Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Nature does nothing in vain when less will serve; for Nature is pleased with simplicity and affects not the pomp of superfluous causes.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Conceive

Conceive Quotes (98 quotes)

Ath. There still remain three studies suitable for freemen. Calculation in arithmetic is one of them; the measurement of length, surface, and depth is the second; and the third has to do with the revolutions of the stars in reference to one another … there is in them something that is necessary and cannot be set aside, … if I am not mistaken, [something of] divine necessity; for as to the human necessities of which men often speak when they talk in this manner, nothing can be more ridiculous than such an application of the words.
Cle. And what necessities of knowledge are there, Stranger, which are divine and not human?
Ath. I conceive them to be those of which he who has no use nor any knowledge at all cannot be a god, or demi-god, or hero to mankind, or able to take any serious thought or charge of them.
Plato
In Republic, Bk. 7, in Jowett, Dialogues of Plato (1897, 2010), Vol. 4, 331.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Charge (59)  |  Depth (94)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  God (757)  |  Hero (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Length (23)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Reference (33)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Aside (4)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Suitable (8)  |  Surface (209)  |  Thought (953)  |  Use (766)  |  Word (619)

A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings, and aspirations to which he clings because of their superpersonal value. It seems to me that what is important is the force of this superpersonal content and the depth of the conviction concerning its overpowering meaningfulness, regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. In this sense religion is the age-old endeavor of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals and constantly to strengthen and extend their effect. If one conceives of religion and science according to these definitions then a conflict between them appears impossible. For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Accordingly (5)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Appear (118)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Buddha (5)  |  Capable (168)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Cling (6)  |  Completely (135)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Content (69)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Count (105)  |  Definition (221)  |  Depth (94)  |  Desire (204)  |  Devout (5)  |  Divine (112)  |  Domain (69)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Effect (393)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Exist (443)  |  Extend (128)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Fetters (7)  |  Force (487)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Goal (145)  |  Himself (461)  |  Important (209)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kind (557)  |  Liberate (10)  |  Loftiness (3)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Outside (141)  |  Person (363)  |  Personality (62)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rational (90)  |  Regardless (4)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Require (219)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Seem (145)  |  Selfish (11)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significance (113)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Superpersonal (2)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unite (42)  |  Value (365)

After that, I thought about what a proposition generally needs in order to be true and certain because, since I had just found one that I knew was such, I thought I should also know what this certainty consists in. Having noticed that there is nothing at all in the proposition “I think, therefore I am” [cogito ergo sum] which convinces me that I speak the truth, apart from the fact that I see very clearly that one has to exist in order to think, I judged that I could adopt as a general rule that those things we conceive very clearly and distinctly are all true. The only outstanding difficulty is in recognizing which ones we conceive distinctly.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 4, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Cogito Ergo Sum (4)  |  Consist (223)  |  Convince (41)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  General (511)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Outstanding (16)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Rule (294)  |  See (1081)  |  Speak (232)  |  Sum (102)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)

An all-inclusive geometrical symbolism, such as Hamilton and Grassmann conceived of, is impossible.
In 'Über Vectoranalysis', Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker Vereinigung (1901), 5, 52. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 200. From the original German, “Es kann keine allumfassende geometrische Symbolik geben, wie sie Grassmann und Hamilton sich dachten.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hermann Günther Grassmann (3)  |  Sir William Rowan Hamilton (10)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inclusive (4)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Symbol (93)

Any opinion as to the form in which the energy of gravitation exists in space is of great importance, and whoever can make his opinion probable will have, made an enormous stride in physical speculation. The apparent universality of gravitation, and the equality of its effects on matter of all kinds are most remarkable facts, hitherto without exception; but they are purely experimental facts, liable to be corrected by a single observed exception. We cannot conceive of matter with negative inertia or mass; but we see no way of accounting for the proportionality of gravitation to mass by any legitimate method of demonstration. If we can see the tails of comets fly off in the direction opposed to the sun with an accelerated velocity, and if we believe these tails to be matter and not optical illusions or mere tracks of vibrating disturbance, then we must admit a force in that direction, and we may establish that it is caused by the sun if it always depends upon his position and distance.
Letter to William Huggins (13 Oct 1868). In P. M. Hannan (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 451-2.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Comet (54)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Depend (228)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distance (161)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Effect (393)  |  Energy (344)  |  Equality (31)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fly (146)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Kind (557)  |  Legitimate (25)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Negative (63)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Optical (11)  |  Physical (508)  |  Position (77)  |  Proportionality (2)  |  Purely (109)  |  See (1081)  |  Single (353)  |  Space (500)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Stride (15)  |  Sun (385)  |  Track (38)  |  Universality (22)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whoever (42)  |  Will (2355)

Ask a scientist what he conceives the scientific method to be, and he will adopt an expression that is at once solemn and shifty eyed: solemn because he feels he ought to declare an opinion; shifty eyed because he is wondering how to conceal the fact that he has no opinion to declare. If taunted he would probably mumble something about “Induction” and “Establishing the Laws of Nature”, but if anyone working in a laboratory professed to be trying to establish the Laws of Nature by induction, we should think he was overdue for leave.
From a Jayne Lecture (1968), 'Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought', printed in Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society (1969), Vol. 75. Lecture republished as Induction and Intuition in Scientific Thought (2009), 11. Also included in Peter Medawar, Pluto’s Republic (1984), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Declare (45)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feel (367)  |  Induction (77)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Profess (20)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Something (719)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trying (144)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wondering (3)

But if the heavens are moved by a daily movement, it is necessary to assume in the principal bodies of the universe and in the heavens two ways of movement which are contrary to each other: one from east to west and the other from west to east, as has often been said. And with this, it is proper to assume an excessively great speed, for anyone who reckons and considers well the height of distance of the heavens and the magnitude of these and of their circuit, if such a circuit were made in a day, could not imagine or conceive how marvelously and excessively swift would be the movement of the heavens, and how unbelievable and unthinkable.
In Isaac Asimov and Jason A. Shulman (eds.), Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 329. Webmaster so far has been unable to locate the primary source (can you help?)
Science quotes on:  |  Circuit (29)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Daily (87)  |  Distance (161)  |  East (18)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Movement (155)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Other (2236)  |  Principal (63)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Speed (65)  |  Two (937)  |  Unbelievable (7)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unthinkable (8)  |  Way (1217)  |  West (17)

By the classification of any series of objects, is meant the actual or ideal arrangement together of those which are like and the separation of those which are unlike ; the purpose of this arrangement being to facilitate the operations of the mind in clearly conceiving and retaining in the memory the characters of the objects in question.‎
In 'Lecture I: On the Classification of Animals', Lectures on the Elements of Comparative Anatomy: On the ... - (1864), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Being (1278)  |  Character (243)  |  Classification (97)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Facilitate (5)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Like (22)  |  Mean (809)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Retain (56)  |  Separation (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Together (387)  |  Unlike (8)

Can a physicist visualize an electron? The electron is materially inconceivable and yet, it is so perfectly known through its effects that we use it to illuminate our cities, guide our airlines through the night skies and take the most accurate measurements. What strange rationale makes some physicists accept the inconceivable electrons as real while refusing to accept the reality of a Designer on the ground that they cannot conceive Him?
In letter to California State board of Education (14 Sep 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Airplane (41)  |  Designer (6)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electron (93)  |  God (757)  |  Ground (217)  |  Guide (97)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Inconceivable (12)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Material (353)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Rationale (7)  |  Reality (261)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Strange (157)  |  Through (849)  |  Use (766)

Can science ever be immune from experiments conceived out of prejudices and stereotypes, conscious or not? (Which is not to suggest that it cannot in discrete areas identify and locate verifiable phenomena in nature.) I await the study that says lesbians have a region of the hypothalamus that resembles straight men and I would not be surprised if, at this very moment, some scientist somewhere is studying brains of deceased Asians to see if they have an enlarged ‘math region’ of the brain.
Kay Diaz
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Area (31)  |  Asian (3)  |  Await (5)  |  Brain (270)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Discrete (11)  |  Enlarge (35)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Identify (13)  |  Immune (3)  |  Locate (7)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Region (36)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Stereotype (4)  |  Straight (73)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Verifiable (6)

Does the harmony the human intelligence thinks it discovers in nature exist outside of this intelligence? No, beyond doubt, a reality completely independent of the mind which conceives it, sees or feels it, is an impossibility.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Completely (135)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Exist (443)  |  Feel (367)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Outside (141)  |  Reality (261)  |  See (1081)  |  Think (1086)

Even though the realms of religion and science in themselves are clearly marked off from each other, nevertheless there exist between the two strong reciprocal relationships and dependencies. Though religion may be that which determines the goal, it has, nevertheless, learned from science, in the broadest sense, what means will contribute to the attainment of the goals it has set up. But science can only be created by those who are thoroughly imbued with the aspiration toward truth and understanding. This source of feeling, however, springs from the sphere of religion. To this there also belongs the faith in the possibility that the regulations valid for the world of existence are rational, that is, comprehensible to reason. I cannot conceive of a genuine scientist without that profound faith. The situation may be expressed by an image: science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.
From paper 'Science, Philosophy and Religion', prepared for initial meeting of the Conference on Science, Philosophy and Religion in Their Relation to the Democratic Way of Life, at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, New York City (9-11 Sep 1940). Collected in Albert Einstein: In His Own Words (2000), 212.
Science quotes on:  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blind (95)  |  Comprehensible (4)  |  Determine (144)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Express (186)  |  Faith (203)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Goal (145)  |  Image (96)  |  Lame (3)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Profound (104)  |  Rational (90)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reciprocal (7)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Regulations (3)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Set (394)  |  Situation (113)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Spring (133)  |  Strong (174)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

For me, the idea of a creation is not conceivable without invoking the necessity of design. One cannot be exposed to the law and order of the universe without concluding that there must be design and purpose behind it all.
In letter to California State board of Education (14 Sep 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Creation (327)  |  Design (195)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Exposure (7)  |  Idea (843)  |  Law (894)  |  Law And Order (4)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Universe (857)

For the first time there was constructed with this machine [locomotive engine] a self-acting mechanism in which the interplay of forces took shape transparently enough to discern the connection between the heat generated and the motion produced. The great puzzle of the vital force was also immediately solved for the physiologist in that it became evident that it is more than a mere poetic comparison when one conceives of the coal as the food of the locomotive and the combustion as the basis for its life.
'Leid und Freude in der Naturforschung', Die Gartenlaube (1870), 359. Trans. Kenneth L. Caneva, Robert Mayer and the Conservation of Energy (1993), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (173)  |  Coal (57)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Connection (162)  |  Construct (124)  |  Discern (33)  |  Engine (98)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evident (91)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heat (174)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Life (1795)  |  Locomotive (8)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Produced (187)  |  Puzzle (44)  |  Self (267)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vital (85)  |  Vital Force (7)

For thousands of years men have striven and suffered and begotten and woman have brought forth in pain. A hundred years ago, perhaps, another man sat on this spot; like you he gazed with awe and yearning in his heart at the dying light on the glaciers. Like you he was begotten of man and born of woman. He felt pain and brief joy as you do. Was he someone else? Was it not you yourself? What is this Self of yours? What was the necessary condition for making the thing conceived this time into you, just you and not someone else?
In Seek for the Road (1925). Quoted in Ken Wilber, Quantum Questions (1984), 96-97.
Science quotes on:  |  Awe (43)  |  Begotten (2)  |  Birth (147)  |  Brief (36)  |  Condition (356)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dying (2)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Glacier (17)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Joy (107)  |  Light (607)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Pain (136)  |  Self (267)  |  Sit (48)  |  Strive (46)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Woman (151)  |  Year (933)  |  Yearn (12)  |  Yearning (12)

