Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index M > Category: Music

Music Quotes (66 quotes)

Question: If you walk on a dry path between two walls a few feet apart, you hear a musical note or “ring” at each footstep. Whence comes this?
Answer: This is similar to phosphorescent paint. Once any sound gets between two parallel reflectors or walls, it bounds from one to the other and never stops for a long time. Hence it is persistent, and when you walk between the walls you hear the sounds made by those who walked there before you. By following a muffin man down the passage within a short time you can hear most distinctly a musical note, or, as it is more properly termed in the question, a “ring” at every (other) step.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 175-6, Question 2. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Before (6)  |  Bound (12)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Dry (12)  |  Examination (60)  |  Following (16)  |  Footstep (5)  |  Howler (15)  |  Long (95)  |  Man (345)  |  Note (22)  |  Paint (17)  |  Parallel (16)  |  Passage (14)  |  Path (59)  |  Persistence (16)  |  Question (315)  |  Reflector (3)  |  Short (31)  |  Similarity (17)  |  Sound (59)  |  Stop (56)  |  Term (87)  |  Time (439)  |  Walk (56)  |  Wall (20)

[At a musical concert:]
...the music's pure algebra of enchantment.
In Louis Untermeyer, Modern American Poetry (1962), 430.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (36)  |  Enchantment (8)

A fateful process is set in motion when the individual is released “to the freedom of his own impotence” and left to justify his existence by his own efforts. The autonomous individual, striving to realize himself and prove his worth, has created all that is great in literature, art, music, science and technology. The autonomous individual, also, when he can neither realize himself nor justify his existence by his own efforts, is a breeding call of frustration, and the seed of the convulsions which shake our world to its foundations.
In The Passionate State of Mind (1955), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Autonomous (3)  |  Breed (18)  |  Call (68)  |  Convulsion (5)  |  Create (98)  |  Effort (94)  |  Existence (254)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Frustration (9)  |  Great (300)  |  Impotence (6)  |  Individual (177)  |  Justify (19)  |  Leave (63)  |  Literature (64)  |  Motion (127)  |  Process (201)  |  Prove (60)  |  Realize (43)  |  Release (15)  |  Science And Technology (20)  |  Seed (52)  |  Set (56)  |  Shake (19)  |  Strive (35)  |  World (667)  |  Worth (74)

A large number of areas of the brain are involved when viewing equations, but when one looks at a formula rated as beautiful it activates the emotional brain—the medial orbito-frontal cortex—like looking at a great painting or listening to a piece of music. … Neuroscience can’t tell you what beauty is, but if you find it beautiful the medial orbito-frontal cortex is likely to be involved; you can find beauty in anything.
As quoted in James Gallagher, 'Mathematics: Why The Brain Sees Maths As Beauty,' BBC News (13 Feb 2014), on bbc.co.uk web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Brain (181)  |  Cortex (3)  |  Emotional (13)  |  Equation (69)  |  Formula (51)  |  Listen (26)  |  Neuroscience (3)  |  Painting (24)  |  View (115)

A work of genius is something like the pie in the nursery song, in which the four and twenty blackbirds are baked. When the pie is opened, the birds begin to sing. Hereupon three fourths of the company run away in a fright; and then after a time, feeling ashamed, they would fain excuse themselves by declaring, the pie stank so, they could not sit near it. Those who stay behind, the men of taste and epicures, say one to another, We came here to eat. What business have birds, after they have been baked, to be alive and singing? This will never do. We must put a stop to so dangerous an innovation: for who will send a pie to an oven, if the birds come to life there? We must stand up to defend the rights of all the ovens in England. Let us have dead birds..dead birds for our money. So each sticks his fork into a bird, and hacks and mangles it a while, and then holds it up and cries, Who will dare assert that there is any music in this bird’s song?
Co-author with his brother Augustus William Hare Guesses At Truth, By Two Brothers: Second Edition: With Large Additions (1848), Second Series, 86. (The volume is introduced as “more than three fourths new.” This quote is identified as by Julius; Augustus had died in 1833.)
Science quotes on:  |  Ashamed (2)  |  Assertion (23)  |  Baking (2)  |  Bird (96)  |  Blackbird (2)  |  Business (71)  |  Cry (13)  |  Dangerous (45)  |  Dare (22)  |  Death (270)  |  Defend (20)  |  Eating (21)  |  England (31)  |  Excuse (15)  |  Fork (2)  |  Fright (4)  |  Genius (186)  |  Hacking (2)  |  Holding (3)  |  Innovation (38)  |  Life (917)  |  Money (125)  |  Nursery (3)  |  Opening (15)  |  Oven (3)  |  Pie (3)  |  Right (144)  |  Run (33)  |  French Saying (61)  |  Sing (9)  |  Song (18)  |  Standing (11)  |  Stink (5)  |  Stop (56)  |  Taste (35)  |  Themself (3)

Again, it [the Analytical Engine] might act upon other things besides number, were objects found whose mutual fundamental relations could be expressed by those of the abstract science of operations, and which should be also susceptible of adaptations to the action of the operating notation and mechanism of the engine. Supposing for instance, that the fundamental relations of pitched sounds in the science of harmony and of musical composition were susceptible of such expression and adaptations, the engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent.
In Richard Taylor (ed.), 'Translator’s Notes to M. Menabrea’s Memoir', Scientific Memoirs, Selected from the Transactions of Foreign Academies and Learned Societies and from Foreign Journals (1843), 3, Note A, 694. Her notes were appended to L.F. Menabrea, of Turin, Officer of the Military Engineers, 'Article XXIX: Sketch of the Analytical Engine invented by Charles Babbage Esq.', Bibliothèque Universelle de Gnve (Oct 1842), No. 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Action (151)  |  Adaptation (40)  |  Analytical Engine (5)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Composition (52)  |  Elaborate (13)  |  Expression (82)  |  Extent (30)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Mutual (22)  |  Notation (9)  |  Number (179)  |  Object (110)  |  Operation (96)  |  Pitch (7)  |  Relation (96)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sound (59)  |  Supposing (3)  |  Susceptible (3)

