Celebrating 17 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY™
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to earth.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Army

Army Quotes (19 quotes)

A study of Disease—of Pestilences methodically prepared and deliberately launched upon man and beast—is certainly being pursue in the laboratories of more than one great country. Blight to destroy crops, Anthrax to slay horses and cattle, Plague to poison not armies but whole districts—such are the lines along which military science is remorselessly advancing.
'Shall We All Commit Suicide?'. Pall Mall (Sep 1924). Reprinted in Thoughts and Adventures (1932), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological Warfare (2)  |  Cow (25)  |  Disease (226)  |  Horse (34)  |  Laboratory (110)  |  Military Science (2)  |  Pestilence (7)  |  Plague (32)  |  Poison (29)

A wise physician, skill’d our wounds to heal, is more than armies to the public weal.
Homer and Alexander Pope (trans.), The Iliad of Homer (1809), Vol. 2, 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Heal (3)  |  Homer (7)  |  Medicine (256)  |  Physician (210)  |  Skill (44)  |  Wisdom (126)  |  Wound (10)

Again and again, often in the busiest phases of the insulin investigations, he [Frederick Banting] found time to set a fracture or perform a surgical operation on one of his army comrades or on some patient who was in need.
In 'Obituary: Sir Frederick Banting', Science (14 Mar 1941), N.S. 93, No. 2411, 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Sir Frederick Grant Banting (10)  |  Comrade (2)  |  Fracture (4)  |  Insulin (7)  |  Investigation (115)  |  Operation (85)  |  Patient (88)  |  Surgery (38)

An invasion of armies can be resisted; an invasion of ideas cannot be resisted.
Histoire d' un Crime (written 1851-52, published 1877), conclusion, chap. 10. Trans. T. H. Joyce and Arthur Locker (1886), 413.
Science quotes on:  |  Idea (378)  |  Invasion (6)  |  Resistance (21)

Education is a better safeguard of liberty than a standing army. If we retrench the wages of the schoolmaster, we must raise those of the recruiting sergeant.
Given as a column-end filler in The Farmer's Cabinet, and American Herd Book (15 Mar 1839), Vol. 3, No. 8, 247. This is the earliest occurrence yet found by the editor. If you know the primary source, please contact the Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (85)  |  Education (251)  |  Liberty (11)  |  Raise (9)  |  Recruiting (3)  |  Safeguard (4)  |  Schoolmaster (4)  |  Standing (11)  |  Wage (4)

Thomas Robert Malthus quote Famine … the most dreadful resource of nature.
colorization © todayinsci (Terms of Use) (source)

Please respect the colorization artist’s wishes and do not copy this image for ONLINE use anywhere else.

Thank you.

For offline use, click Terms of Use tab on top menu.

Famine seems to be the last, the most dreadful resource of nature. The power of population is so superior to the power in the earth to produce subsistence for man, that premature death must in some shape or other visit the human race. The vices of mankind are active and able ministers of depopulation. They are the precursors in the great army of destruction; and often finish the dreadful work themselves. But should they fail in this war of extermination, sickly seasons, epidemics, pestilence, and plague, advance in terrific array, and sweep off their thousands and ten thousands. Should success be still incomplete, gigantic inevitable famine stalks in the rear, and with one mighty blow, levels the population with the food of the world.
In An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), 140, and in new enlarged edition (1803), 350.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (61)  |  Advancement (31)  |  Array (5)  |  Blow (11)  |  Death (239)  |  Destruction (72)  |  Dreadful (3)  |  Earth (397)  |  Epidemic (5)  |  Extermination (7)  |  Failure (94)  |  Famine (6)  |  Finish (16)  |  Food (121)  |  Human Race (38)  |  Inevitability (7)  |  Last (19)  |  Mankind (163)  |  Minister (5)  |  Nature (841)  |  Pestilence (7)  |  Plague (32)  |  Population (62)  |  Power (208)  |  Precursor (2)  |  Premature (14)  |  Production (87)  |  Resource (26)  |  Season (17)  |  Sickness (17)  |  Subsistence (5)  |  Success (173)  |  Superiority (9)  |  Sweep (8)  |  Themself (3)  |  Vice (13)  |  War (114)  |  Work (330)  |  World (481)

Fleets are not confined to the ocean, but now sail over the land. … All the power of the British Navy has not been able to prevent Zeppelins from reaching England and attacking London, the very heart of the British Empire. Navies do not protect against aerial attack. … Heavier-than-air flying machines of the aeroplane type have crossed right over the heads of armies, of million of men, armed with the most modern weapons of destruction, and have raided places in the rear. Armies do not protect against aerial war.
In 'Preparedness for Aerial Defense', Addresses Before the Eleventh Annual Convention of the Navy League of the United States, Washington, D.C., April 10-13, 1916 (1916), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Aerial (3)  |  Airplane (27)  |  Attack (25)  |  England (31)  |  Fleet (3)  |  Flying Machine (5)  |  London (11)  |  Navy (9)  |  Ocean (99)  |  Protection (19)  |  Raid (4)  |  War (114)  |  Weapon (50)  |  Zeppelin (4)

