ingenious arrangement of wheels, levers and springs, and believes it civilization.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  173-174.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Humour (116)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Lever (13)  |  Person (363)  |  Wheel (50)

IODINE
It was Courtois discover'd Iodine
(In the commencement of this century),
Which, with its sisters, bromine and chlorine,
Enjoys a common parentage - the sea;
Although sometimes 'tis found, with other things,
In minerals and many saline springs.

But yet the quantity is so minute
In the great ocean, that a chemist might,
With sensibilities the most acute,
Have never brought this element to light,
Had he not thought it were as well to try
Where ocean's treasures concentrated lie.

And Courtois found that several plants marine,
Sponges, et cetera, exercise the art
Of drawing from the sea its iodine
In quantities sufficient to impart
Its properties; and he devised a plan
Of bringing it before us - clever man!
Anonymous
Discursive Chemical Notes in Rhyme (1876) by the Author of the Chemical Review, a B.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Biography (240)  |  Bromine (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Clever (38)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Common (436)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Element (310)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impart (23)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plant (294)  |  Poem (96)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Try (283)

It has often been said that power corrupts. But it is perhaps equally important to realize that weakness, too, corrupts. Power corrupts the few, while weakness corrupts the many. Hatred, malice, rudeness, intolerance, and suspicion are the faults of weakness. The resentment of the weak does not spring from any injustice done to them but from the sense of inadequacy and impotence. We cannot win the weak by sharing our wealth with them. They feel our generosity as oppression. St. Vincent De Paul cautioned his disciples to deport themselves so that the poor “will forgive them the bread you give them.”
In 'The Awakening of Asia', The Ordeal of Change (1963), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Bread (39)  |  Caution (24)  |  Corrupt (4)  |  De (3)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Equally (130)  |  Fault (54)  |  Feel (367)  |  Forgive (12)  |  Generosity (7)  |  Give (202)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Important (209)  |  Impotence (8)  |  Inadequacy (4)  |  Injustice (4)  |  Intolerance (8)  |  Malice (5)  |  Often (106)  |  Oppression (6)  |  Poor (136)  |  Power (746)  |  Realize (147)  |  Resentment (6)  |  Rudeness (5)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Share (75)  |  Sharing (11)  |  St (2)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Weak (71)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Will (2355)  |  Win (52)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Employment (32)  |  Equality (31)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evening (12)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fly (146)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happy (105)  |  Insect (77)  |  Intent (8)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (10)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  New-born (2)  |  Noon (14)  |  Office (71)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proper (144)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (233)  |  Sport (22)  |  Summer (54)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Testament (4)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wing (75)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

It is a lovely and terrible wilderness, such as wilderness as Christ and the prophets went out into; harshly and beautifully colored, broken and worn until its bones are exposed, its great sky without a smudge of taint from Technocracy, and in hidden corners and pockets under its cliffs the sudden poetry of springs.
Letter (3 Dec 1960) written to David E. Pesonen of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission. Collected in 'Coda: Wilderness Letter', The Sound of Mountain Water: The Changing American West (1969), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Bone (95)  |  Broken (56)  |  Christ (17)  |  Cliff (19)  |  Color (137)  |  Corner (57)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harsh (8)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Lovely (10)  |  Pocket (11)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Sky (161)  |  Smudge (2)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Taint (10)  |  Technocracy (2)  |  Technology (257)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Wilderness (45)  |  Worn (5)

Keep your faith in all beautiful things; in the Sun when it is hidden, in the Spring when it is gone.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Faith (203)  |  Hide (69)  |  Keep (101)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thing (1915)

Law springs from experiment, but not immediately. Experiment is individual, the law deduced from it is general; experiment is only approximate, the law is precise, or at least pretends to be. Experiment is made under conditions always complex, the enunciation of the law eliminates these complications. This is what is called ‘correcting the systematic errors’.
From La Valeur de la Science (1904), 142, as translated by George Bruce Halsted (trans.), in The Value of Science (1907), 77. From the French, “La loi sort de l’expérience, mais elle n’en sort pas immédiatement. L’expérience est individuelle, la loi qu’on en tire est générale, l’expérience n’est qu’approchée, la loi est précise ou du moins prétend l’élre. L’expérience se fait dans des conditions toujours complexes, l’énoncé de la loi élimine ces complications. C’est ce qu’on appelle ‘corriger les erreurs systématiques’.”
Science quotes on:  |  Approximate (25)  |  Call (769)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complication (29)  |  Condition (356)  |  Correct (86)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Enunciate (2)  |  Enunciation (7)  |  Error (321)  |  Experiment (695)  |  General (511)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Individual (404)  |  Law (894)  |  Least (75)  |  Precise (68)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Systematic (57)

Let Nature do your bottling and your pickling and preserving. For all Nature is doing her best each moment to make us well. She exists for no other end. Do not resist her. With the least inclination to be well, we should not be sick. Men have discovered—or think they have discovered—the salutariness of a few wild things only, and not of all nature. Why, “nature” is but another name for health, and the seasons are but different states of health. Some men think that they are not well in spring, or summer, or autumn, or winter; it is only because they are not well in them.
(23 Aug 1853). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: V: March 5-November 30, 1853 (1906), 395.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Autumn (9)  |  Best (459)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  End (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Health (193)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Moment (253)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pickle (3)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Resist (15)  |  Salutary (5)  |  Season (47)  |  Sick (81)  |  State (491)  |  Summer (54)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (87)  |  Winter (44)

Let us award a just, a brilliant homage to those rare men whom nature has endowed with the precious privilege of arranging a thousand isolated facts, of making seductive theories spring from them; but let us not forget to state, that the scythe of the reaper had cut the stalks before one had thought of uniting them into sheaves!
In François Arago, trans. by William Henry Smyth, Baden Powell and Robert Grant, 'Fourier', Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men (1859), Vol. 1, 409.
Science quotes on:  |  Arranging (3)  |  Award (13)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Cut (114)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Endowment (16)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Forget (115)  |  Homage (4)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Making (300)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Precious (41)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Rare (89)  |  Reaper (3)  |  Seductive (4)  |  Sheaf (2)  |  Stalk (6)  |  State (491)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Uniting (4)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (100)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Declare (45)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (65)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Error (321)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Join (26)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (607)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (790)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rise (166)  |  Run (174)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Step (231)  |  Succession (77)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Therefrom (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  True (212)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Vary (27)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whereby (2)  |  Why (491)

Life has found ways to flourish in boiling hot springs and on icy mountain tops, to fly, glow in the dark, put forth leaves in a rainless desert, or plumb the ocean, reproducing and adapting, reincarnating itself in new forms in defiance of time and death.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Boil (23)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Death (388)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Desert (56)  |  Find (998)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Fly (146)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Glow (14)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hot (60)  |  Icy (3)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mountain (185)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Reincarnation (2)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Way (1217)

Looking back across the long cycles of change through which the land has been shaped into its present form, let us realise that these geographical revolutions are not events wholly of the dim past, but that they are still in progress. So slow and measured has been their march, that even from the earliest times of human history they seem hardly to have advanced at all. But none the less are they surely and steadily transpiring around us. In the fall of rain and the flow of rivers, in the bubble of springs and the silence of frost, in the quiet creep of glaciers and the tumultuous rush of ocean waves, in the tremor of the earthquake and the outburst of the volcano, we may recognise the same play of terrestrial forces by which the framework of the continents has been step by step evolved.
Lecture at the Evening Meeting, Royal Geographical Society (24 Mar 1879), 'Discussion on Geographical Evolution', in Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society and Monthly Record (1879), New Monthly Series, 1, 443.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Bubble (22)  |  Change (593)  |  Continent (76)  |  Creep (15)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Eruption (9)  |  Event (216)  |  Fall (230)  |  Flow (83)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Framework (31)  |  Frost (14)  |  Glacier (17)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  March (46)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Rain (62)  |  Revolution (129)  |  River (119)  |  Silence (56)  |  Slow (101)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Still (613)  |  Surely (101)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tremor (2)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Wave (107)  |  Wholly (88)