Away, away, from men and towns,
To the wild wood and the downs,—
To the silent wilderness,
Where the soul need not repress
Its music.
Poem, 'The Invitation' (1822), collected in The Poetical Works (1844), 306.
Science quotes on:  |  Down (44)  |  Men (17)  |  Repression (2)  |  Silent (18)  |  Soul (139)  |  Town (18)  |  Wild (39)  |  Wilderness (28)  |  Wood (33)

Even today a good many distinguished minds seem unable to accept or even to understand that from a source of noise natural selection alone and unaided could have drawn all the music of the biosphere. In effect natural selection operates upon the products of chance and can feed nowhere else; but it operates in a domain of very demanding conditions, and from this domain chance is barred. It is not to chance but to these conditions that eveloution owes its generally progressive cource, its successive conquests, and the impresssion it gives of a smooth and steady unfolding.
In Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1971), 118-119.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Ban (9)  |  Biosphere (10)  |  Chance (122)  |  Condition (119)  |  Mind (544)  |  Natural Selection (79)  |  Noise (24)  |  Nourishment (16)  |  Understanding (317)

For many parts of Nature can neither be invented with sufficient subtlety, nor demonstrated with sufficient perspicuity, nor accommodated unto use with sufficient dexterity, without the aid and intervening of the mathematics, of which sort are perspective, music, astronomy, cosmography, architecture, engineery, and divers others.
The Advancement of Learning (1605), Book 2. Reprinted in The Two Books of Francis Bacon: Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human (2009), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodation (5)  |  Aid (23)  |  Architecture (35)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Cosmography (2)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Dexterity (4)  |  Diversity (46)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Intervention (8)  |  Invention (283)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Perspective (15)  |  Subtlety (9)  |  Sufficiency (13)

Fractals are patterns which occur on many levels. This concept can be applied to any musical parameter. I make melodic fractals, where the pitches of a theme I dream up are used to determine a melodic shape on several levels, in space and time. I make rhythmic fractals, where a set of durations associated with a motive get stretched and compressed and maybe layered on top of each other. I make loudness fractals, where the characteristic loudness of a sound, its envelope shape, is found on several time scales. I even make fractals with the form of a piece, its instrumentation, density, range, and so on. Here I’ve separated the parameters of music, but in a real piece, all of these things are combined, so you might call it a fractal of fractals.
Interview (1999) on The Discovery Channel. As quoted by Benoit B. Manelbrot and Richard Hudson in The (Mis)Behaviour of Markets: A Fractal View of Risk, Ruin and Reward (2010), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (15)  |  Associated (2)  |  Call (68)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Combined (3)  |  Compressed (3)  |  Concept (102)  |  Density (11)  |  Determine (45)  |  Dream (92)  |  Duration (9)  |  Envelope (5)  |  Form (210)  |  Fractal (9)  |  Instrumentation (3)  |  Level (51)  |  Loudness (3)  |  Motive (26)  |  Musical (3)  |  Occur (26)  |  Parameter (2)  |  Pattern (56)  |  Piece (32)  |  Pitch (7)  |  Range (38)  |  Real (95)  |  Rhythmic (2)  |  Scale (49)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Separate (46)  |  Set (56)  |  Shape (52)  |  Sound (59)  |  Theme (8)  |  Thing (37)  |  Time And Space (30)  |  Top (20)

From Pythagoras (ca. 550 BC) to Boethius (ca AD 480-524), when pure mathematics consisted of arithmetic and geometry while applied mathematics consisted of music and astronomy, mathematics could be characterized as the deductive study of “such abstractions as quantities and their consequences, namely figures and so forth” (Aquinas ca. 1260). But since the emergence of abstract algebra it has become increasingly difficult to formulate a definition to cover the whole of the rich, complex and expanding domain of mathematics.
In 100 Years of Mathematics: a Personal Viewpoint (1981), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (29)  |  Applied Mathematics (10)  |  Saint Thomas Aquinas (15)  |  Arithmetic (68)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Deduction (49)  |  Definition (152)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Domain (21)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Pure Mathematics (27)  |  Pythagoras (27)

Gradually, at various points in our childhoods, we discover different forms of conviction. There’s the rock-hard certainty of personal experience (“I put my finger in the fire and it hurt,”), which is probably the earliest kind we learn. Then there’s the logically convincing, which we probably come to first through maths, in the context of Pythagoras’s theorem or something similar, and which, if we first encounter it at exactly the right moment, bursts on our minds like sunrise with the whole universe playing a great chord of C Major.
In short essay, 'Dawkins, Fairy Tales, and Evidence', 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Bursting (3)  |  Childhood (23)  |  Chord (3)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Experience (268)  |  Finger (38)  |  Fire (117)  |  Learning (174)  |  Logic (187)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mind (544)  |  Playing (3)  |  Pythagoras (27)  |  Sunrise (7)  |  Theorem (46)  |  Universe (563)