How twins are born my discourse will explain thus. The cause is chiefly the nature of the womb in woman. For if it has grown equally on either side of its mouth, and if it opens equally, and also dries equally after menstruation, it can give nourishment, if it conceive the secretion of the man so that it immediately divides into both parts of the womb equally. Now if the seed secreted from both parents be abundant and strong, it can grow in both places, as it masters the nourishment that reaches it. In all other cases twins are not formed. Now when the secretion from both parents is male, of necessity boys are begotten in both places; but when from both it is female, girls are begotten. But when one secretion is female and the other male, whichever masters the other gives the embryo its sex. Twins are like one another for the following reasons. First, the places are alike in which they grow; then they were secreted together; then they grow by the same nourishment, and at birth they reach together the light of day.
Regimen, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Birth (147)  |  Both (493)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Divide (75)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Equally (130)  |  Explain (322)  |  Female (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Girl (37)  |  Grow (238)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Menstruation (3)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sex (69)  |  Side (233)  |  Strong (174)  |  Together (387)  |  Twin (15)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)  |  Womb (24)

I believe that life can go on forever. It takes a million years to evolve a new species, ten million for a new genus, one hundred million for a class, a billion for a phylum—and that’s usually as far as your imagination goes. In a billion years, it seems, intelligent life might be as different from humans as humans are from insects. But what would happen in another ten billion years? It’s utterly impossible to conceive of ourselves changing as drastically as that, over and over again. All you can say is, on that kind of time scale the material form that life would take is completely open. To change from a human being to a cloud may seem a big order, but it’s the kind of change you’d expect over billions of years.
Quoted in Omni (1986), 8, 38.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Billion (95)  |  Change (593)  |  Class (164)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Completely (135)  |  Different (577)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expect (200)  |  Forever (103)  |  Form (959)  |  Genus (25)  |  Happen (274)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Insect (77)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Material (353)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Order (632)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Species (401)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)  |  Year (933)

I can conceive few human states more enviable than that of the man to whom, panting in the foul laboratory, or watching for his life under the tropic forest, Isis shall for a moment lift her sacred veil, and show him, once and for ever, the thing he dreamed not of; some law, or even mere hint of a law, explaining one fact; but explaining with it a thousand more, connecting them all with each other and with the mighty whole, till order and meaning shoots through some old Chaos of scattered observations.
Health and Education (1874), 289.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Deer (9)  |  Dream (208)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Forest (150)  |  Foul (15)  |  Hint (21)  |  Human (1468)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Mouse (32)  |  Observation (555)  |  Old (481)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paramecium (2)  |  Rat (37)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Show (346)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Veil (26)  |  Whole (738)

I cannot conceive of a God who rewards and punishes his creatures, or has a will of the type of which we are conscious in ourselves. An individual who should survive his physical death is also beyond my comprehension, nor do I wish it otherwise; such notions are for the fears or absurd egoism of feeble souls.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Creature (233)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeble (27)  |  God (757)  |  Individual (404)  |  Notion (113)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physical (508)  |  Punish (9)  |  Reward (68)  |  Soul (226)  |  Survive (79)  |  Type (167)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

I conceive of nothing, in religion, science, or philosophy, that is more than the proper thing to wear, for a while.
Wild Talents (1932, 2006), 240.
Science quotes on:  |  Fashion (30)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Proper (144)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)

I conceive that Lamarck was the first to bring it forward systematically & to 'go the whole orang' ... Yet evolutionists 'cannot be pooh-poohed & ought not to be so.'
Letter to Huxley (17 Jun 1859), Imperial College Archives, Huxley Papers, 6:20. Partly reprinted in Leonard G. Wilsou (ed.), Sir Charles Lyell's Scientific Journals on the Species Question (1970), 314. Lyell expressed the same remark to Darwin in 1863 (The Correspondence of Charles Darwin (1999), Vol. 11, 231.)
Science quotes on:  |  Evolutionist (7)  |  First (1283)  |  Forward (102)  |  Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (24)  |  Whole (738)

I concluded that I might take as a general rule the principle that all things which we very clearly and obviously conceive are true: only observing, however, that there is some difficulty in rightly determining the objects which we distinctly conceive.
In Discours de la Méthode (1637), as translated by J. Veitch, A Discourse on Method (1912), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Distinct (97)  |  General (511)  |  Object (422)  |  Observe (168)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Principle (507)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thing (1915)  |  True (212)

I do ... humbly conceive (tho' some possibly may think there is too much notice taken of such a trivial thing as a rotten Shell, yet) that Men do generally rally too much slight and pass over without regard these Records of Antiquity which Nature have left as Monuments and Hieroglyphick Characters of preceding Transactions in the like duration or Transactions of the Body of the Earth, which are infinitely more evident and certain tokens than any thing of Antiquity that can be fetched out of Coins or Medals, or any other way yet known, since the best of those ways may be counterfeited or made by Art and Design, as may also Books, Manuscripts and Inscriptions, as all the Learned are now sufficiently satisfied, has often been actually practised; but those Characters are not to be Counterfeited by all the Craft in the World, nor can they be doubted to be, what they appear, by anyone that will impartially examine the true appearances of them: And tho' it must be granted, that it is very difficult to read them, and to raise a Chronology out of them, and to state the intervalls of the Times wherein such, or such Catastrophies and Mutations have happened; yet 'tis not impossible, but that, by the help of those joined to ' other means and assistances of Information, much may be done even in that part of Information also.
Lectures and Discourses of Earthquakes (1668). In The Posthumous Works of Robert Hooke, containing his Cutlerian Lectures and other Discourses read at the Meetings of the Illustrious Royal Society (1705), 411.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Antiquity (33)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Art (657)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Best (459)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Certain (550)  |  Character (243)  |  Chronology (9)  |  Design (195)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evident (91)  |  Examine (78)  |  Geology (220)  |  Grant (73)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Humbly (8)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Information (166)  |  Inscription (11)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Monument (45)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notice (77)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Regard (305)  |  Shell (63)  |  State (491)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Token (9)  |  Transaction (13)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

I do not conceive of any manifestation of culture, of science, of art, as purposes in themselves. I think the purpose of science and culture is man.
In G. Barry Golson (ed.) The Playboy Interview (1981), 254.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Conception (154)  |  Culture (143)  |  Do (1908)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Purpose Of Science (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)

I have been described on more than one occasion as belonging to something called the 'Functional School of Social Anthropology' and even as being its leader, or one of its leaders. This Functional School does not really exist; it is a myth invented by Professor Malinowski ... There is no place in natural science for 'schools' in this sense, and I regard social anthropology as a branch of natural science. ... I conceive of social anthropology as the theoretical natural science of human society, that is, the investigation of social phenomena by methods essentially similar to those used in the physical and biological sciences. I am quite willing to call the subject 'comparative sociology', if anyone so wishes.
In A. Kuper, Anthropologists and Anthropology: The Modern British School (1983), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belonging (37)  |  Biography (240)  |  Biological (137)  |  Branch (150)  |  Call (769)  |  Exist (443)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Leader (43)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Myth (56)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Physical (508)  |  Professor (128)  |  Regard (305)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Sociology (46)  |  Something (719)  |  Subject (521)  |  Willing (44)

I know, indeed, and can conceive of no pursuit so antagonistic to the cultivation of the oratorical faculty … as the study of Mathematics. An eloquent mathematician must, from the nature of things, ever remain as rare a phenomenon as a talking fish, and it is certain that the more anyone gives himself up to the study of oratorical effect the less will he find himself in a fit state to mathematicize.
In Address (22 Feb 1877) for Commemoration Day at Johns Hopkins University. Published as a pamphlet, and reprinted in The Collected Mathematical Papers of James Joseph Sylvester: (1870-1883) (1909), Vol. 3, 72. https://books.google.com/books?id=wgVbAAAAQAAJ James Joseph Sylvester - 1877
Science quotes on:  |  Antagonistic (3)  |  Certain (550)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Effect (393)  |  Eloquent (2)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Find (998)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fit (134)  |  Himself (461)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Less (103)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Things (29)  |  Oration (2)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Rare (89)  |  Remain (349)  |  State (491)  |  Study (653)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

I specifically paused to show that, if there were such machines with the organs and shape of a monkey or of some other non-rational animal, we would have no way of discovering that they are not the same as these animals. But if there were machines that resembled our bodies and if they imitated our actions as much as is morally possible, we would always have two very certain means for recognizing that, none the less, they are not genuinely human. The first is that they would never be able to use speech, or other signs composed by themselves, as we do to express our thoughts to others. For one could easily conceive of a machine that is made in such a way that it utters words, and even that it would utter some words in response to physical actions that cause a change in its organs—for example, if someone touched it in a particular place, it would ask what one wishes to say to it, or if it were touched somewhere else, it would cry out that it was being hurt, and so on. But it could not arrange words in different ways to reply to the meaning of everything that is said in its presence, as even the most unintelligent human beings can do. The second means is that, even if they did many things as well as or, possibly, better than anyone of us, they would infallibly fail in others. Thus one would discover that they did not act on the basis of knowledge, but merely as a result of the disposition of their organs. For whereas reason is a universal instrument that can be used in all kinds of situations, these organs need a specific disposition for every particular action.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 5, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arrange (30)  |  Ask (411)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Cry (29)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Express (186)  |  Fail (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Monkey (52)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Presence (63)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reply (56)  |  Response (53)  |  Result (677)  |  Say (984)  |  Show (346)  |  Situation (113)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speech (61)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Touch (141)  |  Two (937)  |  Universal (189)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

I suspect there could be life and intelligence out there in forms that we can't conceive. And there could, of course, be forms of intelligence beyond human capacity—beyond as much as we are beyond a chimpanzee.
As quoted by Robin McKie in 'Aliens Can't Hear Us, Says Astronomer', The Guardian (27 Jan 2010), reporting on “a special meeting on the search for extraterrestrial intelligence” on 26 Jan 2010.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Chimpanzee (13)  |  Course (409)  |  Form (959)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Life (1795)

I think it is a duty I owe to my profession and to my sex to show that a woman has a right to the practice of her profession and cannot be condemned to abandon it merely because she marries. I cannot conceive how women’s colleges, inviting and encouraging women to enter professions can be justly founded or maintained denying such a principle.
(From a letter Brooks wrote to her dean, knowing that she would be told to resign if she married, she asked to keep her job. Nevertheless, she lost her teaching position at Barnard College in 1906. Dean Gill wrote that “The dignity of women’s place in the home demands that your marriage shall be a resignation.”)
As quoted by Margaret W. Rossiter in Women Scientists in America: Struggles and Strategies to 1940. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1982).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abandon (68)  |  Ask (411)  |  College (66)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemnation (15)  |  Demand (123)  |  Denial (17)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Duty (68)  |  Encouraging (12)  |  Enter (141)  |  Founding (5)  |  Home (170)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Job (82)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Letter (109)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Merely (316)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Owe (71)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Profession (99)  |  Right (452)  |  Role Model (7)  |  Sex (69)  |  Show (346)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Think (1086)  |  Woman (151)

I will paint for [man] not only the visible universe, but all that he can conceive of nature’s immensity in the womb of an atom.
In 'The Misery of Man Without God', Blaise Pascal (1910), Vol. 48, 27, as translated by W.F. Trotter.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Paint (22)  |  Universe (857)  |  Visible (84)  |  Will (2355)  |  Womb (24)

I will try to account for the degree of my aesthetic emotion. That, I conceive, is the function of the critic.
In Art (1913), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Critic (20)  |  Degree (276)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Function (228)  |  Try (283)  |  Will (2355)

If the love of surgery is a proof of a person’s being adapted for it, then certainly I am fitted to he a surgeon; for thou can’st hardly conceive what a high degree of enjoyment I am from day to day experiencing in this bloody and butchering department of the healing art. I am more and more delighted with my profession.
Letter to his father (1853). In John Vaughan, 'Lord Lister', The Living Age (1918), 297, 361. Reprinted from The Fortnightly Review (1918), 109, 417- .
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Art (657)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Degree (276)  |  Delight (108)  |  Department (92)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Healing (25)  |  High (362)  |  Love (309)  |  More (2559)  |  Person (363)  |  Profession (99)  |  Proof (287)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Surgery (51)