I feel that the recent ruling of the United States Army and Navy regarding the refusal of colored blood donors is an indefensible one from any point of view. As you know, there is no scientific basis for the separation of the bloods of different races except on the basis of the individual blood types or groups. (1942)
Spencie Love, One Blood: The Death and Resurrection of Charles R. Drew (1996), 155-56, quoting as it appeared in Current Biography (1944), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (42)  |  Blood (83)  |  Color (67)  |  Group (36)  |  Navy (9)  |  Point Of View (20)  |  Race (60)  |  Refusal (19)  |  Separation (29)  |  Type (23)  |  United States (22)

It is sometimes helpful to differentiate between the God of Miracles and the God of Order. When scientists use the word God, they usually mean the God of Order. …The God of Miracles intervenes in our affairs, performs miracles, destroys wicked cities, smites enemy armies, drowns the Pharaoh's troops, and avenges the pure and noble. …This is not to say that miracles cannot happen, only that they are outside what is commonly called science.
In 'Conclusion', Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the Tenth Dimension (1995), 330-331.
Science quotes on:  |  Affair (14)  |  City (27)  |  Destroy (44)  |  Differentiate (6)  |  Drown (6)  |  Enemy (37)  |  God (316)  |  Happen (31)  |  Intervene (2)  |  Miracle (42)  |  Noble (30)  |  Order (110)  |  Perform (16)  |  Pharaoh (3)  |  Pure (38)  |  Science (1331)  |  Scientist (361)  |  Smite (4)  |  Wicked (2)  |  Word (182)

My dynamite will sooner lead to peace than a thousand world conventions. As soon as men will find that in one instant, whole armies can be utterly destroyed, they surely will abide by golden peace.
As quoted, without citation, in Peter T. Davis and ‎Craig R. McGuffin, Wireless Local Area Networks: Technology, Issues, and Strategies (1995), 159. Various sources since then have the quote with that wording. This shares the same sentiment - and may be an alternate translation - as Nobel’s quote given by Linus Pauling in his Nobel Acceptance Speech (see elsewhere on this page). Pauling in his speech said it was from a statement by Nobel in 1892, as reported by Bertha von Sutter. Webmaster has so far found no definitive print source for either version. Please contact Webmaster if you have.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (3)  |  Convention (9)  |  Destroy (44)  |  Dynamite (3)  |  Golden (7)  |  Instant (7)  |  Peace (45)  |  Thousand (80)  |  Utterly (10)  |  World (481)

Neither the Army nor the Navy is of any protection, or very slight protection, against aerial raids. We may therefore look forward with certainty to the time that is coming, and indeed is almost now at hand, when sea power and land power will be secondary to air power, and that nation which gains control of the air will practically control the world.
In 'Preparedness for Aerial Defense', Addresses Before the Eleventh Annual Convention of the Navy League of the United States, Washington, D.C., April 10-13, 1916 (1916), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Aerial (3)  |  Control (72)  |  Navy (9)  |  Protection (19)  |  Raid (4)  |  World (481)

Our factories may well put an end to war sooner than your (peace) congresses. The day when two army corps can annihilate one another in one second, all civilized nations, it is to be hoped, will recoil from war and discharge their troops.
As quoted by Linus Pauling in Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech (10 Dec 1963). Pauling in his speech said it was from a statement by Nobel “in 1892, as reported by Bertha von Sutter.” Printed in Göran Liljestrand (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1963, (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (3)  |  Civilized (4)  |  Congress (7)  |  Corps (2)  |  Discharge (7)  |  End (89)  |  Factory (12)  |  Hope (90)  |  Nation (85)  |  Peace (45)  |  Recoil (5)  |  Second (17)  |  War (114)

Science has been arranging, classifying, methodizing, simplifying, everything except itself. It has made possible the tremendous modern development of power of organization which has so multiplied the effective power of human effort as to make the differences from the past seem to be of kind rather than of degree. It has organized itself very imperfectly. Scientific men are only recently realizing that the principles which apply to success on a large scale in transportation and manufacture and general staff work to apply them; that the difference between a mob and an army does not depend upon occupation or purpose but upon human nature; that the effective power of a great number of scientific men may be increased by organization just as the effective power of a great number of laborers may be increased by military discipline.
'The Need for Organization in Scientific Research', in Bulletin of the National Research Council: The National Importance of Scientific and Industrial Research (Oct 1919), Col 1, Part 1, No. 1, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Classification (75)  |  Discipline (27)  |  Human Nature (47)  |  Manufacturing (21)  |  Men Of Science (95)  |  Occupation (32)  |  Organization (68)  |  Science (1331)  |  Success (173)  |  Transportation (9)

Specialists never contribute anything to their specialty; Helmholtz wasn’t an eye-specialist, but a German army doctor who invented the ophthalmoscope one Saturday afternoon when there wasn’t anything else to do. Incidentally, he rewrote whole chapters of physics, so that the physicists only know him as one of their own. Robert Mayer wasn’t a physicist, but another country doctor; and Pasteur, who made bacteriology, was a tanner’s son or a chemist, as you will.
In Fischerisms (1930), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (3)  |  Bacteriology (5)  |  Chapter (6)  |  Chemist (73)  |  Contribution (40)  |  Country (86)  |  Doctor (76)  |  Eye (128)  |  German (5)  |  Hermann von Helmholtz (20)  |  Incidental (6)  |  Invented (3)  |  Robert Mayer (10)  |  Louis Pasteur (44)  |  Physicist (108)  |  Physics (244)  |  Son (12)  |  Specialist (15)  |  Specialty (8)  |  Whole (73)