He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice. This disgrace to civilisation should be done away with at once. Heroism at command, senseless brutality, deplorable love-of-country stance, how violently I hate all this, how despicable and ignoble war is; I would rather be torn to shreds than be part of so base an action! It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (80)  |  Action (151)  |  Already (16)  |  Base (43)  |  Brain (181)  |  Brutality (3)  |  Civilisation (18)  |  Cloak (3)  |  Command (14)  |  Contempt (11)  |  Conviction (57)  |  Deplorable (2)  |  Despicable (3)  |  Disgrace (6)  |  Earn (4)  |  File (5)  |  Fully (11)  |  Give (117)  |  Hate (26)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Kill (37)  |  Large (82)  |  March (15)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Murder (11)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Part (146)  |  Rank (19)  |  Senseless (3)  |  Shred (6)  |  Spinal Cord (3)  |  Suffice (3)  |  Tear (20)  |  Violently (2)  |  War (144)

How can a man sit down and quietly pare his nails, while the earth goes gyrating ahead amid such a din of sphere music, whirling him along about her axis some twenty-four thousand miles between sun and sun, but mainly in a circle some two millions of miles actual progress? And then such a hurly-burly on the surface …. Can man do less than get up and shake himself?
(6 Mar 1838). In Henry David Thoreau and Bradford Torrey (ed.), The Writings of Henry Thoreau: Journal: I: 1837-1846 (1906), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (487)  |  Planet (199)  |  Progress (317)  |  Shake (19)  |  Sit (24)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Surface (74)  |  Whirl (2)

Hunting, fishing, drawing, and music occupied my every moment. ... Cares I knew not, and cared naught about them.
[Recalling his time spent at his father's property, Mill Grove, during his first visit to America.]
In John James Audubon and Lucy Audubon (editor), The Life of John James Audubon: the Naturalist (1869), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (73)  |  Drawing (18)  |  Fishing (12)  |  Hunting (7)  |  Moment (61)  |  Naught (4)  |  Occupation (37)

I conclude that the musical notes and rhythms were first acquired by the male or female progenitors of mankind for the sake of charming the opposite sex.
Descent of Man
Science quotes on:  |  Sex (48)

I do present you with a man of mine [Hortensio]
Cunning in music and the mathematics
To instruct her fully in those sciences.
In The Taming of the Shrew (1594), Act 2, Scene 1, in The Plays of William Shakespeare (1813), 242.
Science quotes on:  |  Cunning (7)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Mathematics (587)

I was reading in an article on Bizet not long ago that music has ceased to be an art and has become a science—in which event it must have a mathematical future!
In letter to H.E. Krehbiel (1887), collected in Elizabeth Bisland The Writings of Lafcadio Hearn (1922), Vol. 14, 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Article (15)  |  Becoming (13)  |  Future (229)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Reading (51)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Art (157)

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured and far away.
In Walden: Or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1906), 358.
Science quotes on:  |  Companion (7)  |  Different (110)  |  Drummer (2)  |  Eccentric (10)  |  Far (77)  |  Hearing (27)  |  Keep (47)  |  Measure (70)  |  Pace (4)  |  Step (67)

If a person sweeps streets for a living, he should sweep them as Michelangelo painted, as Beethoven composed music, as Shakespeare wrote his plays.
As quoted, without citation, in Patricia J. Raskin, Pathfinding: Seven Principles for Positive Living (2002), 102.
Science quotes on:  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (6)  |  Compose (7)  |  Living (44)  |  Michelangelo (2)  |  Paint (17)  |  Person (114)  |  Play (60)  |  William Shakespeare (90)  |  Street (17)  |  Sweep (11)  |  Write (87)

If I choose to impose individual blame for all past social ills, there will be no one left to like in some of the most fascinating periods of our history. For example ... if I place every Victorian anti-Semite beyond the pale of my attention, my compass of available music and literature will be pitifully small. Though I hold no shred of sympathy for active persecution, I cannot excoriate individuals who acquiesced passively in a standard societal judgment. Rail instead against the judgment, and try to understand what motivates men of decent will.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acquiesce (2)  |  Active (17)  |  Attention (76)  |  Available (18)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Blame (17)  |  Choose (35)  |  Compass (19)  |  Decent (4)  |  Example (57)  |  Fascinating (17)  |  History (302)  |  Hold (56)  |  Impose (17)  |  Individual (177)  |  Instead (12)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Leave (63)  |  Literature (64)  |  Motivate (4)  |  Pale (4)  |  Passively (3)  |  Past (109)  |  Period (49)  |  Persecution (9)  |  Place (111)  |  Rail (3)  |  Shred (6)  |  Small (97)  |  Social (93)  |  Standard (41)  |  Sympathy (15)  |  Try (103)  |  Understand (189)  |  Victorian (5)

If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my dreams in music. I see my life in terms of music... I get most joy in life out of music.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (92)  |  Joy (61)  |  Life (917)  |  Live (186)  |  Musician (11)  |  Often (69)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Probably (21)  |  See (197)  |  Term (87)  |  Think (205)

It is agreed that all sound which is the material of music is of three sorts. First is harmonica, which consists of vocal music; second is organica, which is formed from the breath; third is rhythmica, which receives its numbers from the beat of the fingers. For sound is produced either by the voice, coming through the throat; or by the breath, coming through the trumpet or tibia, for example; or by touch, as in the case of the cithara or anything else that gives a tuneful sound on being struck.
Etymologies [c.600], Book III, chapter 19, quoted in E. Grant (ed.), A Source Book in Medieval Science (1974), trans. E. Brehaut (1912), revised by E. Grant, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Beat (15)  |  Breath (24)  |  Number (179)  |  Sound (59)  |  Throat (10)  |  Touch (48)  |  Voice (41)

