Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A people without children would face a hopeless future; a country without trees is almost as helpless.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index A > Category: Arm

Arm Quotes (81 quotes)

“Advance, ye mates! Cross your lances full before me. Well done! Let me touch the axis.” So saying, with extended arm, he grasped the three level, radiating lances at their crossed centre; while so doing, suddenly and nervously twitched them; meanwhile, glancing intently from Starbuck to Stubb; from Stubb to Flask. It seemed as though, by some nameless, interior volition, he would fain have shocked into them the same fiery emotion accumulated within the Leyden jar of his own magnetic life. The three mates quailed before his strong, sustained, and mystic aspect. Stubb and Flask looked sideways from him; the honest eye of Starbuck fell downright.
“In vain!&rsdquo; cried Ahab; “but, maybe, 'tis well. For did ye three but once take the full-forced shock, then mine own electric thing, that had perhaps expired from out me. Perchance, too, it would have dropped ye dead. ...”
[Commentary by Henry Schlesinger: Electricity—mysterious and powerful as it seemed at the time—served as a perfect metaphor for Captain Ahab's primal obsession and madness, which he transmits through the crew as if through an electrical circuit in Moby-Dick.]
Extract from Herman Melville, Moby-Dick and comment by Henry Schlesinger in The Battery: How Portable Power Sparked a Technological Revolution (2010), 64.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Advance (280)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Captain (14)  |  Circuit (29)  |  Death (388)  |  Doing (280)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Extend (128)  |  Eye (419)  |  Honest (50)  |  Interior (32)  |  Leyden Jar (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Madness (33)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Obsession (13)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Quail (2)  |  Shock (37)  |  Strong (174)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Touch (141)  |  Vain (83)  |  Volition (3)

The Mighty Task is Done

At last the mighty task is done;
Resplendent in the western sun
The Bridge looms mountain high;
Its titan piers grip ocean floor,
Its great steel arms link shore with shore,
Its towers pierce the sky.

On its broad decks in rightful pride,
The world in swift parade shall ride,
Throughout all time to be;
Beneath, fleet ships from every port,
Vast landlocked bay, historic fort,
And dwarfing all the sea.

To north, the Redwood Empires gates;
To south, a happy playground waits,
In Rapturous appeal;
Here nature, free since time began,
Yields to the restless moods of man,
Accepts his bonds of steel.

Launched midst a thousand hopes and fears,
Damned by a thousand hostile sneers,
Yet Neer its course was stayed,
But ask of those who met the foe
Who stood alone when faith was low,
Ask them the price they paid.

Ask of the steel, each strut and wire,
Ask of the searching, purging fire,
That marked their natal hour;
Ask of the mind, the hand, the heart,
Ask of each single, stalwart part,
What gave it force and power.

An Honored cause and nobly fought
And that which they so bravely wrought,
Now glorifies their deed,
No selfish urge shall stain its life,
Nor envy, greed, intrigue, nor strife,
Nor false, ignoble creed.

High overhead its lights shall gleam,
Far, far below lifes restless stream,
Unceasingly shall flow;
For this was spun its lithe fine form,
To fear not war, nor time, nor storm,
For Fate had meant it so.

Written upon completion of the building of the Golden Gate Bridge, May 1937. In Allen Brown, Golden Gate: biography of a Bridge (1965), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Arms (37)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bay (5)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Bond (45)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Course (409)  |  Creed (27)  |  Deck (3)  |  Deed (34)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Envy (15)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fate (72)  |  Fear (197)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flow (83)  |  Foe (9)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Fort (2)  |  Free (232)  |  Gate (32)  |  Golden Gate Bridge (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greed (14)  |  Happy (105)  |  Heart (229)  |  High (362)  |  History (673)  |  Honor (54)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hour (186)  |  Last (426)  |  Launch (20)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Loom (20)  |  Low (80)  |  Man (2251)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Parade (3)  |  Playground (6)  |  Poem (96)  |  Power (746)  |  Price (51)  |  Pride (78)  |  Rapture (7)  |  Redwood (8)  |  Ride (21)  |  Sea (308)  |  Selfish (11)  |  Ship (62)  |  Shore (24)  |  Single (353)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sneer (9)  |  South (38)  |  Steel (21)  |  Storm (51)  |  Stream (81)  |  Strut (2)  |  Sun (385)  |  Task (147)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tower (42)  |  Vast (177)  |  War (225)  |  Western (45)  |  Wire (35)  |  World (1774)  |  Yield (81)

L’homme n’est qu’un roseau, le plus faible de la nature, mais c’est un roseau pensant. Il ne faut pas que l’univers entier s’arme pour l’écraser; une vapeur, une goutte d’eau suffit pour le tuer. Mais quand l’univers l’écraserait, l’homme serait encore plus noble que ce qui le tue, parce qu’il sait qu’il meurt et l’avantage que l’univers a sur lui; l’univers n'en sait rien.
Man is a reed, the feeblest thing in nature. But a reed that can think. The whole universe need not fly to arms to kill him ; for a little heat or a drop of water can slay a man. But, even then, man would be nobler than his destroyer, for he would know he died, while the whole universe would know nothing of its victory.
Pensées. As given and translated in Hugh Percy Jones (ed.), Dictionary of Foreign Phrases and Classical Quotations (1908), 292.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arms (37)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Death (388)  |  Drop (76)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Fly (146)  |  Heat (174)  |  Kill (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noble (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plus (43)  |  Reed (8)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Victory (39)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)