Many a genius has been slow of growth. Oaks that flourish for a thousand years do not spring up into beauty like a reed.
In The Spanish Drama: Lope de Vega and Calderon (1846), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Do (1908)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Flourishing (6)  |  Genius (284)  |  Growth (187)  |  Oak (14)  |  Reed (8)  |  Slow (101)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Year (933)

Many animals even now spring out of the soil,
Coalescing from the rains and the heat of the sun.
Small wonder, then, if more and bigger creatures,
Full-formed, arose from the new young earth and sky.
The breed, for instance, of the dappled birds
Shucked off their eggshells in the springtime, as
Crickets in summer will slip their slight cocoons
All by themselves, and search for food and life.
Earth gave you, then, the first of mortal kinds,
For all the fields were soaked with warmth and moisture.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 5, lines 794-803, 181.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Bird (149)  |  Cocoon (3)  |  Creature (233)  |  Cricket (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Moisture (20)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  New (1216)  |  Rain (62)  |  Search (162)  |  Sky (161)  |  Small (477)  |  Soil (86)  |  Springtime (5)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sun (385)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Warmth (21)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Young (227)

Maple-trees are the cows of trees (spring-milked).
In Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit (1887), 10. Presumably referring to maple syrup production.
Science quotes on:  |  Cow (39)  |  Milk (22)  |  Tree (246)

Mathematics, while giving no quick remuneration, like the art of stenography or the craft of bricklaying, does furnish the power for deliberate thought and accurate statement, and to speak the truth is one of the most social qualities a person can possess. Gossip, flattery, slander, deceit, all spring from a slovenly mind that has not been trained in the power of truthful statement, which is one of the highest utilities.
In Social Phases of Education in the School and the Home (1900), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Craft (10)  |  Deceit (7)  |  Deliberate (18)  |  Flattery (7)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Gossip (8)  |  High (362)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Person (363)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Quality (135)  |  Quick (13)  |  Slander (3)  |  Slovenly (2)  |  Social (252)  |  Speak (232)  |  Statement (142)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Utility (49)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)

Men have called me mad; but the question is not yet settled, whether madness is or is not the loftiest intelligence—whether much that is glorious—whether all that is profound—does not spring from disease of thought—from moods of mind exalted at the expense of the general intellect.
In Eleonora (1850). Collected on The Works of the Late Edgar Allan Poe (1859), Vol. 1, 446.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Disease (328)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Expense (16)  |  General (511)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Mad (53)  |  Madness (33)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mood (13)  |  Profound (104)  |  Question (621)  |  Settle (19)  |  Settled (34)  |  Thought (953)

Never forget that tyranny most often springs from a fanatical faith in the absoluteness of one’s beliefs.
In Ashley Montagu (ed.), Science and Creationism (1984), Introduction, 9.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absoluteness (4)  |  Belief (578)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fanatical (3)  |  Forget (115)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Tyranny (14)

New scientific ideas never spring from a communal body, however organized, but rather from the head of an individually inspired researcher who struggles with his problems in lonely thought and unites all his thought on one single point which is his whole world for the moment.
Address on the 25th anniversary of the Kaiser-Wilhelm Gesellschaft (Jan 1936). Quoted in Surviving the Swastika: Scientific Research in Nazi Germany (1993), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Body (537)  |  Community (104)  |  Head (81)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Moment (253)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Organization (114)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Single (353)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unite (42)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Nothing is so beautiful as spring—
When weeds in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush;...
'Spring' (1877), reprinted in Gerard Manley Hopkins and Michael White (ed.) Some Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins, (1945), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Long (790)  |  Lovely (10)  |  Lush (3)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Weed (18)  |  Wheel (50)

Now it is a well-known principle of zoological evolution that an isolated region, if large and sufficiently varied in its topography, soil, climate and vegetation, will give rise to a diversified fauna according to the law of adaptive radiation from primitive and central types. Branches will spring off in all directions to take advantage of every possible opportunity of securing food. The modifications which animals undergo in this adaptive radiation are largely of mechanical nature, they are limited in number and kind by hereditary, stirp or germinal influences, and thus result in the independent evolution of similar types in widely-separated regions under the law of parallelism or homoplasy. This law causes the independent origin not only of similar genera but of similar families and even of our similar orders. Nature thus repeats herself upon a vast scale, but the similarity is never complete and exact.
'The Geological and Faunal Relations of Europe and America during the Tertiary Period and the Theory of the Successive Invasions of an African Fauna', Science (1900), 11, 563-64.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Branch (150)  |  Cause (541)  |  Central (80)  |  Climate (97)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Direction (175)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Family (94)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Food (199)  |  Genus (25)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Independence (34)  |  Influence (222)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Modification (55)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Parallelism (2)  |  Possible (552)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principle (507)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Region (36)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scale (121)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Soil (86)  |  Type (167)  |  Variation (90)  |  Vast (177)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zoology (36)

Nymphs! you disjoin, unite, condense, expand,
And give new wonders to the Chemist’s hand;
On tepid clouds of rising steam aspire,
Or fix in sulphur all its solid fire;
With boundless spring elastic airs unfold,
Or fill the fine vacuities of gold
With sudden flash vitrescent sparks reveal,
By fierce collision from the flint and steel. …
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Collision (15)  |  Expand (53)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flash (49)  |  Flint (6)  |  Gold (97)  |  New (1216)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Rising (44)  |  Solid (116)  |  Spark (31)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steel (21)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Unite (42)  |  Wonder (236)

ORGANIC LIFE beneath the shoreless waves
Was born and nurs'd in Ocean's pearly caves;
First, forms minute, unseen by spheric glass,
Move on the mud, or pierce the watery mass;
These, as successive generations bloom,
New powers acquire, and larger limbs assume;
Whence countless groups of vegetation spring,
And breathing realms of fin, and feet, and wing.
Thus the tall Oak, the giant of the wood,
Which bears Britannia's thunders on the flood;
The Whale, unmeasured monster of the main,
The lordly Lion, monarch of the plain,
The Eagle soaring in the realms of air,
Whose eye undazzled drinks the solar glare,
Imperious man, who rules the bestial crowd,
Of language, reason, and reflection proud,
With brow erect, who scorns this earthy sod,
And styles himself the image of his God;
Arose from rudiments of form and sense,
An embryon point, or microscopic ens!
The Temple of Nature (1803), canto 1, lines 295-314, pages 26-8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Countless (36)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Flood (50)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Giant (67)  |  Glass (92)  |  God (757)  |  Himself (461)  |  Image (96)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lion (22)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Minute (125)  |  Monster (31)  |  Move (216)  |  Mud (26)  |  New (1216)  |  Oak (14)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Organic (158)  |  Poem (96)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Rudiment (6)  |  Rule (294)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Sense (770)  |  Soaring (9)  |  Successive (73)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Wave (107)  |  Whale (32)  |  Wing (75)  |  Wood (92)

Our knowledge springs from two fundamental sources of the mind; the first is the capacity of receiving representations (receptivity for impressions), the second is the power of knowing an object through these representations (spontaneity [in the production] of concepts).
Critique of Pure Reason (1781), trans. Norman Kemp Smith (1929), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Capacity (100)  |  Concept (221)  |  First (1283)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Impression (114)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Power (746)  |  Production (183)  |  Representation (53)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)

Our obligation to survive and flourish is owed not just to ourselves, but also to the cosmos, ancient and vast, from which we spring.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Obligation (25)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Owe (71)  |  Survive (79)  |  Vast (177)

Over increasingly large areas of the United States, spring now comes unheralded by the return of the birds, and the early mornings are strangely silent where once they were filled with the beauty of bird song.
On the effect of chemical insecticides and fertilizers, Silent Spring, Houghton Mifflin (1962)
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bird (149)  |  Early (185)  |  Environment (216)  |  Large (394)  |  Morning (94)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Return (124)  |  Song (37)  |  State (491)