It is only by introducing the young to great literature, drama and music, and to the excitement of great science that we open to them the possibilities that lie within the human spirit—enable them to see visions and dream dreams.
Quoted, without citation in Reader's Digest Quotable Quotes (1997), 144. This quote, usually seen attributed as 'Eric Anderson' is here tentatively linked to Sir Eric Anderson. If you can confirm this with a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Drama (10)  |  Dream (92)  |  Excitement (33)  |  Human Spirit (8)  |  Literature (64)  |  Science (1699)  |  Vision (55)  |  Youth (57)

It was during my enchanted days of travel that the idea came to me, which, through the years, has come into my thoughts again and again and always happily—the idea that geology is the music of the earth.
Conversation with the Earth (1954), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Geology (187)

Mathematics is music for the mind; music is mathematics for the soul.
Anonymous
In Nat Shapiro (ed.) An Encyclopedia of Quotations About Music (1981), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mind (544)  |  Soul (139)

Mathematics is, as it were, a sensuous logic, and relates to philosophy as do the arts, music, and plastic art to poetry.
Aphorism 365 from Selected Aphorisms from the Lyceum (1797-1800). In Friedrich Schlegel, translated by Ernst Behler and Roman Struc, Dialogue on Poetry and Literary Aphorisms (trans. 1968), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Logic (187)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Philosophy (213)  |  Plastic (15)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Relation (96)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Sensuous (3)

Mathematics may, like poetry or music, “promote and sustain a lofty habit of mind.”
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Habit (78)  |  Lofty (7)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mind (544)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Promoting (7)  |  Sustain (13)

Mathematics, as much as music or any other art, is one of the means by which we rise to a complete self-consciousness. The significance of mathematics resides precisely in the fact that it is an art; by informing us of the nature of our own minds it informs us of much that depends on our minds.
In Aspects of Science: Second Series (1926), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Dependence (32)  |  Informing (2)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Means (109)  |  Mind (544)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Rise (51)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Self-Consciousness (2)  |  Significance (60)

Modern music, headstrong, wayward, tragically confused as to what to say and how to say it, has mounted its horse, as the joke goes, and ridden off in all directions. If we require of an art that it be unified as a whole and expressed in a universal language known to all, if it must be a consistent symbolization of the era, then modern music is a disastrous failure. It has many voices, many symbolizations. It it known to one, unknown to another. But if an art may be as variable and polyvocal as the different individuals and emotional regions from which it comes in this heterogeneous modern world, then the diversity and contradiction of modern music may be acceptable.
In Art Is Action: A Discussion of Nine Arts in a Modern World (1939), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Confused (3)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Disastrous (3)  |  Diversity (46)  |  Emotion (62)  |  Failure (118)  |  Horse (40)  |  Individual (177)  |  Joke (39)  |  Language (155)  |  Modern (104)  |  Symbol (35)  |  Tragic (8)  |  Unified (9)  |  Universal (70)  |  Wayward (3)

Modern war, even from the consideration of physical welfare, is not creative. Soldiers and civilians alike are supposed to put on mental khaki. … War means the death of that fertile war which consists of the free, restless conflict of ideas. The war which matters is that of the scientist with nature; of the farmer with the tawny desert; of … philosopher against … mob stupidity. Such war is creative. … Inventions that further life and joy; freedom; new knowledge, whether Luther Burbank’s about the breeding of fruits or Einstein's about relativity; great cathedrals and Beethoven's music: these modern mechanical war can destroy but never produce. At its most inventive height, war creates the Maxim gun, the submarine, disseminable germs of disease, life-blasting gases. Spiritually and intellectually, modern war is not creative.
From ‘The Stagnation of War’, in Allen D. Hole (ed.) The Messenger of Peace (Nov 1924), 49, No. 11, 162-163.
Science quotes on:  |  Beethoven_Ludwig (6)  |  Biological Warfare (2)  |  Breeding (11)  |  Luther Burbank (7)  |  Cathedral (11)  |  Creative (41)  |  Death (270)  |  Desert (27)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Albert Einstein (535)  |  Farmer (23)  |  Fertile (10)  |  Freedom (76)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Germ (27)  |  Idea (440)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Invention (283)  |  Joy (61)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Mental (57)  |  Mob (5)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Produce (63)  |  Relativity (50)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Spiritually (3)  |  Stupidity (27)  |  Submarine (9)  |  Tawny (2)  |  War (144)  |  Welfare (16)

Music and language are both uniquely human activities; they set us apart from the other creatures of this planet.
In 'Music and Language: A New Look at an Old Analogy', Music Educators Journal (Mar 1972), 58, No. 7, 60.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Creature (127)  |  Differentiate (6)  |  Human (445)  |  Language (155)  |  Planet (199)  |  Unique (24)

Music is the effort we make to explain to ourselves how our brains work. We listen to Bach transfixed because this is listening to a human mind.
The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1980), 154.
Science quotes on:  |  Bach (2)  |  Brain (181)  |  Effort (94)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Listening (8)  |  Mind (544)