If the world has begun with a single quantum, the notions of space and would altogether fail to have any meaning at the beginning; they would only begin to have a sensible meaning when the original quantum had been divided into a sufficient number of quanta. If this suggestion is correct, the beginning of the world happened a little before the beginning of space and time. I think that such a beginning of the world is far enough from the present order of Nature to be not at all repugnant. It may be difficult to follow up the idea in detail as we are not yet able to count the quantum packets in every case. For example, it may be that an atomic nucleus must be counted as a unique quantum, the atomic number acting as a kind of quantum number. If the future development of quantum theory happens to turn in that direction, we could conceive the beginning of the universe in the form of a unique atom, the atomic weight of which is the total mass of the universe. This highly unstable atom would divide in smaller and smaller atoms by a kind of super-radioactive process.
In 'The Beginning of the World from the Point of View of Quantum Theory', Nature (1931), 127, 706.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Number (3)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Count (105)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Direction (175)  |  Divide (75)  |  Divided (50)  |  Enough (340)  |  Fail (185)  |  Follow (378)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Idea (843)  |  Kind (557)  |  Little (707)  |  Mass (157)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Notion (113)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin Of The Universe (16)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Number (2)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Single (353)  |  Space (500)  |  Space And Time (36)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Total (94)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unique (67)  |  Universe (857)  |  Weight (134)  |  World (1774)

If, then, there must be something eternal, let us see what sort of Being it must be. And to that it is very obvious to Reason, that it must necessarily be a cogitative Being. For it is as impossible to conceive that ever bare incogitative Matter should produce a thinking intelligent Being, as that nothing should of itself produce Matter...
In Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690, 1801), Book 4, Chap. 10, Sec. 10, 114.
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (33)  |  Being (1278)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Produce (104)  |  Reason (744)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Thinking (414)

In order to form for one's self a just notion of the operations which result in the production of thought, it is necessary to conceive of the brain as a peculiar organ, specially designed for the production thereof, just as the stomach is designed to effect digestion, the liver to filter the bile, the parotids and the maxillary and sublingual glands to prepare the salivary juices.
Rapports du Physique et du Moral de l'Homme (1805), 2nd edition, Vol. 1, 152-3. Translated in Robert M. Young, Mind, Brain and Adaptation in the Nineteenth Century (1970), 20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bile (5)  |  Brain (270)  |  Design (195)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Effect (393)  |  Form (959)  |  Gland (14)  |  Liver (19)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Notion (113)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Organ (115)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Production (183)  |  Result (677)  |  Saliva (4)  |  Self (267)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Thought (953)

In scientific investigations it is grievously wrong to pander to the public’s impatience for results, or to let them think that for discovery it is necessary only to set up a great manufactory and a system of mass production. If in treatment team work is effective, in research it is the individual who counts first and above all. No great thought has ever sprung from anything but a single mind, suddenly conceiving. Throughout the whole world there has been too violent a forcing of the growth of ideas; too feverish a rush to perform experiments and publish conclusions. A year of vacation for calm detachment with all the individual workers thinking it all over in a desert should be proclaimed.
In Viewless Winds: Being the Recollections and Digressions of an Australian Surgeon (1939), 286.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Calm (31)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Count (105)  |  Desert (56)  |  Detachment (8)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Effective (59)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feverish (6)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grievous (3)  |  Growth (187)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Individual (404)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Manufactory (2)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mass Production (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Pander (3)  |  Perform (121)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Production (183)  |  Public (96)  |  Publish (36)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Rush (18)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Up (3)  |  Single (353)  |  Spring (133)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  System (537)  |  Team (15)  |  Teamwork (5)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vacation (4)  |  Violent (17)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)

In the infancy of physical science, it was hoped that some discovery might be made that would enable us to emancipate ourselves from the bondage of gravity, and, at least, pay a visit to our neighbour the moon. The poor attempts of the aeronaut have shewn the hopelessness of the enterprise. The success of his achievement depends on the buoyant power of the atmosphere, but the atmosphere extends only a few miles above the earth, and its action cannot reach beyond its own limits. The only machine, independent of the atmosphere, we can conceive of, would be one on the principle of the rocket. The rocket rises in the air, not from the resistance offered by the atmosphere to its fiery stream, but from the internal reaction. The velocity would, indeed, be greater in a vacuum than in the atmosphere, and could we dispense with the comfort of breathing air, we might, with such a machine, transcend the boundaries of our globe, and visit other orbs.
God's Glory in the Heavens (1862, 3rd Ed. 1867) 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Action (327)  |  Air (347)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bondage (5)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Buoyancy (7)  |  Buoyant (5)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Emancipate (2)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Extend (128)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hopelessness (6)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Internal (66)  |  Limit (280)  |  Machine (257)  |  Moon (237)  |  Offer (141)  |  Orb (20)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Poor (136)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Resistance (40)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space Travel (19)  |  Stream (81)  |  Success (302)  |  Transcend (26)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Velocity (48)

In the school of political projectors, I was but ill entertained, the professors appearing, in my judgment, wholly out of their senses; which is a scene that never fails to make me melancholy. These unhappy people were proposing schemes for persuading monarchs to choose favourites upon the score of their wisdom, capacity, and virtue; of teaching ministers to consult the public good; of rewarding merit, great abilities, and eminent services; of instructing princes to know their true interest, by placing it on the same foundation with that of their people; of choosing for employment persons qualified to exercise them; with many other wild impossible chimeras, that never entered before into the heart of man to conceive, and confirmed in me the old observation, that there is nothing so extravagant and irrational which some philosophers have not maintained for truth.
Gulliver's Travels (1726, Penguin ed. 1967), Part III, Chap. 6, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Chimera (9)  |  Choose (112)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Employment (32)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Extravagance (3)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Fail (185)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Interest (386)  |  Irrational (13)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Man (2251)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  Merit (50)  |  Minister (9)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Observation (555)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Political (121)  |  Prince (13)  |  Professor (128)  |  Projector (3)  |  Qualified (12)  |  Scene (36)  |  Scheme (57)  |  School (219)  |  Sense (770)  |  Service (110)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unhappiness (9)  |  Unhappy (16)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wisdom (221)

Infinite space cannot be conceived by anybody; finite but unbounded space is difficult to conceive but not impossible. … [We] are using a conception of space which must have originated a million years ago and has become rather firmly imbedded in human thought. But the space of Physics ought not to be dominated by this creation of the dawning mind of an enterprising ape."
In The Nature of the Physical World (1929), 80-81.
Science quotes on:  |  Anybody (42)  |  Ape (53)  |  Become (815)  |  Conception (154)  |  Creation (327)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Finite (59)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Million (114)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Originate (36)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Space (500)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unbounded (5)  |  Year (933)

It is above all the duty of the methodical text-book to adapt itself to the pupil’s power of comprehension, only challenging his higher efforts with the increasing development of his imagination, his logical power and the ability of abstraction. This indeed constitutes a test of the art of teaching, it is here where pedagogic tact becomes manifest. In reference to the axioms, caution is necessary. It should be pointed out comparatively early, in how far the mathematical body differs from the material body. Furthermore, since mathematical bodies are really portions of space, this space is to be conceived as mathematical space and to be clearly distinguished from real or physical space. Gradually the student will become conscious that the portion of the real space which lies beyond the visible stellar universe is not cognizable through the senses, that we know nothing of its properties and consequently have no basis for judgments concerning it. Mathematical space, on the other hand, may be subjected to conditions, for instance, we may condition its properties at infinity, and these conditions constitute the axioms, say the Euclidean axioms. But every student will require years before the conviction of the truth of this last statement will force itself upon him.
In Methodisches Lehrbuch der Elementar-Mathemalik (1904), Teil I, Vorwort, 4-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Adapt (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Book (392)  |  Caution (24)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Concern (228)  |  Condition (356)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Consequently (5)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Conviction (97)  |  Development (422)  |  Differ (85)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Duty (68)  |  Early (185)  |  Effort (227)  |  Euclidean (3)  |  Far (154)  |  Force (487)  |  Furthermore (2)  |  Gradually (102)  |  High (362)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Instance (33)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logical (55)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Methodical (8)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pedagogy (2)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Portion (84)  |  Power (746)  |  Property (168)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Real (149)  |  Really (78)  |  Reference (33)  |  Require (219)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Space (500)  |  Statement (142)  |  Stellar (4)  |  Student (300)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tact (6)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Test (211)  |  Text-Book (5)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Visible (84)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

It is always noteworthy that all those who seriously study this science [the theory of numbers] conceive a sort of passion for it.
Letter to Jonos Boyai (2 Sep 1808). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 413.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Number (699)  |  Passion (114)  |  Science (3879)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)

It is difficult to conceive a grander mass of vegetation:—the straight shafts of the timber-trees shooting aloft, some naked and clean, with grey, pale, or brown bark; others literally clothed for yards with a continuous garment of epiphytes, one mass of blossoms, especially the white Orchids Caelogynes, which bloom in a profuse manner, whitening their trunks like snow. More bulky trunks were masses of interlacing climbers, Araliaceae, Leguminosae, Vines, and Menispermeae, Hydrangea, and Peppers, enclosing a hollow, once filled by the now strangled supporting tree, which has long ago decayed away. From the sides and summit of these, supple branches hung forth, either leafy or naked; the latter resembling cables flung from one tree to another, swinging in the breeze, their rocking motion increased by the weight of great bunches of ferns or Orchids, which were perched aloft in the loops. Perpetual moisture nourishes this dripping forest: and pendulous mosses and lichens are met with in profusion.
Himalayan Journals (1854), vol. 1, 110-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Bark (18)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Botany (57)  |  Brown (23)  |  Cable (11)  |  Clean (50)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Decay (53)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fern (9)  |  Forest (150)  |  Garment (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himalayas (2)  |  Lichen (2)  |  Literally (30)  |  Long (790)  |  Loop (6)  |  Mass (157)  |  Moisture (20)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Orchid (3)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perch (7)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Profuse (3)  |  Rocking (2)  |  Side (233)  |  Snow (37)  |  Straight (73)  |  Summit (25)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trunk (21)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Weight (134)  |  White (127)

It is impossible for us adequately to conceive the boldness of the measure which aimed at universal education through the establishment of free schools. ... it had no precedent in the world's history ... But time has ratified its soundness. Two centuries proclaim it to be as wise as it was courageous, as beneficient as it was disinterested. ... The establishment of free schools was one of those grand mental and moral experiments whose effects could not be developed and made manifest in a single generation. ... The sincerity of our gratitude must be tested by our efforts to perpetuate and improve what they established. The gratitude of the lips only is an unholy offering.
Tenth Report of the Secretary of the Massachusetts Board of Education (1946). Life and Works of Horace Mann (1891), Vol. 4, 111-112.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aim (165)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Develop (268)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Effort (227)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Free (232)  |  Generation (242)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  History (673)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  Must (1526)  |  Perpetuate (10)  |  Precedent (7)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  School (219)  |  Sincerity (6)  |  Single (353)  |  Test (211)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Universal (189)  |  Wise (131)  |  World (1774)

It is impossible to devise an experiment without a preconceived idea; devising an experiment, we said, is putting a question; we never conceive a question without an idea which invites an answer. I consider it, therefore, an absolute principle that experiments must always be devised in view of a preconceived idea, no matter if the idea be not very clear nor very well defined.
An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865, translation 1927, 1957), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Answer (366)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Conceiving (3)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Definition (221)  |  Devise (14)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Preconceive (3)  |  Principle (507)  |  Putting (2)  |  Question (621)  |  View (488)

It is often said that all the conditions for the first production of a living being are now present, which could ever have been present. But if (and oh what a big if) we could conceive in some warm little pond with all sort of ammonia and phosphoric salts—light, heat, electricity present, that a protein compound was chemically formed, ready to undergo still more complex changes, at the present such matter would be instantly devoured, or absorbed, which would not have been the case before living creatures were formed.
Letter (1 Feb 1871) to Joseph Dalton Hooker. In The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1888), Vol. 3, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Being (1278)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Complex (188)  |  Compound (113)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Devour (29)  |  Electricity (159)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Pond (15)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Protein (54)  |  Salt (46)  |  Still (613)  |  Warm (69)

