Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Continually

Continually Quotes (14 quotes)

La théorie est l’hypothèse vérifiée, après qu’elle a été soumise au contrôle du raisonnement et de la critique expérimentale. La meilleure théorie est celle qui a été vérifiée par le plus grand nombre de faits. Mais une théorie, pour rester bonne, doit toujours se modifier avec les progrès de la science et demeurer constamment soumise à la vérification et à la critique des faits nouveaux qui apparaissent.
A theory is a verified hypothesis, after it has been submitted to the control of reason and experimental criticism. The soundest theory is one that has been verified by the greatest number of facts. But to remain valid, a theory must be continually altered to keep pace with the progress of science and must be constantly resubmitted to verification and criticism as new facts appear.
Original work in French, Introduction à l'Étude de la Médecine Expérimentale (1865), 385. English translation by Henry Copley Green in An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1927, 1957), 220.
Science quotes on:  |  Criticism (52)  |  Fact (609)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  New (340)  |  Number (179)  |  Progress (317)  |  Theory (582)  |  Validity (22)  |  Verification (20)

Abstract as it is, science is but an outgrowth of life. That is what the teacher must continually keep in mind. … Let him explain … science is not a dead system—the excretion of a monstrous pedantism—but really one of the most vigorous and exuberant phases of human life.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 195-196.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Dead (45)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Explain (61)  |  Human (445)  |  Life (917)  |  Monstrous (7)  |  Outgrowth (3)  |  Phase (14)  |  Science (1699)  |  System (141)  |  Teacher (90)  |  Vigorous (11)

Accustom yourself continually to make many acts of love, for they enkindle and melt the soul.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (7)  |  Act (80)  |  Enkindle (2)  |  Love (164)  |  Melt (15)  |  Soul (139)

I shall devote only a few lines to the expression of my belief in the importance of science ... it is by this daily striving after knowledge that man has raised himself to the unique position he occupies on earth, and that his power and well-being have continually increased.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Daily (19)  |  Devote (23)  |  Earth (487)  |  Expression (82)  |  Importance Of Science (2)  |  Increase (107)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Line (44)  |  Occupy (18)  |  Position (54)  |  Power (273)  |  Raise (20)  |  Strive (35)  |  Unique (24)  |  Well-Being (4)

It does appear that on the whole a physicist… tries to reduce his theory at all times to as few parameters as possible and is inclined to feel that a theory is a “respectable” one, though by no means necessarily correct, if in principle it does offer reasonably specific means for its possible refutation. Moreover the physicist will generally arouse the irritation amongst fellow physicists if he is not prepared to abandon his theory when it clashes with subsequent experiments. On the other hand it would appear that the chemist regards theories—or perhaps better his theories (!) —as far less sacrosanct, and perhaps in extreme cases is prepared to modify them continually as each bit of new experimental evidence comes in.
'Discussion: Physics and Chemistry: Comments on Caldin's View of Chemistry', British Journal of the Philosophy of Science, 1960, 11, 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (37)  |  Arouse (8)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Clash (7)  |  Correct (53)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Irritation (2)  |  Modify (11)  |  Parameter (2)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Principle (228)  |  Reduce (32)  |  Refutation (10)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Theory (582)

The development of mathematics is largely a natural, not a purely logical one: mathematicians are continually answering questions suggested by astronomers or physicists; many essential mathematical theories are but the reflex outgrowth from physical puzzles.
In 'The Teaching of the History of Science', The Scientific Monthly (Sep 1918), 194.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Astronomer (50)  |  Development (228)  |  Essential (87)  |  Logical (20)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Natural (128)  |  Outgrowth (3)  |  Physical (94)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Puzzle (30)  |  Question (315)  |  Reflex (9)  |  Theory (582)

The divine tape recorder holds a million scenarios, each perfectly sensible. Little quirks at the outset, occurring for no particular reason, unleash cascades of consequences that make a particular feature seem inevitable in retrospect. But the slightest early nudge contacts a different groove, and history veers into another plausible channel, diverging continually from its original pathway. The end results are so different, the initial perturbation so apparently trivial.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Apparently (11)  |  Cascade (3)  |  Channel (17)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Contact (24)  |  Different (110)  |  Diverge (2)  |  Divine (42)  |  Early (39)  |  End (141)  |  Feature (34)  |  Groove (2)  |  History (302)  |  Hold (56)  |  Inevitable (17)  |  Initial (13)  |  Little (126)  |  Million (89)  |  Nudge (2)  |  Occur (26)  |  Original (36)  |  Outset (4)  |  Particular (54)  |  Pathway (11)  |  Perfectly (8)  |  Perturbation (4)  |  Plausible (6)  |  Quirk (2)  |  Reason (330)  |  Recorder (3)  |  Result (250)  |  Scenario (3)  |  Seem (89)  |  Sensible (22)  |  Slight (18)  |  Tape (2)  |  Trivial (30)