My mother, my dad and I left Cuba when I was two [January, 1959]. Castro had taken control by then, and life for many ordinary people had become very difficult. My dad had worked [as a personal bodyguard for the wife of Cuban president Batista], so he was a marked man. We moved to Miami, which is about as close to Cuba as you can get without being there. It’s a Cuba-centric society. I think a lot of Cubans moved to the US thinking everything would be perfect. Personally, I have to say that those early years were not particularly happy. A lot of people didn’t want us around, and I can remember seeing signs that said: “No children. No pets. No Cubans.” Things were not made easier by the fact that Dad had begun working for the US government. At the time he couldn’t really tell us what he was doing, because it was some sort of top-secret operation. He just said he wanted to fight against what was happening back at home. [Estefan’s father was one of the many Cuban exiles taking part in the ill-fated, anti-Castro Bay of Pigs invasion to overthrow dictator Fidel Castro.] One night, Dad disappered. I think he was so worried about telling my mother he was going that he just left her a note. There were rumours something was happening back home, but we didn’t really know where Dad had gone. It was a scary time for many Cubans. A lot of men were involved—lots of families were left without sons and fathers. By the time we found out what my dad had been doing, the attempted coup had taken place, on April 17, 1961. Intitially he’d been training in Central America, but after the coup attempt he was captured and spent the next wo years as a political prisoner in Cuba. That was probably the worst time for my mother and me. Not knowing what was going to happen to Dad. I was only a kid, but I had worked out where my dad was. My mother was trying to keep it a secret, so she used to tell me Dad was on a farm. Of course, I thought that she didn’t know what had really happened to him, so I used to keep up the pretence that Dad really was working on a farm. We used to do this whole pretending thing every day, trying to protect each other. Those two years had a terrible effect on my mother. She was very nervous, just going from church to church. Always carrying her rosary beads, praying her little heart out. She had her religion, and I had my music. Music was in our family. My mother was a singer, and on my father’s side there was a violinist and a pianist. My grandmother was a poet.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  America (74)  |  April (4)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Back (55)  |  Bad (78)  |  Bay Of Pigs (2)  |  Become (100)  |  Begin (52)  |  Capture (8)  |  Carry (35)  |  Fidel Castro (3)  |  Central (23)  |  Child (189)  |  Church (30)  |  Close (40)  |  Control (93)  |  Cuba (2)  |  Dictator (3)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Early (39)  |  Easy (56)  |  Effect (133)  |  Everything (120)  |  Exile (4)  |  Fact (609)  |  Family (37)  |  Farm (17)  |  Father (44)  |  Fight (37)  |  Find (248)  |  Government (85)  |  Grandmother (4)  |  H (3)  |  Happen (63)  |  Happy (22)  |  Heart (110)  |  Home (58)  |  Invasion (7)  |  Involve (27)  |  Keep (47)  |  Kid (12)  |  Know (321)  |  Leave (63)  |  Life (917)  |  Little (126)  |  Lot (23)  |  Mark (28)  |  Mother (59)  |  Move (58)  |  Nervous (5)  |  Next (24)  |  Night (73)  |  Note (22)  |  Of Course (11)  |  Operation (96)  |  Ordinary (44)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Part (146)  |  Particularly (12)  |  People (269)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Personal (49)  |  Personally (4)  |  Pet (7)  |  Pianist (2)  |  Place (111)  |  Poet (59)  |  Political (31)  |  Pray (13)  |  President (11)  |  Pretence (5)  |  Pretend (14)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Probably (21)  |  Protect (26)  |  Really (50)  |  Religion (210)  |  Remember (53)  |  Rumour (2)  |  Say (126)  |  Scary (2)  |  Secret (98)  |  See (197)  |  Side (36)  |  Sign (36)  |  Society (188)  |  Son (16)  |  Sort (32)  |  Spend (24)  |  Tell (67)  |  Terrible (14)  |  Think (205)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time (439)  |  Training (39)  |  Try (103)  |  Want (120)  |  Whole (122)  |  Wife (18)  |  Work (457)  |  Worry (27)  |  Year (214)

Newton was probably responsible for the concept that there are seven primary colours in the spectrum—he had a strong interest in musical harmonies and, since there are seven distinct notes in the musical scale, he divided up the spectrum into spectral bands with widths corresponding to the ratios of the small whole numbers found in the just scale.
In 'Light and Colour', Trevor Lamb and Janine Bourriau, Colour: Art & Science (1995), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Color (78)  |  Concept (102)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Divide (24)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Interest (170)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (258)  |  Note (22)  |  Primary (29)  |  Ratio (15)  |  Responsible (11)  |  Scale (49)  |  Seven (5)  |  Spectrum (23)

Obviously, what our age has in common with the age of the Reformation is the fallout of disintegrating values. What needs explaining is the presence of a receptive audience. More significant than the fact that poets write abstrusely, painters paint abstractly, and composers compose unintelligible music is that people should admire what they cannot understand; indeed, admire that which has no meaning or principle.
In Reflections on the Human Condition (1973), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (10)  |  Age (137)  |  Audience (13)  |  Common (92)  |  Compose (7)  |  Composer (2)  |  Disintegrate (3)  |  Explain (61)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fallout (2)  |  Mean (63)  |  Need (211)  |  Obviously (9)  |  Paint (17)  |  Painter (15)  |  People (269)  |  Poet (59)  |  Presence (26)  |  Principle (228)  |  Receptive (3)  |  Reformation (4)  |  Significant (26)  |  Understand (189)  |  Unintelligible (7)  |  Value (180)  |  Write (87)

Of all my inventions, I liked the phonograph best. Life’s most soothing things are sweet music and a child’s goodnight.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Child (189)  |  Invention (283)  |  Life (917)  |  Phonograph (8)  |  Sweet (10)

Physical Science and Industrialism may be conceived as a pair of dancers, both of whom know their steps and have an ear for the rhythm of the music. If the partner who has been leading chooses to change parts and to follow instead, there is perhaps no reason to expect that he will dance less correctly than before.
From 'Introduction: The Geneses of Civilizations', A Study of History (1948), Vol. 1, 3, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (291)  |  Choose (35)  |  Conceive (22)  |  Correct (53)  |  Dance (14)  |  Dancer (4)  |  Expect (27)  |  Follow (66)  |  Lead (101)  |  Partner (4)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Reason (330)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Step (67)