It is often said that all the conditions for the first production of a living organism are now present, which could have ever been present. But if (and oh! what a big if!) we could conceive in some warm pond, with all sorts of ammonia and phosphoric salts, light, heat, electricity, &c., present, that a proteine compound was chemically formed ready to undergo still more complex changes, at the present day such matter would be instantly devoured or absorbed, which would not have been the case before living creatures were formed.
Letter; as quoted in The Origin of Life by J.D. Bernal (1967) publ.Weidenfeld and Nicholson, London
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  All (4108)  |  Ammonia (15)  |  Change (593)  |  Complex (188)  |  Compound (113)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Devour (29)  |  Electricity (159)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Heat (174)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Light (607)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Pond (15)  |  Present (619)  |  Production (183)  |  Salt (46)  |  Still (613)  |  Warm (69)

It must ... be admitted that very simple relations ... exist between the volumes of gaseous substances and the numbers of simple or compound molecules which form them. The first hypothesis to present itself in this connection, and apparently even the only admissible one, is the supposition that the number of integral molecules in any gases is always the same for equal volumes, or always proportional to the volumes. Indeed, if we were to suppose that the number of molecules contained in a given volume were different for different gases, it would scarcely be possible to conceive that the law regulating the distance of molecules could give in all cases relations so simple as those which the facts just detailed compel us to acknowledge between the volume and the number of molecules.
'Essay on a Manner of Determining the Relative Masses of the Elementary Molecules of Bodies, and the Proportions in which they enter into these Compounds', Journal de Physique, 1811, 73, 58-76. In Foundations of the Molecular Theory; Alembic Club Reprints, Number 4 (1923), 28-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Admissible (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Compel (30)  |  Compound (113)  |  Connection (162)  |  Detail (146)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Gas (83)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Integral (26)  |  Law (894)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Simple (406)  |  Substance (248)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Supposition (50)

It will be noticed that the fundamental theorem proved above bears some remarkable resemblances to the second law of thermodynamics. Both are properties of populations, or aggregates, true irrespective of the nature of the units which compose them; both are statistical laws; each requires the constant increase of a measurable quantity, in the one case the entropy of a physical system and in the other the fitness, measured by m, of a biological population. As in the physical world we can conceive the theoretical systems in which dissipative forces are wholly absent, and in which the entropy consequently remains constant, so we can conceive, though we need not expect to find, biological populations in which the genetic variance is absolutely zero, and in which fitness does not increase. Professor Eddington has recently remarked that “The law that entropy always increases—the second law of thermodynamics—holds, I think, the supreme position among the laws of nature.” It is not a little instructive that so similar a law should hold the supreme position among the biological sciences. While it is possible that both may ultimately be absorbed by some more general principle, for the present we should note that the laws as they stand present profound differences—-(1) The systems considered in thermodynamics are permanent; species on the contrary are liable to extinction, although biological improvement must be expected to occur up to the end of their existence. (2) Fitness, although measured by a uniform method, is qualitatively different for every different organism, whereas entropy, like temperature, is taken to have the same meaning for all physical systems. (3) Fitness may be increased or decreased by changes in the environment, without reacting quantitatively upon that environment. (4) Entropy changes are exceptional in the physical world in being irreversible, while irreversible evolutionary changes form no exception among biological phenomena. Finally, (5) entropy changes lead to a progressive disorganization of the physical world, at least from the human standpoint of the utilization of energy, while evolutionary changes are generally recognized as producing progressively higher organization in the organic world.
The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection (1930), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Aggregate (23)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Both (493)  |  Change (593)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington (130)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Entropy (44)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exception (73)  |  Exceptional (18)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  General (511)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Human (1468)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Increase (210)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Little (707)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Method (505)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occur (150)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organism (220)  |  Organization (114)  |  Other (2236)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Population (110)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Profound (104)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Remain (349)  |  Require (219)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (14)  |  Species (401)  |  Stand (274)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Variance (12)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Zero (37)

Just as our eyes need light in order to see, our minds need ideas in order to conceive.
Recherche de la vérité
Science quotes on:  |  Eye (419)  |  Idea (843)  |  Light (607)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Need (290)  |  Order (632)  |  See (1081)

Let us now declare the means whereby our understanding can rise to knowledge without fear of error. There are two such means: intuition and deduction. By intuition I mean not the varying testimony of the senses, nor the deductive judgment of imagination naturally extravagant, but the conception of an attentive mind so distinct and so clear that no doubt remains to it with regard to that which it comprehends; or, what amounts to the same thing, the self-evidencing conception of a sound and attentive mind, a conception which springs from the light of reason alone, and is more certain, because more simple, than deduction itself. …
It may perhaps be asked why to intuition we add this other mode of knowing, by deduction, that is to say, the process which, from something of which we have certain knowledge, draws consequences which necessarily follow therefrom. But we are obliged to admit this second step; for there are a great many things which, without being evident of themselves, nevertheless bear the marks of certainty if only they are deduced from true and incontestable principles by a continuous and uninterrupted movement of thought, with distinct intuition of each thing; just as we know that the last link of a long chain holds to the first, although we can not take in with one glance of the eye the intermediate links, provided that, after having run over them in succession, we can recall them all, each as being joined to its fellows, from the first up to the last. Thus we distinguish intuition from deduction, inasmuch as in the latter case there is conceived a certain progress or succession, while it is not so in the former; … whence it follows that primary propositions, derived immediately from principles, may be said to be known, according to the way we view them, now by intuition, now by deduction; although the principles themselves can be known only by intuition, the remote consequences only by deduction.
In Rules for the Direction of the Mind, Philosophy of Descartes. [Torrey] (1892), 64-65.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Add (40)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Amount (151)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chain (50)  |  Clear (100)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Declare (45)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Derive (65)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Error (321)  |  Evident (91)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Former (137)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Inasmuch (5)  |  Incontestable (2)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Join (26)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Latter (21)  |  Let (61)  |  Light (607)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (790)  |  Mark (43)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Movement (155)  |  Naturally (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Obliged (6)  |  Other (2236)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Provide (69)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recall (10)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rise (166)  |  Run (174)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Second (62)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Step (231)  |  Succession (77)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Therefrom (2)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  True (212)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Vary (27)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whereby (2)  |  Why (491)

My mind seems to have become a kind of machine for grinding general laws out of large collections of facts, but why this should have caused the atrophy of that part of the brain that alone on which the higher tastes depend, I cannot conceive. A man with a mind more highly organised or better constituted than mine would not, I suppose, have thus suffered, and if I had to live my life over again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week; for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept alive through use.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Alone (311)  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Biography (240)  |  Brain (270)  |  Collection (64)  |  Depend (228)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  General (511)  |  Kind (557)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Listen (73)  |  Live (628)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mine (76)  |  More (2559)  |  Music (129)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Read (287)  |  Rule (294)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Taste (90)  |  Through (849)  |  Use (766)  |  Week (70)  |  Why (491)

Next to the promulgation of the truth, the best thing I can conceive that man can do is the public recantation of an error.
In Collected Papers of Joseph Baron Lister (1909), Vol. 1, 366. As quoted and cited in Sir Rickman John Godlee, Lord Lister (1918), 278.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Do (1908)  |  Error (321)  |  Man (2251)  |  Next (236)  |  Promulgation (5)  |  Public (96)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)

One may conceive light to spread successively, by spherical waves.
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Light (607)  |  Spread (83)  |  Wave (107)

Our most trustworthy safeguard in making general statements on this question is imagination. If we can imagine the breaking of a law of physics then… it is in some degree an empirical law. With a purely rational law we could not conceive an alternative… This ultimate criterion serves as an anchor to keep us from drifting unduly in a perilous sea of thought.
From concluding paragraph of 'Transition to General Relativity', The Special Theory of Relativity (1940, 2014), Chap 8, 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (29)  |  Anchor (10)  |  Break (99)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Degree (276)  |  Drift (13)  |  Empirical (54)  |  General (511)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Keep (101)  |  Law (894)  |  Making (300)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perilous (4)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Purely (109)  |  Question (621)  |  Rational (90)  |  Safeguard (7)  |  Sea (308)  |  Serve (59)  |  Statement (142)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trustworthy (11)  |  Ultimate (144)

Physical Science and Industrialism may be conceived as a pair of dancers, both of whom know their steps and have an ear for the rhythm of the music. If the partner who has been leading chooses to change parts and to follow instead, there is perhaps no reason to expect that he will dance less correctly than before.
From 'Introduction: The Geneses of Civilizations', A Study of History (1948), Vol. 1, 3, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Change (593)  |  Choose (112)  |  Correct (86)  |  Dance (32)  |  Dancer (4)  |  Ear (68)  |  Expect (200)  |  Follow (378)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Music (129)  |  Partner (5)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Science (3879)  |  Step (231)  |  Will (2355)

Properly read, the Bible is the most potent force for atheism ever conceived.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Atheism (9)  |  Bible (91)  |  Force (487)  |  Most (1731)  |  Potent (12)  |  Properly (20)  |  Read (287)

Speeches are like babies-easy to conceive but hard to deliver.
Aristotle
Attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  Deliver (29)  |  Easy (204)  |  Hard (243)  |  Speech (61)

Spherical space is not very easy to imagine. We have to think of the properties of the surface of a sphere—the two-dimensional case—and try to conceive something similar applied to three-dimensional space. Stationing ourselves at a point let us draw a series of spheres of successively greater radii. The surface of a sphere of radius r should be proportional to r2; but in spherical space the areas of the more distant spheres begin to fall below the proper proportion. There is not so much room out there as we expected to find. Ultimately we reach a sphere of biggest possible area, and beyond it the areas begin to decrease. The last sphere of all shrinks to a point—our antipodes. Is there nothing beyond this? Is there a kind of boundary there? There is nothing beyond and yet there is no boundary. On the earth’s surface there is nothing beyond our own antipodes but there is no boundary there
In Space, Time and Gravitation: An Outline of the General Relativity Theory (1920, 1921), 158-159.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Draw (137)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fall (230)  |  Find (998)  |  Greater (288)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Kind (557)  |  Last (426)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proper (144)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Reach (281)  |  Series (149)  |  Shrink (23)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Surface (209)  |  Think (1086)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Ultimately (55)

The Archetypal idea was manifested in the flesh, under divers such modifications, upon this planet, long prior to the existence of those animal species that actually exemplify it. To what natural laws or secondary causes the orderly succession and progression of such organic phaenomena may have been committed we as yet are ignorant. But if, without derogation of the Divine power, we may conceive the existence of such ministers, and personify them by the term 'Nature,' we learn from the past history of our globe that she has advanced with slow and stately steps, guided by the archetypal light, amidst the wreck of worlds, from the first embodiment of the Vertebrate idea under its old Ichthyic vestment, until it became arrayed in the glorious garb of the Human form.
On the Nature of Limbs (1849), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (62)  |  Animal (617)  |  Archetype (5)  |  Array (5)  |  Cause (541)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Conception (154)  |  Divine (112)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Example (94)  |  Existence (456)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Garb (6)  |  Globe (47)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Glory (58)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Minister (9)  |  Modification (55)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Organic (158)  |  Past (337)  |  Personification (3)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Progression (23)  |  Secondary (14)  |  Slow (101)  |  Species (401)  |  Stately (12)  |  Step (231)  |  Succession (77)  |  Term (349)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  Vestment (2)  |  World (1774)  |  Wreck (7)