That atomic energy though harnessed by American scientists and army men for destructive purposes may be utilised by other scientists for humanitarian purposes is undoubtedly within the realm of possibility. … An incendiary uses fire for his destructive and nefarious purpose, a housewife makes daily use of it in preparing nourishing food for mankind.
In The Words of Gandhi (2001), 87.
Science quotes on:  |  American (15)  |  Atomic Bomb (98)  |  Atomic Energy (17)  |  Destruction (72)  |  Fire (100)  |  Food (121)  |  Harness (11)  |  Mankind (163)  |  Nourishing (2)  |  Possibility (87)  |  Preparing (2)  |  Purpose (111)  |  Scientist (361)  |  Use (70)  |  Utilize (3)

The development of the nucleoplasm during ontogeny may be to some extent compared to an army composed of corps, which are made up of divisions, and these of brigades, and so on. The whole army may be taken to represent the nucleoplasm of the germ-cell: the earliest cell-division … may be represented by the separation of the two corps, similarly formed but with different duties: and the following cell­divisions by the successive detachment of divisions, brigades, regiments, battalions, companies, etc.; and as the groups become simpler so does their sphere of action become limited.
In 'The Continuity of the Germ-plasm as the Foundation of a Theory of Heredity' (1885), Essays upon Heredity and Kindred Biological Problems (1891), Vol. 1, 195.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (103)  |  Battalion (2)  |  Become (28)  |  Brigade (3)  |  Cell Division (4)  |  Company (22)  |  Comparison (45)  |  Corps (2)  |  Development (191)  |  Difference (183)  |  Duty (42)  |  Formation (51)  |  Germ Cell (2)  |  Nucleoplasm (2)  |  Ontogeny (6)  |  Regiment (2)  |  Representation (21)  |  Separation (29)  |  Simpler (5)  |  Successive (12)

These days at ten o’clock at night a most alarming wonder has manifested itself in the skies. The firmament was rent asunder and through this gap one could distinguish chariots and armies, riders with yellow, white, red and black standards, though to do battle against each other. This awesome and unusual vision continued from ten at night till about two of the morning, and was witnessed with alarm and dismay by many honest and trustworthy people. The significance thereof is known but to God Almighty, Who may graciously prevent the shedding of innocent blood.
Anonymous
'Frightful Apparition in the Sky at Vienna. From Vienna, the 11th day of August 1590'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) News and Rumor in Renaissance Europe: The Fugger Newsletters (1959), 188. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg.
Science quotes on:  |  Almighty (6)  |  Asunder (2)  |  Awesome (7)  |  Battle (20)  |  Black (19)  |  Blood (83)  |  Chariot (2)  |  Dismay (4)  |  Firmament (11)  |  Gap (20)  |  God (316)  |  Graciously (2)  |  Honest (16)  |  Innocent (7)  |  Manifest (6)  |  Meteorology (25)  |  Morning (26)  |  Night (61)  |  People (111)  |  Prevent (12)  |  Red (22)  |  Rent (2)  |  Rider (2)  |  Shedding (2)  |  Significance (47)  |  Sky (54)  |  Standard (27)  |  Trustworthy (4)  |  Unusual (11)  |  Vision (39)  |  White (29)  |  Witness (15)  |  Wonder (106)  |  Yellow (7)

We have hitherto considered those Ideas, in the reception whereof, the Mind is only passive, which are those simple ones received from Sensation and Reflection before-mentioned, whereof the Mind cannot make anyone to it self, nor have any Idea which does not wholy consist of them. But as these simple Ideas are observed to exist in several Combinations united together; so the Mind has a power to consider several of them united together, as one Idea; and that not only as they are united in external Objects, but as it self has joined them. Ideas thus made up of several simple ones put together, I call Complex; such as are Beauty, Gratitude, a Man, an Army, the Universe; which tough complicated various simple Ideas, made up of simple ones, yet are, when the Mind pleases, considered each by if self, as one entire thing, and signified by one name.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 2, Chapter 12, Section 1, 163-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (143)  |  Complex (42)  |  Gratitude (7)  |  Idea (378)  |  Man (327)  |  Mind (429)  |  Object (80)  |  Reflection (39)  |  Sensation (17)  |  Universe (433)

…at the stars,
Which are the brain of heaven, he look’d, and sank.
Around the ancient track marched, rank on rank,
The army of unalterable law.
In poem, 'Lucifer in Starlight', collected in Arthur Quiller-Couch (ed.), The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250–1900 (1919), 942.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (57)  |  Brain (153)  |  Heaven (102)  |  Law (366)  |  March (7)  |  Rank (16)  |  Star (212)  |  Track (4)  |  Unalterable (3)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.