Religion shows a pattern of heredity which I think is similar to genetic heredity. ... There are hundreds of different religious sects, and every religious person is loyal to just one of these. ... The overwhelming majority just happen to choose the one their parents belonged to. Not the sect that has the best evidence in its favour, the best miracles, the best moral code, the best cathedral, the best stained-glass, the best music when it comes to choosing from the smorgasbord of available religions, their potential virtues seem to count for nothing compared to the matter of heredity.
From edited version of a speech, at the Edinburgh International Science Festival (15 Apr 1992), as reprinted from the Independent newspaper in Alec Fisher, The Logic of Real Arguments (2004), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |  Belonging (12)  |  Best (129)  |  Cathedral (11)  |  Choose (35)  |  Code (12)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Favor (22)  |  Genetic (11)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Loyal (4)  |  Majority (32)  |  Miracle (55)  |  Moral (100)  |  Overwhelming (18)  |  Parent (39)  |  Person (114)  |  Potential (34)  |  Religion (210)  |  Sect (3)  |  Similar (22)  |  Virtue (55)

Science cannot tell us a word about why music delights us, of why and how an old song can move us to tears.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Delight (51)  |  Move (58)  |  Old (104)  |  Science (1699)  |  Song (18)  |  Tear (20)  |  Tell (67)  |  Word (221)

Science, ships, policies, cities, factories, are not nothing,
Like a grand procession to music of distant bugles pouring, triumphantly moving, and grander heaving in sight,
They stand for realities—all is as it should be.
In poem, 'As I Walk These Broad Majestic Days', Leaves of Grass (1892), 379.
Science quotes on:  |  City (37)  |  Distant (16)  |  Factory (13)  |  Grand (15)  |  Heave (2)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Policy (23)  |  Procession (2)  |  Reality (140)  |  Science (1699)  |  Ship (33)  |  Triumph (33)

Sound travels farthest as music; the most telling form of truth is poetry.
From chapter 'Jottings from a Note-book', in Canadian Stories (1918), 167.
Science quotes on:  |  Form (210)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Sound (59)  |  Telling (23)  |  Travel (40)  |  Truth (750)

Sport is an international phenomenon, like science or music.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  International (18)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sport (9)

The capacity to blunder slightly is the real marvel of DNA. Without this special attribute, we would still be anaerobic bacteria and there would be no music.
In The Medusa and the Snail: More Notes of a Biology Watcher (1974, 1979), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Attribute (22)  |  Bacteria (32)  |  Blunder (13)  |  Capacity (42)  |  DNA (67)  |  Error (230)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Marvel (24)  |  Reality (140)  |  Slightness (2)  |  Special (51)

the Courts of Justice had once ruled that a man carrying bagpipes was a man carrying a weapon—so inspiring was the music of the pipers to the clans in battle.
The Reader
Science quotes on:  |  Battle (30)  |  Carry (35)  |  Court (16)  |  Inspire (35)  |  Justice (24)  |  Rule (135)  |  Weapon (57)

The fact is that there are few more “popular” subjects than mathematics. Most people have some appreciation of mathematics, just as most people can enjoy a pleasant tune; and there are probably more people really interested in mathematics than in music. Appearances may suggest the contrary, but there are easy explanations. Music can be used to stimulate mass emotion, while mathematics cannot; and musical incapacity is recognized (no doubt rightly) as mildly discreditable, whereas most people are so frightened of the name of mathematics that they are ready, quite unaffectedly, to exaggerate their own mathematical stupidity.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Fear (113)  |  Mathematics (587)

The fact remains that, if the supply of energy failed, modern civilization would come to an end as abruptly as does the music of an organ deprived of wind.
Matter and Energy (1911), 251.
Science quotes on:  |  Abrupt (3)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Deprivation (5)  |  End (141)  |  Energy (185)  |  Energy Conservation (3)  |  Failure (118)  |  Future (229)  |  Modern (104)  |  Organ (60)  |  Problem (362)  |  Supply (31)  |  Wind (52)

The mind of God we believe is cosmic music, the music of strings resonating through 11 dimensional hyperspace. That is the mind of God.
From online article with video 'Math is the Mind of God', (29 Dec 2012) on website of bigthink.com.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (400)  |  Cosmic (34)  |  Dimension (26)  |  God (454)  |  Hyperspace (3)  |  Mind (544)  |  Resonate (2)  |  String (17)  |  Superstring (3)

The mind of man may be compared to a musical instrument with a certain range of notes, beyond which in both directions we have an infinitude of silence. The phenomena of matter and force lie within our intellectual range, and as far as they reach we will at all hazards push our inquiries. But behind, and above, and around all, the real mystery of this universe [Who made it all?] lies unsolved, and, as far as we are concerned, is incapable of solution.
In 'Matter and Force', Fragments of Science for Unscientific People (1871), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Above (4)  |  Around (6)  |  Behind (25)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Certain (84)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Concern (76)  |  Creation (211)  |  Direction (56)  |  Enquiry (75)  |  Force (194)  |  Hazard (11)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Incapability (2)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Lie (80)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Note (22)  |  Origin Of The Universe (13)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Push (22)  |  Range (38)  |  Reach (68)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Silence (32)  |  Solution (168)  |  Universe (563)  |  Unsolved (7)  |  Within (6)