The belief that mathematics, because it is abstract, because it is static and cold and gray, is detached from life, is a mistaken belief. Mathematics, even in its purest and most abstract estate, is not detached from life. It is just the ideal handling of the problems of life, as sculpture may idealize a human figure or as poetry or painting may idealize a figure or a scene. Mathematics is precisely the ideal handling of the problems of life, and the central ideas of the science, the great concepts about which its stately doctrines have been built up, are precisely the chief ideas with which life must always deal and which, as it tumbles and rolls about them through time and space, give it its interests and problems, and its order and rationality. That such is the case a few indications will suffice to show. The mathematical concepts of constant and variable are represented familiarly in life by the notions of fixedness and change. The concept of equation or that of an equational system, imposing restriction upon variability, is matched in life by the concept of natural and spiritual law, giving order to what were else chaotic change and providing partial freedom in lieu of none at all. What is known in mathematics under the name of limit is everywhere present in life in the guise of some ideal, some excellence high-dwelling among the rocks, an “ever flying perfect” as Emerson calls it, unto which we may approximate nearer and nearer, but which we can never quite attain, save in aspiration. The supreme concept of functionality finds its correlate in life in the all-pervasive sense of interdependence and mutual determination among the elements of the world. What is known in mathematics as transformation—that is, lawful transfer of attention, serving to match in orderly fashion the things of one system with those of another—is conceived in life as a process of transmutation by which, in the flux of the world, the content of the present has come out of the past and in its turn, in ceasing to be, gives birth to its successor, as the boy is father to the man and as things, in general, become what they are not. The mathematical concept of invariance and that of infinitude, especially the imposing doctrines that explain their meanings and bear their names—What are they but mathematicizations of that which has ever been the chief of life’s hopes and dreams, of that which has ever been the object of its deepest passion and of its dominant enterprise, I mean the finding of the worth that abides, the finding of permanence in the midst of change, and the discovery of a presence, in what has seemed to be a finite world, of being that is infinite? It is needless further to multiply examples of a correlation that is so abounding and complete as indeed to suggest a doubt whether it be juster to view mathematics as the abstract idealization of life than to regard life as the concrete realization of mathematics.
In 'The Humanization of Teaching of Mathematics', Science, New Series, 35, 645-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abide (12)  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Birth (147)  |  Boy (94)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Cease (79)  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Constant (144)  |  Content (69)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detach (5)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dream (208)  |  Element (310)  |  Ralph Waldo Emerson (150)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equation (132)  |  Especially (31)  |  Estate (5)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Flux (21)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Functionality (2)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guise (5)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Impose (22)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indication (33)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invariance (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Needless (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Painting (44)  |  Partial (10)  |  Passion (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Pervasive (5)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Realization (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Rock (161)  |  Roll (40)  |  Save (118)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stately (12)  |  Static (8)  |  Successor (14)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tumble (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unto (8)  |  Variability (5)  |  Variable (34)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

The human understanding is unquiet; it cannot stop or rest, and still presses onward, but in vain. Therefore it is that we cannot conceive of any end or limit to the world, but always as of necessity it occurs to us that there is something beyond... But he is no less an unskilled and shallow philosopher who seeks causes of that which is most general, than he who in things subordinate and subaltern omits to do so
From Aphorism 48, Novum Organum, Book I (1620). Collected in James Spedding (ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1858), Vol. 4, 57.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cause (541)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  General (511)  |  Human (1468)  |  Limit (280)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Occur (150)  |  Omit (11)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Rest (280)  |  Seek (213)  |  Something (719)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unskilled (4)  |  Vain (83)  |  World (1774)

The idea of an atom has been so constantly associated with incredible assumptions of infinite strength, absolute rigidity, mystical actions at a distance, and individuality, that chemists and many other reasonable naturalists of modern times, losing all patience with it, have dismissed it to the realms of metaphysics, and made it smaller than ‘anything we can conceive.’ But if atoms are inconceivably small, why are not all chemical actions infinitely swift? Chemistry is powerless to deal with this question, and many others of paramount importance, if barred by the hardness of its fundamental assumptions, from contemplating the atom as a real portion of matter occupying a finite space, and forming not an immeasurably small constituent of any palpable body.
Sir William Thomson and Peter Guthrie Tait, A Treatise on Natural Philosophy (1883), Vol. I, Part 2, 495.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Atom (355)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Contemplating (11)  |  Deal (188)  |  Distance (161)  |  Finite (59)  |  Forming (42)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Matter (798)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Modern (385)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Other (2236)  |  Palpable (8)  |  Paramount (10)  |  Patience (56)  |  Portion (84)  |  Question (621)  |  Realm (85)  |  Rigidity (5)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Strength (126)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)

The idea of an indivisible, ultimate atom is inconceivable by the lay mind. If we can conceive of an idea of the atom at all, we can conceive it as capable of being cut in half; indeed, we cannot conceive it at all unless we so conceive it. The only true atom, the only thing which we cannot subdivide and cut in half, is the universe. We cannot cut a bit off the universe and put it somewhere else. Therefore the universe is a true atom and, indeed, is the smallest piece of indivisible matter which our minds can conceive; and they cannot conceive it any more than they can the indivisible, ultimate atom.
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cut (114)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Universe (857)

The individual feels the futility of human desires and aims and the sublimity and marvelous order which reveal themselves both in nature and in the world of thought. Individual existence impresses him as a sort of prison and he wants to experience the universe as a single significant whole. The beginnings of cosmic religious feeling already appear at an early stage of development, e.g., in many of the Psalms of David and in some of the Prophets. Buddhism, as we have learned especially from the wonderful writings of Schopenhauer, contains a much stronger element of this. The religious geniuses of all ages have been distinguished by this kind of religious feeling, which knows no dogma and no God conceived in man’s image; so that there can be no church whose central teachings are based on it. Hence it is precisely among the heretics of every age that we find men who were filled with this highest kind of religious feeling and were in many cases regarded by their contemporaries as atheists, sometimes also as saints. Looked at in this light, men like Democritus, Francis of Assisi, and Spinoza are closely akin to one another.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Aim (165)  |  Akin (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Appear (118)  |  Atheist (15)  |  Base (117)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Beginnings (5)  |  Both (493)  |  Case (99)  |  Central (80)  |  Church (56)  |  Closely (12)  |  Contain (68)  |  Contemporary (30)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  David (6)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Desire (204)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Early (185)  |  Element (310)  |  Especially (31)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fill (61)  |  Find (998)  |  Francis (2)  |  Futility (7)  |  Genius (284)  |  God (757)  |  Heretic (8)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Image (96)  |  Impress (64)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Light (607)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marvelous (29)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Order (632)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prison (13)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Regard (305)  |  Religious (126)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Saint (17)  |  Schopenhauer (6)  |  Significant (74)  |  Single (353)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spinoza (11)  |  Stage (143)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Sublimity (5)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  World (1774)  |  Writing (189)  |  Writings (6)

The individual, if left alone from birth would remain primitive and beast-like in his thoughts and feelings to a degree that we can hardly conceive. The individual is what he is and has the significance that he has not so much in virtue of his individuality, but rather as a member of a great human society, which directs his material and spiritual existence from the cradle to the grave.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Beast (55)  |  Beast-Like (2)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direct (225)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hardly (19)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Individual (404)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Leave (130)  |  Material (353)  |  Member (41)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Remain (349)  |  Significance (113)  |  Society (326)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Thought (953)  |  Virtue (109)

The language of analysis, most perfect of all, being in itself a powerful instrument of discoveries, its notations, especially when they are necessary and happily conceived, are so many germs of new calculi.
From Theorie Analytique des Probabilités (1812), 7. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 200. From the original French, “La langue de l’Analyse, la plus parfaite de toutes, étant par elle-même un puissant instrument de découvertes, ses notations, lorsqu’elles sont nécessaires et heureusement imaginées, sont autant de germes de nouveaux calculs.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Being (1278)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Germ (53)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  Notation (27)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Powerful (139)

The most important distinction between the two qualities [talent and genius] is this: one, in conception, follows mechanical processes; the other, vital. Talent feebly conceives objects with the senses and understanding; genius, fusing all its powers together in the alembic of an impassioned imagination, clutches every thing in the concrete, conceives objects as living realities, gives body to spiritual abstractions, and spirit to bodily appearances, and like
“A gate of steel
Fronting the sun, receives and renders back
His figure and his heat!”
In 'Genius', Wellman’s Miscellany (Dec 1871), 4, No. 6, 203. The quotation at the end is from Wiliam Shakespeare, Tr. & Cress. iii, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Alembic (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Back (390)  |  Body (537)  |  Clutch (2)  |  Conception (154)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Figure (160)  |  Follow (378)  |  Following (16)  |  Gate (32)  |  Genius (284)  |  Giving (11)  |  Heat (174)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Impassioned (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Living (491)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Process (423)  |  Reality (261)  |  Receive (114)  |  Render (93)  |  Sense (770)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Steel (21)  |  Sun (385)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vital (85)

The most remarkable discovery made by scientists is science itself. The discovery must be compared in importance with the invention of cave-painting and of writing. Like these earlier human creations, science is an attempt to control our surroundings by entering into them and understanding them from inside. And like them, science has surely made a critical step in human development which cannot be reversed. We cannot conceive a future society without science.
In Scientific American (Sep 1958). As cited in '50, 100 & 150 years ago', Scientific American (Sep 2008), 299, No. 3, 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Cave Painting (2)  |  Control (167)  |  Creation (327)  |  Critical (66)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Future (429)  |  Human (1468)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inside (26)  |  Invention (369)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Reversal (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Society (326)  |  Step (231)  |  Surely (101)  |  Surroundings (5)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Writing (189)

The object of pure mathematics is those relations which may be conceptually established among any conceived elements whatsoever by assuming them contained in some ordered manifold; the law of order of this manifold must be subject to our choice; the latter is the case in both of the only conceivable kinds of manifolds, in the discrete as well as in the continuous.
In Über das System der rein mathematischen Wissenschaften, Jahresbericht der Deutschen Mathematiker-Vereinigung, Bd. 1, 36. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (38)  |  Both (493)  |  Choice (110)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Concept (221)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Discrete (11)  |  Element (310)  |  Establish (57)  |  Kind (557)  |  Law (894)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Relation (157)  |  Subject (521)  |  Whatsoever (41)

The opinion of Bacon on this subject [geometry] was diametrically opposed to that of the ancient philosophers. He valued geometry chiefly, if not solely, on account of those uses, which to Plato appeared so base. And it is remarkable that the longer Bacon lived the stronger this feeling became. When in 1605 he wrote the two books on the Advancement of Learning, he dwelt on the advantages which mankind derived from mixed mathematics; but he at the same time admitted that the beneficial effect produced by mathematical study on the intellect, though a collateral advantage, was “no less worthy than that which was principal and intended.” But it is evident that his views underwent a change. When near twenty years later, he published the De Augmentis, which is the Treatise on the Advancement of Learning, greatly expanded and carefully corrected, he made important alterations in the part which related to mathematics. He condemned with severity the pretensions of the mathematicians, “delidas et faslum mathematicorum.” Assuming the well-being of the human race to be the end of knowledge, he pronounced that mathematical science could claim no higher rank than that of an appendage or an auxiliary to other sciences. Mathematical science, he says, is the handmaid of natural philosophy; she ought to demean herself as such; and he declares that he cannot conceive by what ill chance it has happened that she presumes to claim precedence over her mistress.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 395.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Admit (45)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alteration (30)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Appear (118)  |  Appendage (2)  |  Assume (38)  |  Auxiliary (11)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Base (117)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beneficial (13)  |  Book (392)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Chance (239)  |  Change (593)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Claim (146)  |  Collateral (4)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Correct (86)  |  De (3)  |  Declare (45)  |  Derive (65)  |  Diametrically (6)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Evident (91)  |  Expand (53)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Handmaid (6)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Important (209)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intend (16)  |  It Is Evident (5)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Late (118)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Less (103)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mistress (7)  |  Mix (19)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Oppose (24)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plato (76)  |  Precedence (4)  |  Presume (9)  |  Pretension (6)  |  Principal (63)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Pronounce (10)  |  Publish (36)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  Relate (21)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Severity (6)  |  Solely (9)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  View (488)  |  Well-Being (5)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what is in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence which at a given instant knew all the forces acting in nature and the position of every object in the universe—if endowed with a brain sufficiently vast to make all necessary calculations—could describe with a single formula the motions of the largest astronomical bodies and those of the smallest atoms. To such an intelligence, nothing would be uncertain; the future, like the past, would be an open book.
As quoted in The Fascination of Physics by Jacqueline D. Spears and Dean Zollman (1986). Alternate translation: “The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what is in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence which at a given instant comprehends all the relations of the entities of this universe, it could state the respective positions, motions, and general effects of all these entities at any time in the past or future.” In Harry Woolf, The Analytic spirit: essays in the history of science in honor of Henry Guerlac (1981), 91, the author states that “the language Laplace used was obviously borrowed from Concdorset, though now the words were reshuffled to express a new idea.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Book (392)  |  Brain (270)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Describe (128)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Force (487)  |  Formula (98)  |  Future (429)  |  Instant (45)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Largest (39)  |  Moment (253)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Open (274)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Single (353)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)