Palaeontology is the Aladdin’s lamp of the most deserted and lifeless regions of the earth; it touches the rocks and there spring forth in orderly succession the monarchs of the past and the ancient river streams and savannahs wherein they flourished. The rocks usually hide their story in the most difficult and inaccessible places.
In On the Trail of Ancient Man (1926), x.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Desert (56)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Earth (996)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Hide (69)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Lifeless (14)  |  Most (1731)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Paleontologist (19)  |  Past (337)  |  River (119)  |  Rock (161)  |  Story (118)  |  Stream (81)  |  Succession (77)  |  Usually (176)

Philosophy, and science, and the springs
Of wonder, and th wisdom of the world,
I have essayed; and in my mind there is
A power to make these subject to itself...
From poem 'Manfred'.
Science quotes on:  |  Essay (27)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Power (746)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)  |  Th (2)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

Poised for flight,
Wings spread bright,
Spring from night into the Sun.
Help on the Way
Science quotes on:  |  Bright (79)  |  Flight (98)  |  Night (120)  |  Poise (4)  |  Spread (83)  |  Sun (385)  |  Wing (75)

Power corrupts the few, while weakness corrupts the many.… The resentment of the weak does not spring from any injustice done to them but from the sense of their inadequacy and impotence. They hate not wickedness but weakness. When it is in their power to do so, the weak destroy weakness wherever they see it.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Corrupt (4)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Do (1908)  |  Hate (64)  |  Impotence (8)  |  Inadequacy (4)  |  Injustice (4)  |  Power (746)  |  Resentment (6)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Weak (71)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Wickedness (2)

Research in neurophysiology is much more like paddling a small canoe on a mountain river. The river which is fed by many distant springs carries you along all right though often in a peculiar direction. You have to paddle quite hard to keep afloat. And sooner or later some of your ideas are upset and are carried downstream like an upturned canoe.
From Speech (10 Dec 1963) at the Nobel Banquet in Stockholm, Sweden. Collected inGöran Liljestrand (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1963, (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Afloat (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Canoe (2)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distant (33)  |  Downstream (2)  |  Hard (243)  |  Idea (843)  |  Keep (101)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Neurophysiology (2)  |  Paddle (3)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Research (664)  |  Right (452)  |  River (119)  |  Small (477)  |  Sooner Or Later (6)  |  Upset (18)

That there is a Spring, or Elastical power in the Air we live in. By which ελατνρ [elater] or Spring of the Air, that which I mean is this: That our Air either consists of, or at least abounds with, parts of such a nature, that in case they be bent or compress'd by the weight of the incumbent part of the Atmosphere, or by any other Body, they do endeavour, as much as in them lies, to free themselves from that pressure, by bearing against the contiguous Bodies that keep them bent.
New Experiments Physico-Mechanical Touching the Spring of the Air (1660), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (17)  |  Against (332)  |  Air (347)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Body (537)  |  Consist (223)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Free (232)  |  Lie (364)  |  Live (628)  |  Mean (809)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Weight (134)

The axe and saw are insanely busy, chips are flying thick as snowflakes, and every summer thousands of acres of priceless forests, with their underbrush, soil, springs, climate, scenery, and religion, are vanishing away in clouds of smoke, while, except in the national parks, not one forest guard is employed.
John Muir
From 'The American Forests', The Atlantic (Aug 1897), 80, No. 478, 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Acre (12)  |  Axe (15)  |  Busy (28)  |  Chip (4)  |  Climate (97)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employed (3)  |  Flying (72)  |  Forest (150)  |  Guard (18)  |  National Park (4)  |  Priceless (7)  |  Religion (361)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Snowflake (14)  |  Soil (86)  |  Summer (54)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Underbrush (2)  |  Vanishing (11)

The bird which is drawn to the water by its need of finding there the prey on which it lives, separates the digits of its feet in trying to strike the water and move about on the surface. The skin which unites these digits at their base acquires the habit of being stretched by these continually repeated separations of the digits; thus in course of time there are formed large webs which unite the digits of ducks, geese, etc., as we actually find them. In the same way efforts to swim, that is to push against the water so as to move about in it, have stretched the membranes between the digits of frogs, sea-tortoises, the otter, beaver, etc.
On the other hand, a bird which is accustomed to perch on trees and which springs from individuals all of whom had acquired this habit, necessarily has longer digits on its feet and differently shaped from those of the aquatic animals that I have just named. Its claws in time become lengthened, sharpened and curved into hooks, to clasp the branches on which the animal so often rests.
We find in the same way that the bird of the water-side which does not like swimming and yet is in need of going to the water's edge to secure its prey, is continually liable to sink into the mud. Now this bird tries to act in such a way that its body should not be immersed in the liquid, and hence makes its best efforts to stretch and lengthen its legs. The long-established habit acquired by this bird and all its race of continually stretching and lengthening its legs, results in the individuals of this race becoming raised as though on stilts, and gradually obtaining long, bare legs, denuded of feathers up to the thighs and often higher still.
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 249-50, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 119-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Act (272)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aquatic (5)  |  Bare (33)  |  Base (117)  |  Beaver (7)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Bird (149)  |  Body (537)  |  Claw (8)  |  Course (409)  |  Duck (3)  |  Edge (47)  |  Effort (227)  |  Find (998)  |  Foot (60)  |  Form (959)  |  Frog (38)  |  Goose (12)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Habit (168)  |  Individual (404)  |  Large (394)  |  Leg (34)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Membrane (21)  |  Move (216)  |  Mud (26)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Other (2236)  |  Otter (2)  |  Perch (7)  |  Push (62)  |  Race (268)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Sea (308)  |  Separate (143)  |  Separation (57)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Side (233)  |  Sink (37)  |  Skin (47)  |  Still (613)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strike (68)  |  Surface (209)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tortoise (10)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unite (42)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)

The complacent manner in which geologists have produced their theories has been extremely amusing; for often with knowledge (and that frequently inaccurate) not extending beyond a given province, they have described the formation of a world with all the detail and air of eye-witnesses. That much good ensues, and that the science is greatly advanced, by the collision of various theories, cannot be doubted. Each party is anxious to support opinions by facts. Thus, new countries are explored, and old districts re-examined; facts come to light that do not suit either party; new theories spring up; and, in the end, a greater insight into the real structure of the earth's surface is obtained.
Sections and Views Illustrative of Geological Phenomena (1830), iii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Collision (15)  |  Detail (146)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Formation (96)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Geology (220)  |  Good (889)  |  Greater (288)  |  Insight (102)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Light (607)  |  New (1216)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Old (481)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Produced (187)  |  Province (35)  |  Science (3879)  |  Structure (344)  |  Support (147)  |  Surface (209)  |  Theory (970)  |  Various (200)  |  World (1774)

The concept of number is the obvious distinction between the beast and man. Thanks to number, the cry becomes a song, noise acquires rhythm, the spring is transformed into a dance, force becomes dynamic, and outlines figures.
Epigraph, without citation, in Corrective and Social Psychiatry and Journal of Behavior Technology Methods and Therapy (1966), Vol. 12, 409.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquire (39)  |  Beast (55)  |  Become (815)  |  Concept (221)  |  Cry (29)  |  Dance (32)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Figure (160)  |  Force (487)  |  Man (2251)  |  Noise (37)  |  Number (699)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Outline (11)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Song (37)  |  Thank (46)  |  Thanks (26)  |  Transform (73)

The discovery that these soccer-ball-like molecules can be made in large quantities will have an effect on chemistry like the sowing of a bucket of flower seeds—the results will spring up everywhere from now on. I’d be surprised if we don’t see thousands of new fullerene compounds in the next few years, some of which are almost certain to have important uses.
As quoted in Malcolm W. Browne, 'Bizarre New Class of Molecules Spawns Its Own Branch of Chemistry', New York Times (25 Dec 1990), Late Edition (East Coast), L37.
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (62)  |  Bucket (4)  |  Buckyball (4)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Compound (113)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Flower (106)  |  Fullerene (3)  |  Important (209)  |  Large (394)  |  Molecule (174)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Seed (93)  |  Soccer (3)  |  Sow (11)  |  Sowing (9)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