The poets did well to conjoin music and medicine, in Apollo, because the office of medicine is but to tune the curious harp of man's body and reduce it to harmony.
The Advancement of Learning (1605), Book 2. Reprinted in The Two Books of Francis Bacon: Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human (2009), 106.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (193)  |  Conjoin (2)  |  Curious (24)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Harp (3)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Poet (59)  |  Reduce (32)  |  Tune (9)

The process of preparing programs for a digital computer is especially attractive, not only because it can be economically and scientifically rewarding, but also because it can be an aesthetic experience much like composing poetry or music.
The Art of Computer Programming (1968), Vol. 1, v.
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Experience (268)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Programming (2)  |  Reward (38)  |  Software (11)  |  Writing (72)

The silencing of the rainforests is a double deforestation, not only of trees but a deforestation of the mind’s music, medicine and knowledge.
In 'Fifty Years On, the Silence of Rachel Carson’s Spring Consumes Us', The Guardian (25 Sep 2012),
Science quotes on:  |  Deforestation (39)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Mind (544)  |  Rain Forest (21)  |  Silence (32)  |  Tree (143)

The sky seems to be a pure, a cooler blue, the trees a deeper green. The whole world is charged with the glory of God and I feel fire and music under my feet.
On reading the scriptures. Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 166
Science quotes on:  |  Blue (30)  |  Charge (29)  |  Cool (9)  |  Deep (81)  |  Feel (93)  |  Fire (117)  |  Foot (39)  |  Glory (44)  |  God (454)  |  Green (23)  |  Pure (62)  |  Seem (89)  |  Sky (68)  |  Tree (143)  |  Whole (122)  |  World (667)

The spirit of science arises from the habit of seeking food; the spirit of art arises from the habit of imitation, by which the young animal first learns to feed; the spirit of music arises from primeval speech, by means of which males and females are attracted to each other.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 443.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Attract (15)  |  Female (20)  |  Food (139)  |  Habit (78)  |  Imitation (17)  |  Male (24)  |  Primeval (8)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Seek (57)  |  Speech (40)  |  Spirit (113)

The wind makes music in the woods, but the tune changes with the seasons.
In 'Why We Should Celebrate Winter Woodland–Not Just the Christmas Tree', The Guardian (12 Dec 2015).
Science quotes on:  |  Change (291)  |  Season (24)  |  Tune (9)  |  Wind (52)  |  Woods (11)

There is beauty in discovery. There is mathematics in music, a kinship of science and poetry in the description of nature, and exquisite form in a molecule. Attempts to place different disciplines in different camps are revealed as artificial in the face of the unity of knowledge. All illiterate men are sustained by the philosopher, the historian, the political analyst, the economist, the scientist, the poet, the artisan, and the musician.
From address (1958), upon being appointed Chancellor of the University of California.
Science quotes on:  |  Analyst (4)  |  Artificial (26)  |  Artisan (7)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Description (72)  |  Different (110)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Economist (13)  |  Exquisite (12)  |  Form (210)  |  Historian (30)  |  Illiterate (3)  |  Kinship (3)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Musician (11)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Poet (59)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Political (31)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Unity (43)

There is geometry in the humming of the strings. There is music in the spacing of the spheres.
Quoted by Aristotle in Metaphysics. In The Houghton Mifflin Dictionary of Biography (2003), 1250.
Science quotes on:  |  Geometry (99)  |  Humming (3)  |  Sphere (40)  |  String (17)

There is in the chemist a form of thought by which all ideas become visible in the mind as strains of an imagined piece of music. This form of thought is developed in Faraday in the highest degree, whence it arises that to one who is not acquainted with this method of thinking, his scientific works seem barren and dry, and merely a series of researches strung together, while his oral discourse when he teaches or explains is intellectual, elegant, and of wonderful clearness.
Autobiography, 257-358. Quoted in William H. Brock, Justus Von Liebig (2002), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemist (79)  |  Clarity (31)  |  Michael Faraday (74)  |  Idea (440)  |  Intellect (157)  |  Lecture (54)  |  Research (517)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Thought (374)

There is plenty of room left for exact experiment in art, and the gate has been opened for some time. What had been accomplished in music by the end of the eighteenth century has only begun in the fine arts. Mathematics and physics have given us a clue in the form of rules to be strictly observed or departed from, as the case may be. Here salutary discipline is come to grips first of all with the function of forms, and not with form as the final result … in this way we learn how to look beyond the surface and get to the root of things.
Paul Klee
Quoted in The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1959), 59, citing Bauhaus-Zeitschrijt (1928).
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  Art (205)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Century (95)  |  Clue (14)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Exact (38)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Final (33)  |  Function (90)  |  Learn (160)  |  Looking (25)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Observed (5)  |  Physics (301)  |  Result (250)  |  Root (48)  |  Rule (135)  |  Salutary (5)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Strictly (6)  |  Surface (74)

There were details like clothing, hair styles and the fragile objects that hardly ever survive for the archaeologist—musical instruments, bows and arrows, and body ornaments depicted as they were worn. … No amounts of stone and bone could yield the kinds of information that the paintings gave so freely
As quoted in Current Biography Yearbook (1985), 259.
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (20)  |  Archaeologist (11)  |  Arrow (13)  |  Bone (57)  |  Bow (9)  |  Clothing (8)  |  Detail (65)  |  Fragile (7)  |  Freely (7)  |  Giving (11)  |  Hair (19)  |  Information (102)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Kind (99)  |  Ornament (12)  |  Painting (24)  |  Stone (57)  |  Survival (49)  |  Yield (23)