The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what it was in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence that at a given instant comprehends all the relations of the entities of this universe, it could state the respective position, motions, and general affects of all these entities at any time in the past or future. Physical astronomy, the branch of knowledge that does the greatest honor to the human mind, gives us an idea, albeit imperfect, of what such an intelligence would be. The simplicity of the law by which the celestial bodies move, and the relations of their masses and distances, permit analysis to follow their motions up to a certain point; and in order to determine the state of the system of these great bodies in past or future centuries, it suffices for the mathematician that their position and their velocity be given by observation for any moment in time. Man owes that advantage to the power of the instrument he employs, and to the small number of relations that it embraces in its calculations. But ignorance of the different causes involved in the production of events, as well as their complexity, taken together with the imperfection of analysis, prevents our reaching the same certainty about the vast majority of phenomena. Thus there are things that are uncertain for us, things more or less probable, and we seek to compensate for the impossibility of knowing them by determining their different degrees of likelihood. So it was that we owe to the weakness of the human mind one of the most delicate and ingenious of mathematical theories, the science of chance or probability.
'Recherches, 1º, sur l'Intégration des Équations Différentielles aux Différences Finies, et sur leur Usage dans la Théorie des Hasards' (1773, published 1776). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 8, 144-5, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Branch (150)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Degree (276)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Employ (113)  |  Event (216)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Follow (378)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Honor (54)  |  Honour (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Instant (45)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Involved (90)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  Majority (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Owe (71)  |  Past (337)  |  Permit (58)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Power (746)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Probability (130)  |  Production (183)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Weakness (48)

The prominent reason why a mathematician can be judged by none but mathematicians, is that he uses a peculiar language. The language of mathesis is special and untranslatable. In its simplest forms it can be translated, as, for instance, we say a right angle to mean a square corner. But you go a little higher in the science of mathematics, and it is impossible to dispense with a peculiar language. It would defy all the power of Mercury himself to explain to a person ignorant of the science what is meant by the single phrase “functional exponent.” How much more impossible, if we may say so, would it be to explain a whole treatise like Hamilton’s Quaternions, in such a wise as to make it possible to judge of its value! But to one who has learned this language, it is the most precise and clear of all modes of expression. It discloses the thought exactly as conceived by the writer, with more or less beauty of form, but never with obscurity. It may be prolix, as it often is among French writers; may delight in mere verbal metamorphoses, as in the Cambridge University of England; or adopt the briefest and clearest forms, as under the pens of the geometers of our Cambridge; but it always reveals to us precisely the writer’s thought.
In North American Review (Jul 1857), 85, 224-225.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adopt (19)  |  All (4108)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Brief (36)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Cambridge University (2)  |  Clear (100)  |  Corner (57)  |  Defy (11)  |  Delight (108)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Dispense (9)  |  England (40)  |  Exact (68)  |  Explain (322)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Expression (175)  |  Form (959)  |  French (20)  |  Function (228)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Hamilton_William (2)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Judge (108)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Language (20)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Metamorphose (2)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pen (20)  |  Person (363)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prolix (2)  |  Prominent (6)  |  Quaternion (9)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Right (452)  |  Right Angle (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Special (184)  |  Square (70)  |  Thought (953)  |  Translate (19)  |  Treatise (44)  |  University (121)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  Wise (131)  |  Writer (86)

The Reason of making Experiments is, for the Discovery of the Method of Nature, in its Progress and Operations. Whosoever, therefore doth rightly make Experiments, doth design to enquire into some of these Operations; and, in order thereunto, doth consider what Circumstances and Effects, in the Experiment, will be material and instructive in that Enquiry, whether for the confirming or destroying of any preconceived Notion, or for the Limitation and Bounding thereof, either to this or that Part of the Hypothesis, by allowing a greater Latitude and Extent to one Part, and by diminishing or restraining another Part within narrower Bounds than were at first imagin'd, or hypothetically supposed. The Method therefore of making Experiments by the Royal Society I conceive should be this.
First, To propound the Design and Aim of the Curator in his present Enquiry.
Secondly, To make the Experiment, or Experiments, leisurely, and with Care and Exactness.
Thirdly, To be diligent, accurate, and curious, in taking Notice of, and shewing to the Assembly of Spectators, such Circumstances and Effects therein occurring, as are material, or at least, as he conceives such, in order to his Theory .
Fourthly, After finishing the Experiment, to discourse, argue, defend, and further explain, such Circumstances and Effects in the preceding Experiments, as may seem dubious or difficult: And to propound what new Difficulties and Queries do occur, that require other Trials and Experiments to be made, in order to their clearing and answering: And farther, to raise such Axioms and Propositions, as are thereby plainly demonstrated and proved.
Fifthly, To register the whole Process of the Proposal, Design, Experiment, Success, or Failure; the Objections and Objectors, the Explanation and Explainers, the Proposals and Propounders of new and farther Trials; the Theories and Axioms, and their Authors; and, in a Word the history of every Thing and Person, that is material and circumstantial in the whole Entertainment of the said Society; which shall be prepared and made ready, fairly written in a bound Book, to be read at the Beginning of the Sitting of the Society: The next Day of their Meeting, then to be read over and further discoursed, augmented or diminished, as the Matter shall require, and then to be sign'd by a certain Number of the Persons present, who have been present, and Witnesses of all the said Proceedings, who, by Subscribing their names, will prove undoubted testimony to Posterity of the whole History.
'Dr Hooke's Method of Making Experiments' (1664-5). In W. Derham (ed.), Philosophical Experiments and Observations Of the Late Eminent Dr. Robert Hooke, F.R.S. And Geom. Prof. Gresh. and Other Eminent Virtuoso's in his Time (1726), 26-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Assembly (13)  |  Augment (12)  |  Author (167)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Book (392)  |  Bound (119)  |  Care (186)  |  Certain (550)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Consider (416)  |  Curious (91)  |  Design (195)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extent (139)  |  Failure (161)  |  Farther (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Greater (288)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Making (300)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Method (505)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Notice (77)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Objection (32)  |  Occur (150)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Present (619)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Prove (250)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Register (21)  |  Require (219)  |  Research (664)  |  Royal (57)  |  Royal Society (16)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Society (326)  |  Success (302)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trial (57)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

The result would inevitably be a state of universal rest and death, if the universe were finite and left to obey existing laws. But it is impossible to conceive a limit to the extent of matter in the universe; and therefore science points rather to an endless progress, through an endless space, of action involving the transformation of potential energy into palpable motion and thence into heat, than to a single finite mechanism, running down like a clock, and stopping for ever.
In 'On the Age of the Sun's Heat' (1862), Popular Lectures and Addresses (1891), Vol. 1, 349-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Clock (47)  |  Death (388)  |  Down (456)  |  Endless (56)  |  Energy (344)  |  Extent (139)  |  Finite (59)  |  Heat (174)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Motion (310)  |  Obey (40)  |  Palpable (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Potential (69)  |  Potential Energy (5)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Running (61)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Space (500)  |  State (491)  |  Through (849)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)

The strata of the earth are frequently very much bent, being raised in some places, and depressed in others, and this sometimes with a very quick ascent or descent; but as these ascents and descents, in a great measure, compensate one another, if we take a large extent of country together, we may look upon the whole set of strata, as lying nearly horizontally. What is very remarkable, however, in their situation, is, that from most, if not all, large tracts of high and mountainous countries, the strata lie in a situation more inclined to the horizon, than the country itself, the mountainous countries being generally, if not always, formed out of the lower strata of earth. This situation of the strata may be not unaptly represented in the following manner. Let a number of leaves of paper, of several different sorts or colours, be pasted upon one another; then bending them up together into a ridge in the middle, conceive them to be reduced again to a level surface, by a plane so passing through them, as to cut off all the part that had been raised; let the middle now be again raised a little, and this will be a good general representation of most, if not of all, large tracts of mountainous countries, together with the parts adjacent, throughout the whole world.
'Conjectures Concerning the Cause, and Observations upon the Phenomena of Earthquakes', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London (1760), 51, 584-5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Country (251)  |  Cut (114)  |  Descent (27)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Extent (139)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Large (394)  |  Lie (364)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Lying (55)  |  Measure (232)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Passing (76)  |  Past (337)  |  Represent (155)  |  Representation (53)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Set (394)  |  Situation (113)  |  Strata (35)  |  Surface (209)  |  Through (849)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Together (387)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The student of mathematics often finds it hard to throw off the uncomfortable feeling that his science, in the person of his pencil, surpasses him in intelligence,—an impression which the great Euler confessed he often could not get rid of. This feeling finds a sort of justification when we reflect that the majority of the ideas we deal with were conceived by others, often centuries ago. In a great measure it is really the intelligence of other people that confronts us in science.
In Popular Scientific Lectures (1910), 196.
Science quotes on:  |  Century (310)  |  Confess (42)  |  Confront (17)  |  Deal (188)  |  Leonhard Euler (35)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Find (998)  |  Get Rid (4)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Idea (843)  |  Impression (114)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Justification (48)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pencil (20)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Really (78)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sort (49)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Surpass (32)  |  Throw (43)  |  Uncomfortable (6)

The theory of punctuated equilibrium, proposed by Niles Eldredge and myself, is not, as so often misunderstood, a radical claim for truly sudden change, but a recognition that ordinary processes of speciation, properly conceived as glacially slow by the standard of our own life-span, do not resolve into geological time as long sequences of insensibly graded intermediates (the traditional, or gradualistic, view), but as geologically ‘sudden’ origins at single bedding planes.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bed (23)  |  Change (593)  |  Claim (146)  |  Do (1908)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Geological (11)  |  Grade (11)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Misunderstand (4)  |  Myself (212)  |  Often (106)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Origin (239)  |  Plane (20)  |  Process (423)  |  Properly (20)  |  Propose (23)  |  Punctuated Equilibrium (2)  |  Radical (25)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Single (353)  |  Slow (101)  |  Standard (57)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Truly (116)  |  View (488)

The truth is that other systems of geometry are possible, yet after all, these other systems are not spaces but other methods of space measurements. There is one space only, though we may conceive of many different manifolds, which are contrivances or ideal constructions invented for the purpose of determining space.
In Science (1903), 18, 106. In Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica (1914), 352.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Construction (112)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Invention (369)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Space (500)  |  System (537)  |  Truth (1057)