The earliest of my childhood recollections is being taken by my grandfather when he set out in the first warm days of early spring with a grubbing hoe (we called it a mattock) on his shoulder to seek the plants, the barks and roots from which the spring medicine for the household was prepared. If I could but remember all that went into that mysterious decoction and the exact method of preparation, and with judicious advertisement put the product upon the market, I would shortly be possessed of wealth which might be made to serve the useful purpose of increasing the salaries of all pathologists. … But, alas! I remember only that the basic ingredients were dogwood bark and sassafras root, and to these were added q.s. bloodroot, poke and yellow dock. That the medicine benefited my grandfather I have every reason to believe, for he was a hale, strong old man, firm in body and mind until the infection came against which even spring medicine was of no avail. That the medicine did me good I well know, for I can see before me even now the green on the south hillside of the old pasture, the sunlight in the strip of wood where the dogwood grew, the bright blossoms and the delicate pale green of the leaf of the sanguinaria, and the even lighter green of the tender buds of the sassafras in the hedgerow, and it is good to have such pictures deeply engraved in the memory.
From address, 'A Medical Retrospect'. Published in Yale Medical Journal (Oct 1910), 17, No. 2, 57. [Note: q.s. in an abbreviation for quantum sufficit meaning “as much as is sufficient,” when used as a quantity specification in medicine and pharmacology. -Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Bark (18)  |  Basic (138)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Body (537)  |  Body And Mind (3)  |  Bright (79)  |  Call (769)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Early (185)  |  Exact (68)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Grandfather (14)  |  Green (63)  |  Hedgerow (2)  |  Hillside (4)  |  Household (8)  |  Infection (27)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Market (20)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Memory (134)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Man (4)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Picture (143)  |  Plant (294)  |  Poke (5)  |  Possess (156)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Product (160)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Remember (179)  |  Root (120)  |  Salary (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  South (38)  |  Strong (174)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Useful (250)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Wood (92)  |  Yellow (30)

The extraordinary development of mathematics in the last century is quite unparalleled in the long history of this most ancient of sciences. Not only have those branches of mathematics which were taken over from the eighteenth century steadily grown, but entirely new ones have sprung up in almost bewildering profusion, and many of them have promptly assumed proportions of vast extent.
In The History of Mathematics in the Nineteenth Century', Congress of Arts and Sciences (1905), Vol. 1, 474. As cited and wuoted in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Bewildering (3)  |  Branch (150)  |  Century (310)  |  Development (422)  |  Extent (139)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  History (673)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Profusion (3)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Science (3879)  |  Vast (177)

The folly of mistaking a paradox for a discovery, a metaphor for a proof, a torrent of verbiage for a spring of capital truths, and oneself for an oracle, is inborn in us.
In John Bartlett, Familiar Quotations: A Collection of Passages, Phrases, and Proverbs Traced (1968), 857.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (780)  |  Folly (43)  |  Inborn (4)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Oracle (4)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Proof (287)  |  Torrent (5)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Verbiage (3)

The greater the tension, the greater the potential. Great energy springs from a correspondingly great tension of opposites.
Carl Jung
In 'Paracelsus as a Spiritual Phenomenon,' Alchemical Studies (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Energy (344)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Potential (69)  |  Tension (24)

The Greeks have given us one of the most beautiful words of our language, the word “enthusiasm” – a God within. The grandeur of the acts of men is measured by the inspiration from which they spring. Happy is he who bears a God within!
Speech (27 Apr 1882) on his reception into the Académie Française, as translated in Maurice Benjamin Strauss, Familiar Medical Quotations (1968), 490.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Bear (159)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  God (757)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Greek (107)  |  Happy (105)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Language (293)  |  Most (1731)  |  Word (619)

The growth curves of the famous Hopkins' rats are familiar to anyone who has ever opened a textbook of physiology. One recalls the proud ascendant curve of the milk-fed group which suddenly turns downwards as the milk supplement is removed, and the waning curve of the other group taking its sudden milk-assisted upward spring, until it passes its fellow now abruptly on the decline. 'Feeding experiments illustrating the importance of accessory factors in normal dietaries', Jour. Physiol., 1912, xliv, 425, ranks aesthetically beside the best stories of H. G. Wells.
Vitamins and Other Dietary Essentials (1933), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Curve (49)  |  Decline (26)  |  Diet (54)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Food (199)  |  Growth (187)  |  Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins (11)  |  Importance (286)  |  Milk (22)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rat (37)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Turn (447)  |  Upward (43)

The history of science has proved that fundamental research is the lifeblood of individual progress and that the ideas that lead to spectacular advances spring from it.
In J. Edwin Holmström, Records and Research in Engineering and Industrial Science (1956), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lifeblood (4)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proof (287)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spectacular (18)

The moment one has offered an original explanation for a phenomenon which seems satisfactory, that moment affection for his intellectual child springs into existence, and as the explanation grows into a definite theory his parental affections cluster about his offspring and it grows more and more dear to him. ... There springs up also unwittingly a pressing of the theory to make it fit the facts and a pressing of the facts to make them fit the theory... To avoid this grave danger, the method of multiple working hypotheses is urged. It differs from the simple working hypothesis in that it distributes the effort and divides the affections... In developing the multiple hypotheses, the effort is to bring up into view every rational exploration of the phenomenon in hand and to develop every tenable hypothesis relative to its nature, cause or origin, and to give to all of these as impartially as possible a working form and a due place in the investigation. The investigator thus becomes the parent of a family of hypotheses; and by his parental relations to all is morally forbidden to fasten his affections unduly upon anyone. ... Each hypothesis suggests its own criteria, its own method of proof, its own method of developing the truth, and if a group of hypotheses encompass the subject on all sides, the total outcome of means and of methods is full and rich.
'Studies for Students. The Method of Multiple Working Hypotheses', Journal of Geology (1897), 5, 840-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Become (815)  |  Cause (541)  |  Child (307)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Danger (115)  |  Definite (110)  |  Develop (268)  |  Differ (85)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Divide (75)  |  Due (141)  |  Effort (227)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Family (94)  |  Fit (134)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Form (959)  |  Grave (52)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Multiple (16)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Origin (239)  |  Parent (76)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proof (287)  |  Rational (90)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Side (233)  |  Simple (406)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tenable (4)  |  Theory (970)  |  Total (94)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)

The rigid career path of a professor at a modern university is that One Must Build the Big Research Group, recruit doctoral students more vigorously than the head football coach, bombard the federal agencies with grant applications more numerous than the pollen falling from the heavens in spring, and leave the paper writing and the research to the postdocs, research associates, and students who do all the bench work and all the computer programming. A professor is chained to his previous topics by his Big Group, his network of contacts built up laboriously over decades, and the impossibility of large funding except in areas where the grantee has grown the group from a corner of the building to an entire floor. The senior tenure-track faculty at a research university–the “silverbacks” in anthropological jargon–are bound by invisible chains stronger than the strongest steel to a narrow range of what the Prevailing Consensus agrees are Very Important Problems. The aspiring scientist is confronted with the reality that his mentors are all business managers.
In his Foreword to Cornelius Lanczos, Discourse on Fourier Series, ix-x.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Associate (25)  |  Bench (8)  |  Bound (119)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Business (149)  |  Career (75)  |  Coach (5)  |  Computer (127)  |  Consensus (8)  |  Contact (65)  |  Corner (57)  |  Decade (59)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Football (10)  |  Funding (19)  |  Grant (73)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Large (394)  |  Manager (6)  |  Mentor (3)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Network (21)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Paper (182)  |  Path (144)  |  Pollen (6)  |  Postgraduate (2)  |  Problem (676)  |  Professor (128)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Research (664)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Senior (6)  |  Silverback (2)  |  Steel (21)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Student (300)  |  Tenure (7)  |  Topic (21)  |  Track (38)  |  University (121)  |  Work (1351)  |  Writing (189)