To Nature nothing can be added; from Nature nothing can be taken away; the sum of her energies is constant, and the utmost man can do in the pursuit of physical truth, or in the applications of physical knowledge, is to shift the constituents of the never-varying total. The law of conservation rigidly excludes both creation and annihilation. Waves may change to ripples, and ripples to waves; magnitude may be substituted for number, and number for magnitude; asteroids may aggregate to suns, suns may resolve themselves into florae and faunae, and floras and faunas melt in air: the flux of power is eternally the same. It rolls in music through the ages, and all terrestrial energy—the manifestations of life as well as the display of phenomena—are but the modulations of its rhythm.
Conclusion of Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion: Being a Course of Twelve Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Season of 1862 (1863), 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Age (137)  |  Aggregate (8)  |  Air (151)  |  Annihilation (6)  |  Asteroid (11)  |  Change (291)  |  Conservation Of Energy (25)  |  Constant (40)  |  Constituent (13)  |  Creation (211)  |  Display (22)  |  Energy (185)  |  Eternally (3)  |  Exclude (4)  |  Fauna (10)  |  Flora (6)  |  Flux (8)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Magnitude (21)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Melt (15)  |  Modulation (3)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Number (179)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Power (273)  |  Resolve (11)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Ripple (3)  |  Same (92)  |  Shift (21)  |  Substitute (23)  |  Sum (30)  |  Sun (211)  |  Take Away (3)  |  Terrestrial (14)  |  Total (29)  |  Truth (750)  |  Wave (55)

When the sexes differ in beauty, in the power of singing, or in producing what I have called instrumental music, it is almost invariably the male which excels the female.
The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Female (20)  |  Male (24)

Which do I consider my greatest invention? … I like the phonograph best … because I love music. And then it has brought so much joy into millions of homes all over this country, and, indeed, all over the world.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (129)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Home (58)  |  Invention (283)  |  Joy (61)  |  Love (164)  |  Million (89)  |  Phonograph (8)  |  World (667)

Why, only last term we sent a man who had never been in a laboratory in his life as a senior Science Master to one of our leading public schools. He came [to our agency] wanting to do private coaching in music. He’s doing very well, I believe.
In Decline and Fall (1928), 1962 edn., 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Agency (13)  |  Laboratory (120)  |  Leading (14)  |  Life (917)  |  Master (55)  |  Private (17)  |  Public School (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Senior (3)  |  Term (87)  |  Wanting (2)

With a tone control at a single touch
I can make Caruso sound like Hutch,
I never did care for music much—
It's the high fidelity!
A parody of the hi-fi addict. From lyrics of 'Song of Reproduction', in the Michael Flanders and Donald Swann revue, At the Drop of a Hat (1959). As quoted in Steven D. Lubar, InfoCulture: The Smithsonian Book of Information Age Inventions (1993), 186. “Hutch” was the popularly used name of Leslie Hutchinson (1900-1969), one of the biggest London cabaret entertainers of the 1920s-30s.
Science quotes on:  |  Care (73)  |  Control (93)  |  Sound (59)  |  Tone (7)  |  Touch (48)

[L]et us not overlook the further great fact, that not only does science underlie sculpture, painting, music, poetry, but that science is itself poetic. The current opinion that science and poetry are opposed is a delusion. ... On the contrary science opens up realms of poetry where to the unscientific all is a blank. Those engaged in scientific researches constantly show us that they realize not less vividly, but more vividly, than others, the poetry of their subjects. Whoever will dip into Hugh Miller's works on geology, or read Mr. Lewes's “Seaside Studies,” will perceive that science excites poetry rather than extinguishes it. And whoever will contemplate the life of Goethe will see that the poet and the man of science can co-exist in equal activity. Is it not, indeed, an absurd and almost a sacrilegious belief that the more a man studies Nature the less he reveres it? Think you that a drop of water, which to the vulgar eye is but a drop of water, loses anything in the eye of the physicist who knows that its elements are held together by a force which, if suddenly liberated, would produce a flash of lightning? Think you that what is carelessly looked upon by the uninitiated as a mere snow-flake, does not suggest higher associations to one who has seen through a microscope the wondrously varied and elegant forms of snow-crystals? Think you that the rounded rock marked with parallel scratches calls up as much poetry in an ignorant mind as in the mind of a geologist, who knows that over this rock a glacier slid a million years ago? The truth is, that those who have never entered upon scientific pursuits know not a tithe of the poetry by which they are surrounded. Whoever has not in youth collected plants and insects, knows not half the halo of interest which lanes and hedge-rows can assume. Whoever has not sought for fossils, has little idea of the poetical associations that surround the places where imbedded treasures were found. Whoever at the seaside has not had a microscope and aquarium, has yet to learn what the highest pleasures of the seaside are. Sad, indeed, is it to see how men occupy themselves with trivialities, and are indifferent to the grandest phenomena—care not to understand the architecture of the Heavens, but are deeply interested in some contemptible controversy about the intrigues of Mary Queen of Scots!—are learnedly critical over a Greek ode, and pass by without a glance that grand epic written by the finger of God upon the strata of the Earth!
Education: Intellectual, Moral, and Physical (1889), 82-83.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (16)  |  Aquarium (2)  |  Blank (11)  |  Collection (38)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Current (43)  |  Delusion (13)  |  Drop (27)  |  Excitation (7)  |  Flash (25)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Glacier (13)  |  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (127)  |  George Henry Lewes (18)  |  Lightning (28)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Hugh Miller (14)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Opinion (146)  |  Opposition (29)  |  Painting (24)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Research (517)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Sculpture (8)  |  Seaside (2)  |  Snowflake (9)  |  Strata (18)  |  Water (244)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Custom Quotations Search - custom search within only our quotations pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

who invites your feedback

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton

Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.