The explosive component in the contemporary scene is not the clamor of the masses but the self-righteous claims of a multitude of graduates from schools and universities. This army of scribes is clamoring for a society in which planning, regulation, and supervision are paramount and the prerogative of the educated. They hanker for the scribe’s golden age, for a return to something like the scribe-dominated societies of ancient Egypt, China, and Europe of the Middle Ages. There is little doubt that the present trend in the new and renovated countries toward social regimentation stems partly from the need to create adequate employment for a large number of scribes. And since the tempo of the production of the literate is continually increasing, the prospect is of ever-swelling bureaucracies.
In 'Scribe, Writer, and Rebel', The Ordeal of Change (1963), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (18)  |  Ancient Egypt (3)  |  Army (22)  |  Bureaucracy (5)  |  China (17)  |  Claim (52)  |  Clamor (7)  |  Component (14)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Country (121)  |  Create (98)  |  Doubt (121)  |  Educate (7)  |  Employment (22)  |  Europe (32)  |  Explosive (16)  |  Golden Age (5)  |  Graduate (9)  |  Increase (107)  |  Large (82)  |  Little (126)  |  Mass (61)  |  Middle Ages (7)  |  Multitude (14)  |  Need (211)  |  New (340)  |  Number (179)  |  Paramount (6)  |  Partly (3)  |  Plan (69)  |  Prerogative (2)  |  Present (103)  |  Production (105)  |  Prospect (19)  |  Regimentation (2)  |  Regulation (18)  |  Renovate (3)  |  Return (35)  |  Scene (10)  |  School (87)  |  Scribe (3)  |  Social (93)  |  Society (188)  |  Stem (11)  |  Supervision (3)  |  Tempo (2)  |  Toward (29)  |  Trend (16)  |  University (51)

The Gaia Hypothesis asserts that Earth’s atmosphere is continually interacting with geology (the lithosphere). Earth’s cycling waters (the hydrosphere), and everything that lives (the biosphere). … The image is that the atmosphere is a circulatory system for life’s bio-chemical interplay. If the atmosphere is pan of a larger whole that has some of the qualities of an organism, one of those qualities we must now pray for is resilience.
In Praise of Nature
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (11)  |  Atmosphere (63)  |  Biosphere (10)  |  Cycle (26)  |  Earth (487)  |  Everything (120)  |  Gaia (3)  |  Geology (187)  |  Hypothesis (227)  |  Image (38)  |  Interact (5)  |  Interplay (5)  |  Large (82)  |  Life (917)  |  Lithosphere (2)  |  Live (186)  |  Organism (126)  |  Pray (13)  |  Quality (65)  |  Resilience (2)  |  System (141)  |  Water (244)  |  Whole (122)

The path isn’t a straight line; it’s a spiral. You continually come back to things you thought you understood and see deeper truths.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 246
Science quotes on:  |  Back (55)  |  Deep (81)  |  Path (59)  |  See (197)  |  Spiral (7)  |  Straight Line (7)  |  Thought (374)  |  Truth (750)  |  Understand (189)

They who clamor loudest for freedom are often the ones least likely to be happy in a free society. The frustrated, oppressed by their shortcomings, blame their failure on existing restraints. Actually, their innermost desire is for an end to the “free for all.” They want to eliminate free competition and the ruthless testing to which the individual is continually subjected in a free society.
In The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements (1951), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Actually (14)  |  Blame (17)  |  Clamor (7)  |  Competition (26)  |  Desire (101)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  End (141)  |  Exist (89)  |  Failure (118)  |  Free (59)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Frustrate (2)  |  Happy (22)  |  Individual (177)  |  Innermost (3)  |  Least (43)  |  Likely (23)  |  Loud (7)  |  Often (69)  |  Oppressed (2)  |  Restraint (8)  |  Ruthless (5)  |  Shortcoming (3)  |  Society (188)  |  Subject (129)  |  Test (96)  |  Want (120)

To inquisitive minds like yours and mine the reflection that the quantity of human knowledge bears no proportion to the quantity of human ignorance must be in one view rather pleasing, viz., that though we are to live forever we may be continually amused and delighted with learning something new.
In letter to Dr. Ingenhouz. Quoted in Theodore Diller, Franklin's Contribution to Medicine (1912), 65. The source gives no specific cite for the letter, and Webmaster has found the quote in no other book checked, so authenticity is in question.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (20)  |  Forever (42)  |  Human (445)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Inquisitiveness (4)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learning (174)  |  Life (917)  |  Mind (544)  |  New (340)  |  Quantity (35)  |  View (115)

When I was in college studying science, I found the experience fundamentally unsatisfying. I was continually oppressed by the feeling that my only role was to “shut up and learn.” I felt there was nothing I could say to my instructors that they would find interesting. … As I sat in the science lecture hall, I was utterly silent. That’s not a good state to be in when you are 19 years old.
In Understanding the Universe: An Inquiry Approach to Astronomy and the Nature of Scientific Research (2013), ix.
Science quotes on:  |  College (27)  |  Experience (268)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Instructor (4)  |  Interest (170)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lecture Hall (2)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Oppressed (2)  |  Role (35)  |  Say (126)  |  Science (1699)  |  Shut Up (2)  |  Silent (18)  |  Sit (24)  |  Study (331)  |  Unsatisfying (3)  |  Utterly (13)

[Dubious attribution] We are all continually faced with great opportunities which are brilliantly disguised as unsolvable problems.
Attributed. (?) Note: So far, Webmaster has been unable to find a primary source for this quote. It can be found seen quoted in several books, but always without citation. The earliest found with attribution to Mead is in Brian E. Walsh, Unleashing Your Brilliance (2005). However, earlier books attribute differently, for example to Lee Iacocca (2000), and to John Gardner (1986). Also found without any attribution (“it has been said”), without any citation, in Christopher H. Lovelock and Charles B. Weinberg, Readings in Public and Nonprofit Marketing (1978), 152. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Face (69)  |  Great (300)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Problem (362)  |  Unsolvable (2)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.