The stories of Whitney’s love for experimenting are legion. At one time he received a letter asking if insects could live in a vacuum. Whitney took the letter to one of the members of his staff and asked the man if he cared to run an experiment on the subject. The man replied that there was no point in it, since it was well established that life could not exist without a supply of oxygen. Whitney, who was an inveterate student of wild life, replied that on his farm he had seen turtles bury themselves in mud each fall, and, although the mud was covered with ice and snow for months, emerge again in the spring. The man exclaimed, “Oh, you mean hibernation!” Whitney answered, “I don’t know what I mean, but I want to know if bugs can live in a vacuum.”
He proceeded down the hall and broached the subject to another member of the staff. Faced with the same lack of enthusiasm for pursuing the matter further, Whitney tried another illustration. “I’ve been told that you can freeze a goldfish solidly in a cake of ice, where he certainly can’t get much oxygen, and can keep him there for a month or two. But if you thaw him out carefully he seems none the worse for his experience.” The second scientist replied, “Oh, you mean suspended animation.” Whitney once again explained that his interest was not in the terms but in finding an answer to the question.
Finally Whitney returned to his own laboratory and set to work. He placed a fly and a cockroach in a bell jar and removed the air. The two insects promptly keeled over. After approximately two hours, however, when he gradually admitted air again, the cockroach waved its feelers and staggered to its feet. Before long, both the cockroach and the fly were back in action.
'Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 357-358.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Air (347)  |  Animation (6)  |  Answer (366)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Back (390)  |  Bell (35)  |  Both (493)  |  Burial (7)  |  Car (71)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Cockroach (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fall (230)  |  Farm (26)  |  Feeler (3)  |  Fly (146)  |  Freeze (5)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Hibernation (3)  |  Hour (186)  |  Ice (54)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lack (119)  |  Legion (4)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Month (88)  |  Mud (26)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Point (580)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Removal (11)  |  Return (124)  |  Run (174)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Snow (37)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supply (93)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thaw (2)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turtle (8)  |  Two (937)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Want (497)  |  Willis R. Whitney (17)  |  Wild (87)  |  Work (1351)

The sun's rays are the ultimate source of almost every motion which takes place on the surface of the earth. By their heat are produced all winds, and those disturbances in the electric equilibrium of the atmosphere which give rise to the phenomena of terrestrial magnetism. By their vivifying action vegetables are elaborated from inorganic matter, and become in their turn the support of animals and of man, and the sources of those great deposits of dynamical efficiency which are laid up for human use in our coal strata. By them the waters of the sea are made to circulate in vapor through the air, and irrigate the land, producing springs and rivers. By them are produced all disturbances of the chemical equilibrium of the elements of nature which, by a series of compositions and decompositions, give rise to new products, and originate a transfer of materials. Even the slow degradation of the solid constituents of the surface, in which its chief geological changes consist, and their diffusion among the waters of the ocean, are entirely due to the abrasion of the wind, rain, and tides, which latter, however, are only in part the effect of solar influence and the alternate action of the seasons.
from Outlines of Astronomy (1849), 237.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Become (815)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chief (97)  |  Coal (57)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consist (223)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Decomposition (18)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Due (141)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Efficiency (44)  |  Elaborated (7)  |  Electric (76)  |  Element (310)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human (1468)  |  Influence (222)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Originate (36)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Produced (187)  |  Product (160)  |  Rain (62)  |  Ray (114)  |  Rise (166)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Season (47)  |  Series (149)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Solid (116)  |  Strata (35)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Through (849)  |  Tide (34)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Turn (447)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Use (766)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Water (481)  |  Weather (44)  |  Wind (128)

There are various causes for the generation of force: a tensed spring, an air current, a falling mass of water, fire burning under a boiler, a metal that dissolves in an acid—one and the same effect can be produced by means of all these various causes. But in the animal body we recognise only one cause as the ultimate cause of all generation of force, and that is the reciprocal interaction exerted on one another by the constituents of the food and the oxygen of the air. The only known and ultimate cause of the vital activity in the animal as well as in the plant is a chemical process.
'Der Lebensprocess im Thiere und die Atmosphare', Annalen der Chemie und Pharmacie (1841), 41, 215-7. Trans. Kenneth L. Caneva, Robert Mo.yer and the Conservation of Energy (1993), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Body (537)  |  Boiler (7)  |  Burning (48)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Current (118)  |  Dissolve (20)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exert (39)  |  Fire (189)  |  Food (199)  |  Force (487)  |  Generation (242)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Known (454)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Metal (84)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Plant (294)  |  Process (423)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Steam (80)  |  Tension (24)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Various (200)  |  Vital (85)  |  Water (481)  |  Wind (128)

There is no science which does not spring from pre-existing knowledge, and no certain and definite idea which has not derived its origin from the senses.
In Willis (trans.) and Alex Bowie (trans.), 'The First Anatomical Disquisition on the Circulation of the Blood, Addressed to Jo. Riolan', On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals (1889), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Definite (110)  |  Derive (65)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Origin (239)  |  Pre-existing (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)

There is symbolic as well as actual beauty in the migration of the birds, the ebb and flow of the tides, the folded bud ready for the spring. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature—the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after the winter.
In The Sense of Wonder (1956, 1965), 88-89.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bird (149)  |  Bud (6)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Ebb (3)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fold (8)  |  Heal (6)  |  Healing (25)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Migration (11)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Night (120)  |  Ready (39)  |  Refrain (9)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Something (719)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Tide (34)  |  Winter (44)

There will one day spring from the brain of science a machine or force so fearful in its potentialities, so absolutely terrifying, that even man, the fighter, who will dare torture and death in order to inflict torture and death, will be appalled, and so abandon war forever.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Appalled (2)  |  Brain (270)  |  Dare (50)  |  Death (388)  |  Fearful (7)  |  Fighter (4)  |  Force (487)  |  Forever (103)  |  Inflict (4)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Order (632)  |  Potentiality (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  Terrify (11)  |  Torture (29)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)

There will still be things that machines cannot do. They will not produce great art or great literature or great philosophy; they will not be able to discover the secret springs of happiness in the human heart; they will know nothing of love and friendship.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Heart (229)  |  Human (1468)  |  Know (1518)  |  Literature (103)  |  Love (309)  |  Machine (257)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Produce (104)  |  Secret (194)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

Through the magic of motion pictures, someone who’s never left Peoria knows the softness of a Paris spring, the color of a Nile sunset, the sorts of vegetation one will find along the upper Amazon and that Big Ben has not yet gone digital.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Amazon (9)  |  Color (137)  |  Digital (10)  |  Find (998)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leave (130)  |  Magic (86)  |  Motion (310)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nile (4)  |  Paris (11)  |  Picture (143)  |  Softness (2)  |  Someone (22)  |  Sort (49)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Through (849)  |  Upper (4)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Will (2355)

To appreciate a work of art we need bring with us nothing from life, no knowledge of its ideas and affairs, no familiarity with its emotions. Art transports us from the world of man’s activity to a world of æsthetic exaltation. For a moment we are shut off from human interests; our anticipations and memories are arrested; we are lifted above the stream of life. The pure mathematician rapt in his studies knows a state of mind which I take to be similar, if not identical. He feels an emotion for his speculations which arises from no perceived relation between them and the lives of men, but springs, inhuman or super-human, from the heart of an abstract science. I wonder, sometimes, whether the appreciators of art and of mathematical solutions are not even more closely allied.
In Art (1913), 25.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Activity (210)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Anticipation (18)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Arise (158)  |  Art (657)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Exaltation (5)  |  Familiarity (19)  |  Feel (367)  |  Heart (229)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Identical (53)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Pure (291)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shut (41)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Speculation (126)  |  State (491)  |  Stream (81)  |  Transport (30)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Water at command, by turning a tap and paying a tax, is more convenient than carrying it from a free spring.
In Sinner Sermons: A Selection of the Best Paragraphs of E. W. Howe (1926), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Carry (127)  |  Civil Engineering (5)  |  Command (58)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Free (232)  |  More (2559)  |  Tap (10)  |  Tax (26)  |  Water (481)