Then if the first argument remains secure (for nobody will produce a neater one, than the length of the periodic time is a measure of the size of the spheres), the order of the orbits follows this sequence, beginning from the highest: The first and highest of all is the sphere of the fixed stars, which contains itself and all things, and is therefore motionless. It is the location of the universe, to which the motion and position of all the remaining stars is referred. For though some consider that it also changes in some respect, we shall assign another cause for its appearing to do so in our deduction of the Earth's motion. There follows Saturn, the first of the wandering stars, which completes its circuit in thirty years. After it comes Jupiter which moves in a twelve-year long revolution. Next is Mars, which goes round biennially. An annual revolution holds the fourth place, in which as we have said is contained the Earth along with the lunar sphere which is like an epicycle. In fifth place Venus returns every nine months. Lastly, Mercury holds the sixth place, making a circuit in the space of eighty days. In the middle of all is the seat of the Sun. For who in this most beautiful of temples would put this lamp in any other or better place than the one from which it can illuminate everything at the same time? Aptly indeed is he named by some the lantern of the universe, by others the mind, by others the ruler. Trismegistus called him the visible God, Sophocles' Electra, the watcher over all things. Thus indeed the Sun as if seated on a royal throne governs his household of Stars as they circle around him. Earth also is by no means cheated of the Moon's attendance, but as Aristotle says in his book On Animals the Moon has the closest affinity with the Earth. Meanwhile the Earth conceives from the Sun, and is made pregnant with annual offspring. We find, then, in this arrangement the marvellous symmetry of the universe, and a sure linking together in harmony of the motion and size of the spheres, such as could be perceived in no other way. For here one may understand, by attentive observation, why Jupiter appears to have a larger progression and retrogression than Saturn, and smaller than Mars, and again why Venus has larger ones than Mercury; why such a doubling back appears more frequently in Saturn than in Jupiter, and still more rarely in Mars and Venus than in Mercury; and furthermore why Saturn, Jupiter and Mars are nearer to the Earth when in opposition than in the region of their occultation by the Sun and re-appearance. Indeed Mars in particular at the time when it is visible throughout the night seems to equal Jupiter in size, though marked out by its reddish colour; yet it is scarcely distinguishable among stars of the second magnitude, though recognized by those who track it with careful attention. All these phenomena proceed from the same course, which lies in the motion of the Earth. But the fact that none of these phenomena appears in the fixed stars shows their immense elevation, which makes even the circle of their annual motion, or apparent motion, vanish from our eyes.
'Book One. Chapter X. The Order of the Heavenly Spheres', in Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), trans. A. M. Duncan (1976), 49-51.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Affinity (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Argument (138)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Back (390)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Cheat (13)  |  Circle (110)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Complete (204)  |  Consider (416)  |  Course (409)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Everything (476)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  God (757)  |  Govern (64)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Immense (86)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Lantern (8)  |  Lie (364)  |  Linking (8)  |  Location (15)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Making (300)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mars (44)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Month (88)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Next (236)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Observation (555)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Progression (23)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Respect (207)  |  Retrogression (6)  |  Return (124)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Royal (57)  |  Ruler (21)  |  Saturn (13)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Show (346)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Space (500)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Temple (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Track (38)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Venus (20)  |  Visible (84)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

There is, I conceive, no contradiction in believing that mind is at once the cause of matter and of the development of individualised human minds through the agency of matter. And when, further on, [Mr Frederick F. Cook] asks, ‘Does mortality give consciousness to spirit, or does spirit give consciousness for a limited period to mortality?’ I would reply, ‘Neither the one nor the other; but, mortality is the means by which a permanent individuality is given to spirit.’
In 'Harmony of Spiritualism and Science', Light (1885), 5, 352.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cause (541)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Development (422)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Other (2236)  |  Period (198)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Reply (56)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Through (849)

There really are not any spheres in the heavens ... Those which have been devised by the experts to save the appearances exist only in the imagination, for the purpose of enabling the mind to conceive the motion which the heavenly bodies trace in their course and, by the aid of geometry, to determine the motion numerically through the use of arithmetic.
J. L. E. Dreyer (ed.), Opera Omnia (1913-29), Vol. 4, 222. Trans. Edward Rosen, 'Nicholas Copernicus', in Charles C. Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1971), Vol. 3, 409.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Course (409)  |  Determine (144)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expert (65)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Planet (356)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Save (118)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  Use (766)

Therefore the solid body of the earth is reasonably considered as being the largest relative to those moving against it and as remaining unmoved in any direction by the force of the very small weights, and as it were absorbing their fall. And if it had some one common movement, the same as that of the other weights, it would clearly leave them all behind because of its much greater magnitude. And the animals and other weights would be left hanging in the air, and the earth would very quickly fallout of the heavens. Merely to conceive such things makes them appear ridiculous.
Ptolemy
'The Almagest 1', in Ptolemy: the Almagest; Nicolaus Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres; Johannes Kepler: Epitome of Copernican Astronomy: IV - V The Harmonies of the World: V, trans. R. Catesby Taliaferro (1952), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Behind (137)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Common (436)  |  Consider (416)  |  Direction (175)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fall (230)  |  Force (487)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Greater (288)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Largest (39)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Merely (316)  |  Movement (155)  |  Other (2236)  |  Remaining (45)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Small (477)  |  Solid (116)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Weight (134)

These Disciplines [mathematics] serve to inure and corroborate the Mind to a constant Diligence in Study; to undergo the Trouble of an attentive Meditation, and cheerfully contend with such Difficulties as lie in the Way. They wholly deliver us from a credulous Simplicity, most strongly fortify us against the Vanity of Scepticism, effectually restrain from a rash Presumption, most easily incline us to a due Assent, perfectly subject us to the Government of right Reason, and inspire us with Resolution to wrestle against the unjust Tyranny of false Prejudices. If the Fancy be unstable and fluctuating, it is to be poized by this Ballast, and steadied by this Anchor, if the Wit be blunt it is sharpened upon this Whetstone; if luxuriant it is pared by this Knife; if headstrong it is restrained by this Bridle; and if dull it is rouzed by this Spur. The Steps are guided by no Lamp more clearly through the dark Mazes of Nature, by no Thread more surely through the intricate Labyrinths of Philosophy, nor lastly is the Bottom of Truth sounded more happily by any other Line. I will not mention how plentiful a Stock of Knowledge the Mind is furnished from these, with what wholesome Food it is nourished, and what sincere Pleasure it enjoys. But if I speak farther, I shall neither be the only Person, nor the first, who affirms it; that while the Mind is abstracted and elevated from sensible Matter, distinctly views pure Forms, conceives the Beauty of Ideas, and investigates the Harmony of Proportions; the Manners themselves are sensibly corrected and improved, the Affections composed and rectified, the Fancy calmed and settled, and the Understanding raised and excited to more divine Contemplations. All which I might defend by Authority, and confirm by the Suffrages of the greatest Philosophers.
Prefatory Oration in Mathematical Lectures (1734), xxxi.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Affection (43)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Anchor (10)  |  Assent (12)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Authority (95)  |  Ballast (2)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Calm (31)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Divine (112)  |  Due (141)  |  Dull (54)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Farther (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortify (4)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Government (110)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Knife (23)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labyrinth (10)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Maze (10)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mention (82)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Presumption (15)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rash (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rectified (4)  |  Resolution (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Settled (34)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spur (4)  |  Step (231)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suffrage (4)  |  Surely (101)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thread (32)  |  Through (849)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Tyranny (14)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Vanity (19)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whetstone (2)  |  Wholesome (12)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wit (59)

This whole theory of electrostatics constitutes a group of abstract ideas and general propositions, formulated in the clear and precise language of geometry and algebra, and connected with one another by the rules of strict logic. This whole fully satisfies the reason of a French physicist and his taste for clarity, simplicity and order. The same does not hold for the Englishman. These abstract notions of material points, force, line of force, and equipotential surface do not satisfy his need to imagine concrete, material, visible, and tangible things. 'So long as we cling to this mode of representation,' says an English physicist, 'we cannot form a mental representation of the phenomena which are really happening.' It is to satisfy the need that he goes and creates a model.
The French or German physicist conceives, in the space separating two conductors, abstract lines of force having no thickness or real existence; the English physicist materializes these lines and thickens them to the dimensions of a tube which he will fill with vulcanised rubber. In place of a family of lines of ideal forces, conceivable only by reason, he will have a bundle of elastic strings, visible and tangible, firmly glued at both ends to the surfaces of the two conductors, and, when stretched, trying both to contact and to expand. When the two conductors approach each other, he sees the elastic strings drawing closer together; then he sees each of them bunch up and grow large. Such is the famous model of electrostatic action imagined by Faraday and admired as a work of genius by Maxwell and the whole English school.
The employment of similar mechanical models, recalling by certain more or less rough analogies the particular features of the theory being expounded, is a regular feature of the English treatises on physics. Here is a book* [by Oliver Lodge] intended to expound the modern theories of electricity and to expound a new theory. In it are nothing but strings which move around pulleys, which roll around drums, which go through pearl beads, which carry weights; and tubes which pump water while others swell and contract; toothed wheels which are geared to one another and engage hooks. We thought we were entering the tranquil and neatly ordered abode of reason, but we find ourselves in a factory.
*Footnote: O. Lodge, Les Théories Modernes (Modern Views on Electricity) (1889), 16.
The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory (1906), 2nd edition (1914), trans. Philip P. Wiener (1954), 70-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Action (327)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Approach (108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Clarity (47)  |  Closer (43)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Conductor (16)  |  Connect (125)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Contact (65)  |  Create (235)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Drum (8)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrostatic (7)  |  Electrostatics (6)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Engage (39)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expand (53)  |  Factory (20)  |  Family (94)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Geometry (255)  |  German (36)  |  Grow (238)  |  Happening (58)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Language (293)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge (13)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Materialize (2)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (87)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mental (177)  |  Model (102)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Precise (68)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regular (46)  |  Representation (53)  |  Roll (40)  |  Rubber (9)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Taste (90)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Tooth (29)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Water (481)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

To pick a hole–say in the 2nd law of Ωcs, that if two things are in contact the hotter cannot take heat from the colder without external agency.
Now let A & B be two vessels divided by a diaphragm and let them contain elastic molecules in a state of agitation which strike each other and the sides. Let the number of particles be equal in A & B but let those in A have equal velocities, if oblique collisions occur between them their velocities will become unequal & I have shown that there will be velocities of all magnitudes in A and the same in B only the sum of the squares of the velocities is greater in A than in B.
When a molecule is reflected from the fixed diaphragm CD no work is lost or gained.
If the molecule instead of being reflected were allowed to go through a hole in CD no work would be lost or gained, only its energy would be transferred from the one vessel to the other.
Now conceive a finite being who knows the paths and velocities of all the molecules by simple inspection but who can do no work, except to open and close a hole in the diaphragm, by means of a slide without mass.
Let him first observe the molecules in A and when lie sees one coming the square of whose velocity is less than the mean sq. vel. of the molecules in B let him open a hole & let it go into B. Next let him watch for a molecule in B the square of whose velocity is greater than the mean sq. vel. in A and when it comes to the hole let him draw and slide & let it go into A, keeping the slide shut for all other molecules.
Then the number of molecules in A & B are the same as at first but the energy in A is increased and that in B diminished that is the hot system has got hotter and the cold colder & yet no work has been done, only the intelligence of a very observant and neat fingered being has been employed. Or in short if heat is the motion of finite portions of matter and if we can apply tools to such portions of matter so as to deal with them separately then we can take advantage of the different motion of different portions to restore a uniformly hot system to unequal temperatures or to motions of large masses. Only we can't, not being clever enough.
Letter to Peter Guthrie Tait (11 Dec 1867). In P. M. Harman (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 331-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Agitation (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Apply (160)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Clever (38)  |  Cold (112)  |  Collision (15)  |  Coming (114)  |  Contact (65)  |  Deal (188)  |  Different (577)  |  Divided (50)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Employ (113)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enough (340)  |  Finite (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Greater (288)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hot (60)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Maxwell’s Demon (2)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Motion (310)  |  Next (236)  |  Number (699)  |  Observe (168)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Path (144)  |  Portion (84)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Short (197)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Simple (406)  |  Square (70)  |  State (491)  |  Strike (68)  |  Sum (102)  |  System (537)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Tool (117)  |  Two (937)  |  Unequal (12)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Watch (109)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