We all know, from what we experience with and within ourselves, that our conscious acts spring from our desires and our fears. Intuition tells us that that is true also of our fellows and of the higher animals. We all try to escape pain and death, while we seek what is pleasant. We are all ruled in what we do by impulses; and these impulses are so organized that our actions in general serve for our self preservation and that of the race. Hunger, love, pain, fear are some of those inner forces which rule the individual’s instinct for self preservation. At the same time, as social beings, we are moved in the relations with our fellow beings by such feelings as sympathy, pride, hate, need for power, pity, and so on. All these primary impulses, not easily described in words, are the springs of man’s actions. All such action would cease if those powerful elemental forces were to cease stirring within us. Though our conduct seems so very different from that of the higher animals, the primary instincts are much alike in them and in us. The most evident difference springs from the important part which is played in man by a relatively strong power of imagination and by the capacity to think, aided as it is by language and other symbolical devices. Thought is the organizing factor in man, intersected between the causal primary instincts and the resulting actions. In that way imagination and intelligence enter into our existence in the part of servants of the primary instincts. But their intervention makes our acts to serve ever less merely the immediate claims of our instincts.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Causal (7)  |  Cease (79)  |  Claim (146)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Death (388)  |  Describe (128)  |  Desire (204)  |  Device (70)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Easily (35)  |  Elemental (3)  |  Enter (141)  |  Escape (80)  |  Evident (91)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  Hate (64)  |  High (362)  |  Hunger (21)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Important (209)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inner (71)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intersect (5)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Less (103)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Need (290)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Pain (136)  |  Part (222)  |  Pity (14)  |  Play (112)  |  Pleasant (20)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Pride (78)  |  Primary (80)  |  Race (268)  |  Relation (157)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Result (677)  |  Rule (294)  |  Same (157)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seem (145)  |  Self (267)  |  Servant (39)  |  Serve (59)  |  Social (252)  |  Stir (21)  |  Strong (174)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  True (212)  |  Try (283)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

We all remember the fairy tales of science in our infancy, which played with the supposition that large animals could jump in the proportion of small ones. If an elephant were as strong as a grasshopper, he could (I suppose) spring clean out of the Zoological Gardens and alight trumpeting upon Primrose Hill. If a whale could leap from the water like a trout, perhaps men might look up and see one soaring above Yarmouth like the winged island of Laputa.
In Manalive (1912), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Clean (50)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Fairy Tale (7)  |  Garden (60)  |  Grasshopper (7)  |  Island (46)  |  Jump (29)  |  Large (394)  |  Leap (53)  |  Look (582)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Remember (179)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Soaring (9)  |  Strong (174)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Trout (4)  |  Water (481)  |  Whale (32)  |  Wing (75)  |  Zoo (8)

We are told that “Mathematics is that study which knows nothing of observation, nothing of experiment, nothing of induction, nothing of causation.” I think no statement could have been made more opposite to the facts of the case; that mathematical analysis is constantly invoking the aid of new principles, new ideas, and new methods, not capable of being defined by any form of words, but springing direct from the inherent powers and activities of the human mind, and from continually renewed introspection of that inner world of thought of which the phenomena are as varied and require as close attention to discern as those of the outer physical world (to which the inner one in each individual man may, I think, be conceived to stand somewhat in the same relation of correspondence as a shadow to the object from which it is projected, or as the hollow palm of one hand to the closed fist which it grasps of the other), that it is unceasingly calling forth the faculties of observation and comparison, that one of its principal weapons is induction, that it has frequent recourse to experimental trial and verification, and that it affords a boundless scope for the exercise of the highest efforts of the imagination and invention.
In Presidential Address to British Association, Exeter British Association Report (1869), pp. 1-9, in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 654.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Afford (17)  |  Aid (97)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Capable (168)  |  Case (99)  |  Causation (14)  |  Close (69)  |  Closed (38)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Continually (16)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Define (49)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discern (33)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fist (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hand (143)  |  High (362)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Inner (71)  |  Introspection (5)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Palm (5)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Power (746)  |  Principal (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Project (73)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Relation (157)  |  Renew (19)  |  Require (219)  |  Same (157)  |  Scope (45)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Stand (274)  |  Statement (142)  |  Study (653)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trial (57)  |  Unceasingly (2)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verification (31)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

We can see that there is only one substance in the universe and that man is the most perfect one. He is to the ape and the cleverest animals what Huygens's planetary clock is to one of Julien Leroy's watches. If it took more instruments, more cogs, more springs to show or tell the time, if it took Vaucanson more artistry to make his flautist than his duck, he would have needed even more to make a speaking machine, which can no longer be considered impossible, particularly at the hands of a new Prometheus. Thus, in the same way, nature needed more artistry and machinery to construct and maintain a machine which could continue for a whole century to tell all the beats of the heart and the mind; for we cannot tell the time from the pulse, it is at least the barometer of heat and liveliness, from which we can judge the nature of the soul.
Machine Man (1747), in Ann Thomson (ed.), Machine Man and Other Writings (1996), 33-4.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Ape (53)  |  Barometer (5)  |  Beat (41)  |  Century (310)  |  Clever (38)  |  Clock (47)  |  Cog (7)  |  Consider (416)  |  Construct (124)  |  Continue (165)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heat (174)  |  Christiaan Huygens (10)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Judge (108)  |  Machine (257)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Prometheus (7)  |  Pulse (20)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Soul (226)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Substance (248)  |  Tell (340)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universe (857)  |  Watch (109)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

We cannot conceive how the Foetus is form'd in the Womb, nor as much as how a Plant springs from the Earth we tread on ... And if we are ignorant of the most obvious things about us, and the most considerable within our selves, 'tis then no wonder that we know not the constitution and powers of the creatures, to whom we are such strangers.
Saducismus Triumphatus or Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions (1689),72-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Conceive (98)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Form (959)  |  Growth (187)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tread (17)  |  Womb (24)  |  Wonder (236)

We grow great by dreams. All big men are dreamers. They see things in the soft haze of a spring day or in the red fire of a long winter’s evening. Some of us let these great dreams die, but others nourish and protect them; nurse them through bad days till they bring them to the sunshine and light which comes always to those who sincerely hope that their dreams will come true.
Quoted, for example, in The American Exporter (1930), Vol. 106, 158. Webmaster has found this quote in numerous texts, but as yet has not identified the original. (Can you help?)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Big (48)  |  Bring (90)  |  Die (86)  |  Dream (208)  |  Dreamer (13)  |  Fire (189)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grow (238)  |  Haze (3)  |  Hope (299)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Nourish (16)  |  Nurse (25)  |  Other (2236)  |  Protect (58)  |  Red (35)  |  See (1081)  |  Sincerely (3)  |  Soft (29)  |  Sunshine (10)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  True (212)  |  Will (2355)  |  Winter (44)

We have now felled forest enough everywhere, in many districts far too much. Let us restore this one element of material life to its normal proportions, and devise means for maintaining the permanence of its relations to the fields, the meadows and the pastures, to the rain and the dews of heaven, to the springs and rivulets with which it waters down the earth.
From Man and Nature (1864), 328-329.
Science quotes on:  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Devise (14)  |  Dew (9)  |  District (9)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Enough (340)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Field (364)  |  Forest (150)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  Meadow (18)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Normal (28)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Rain (62)  |  Reforestation (6)  |  Relation (157)  |  Restore (8)  |  Rivulet (5)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Conservation (3)

We stand by the river and admire the great body of water flowing so sweetly on; could you trace it back to its source, you might find a mere rivulet, but meandering on, joined by other streams and by secret springs, and fed by the rains and dews of heaven, it gathers volume and force, makes its way through the gorges of the mountains, plows, widens and deepens its channel through the provinces, and attains its present majesty.
From Address (1 Aug 1875), 'The Growth of Principles' at Saratoga. Collected in William L. Snyder (ed.), Great Speeches by Great Lawyers: A Collection of Arguments and Speeches (1901), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Back (390)  |  Body (537)  |  Channel (21)  |  Deepen (6)  |  Dew (9)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Gather (72)  |  Geology (220)  |  Gorge (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hydrology (9)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Meander (3)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plow (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Province (35)  |  Rain (62)  |  River (119)  |  Rivulet (5)  |  Secret (194)  |  Source (93)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stream (81)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  Volume (19)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Widen (10)

What I especially admire about you [Arnold Sommerfeld] is the way. at a stamp of your foot, a great number of talented young theorists spring up out of the ground.
As quoted in Paul Forman and Armin Hermann, 'Sommerfeld, Arnold (Johannes Wilhelm)', Biography in Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1975), Vol. 12, 529. Cited from Armin Herman (ed.), Albert Einstein/Arnold Sommerfeld. Briefwechsel: Sechzig Briefe aus dem goldenen Zeitalter der modernen Physik (1968, German), 98.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (18)  |  Especially (31)  |  Foot (60)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ground (217)  |  Number (699)  |  Arnold Sommerfeld (12)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Talent (94)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Way (1217)  |  Young (227)

What marvel is this? We begged you for drinkable springs,
O earth, and what is your lap sending forth?
Is there life in the deeps as well? A race yet unknown
Hiding under the lava? Are they who had fled returning?
Come and see, Greeks; Romans, come! Ancient Pompeii Is found again, the city of Hercules rises!
Translation as given, without citation, as epigraph in C.W. Ceram, Gods, Graves, and Scholars: The Story of Archaeology (1986), 1. There are other translations of the Schiller’s original German, for example, in 'Pompeii and Herculaneum', Life of Schiller: Poetical Works (1902), 249.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  City (78)  |  Deep (233)  |  Drink (53)  |  Earth (996)  |  Greek (107)  |  Herculaneum (4)  |  Hercules (9)  |  Hiding (12)  |  Lap (9)  |  Lava (9)  |  Life (1795)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Pompeii (4)  |  Race (268)  |  Return (124)  |  Rise (166)  |  Roman (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Water (481)

Whatever may happen to the latest theory of Dr. Einstein, his treatise represents a mathematical effort of overwhelming proportions. It is the more remarkable since Einstein is primarily a physicist and only incidentally a mathematician. He came to mathematics rather of necessity than by predilection, and yet he has here developed mathematical formulae and calculations springing from a colossal knowledge.
In 'Marvels at Einstein For His Mathematics', New York Times (4 Feb 1929), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Calculation (127)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Develop (268)  |  Effort (227)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Formula (98)  |  Happen (274)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Overwhelming (30)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Predilection (4)  |  Primary (80)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Represent (155)  |  Theory (970)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Whatever (234)

When air has been freshly and strongly tainted with putrefaction, so as to smell through the water, sprigs of mint have presently died, upon being put into it, their leaves turning black; but if they do not die presently, they thrive in a most surprizing manner. In no other circumstances have I ever seen vegetation so vigorous as in this kind of air, which is immediately fatal to animal life. Though these plants have been crouded in jars filled with this air, every leaf has been full of life; fresh shoots have branched out in various , and have grown much faster than other similiar plants, growing in the same exposure in common air.
This observation led me to conclude that plants, instead of affecting the air in the same manner with animal respiration, reverse the effects of breathing, and tend to keep the atmosphere sweet and wholesome, when it is become noxious, in consequence on animals living and breathing, or dying and putrefying in it.
In order to ascertain this, I took a quantity of air, made thoroughly noxious, by mice breathing and dying in it, and divided it into two parts; one of which I put into a phial immersed in water; and to the other (which was contained in a glass jar, standing in water) I put a sprig of mint. This was about the beginning of August 1771, and after eight or nine days, I found that a mouse lived perfectly well in that part of the air, in which the sprig of mint had grown, but died the moment it was put into the other part of the same original quantity of air; and which I had kept in the very same exposure, but without any plant growing in it.
'Observations on Different Kinds of Air', Philosophical Transactions (1772), 62, 193-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Become (815)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Carbon Dioxide (22)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Common (436)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Death (388)  |  Divided (50)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Faster (50)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Glass (92)  |  Growing (98)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Jar (9)  |  Kind (557)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mint (4)  |  Moment (253)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Noxious (6)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Respiration (13)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Smell (27)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Taint (10)  |  Tainted (5)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Thriving (2)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Various (200)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Water (481)  |  Wholesome (12)

When April wind wakes the call for the soil, I hold the plough as my only hold upon the earth, and, as I follow through the fresh and fragrant furrow, I am planted with every foot-step, growing, budding, blooming in a spirit of spring.
Science quotes on:  |  April (9)  |  Biography (240)  |  Call (769)  |  Earth (996)  |  Follow (378)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Growing (98)  |  Plant (294)  |  Plough (13)  |  Soil (86)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Step (231)  |  Through (849)  |  Wind (128)

When the time is ripe for certain things, these things appear in different places in the manner of violets coming to light in early spring.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Certain (550)  |  Coming (114)  |  Different (577)  |  Early (185)  |  Light (607)  |  Manner (58)  |  Place (177)  |  Ripe (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Violet (11)

When you can dump a load of bricks on a corner lot, and let me watch them arrange themselves into a house — when you can empty a handful of springs and wheels and screws on my desk, and let me see them gather themselves together into a watch — it will be easier for me to believe that all these thousands of worlds could have been created, balanced, and set to moving in their separate orbits, all without any directing intelligence at all.
In 'If A Man Die, Shall He Live again?', More Power To You: Fifty Editorials From Every Week (1917), 218-219.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Balance (77)  |  Belief (578)  |  Brick (18)  |  Corner (57)  |  Creation (327)  |  Desk (13)  |  Directing (5)  |  Dump (2)  |  Ease (35)  |  Easier (53)  |  Empty (80)  |  Gather (72)  |  Handful (13)  |  House (140)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Load (11)  |  Lot (151)  |  Moving (11)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Screw (17)  |  See (1081)  |  Separate (143)  |  Set (394)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Together (387)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Will (2355)  |  Without (13)  |  World (1774)

Where a cell arises, there a cell must have previously existed (omnis cellula e cellula), just as an animal can spring only from an animal, a plant only from a plant. In this manner, although there are still a few spots in the body where absolute demonstration has not yet been afforded, the principle is nevertheless established, that in the whole series of living things, whether they be entire plants or animal organisms, or essential constituents of the same, an eternal law of continuous development prevails.
In Lecture II 'Physiological Tissues' (17 Feb 1858), as translated by Frank Chance in Cellular Pathology: As Based Upon Physiological and Pathological Histology. Twenty Lectures Delivered in the Pathological Institute of Berlin During the Months of February, March and April, 1858 (1860), 27-28.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arise (158)  |  Body (537)  |  Cell (138)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Development (422)  |  Essential (199)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Organism (220)  |  Plant (294)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Principle (507)  |  Series (149)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whole (738)

While religion prescribes brotherly love in the relations among the individuals and groups, the actual spectacle more resembles a battlefield than an orchestra. Everywhere, in economic as well as in political life, the guiding principle is one of ruthless striving for success at the expense of one’s fellow men. This competitive spirit prevails even in school and, destroying all feelings of human fraternity and cooperation, conceives of achievement not as derived from the love for productive and thoughtful work, but as springing from personal ambition and fear of rejection.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Battlefield (9)  |  Brotherly (2)  |  Competitive (8)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Derive (65)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Economic (81)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Expense (16)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Fraternity (4)  |  Group (78)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Individual (404)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  More (2559)  |  Orchestra (2)  |  Personal (67)  |  Political (121)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Principle (507)  |  Productive (32)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Relation (157)  |  Religion (361)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Ruthless (10)  |  School (219)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strive (46)  |  Success (302)  |  Thoughtful (15)  |  Work (1351)