True physics was founded the day when Galileo, rejecting fruitless speculations, conceived the idea … of defining the general form to give to experiments, by assigning for their immediate purpose the measure of all that can be measurable in natural phenomena.
From the original French, “La vraie physique a été fondée le jour où Galilée, rejetant des spéculations depuis si longtemps stériles, a conçu l’idée … de préciser la forme générale à donner aux expériences, en leur assignant pour objet immédiat la mesure de tout ce qui peut être mesurable dans les phénomènes naturels,” in De l’origine et des limites de la correspondance entre l’algèbre et la géométrie (1847), 375. English version by Webmaster using Google translate. This may be the basis of Thomas-Henri Martin describing Galileo’s experimental method , often translated as Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so, from the original French in Galilée: Les droits de la science et la méthode des sciences physiques (1868), 289. Note that in both cases, the words were narrative by the authors, not quoting actual words by Galileo. What the authors wrote was in their own words, and should not be attributed to Galileo with quotation marks.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Define (49)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Form (959)  |  Founded (20)  |  Fruitless (8)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  General (511)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Measure (232)  |  Natural (796)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reject (63)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Speculation (126)  |  True (212)

We are told that “Mathematics is that study which knows nothing of observation, nothing of experiment, nothing of induction, nothing of causation.” I think no statement could have been made more opposite to the facts of the case; that mathematical analysis is constantly invoking the aid of new principles, new ideas, and new methods, not capable of being defined by any form of words, but springing direct from the inherent powers and activities of the human mind, and from continually renewed introspection of that inner world of thought of which the phenomena are as varied and require as close attention to discern as those of the outer physical world (to which the inner one in each individual man may, I think, be conceived to stand somewhat in the same relation of correspondence as a shadow to the object from which it is projected, or as the hollow palm of one hand to the closed fist which it grasps of the other), that it is unceasingly calling forth the faculties of observation and comparison, that one of its principal weapons is induction, that it has frequent recourse to experimental trial and verification, and that it affords a boundless scope for the exercise of the highest efforts of the imagination and invention.
In Presidential Address to British Association, Exeter British Association Report (1869), pp. 1-9, in Collected Mathematical Papers, Vol. 2, 654.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Afford (17)  |  Aid (97)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Capable (168)  |  Case (99)  |  Causation (14)  |  Close (69)  |  Closed (38)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Continually (16)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Define (49)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discern (33)  |  Effort (227)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fist (3)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hand (143)  |  High (362)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Individual (404)  |  Induction (77)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Inner (71)  |  Introspection (5)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outer (13)  |  Palm (5)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical World (28)  |  Power (746)  |  Principal (63)  |  Principle (507)  |  Project (73)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Relation (157)  |  Renew (19)  |  Require (219)  |  Same (157)  |  Scope (45)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stand (274)  |  Statement (142)  |  Study (653)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trial (57)  |  Unceasingly (2)  |  Vary (27)  |  Verification (31)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

We cannot conceive how the Foetus is form'd in the Womb, nor as much as how a Plant springs from the Earth we tread on ... And if we are ignorant of the most obvious things about us, and the most considerable within our selves, 'tis then no wonder that we know not the constitution and powers of the creatures, to whom we are such strangers.
Saducismus Triumphatus or Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions (1689),72-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Considerable (75)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Form (959)  |  Growth (187)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Spring (133)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tread (17)  |  Womb (24)  |  Wonder (236)

We inhabit a dead ember swimming wide in the blank of space, dizzily spinning as it swims, and lighted up from several million miles away by a more horrible hell-fire than was ever conceived by the theological imagination. Yet the dead ember is a green, commodious dwelling-place; and the reverberation of this hell-fire ripens flower and fruit and mildly warms us on summer eves upon the lawn.
In Lay Morals, collected in Works: Letters and Miscellanies of Robert Louis Stevenson: Sketches, Criticism, Etc. (1898) Vol. 22, 552.
Science quotes on:  |  Blank (11)  |  Dead (59)  |  Dizzy (4)  |  Dwelling (11)  |  Ember (2)  |  Eve (4)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flower (106)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Green (63)  |  Horrible (10)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inhabit (16)  |  Lawn (5)  |  Light (607)  |  Mildly (2)  |  Mile (39)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Ripen (4)  |  Space (500)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Summer (54)  |  Swim (30)  |  Swimming (17)  |  Theological (2)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wide (96)

What can you conceive more silly and extravagant than to suppose a man racking his brains, and studying night and day how to fly? ... wearying himself with climbing upon every ascent, ... bruising himself with continual falls, and at last breaking his neck? And all this, from an imagination that it would be glorious to have the eyes of people looking up at him, and mighty happy to eat, and drink, and sleep, at the top of the highest trees in the kingdom.
In A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life (1732), 168. This was written before Montgolfier brothers, pioneer balloonists, were born.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  All (4108)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Brain (270)  |  Break (99)  |  Climb (35)  |  Continual (43)  |  Day (42)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fall (230)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Glory (58)  |  Happy (105)  |  Highest (18)  |  Himself (461)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Last (426)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Neck (15)  |  Night (120)  |  People (1005)  |  Silly (17)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Top (96)  |  Tree (246)

What is possible can never be demonstrated to be false; and 'tis possible the course of nature may change, since we can conceive such a change. Nay, I will go farther, and assert, that he could not so much as prove by any probable arguments, that the future must be conformable to the past. All probable arguments are built on the supposition, that there is this conformity betwixt the future and the past, and therefore can never prove it. This conformity is a matter of fact, and if it must be proved, will admit of no proof but from experience. But our experience in the past can be a proof of nothing for the future, but upon a supposition, that there is a resemblance betwixt them. This therefore is a point, which can admit of no proof at all, and which we take for granted without any proof.
An Abstract of A Treatise on Human Nature (1740), ed. John Maynard Keynes and Piero Sraffa (1938), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Assert (66)  |  Change (593)  |  Conformity (14)  |  Course (409)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  False (100)  |  Farther (51)  |  Future (429)  |  Grant (73)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Past (337)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Will (2355)

Whatever is Natural doth by that appear, adorned with all imaginable Elegance and Beauty. There are such inimitable gildings and embroideries in the smallest seeds of Plants, but especially in the parts of Animals, in the head or eye of a small Fly: such accurate order and symmetry in the frame of the most minute creatures, a Lowse or a Mite, as no man were able to conceive without seeing of them. Whereas the most curious works of Art, the sharpest finest Needle, doth appear as a blunt rough bar of iron, coming from the furnace or the forge. The most accurate engravings or embossments, seem such rude bungling deformed works, as if they had been done with a Mattock or a Trowel.
In Of the Principles and Duties of Natural Religion (1675), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Adornment (4)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Art (657)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Coming (114)  |  Creature (233)  |  Curious (91)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Embroidery (2)  |  Engraving (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fly (146)  |  Forge (9)  |  Inimitable (6)  |  Iron (96)  |  Louse (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mattock (2)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Minute (125)  |  Mite (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Order (632)  |  Plant (294)  |  Seed (93)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Small (477)  |  Symmetry (43)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)

When the boy begins to understand that the visible point is preceded by an invisible point, that the shortest distance between two points is conceived as a straight line before it is ever drawn with the pencil on paper, he experiences a feeling of pride, of satisfaction. And justly so, for the fountain of all thought has been opened to him, the difference between the ideal and the real, potentia et actu, has become clear to him; henceforth the philosopher can reveal him nothing new, as a geometrician he has discovered the basis of all thought.
In Sprüche in Reimen. Sprüche in Prosa. Ethisches (1850), Vol. 3, 214. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 67. From the original German, “Wenn der knabe zu begreifen anfängt, daß einem sichtbaren Punkte ein unsichtbarer vorhergehen müsse, daß der nächste Weg zwischen zwei Punkten schon als Linie gedacht werde, ehe sie mit dem Bleistift aufs Papier gezogen wird, so fühlt er einen gewissen Stolz, ein Behagen. Und nicht mit Unrecht; denn ihm ist die Quelle alles Denkens aufgeschlossen, Idee und Verwirklichtes, potentia et actu, ist ihm klargeworden; der Philosoph entdeckt ihm nichts Neues; dem Geometer war von seiner Seite der Grund alles Denkens aufgegangen.” The Latin phrase, “potentia et actu” means “potentiality and actuality”.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Boy (94)  |  Clear (100)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distance (161)  |  Draw (137)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Justly (6)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Point (580)  |  Potentia (3)  |  Precede (23)  |  Pride (78)  |  Real (149)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Shortest Distance (2)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Visible (84)

When the most abstract and “useless” disciplines have been cultivated for a time, they are often seized upon as practical tools by other departments of science. I conceive that this is no accident, as if one bought a top hat for a wedding, and discovered later when a fire broke out, that it could be used as a water bucket.
In James R. Newman (ed.), 'Commentary on The Use of a Top Hat as a Water Bucket', The World of Mathematics (1956), Vol.4, 2051.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Accident (88)  |  Bucket (4)  |  Buy (20)  |  Conceiving (3)  |  Cultivated (7)  |  Department (92)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Fire (189)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Practical (200)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seized (2)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tool (117)  |  Top (96)  |  Useless (33)  |  Water (481)  |  Wedding (7)

When we survey our lives and endeavours we soon observe that almost the whole of our actions and desires are bound up with the existence of other human beings. We see that our whole nature resembles that of the social animals. We eat food that others have grown, wear clothes that others have made, live in houses that others have built. The greater part of our knowledge and beliefs has been communicated to us by other people through the medium of a language which others have created. Without language our mental capacities would be poor indeed, comparable to those of the higher animals; we have, therefore, to admit that we owe our principal advantage over the beasts to the fact of living in human society. The individual, if left alone from birth would remain primitive and beast-like in his thoughts and feelings to a degree that we can hardly conceive. The individual is what he is and has the significance that he has not so much in virtue of his individuality, but rather as a member of a great human society, which directs his material and spiritual existence from the cradle to the grave.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Admit (45)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Beast (55)  |  Beast-Like (2)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bind (25)  |  Birth (147)  |  Bound (119)  |  Build (204)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Clothes (9)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Comparable (6)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Create (235)  |  Degree (276)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direct (225)  |  Eat (104)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Food (199)  |  Grave (52)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hardly (19)  |  High (362)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Human Society (13)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Language (293)  |  Leave (130)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Material (353)  |  Medium (12)  |  Member (41)  |  Mental (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Owe (71)  |  Part (222)  |  People (1005)  |  Poor (136)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Principal (63)  |  Remain (349)  |  Resemble (63)  |  See (1081)  |  Significance (113)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Survey (33)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wear (18)  |  Whole (738)

While religion prescribes brotherly love in the relations among the individuals and groups, the actual spectacle more resembles a battlefield than an orchestra. Everywhere, in economic as well as in political life, the guiding principle is one of ruthless striving for success at the expense of one’s fellow men. This competitive spirit prevails even in school and, destroying all feelings of human fraternity and cooperation, conceives of achievement not as derived from the love for productive and thoughtful work, but as springing from personal ambition and fear of rejection.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Ambition (43)  |  Battlefield (9)  |  Brotherly (2)  |  Competitive (8)  |  Cooperation (32)  |  Derive (65)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Economic (81)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Expense (16)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Fraternity (4)  |  Group (78)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Individual (404)  |  Life (1795)  |  Love (309)  |  More (2559)  |  Orchestra (2)  |  Personal (67)  |  Political (121)  |  Prescribe (10)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Principle (507)  |  Productive (32)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Relation (157)  |  Religion (361)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Ruthless (10)  |  School (219)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spring (133)  |  Strive (46)  |  Success (302)  |  Thoughtful (15)  |  Work (1351)

[Allowing embryonic stem cell research] … is also likely to lead to human cloning and the harvesting of body parts from babies conceived for this purpose.
An example of extreme prolife religious conservative opposition confusing public opinion.
Statement released 15 Jun 2004 from Focus on the Family organisation which he founded. Quoted in Eve Herold, George Daley, Stem Cell Wars (2007), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Allow (45)  |  Baby (28)  |  Body (537)  |  Clon (3)  |  Cloning (8)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Conservative (15)  |  Embryonic (6)  |  Example (94)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Human (1468)  |  Lead (384)  |  Likely (34)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Part (222)  |  Prolife (2)  |  Public (96)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Religious (126)  |  Research (664)  |  Stem (31)  |  Stem Cell (11)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.