Why may we not say, that all Automata (Engines that move themselves by springs and wheeles as doth a watch) have an artificiall life? For what is the Heart, but a Spring; and the Nerves, but so many Strings; and the Joynts, but so many Wheeles, giving motion to the whole Body, such as was intended by the Artificer? Art goes yet further, imitating the rationall and most excellent worke of Nature, Man. For by Art is created the great LEVIATHAN called a COMMON-WEALTH, or STATE, (in latine CIVITAS) which is but an Artificiall Man; though of greater stature and strength than the Naturall, for whose protection and defence it was intended; and in which, the Soveraignty is an Artificiall Soul, as giving life and motion to the whole body.
Leviathan (1651), ed. C. B. Macpherson (1968), Part I, Introduction, 81.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Artificer (5)  |  Body (537)  |  Call (769)  |  Common (436)  |  Defence (14)  |  Engine (98)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Heart (229)  |  Joint (31)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Protection (36)  |  Say (984)  |  Soul (226)  |  State (491)  |  Strength (126)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)

You can prepare yourself for work. The paintings of the great masters, the compositions of great musicians, the sermons of great preachers, the policies of great statesmen, and the campaigns of great generals, do not spring full bloom from barren rock. … If you are a true student you will be more dissatisfied with yourself when you graduate than you are now.
From Cameron Prize Lecture (1928), delivered before the University of Edinburgh. As quoted in J.B. Collip 'Frederick Grant Banting, Discoverer of Insulin', The Scientific Monthly (May 1941), 52, No. 5, 473-474.
Science quotes on:  |  Barren (30)  |  Bloom (9)  |  Campaign (6)  |  Composition (84)  |  Dissatisfaction (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Full (66)  |  General (511)  |  Graduate (29)  |  Great (1574)  |  Master (178)  |  More (2559)  |  Musician (21)  |  Painting (44)  |  Policy (24)  |  Preacher (13)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sermon (9)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Student (300)  |  True (212)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

[Animals] do not so much act as be put into action, and that objects make an impression on their senses such that it is necessary for them to follow it just as it is necessary for the wheels of a clock to follow the weights and the spring that pulls them.
[In his philosophy, he regarded animals to be merely automatons.].
'Traitez de la voix', Harmonie Universelle (1637), Vol. 1, prop. lii, 79. In Charles Coulston Gillespie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1974), Vol. 9, 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Animal (617)  |  Automaton (12)  |  Clock (47)  |  Do (1908)  |  Follow (378)  |  Following (16)  |  Impression (114)  |  Merely (316)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Object (422)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pull (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Sense (770)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)

[Bobby Clark:] What causes the water in a watermelon?
[Paul McCullough:] They plant the seeds in the spring.
From short movie Love and Hisses (1934). Writer, Ben Holmes (6 Nov 1890 - 2 Dec 1943). In Larry Langman and Paul Gold, Comedy Quotes from the Movies (2001), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Joke (83)  |  Plant (294)  |  Seed (93)  |  Water (481)  |  Watermelon (2)

[On the concept of group:] … what a wealth, what a grandeur of thought may spring from what slight beginnings.
From Address (1913) of the president to the Mathematical and Physical Science Section of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Birmingham, 'The Place of Pure Mathematics', Science (12 Sep 1913), New Series,38, No. 976, 352. Excerpted in Florian Cajori, 'The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: Introduction', A History of Mathematics (1919), 283
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Concept (221)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Group Theory (5)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wealth (94)

[We need not think] that there is any Contradiction, when Philosophy teaches that to be done by Nature; which Religion, and the Sacred Scriptures, teach us to be done by God: no more, than to say, That the balance of a Watch is moved by the next Wheel, is to deny that Wheel, and the rest, to be moved by the Spring; and that both the Spring, and all the other Parts, are caused to move together by the Maker of them. So God may be truly the Cause of This Effect, although a Thousand other Causes should be supposed to intervene: For all Nature is as one Great Engine, made by, and held in His Hand.
'An Idea of a Philosophical History of Plants', in The Anatomy of Plants With an Idea of a Philosophical History of Plants and Several Other Lectures Read Before the Royal Society (1682),80.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Balance (77)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Deny (66)  |  Effect (393)  |  Engine (98)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Maker (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Next (236)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plant (294)  |  Religion (361)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Say (984)  |  Teach (277)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Together (387)  |  Truly (116)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wheel (50)

~~[Misattributed ?]~~ Mathematical discoveries, like springtime violets in the woods, have their season which no human can hasten or retard.
Webmaster believes this quote is likely a misattributed paraphrase. The subject quote is as given in Israel Kleiner, 'Thinking the Unthinkable: The Story of Complex Numbers (with a Moral)', Mathematics Teacher (Oct 1988), 81, No. 7, 590. In Kleiner’s paper, alongside the quote is a citation, thus: “(Kline 1972)?” Notice the appended question mark. The reference at the end of the paper gives: Morris Kline, Mathematical Thought from Ancient to Modern Times (1972), but without page number. Webmaster checked a later edition, Vol. 3 (1990), 861, in which Kline has an epigraph, with different wording about violets, attributed - not to János - but to his father, “Wolfgang Bolyai” (who is also known as Farkas Bolyai). Translator Abe Shenitzer wrote an ambiguous passage in Herbert Meschkowski, NonEuclidean Geometry (1964), 33. In a discussion posted in the NCTM online Math Forum in 1998, Shenitzer clarified that the proper reading is that the “violet talk” is a simile used in advice given by the father to his son. Note that in the passage, János (Johann/John) reports about that advice in narrative form. Thus, one should also note that even in the original language, perhaps the father’s words are not verbatim. See Farkas Bolyai Quotes on another page of this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (780)  |  Hasten (13)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Misattributed (19)  |  Retard (4)  |  Season (47)  |  Springtime (5)  |  Violet (11)  |  Wood (92)

’Tis evident, that as common Air when reduc’d to half Its wonted extent, obtained near about twice as forcible a Spring as it had before; so this thus- comprest Air being further thrust into half this narrow room, obtained thereby a Spring about as strong again as that It last had, and consequently four times as strong as that of the common Air. And there is no cause to doubt, that If we had been here furnisht with a greater quantity of Quicksilver and a very long Tube, we might by a further compression of the included Air have made It counter-balance “the pressure” of a far taller and heavier Cylinder of Mercury. For no man perhaps yet knows how near to an infinite compression the Air may be capable of, If the compressing force be competently increast.
A Defense of the Doctrine Touching the Spring and Weight of the Air (1662), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Balance (77)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cause (541)  |  Common (436)  |  Compression (6)  |  Cylinder (10)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extent (139)  |  Force (487)  |  Greater (288)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Quicksilver (7)  |  Strong (174)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Time (1877)

“Bitzer,” said Thomas Gradgrind. “Your definition of a horse.”
“Quadruped. Graminivorous. Forty teeth; namely, twenty-four grinders, four eye-teeth, and twelve incisive. Sheds coat in the Spring; in marshy countries, sheds hoofs, too. Hoofs hard, but requiring to be shod with iron. Age known by marks in mouth.” Thus (and much more) Bitzer.
“Now girl number twenty,” said Mr. Gradgrind. “You know what a horse is.”
Spoken by fictional character Thomas Gringrind in his schoolroom with pupil Bitzer, Hard Times, published in Household Words (1 Apr 1854), Vol. 36, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Coat (5)  |  Country (251)  |  Definition (221)  |  Eye (419)  |  Girl (37)  |  Hard (243)  |  Horse (74)  |  Incisive (3)  |  Iron (96)  |  Iron Age (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marsh (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Number (699)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Shed (5)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Thomas Gradgrind (2)  |  Tooth (29)

“Hope springs eternal in the human breast,” and is as necessary to life as the act of breathing.
Quoted, without citation, in front matter to T. A. Edison Foundation, Lewis Howard Latimer: A Black Inventor: a Biography and Related Experiments You Can Do (1973). If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Life (1795)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.