Mi è impossibile cingere i fianchi di una ragazza con il mio braccio destro e serrare il suo sorriso nella mia mano sinistra, per poi tentare di studiare i due oggetti separatamente. Allo stesso modo, non ci è possibile separare la vita dalla materia vivente, allo scopo di studiare la sola materia vivente e le sue reazioni. Inevitabilmente, studiando la materia vivente e le sue reazioni, studiamo la vita stessa.
It is impossible to encircle the hips of a girl with my right arm and hold her smile in my left hand, then proceed to study the two items separately. Similarly, we can not separate life from living matter, in order to study only living matter and its reactions. Inevitably, studying living matter and its reactions, we study life itself
In The Nature of Life (1948).
Science quotes on:  |  Due (141)  |  Encircle (2)  |  Girl (37)  |  Hip (3)  |  Hold (95)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Order (632)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Right (452)  |  Separate (143)  |  Smile (31)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Two (937)

Question: A hollow indiarubber ball full of air is suspended on one arm of a balance and weighed in air. The whole is then covered by the receiver of an air pump. Explain what will happen as the air in the receiver is exhausted.
Answer: The ball would expand and entirely fill the vessell, driving out all before it. The balance being of greater density than the rest would be the last to go, but in the end its inertia would be overcome and all would be expelled, and there would be a perfect vacuum. The ball would then burst, but you would not be aware of the fact on account of the loudness of a sound varying with the density of the place in which it is generated, and not on that in which it is heard.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 181, Question 21. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Air (347)  |  Air Pump (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Balance (77)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Burst (39)  |  Cover (37)  |  Density (25)  |  Drive (55)  |  Driving (28)  |  End (590)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Examination (98)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Expulsion (2)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Generation (242)  |  Greater (288)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Hollow (4)  |  Howler (15)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Last (426)  |  Loudness (3)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Overcoming (3)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Place (177)  |  Question (621)  |  Receiver (5)  |  Rest (280)  |  Sound (183)  |  Suspend (9)  |  Vacuum (39)  |  Varying (2)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Weighing (2)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)

Sans laboratoires les savants sont des soldats sans armes
Without laboratories men of science are soldiers without arms.
In French, quoted as “cette phrase mémorable de Pasteur” (this memorable expression by Pasteur) in Bulletin de la Société de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique de Paris (1923), 205. In French and English, as an epigraph, in The Wellcome Research Institution and the Affiliated Research Laboratories and Museums Founded by Sir Henry Wellcome (1932), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Arms (37)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soldier (26)

Thomasina: Every week I plot your equations dot for dot, x’s against y’s in all manner of algebraical relation, and every week they draw themselves as commonplace geometry, as if the world of forms were nothing but arcs and angles. God’s truth, Septimus, if there is an equation for a curve like a bell, there must be an equation for one like a bluebell, and if a bluebell, why not a rose? Do we believe nature is written in numbers?
Septimus: We do.
Thomasina: Then why do your shapes describe only the shapes of manufacture?
Septimus: I do not know.
Thomasina: Armed thus, God could only make a cabinet.
In the play, Acadia (1993), Scene 3, 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Arc (12)  |  Armed (2)  |  Belief (578)  |  Bell (35)  |  Cabinet (4)  |  Commonplace (23)  |  Curve (49)  |  Describe (128)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dot (16)  |  Draw (137)  |  Equation (132)  |  Form (959)  |  Geometry (255)  |  God (757)  |  Know (1518)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Number (699)  |  Plot (11)  |  Relation (157)  |  Rose (34)  |  Shape (72)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Week (70)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)  |  Written (6)

[Bibendum, the iconic Michelin Man, was inspired upon seeing a pile of tires resemble the body of a man.] All it needed was arms, for, being a Frenchman, it wanted to speak!
As quoted by H.M. Davidson, in System: The Magazine of Business (Apr 1922), 41, 446. The comment by Édouard Michelin, a former artist, refers to the idea that Frenchmen speak with hand gestures.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arms (37)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Frenchman (4)  |  Man (2251)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Speak (232)  |  Tire (7)  |  Want (497)

[Students or readers about teachers or authors.] They will listen with both ears to what is said by the men just a step or two ahead of them, who stand nearest to them, and within arm’s reach. A guide ceases to be of any use when he strides so far ahead as to be hidden by the curvature of the earth.
From Lecture (5 Apr 1917) at Hackley School, Tarrytown, N.Y., 'Choosing Books', collected in Canadian Stories (1918), 150.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Author (167)  |  Both (493)  |  Cease (79)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Ear (68)  |  Earth (996)  |  Far (154)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Listen (73)  |  Nearest (4)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reader (40)  |  Stand (274)  |  Step (231)  |  Stride (15)  |  Student (300)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

A short, broad man of tremendous vitality, the physical type of Hereward, the last of the English, and his brother-in-arms, Winter, Sylvester’s capacious head was ever lost in the highest cloud-lands of pure mathematics. Often in the dead of night he would get his favorite pupil, that he might communicate the very last product of his creative thought. Everything he saw suggested to him something new in the higher algebra. This transmutation of everything into new mathematics was a revelation to those who knew him intimately. They began to do it themselves. His ease and fertility of invention proved a constant encouragement, while his contempt for provincial stupidities, such as the American hieroglyphics for π and e, which have even found their way into Webster’s Dictionary, made each young worker apply to himself the strictest tests.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 265.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Algebra (113)  |  American (46)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arms (37)  |  Broad (27)  |  Brother (43)  |  Capacious (2)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Creative (137)  |  Dead (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ease (35)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  English (35)  |  Everything (476)  |  Favorite (37)  |  Fertility (19)  |  Head (81)  |  Hieroglyphic (6)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Invention (369)  |  Last (426)  |  Lost (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  New (1216)  |  Night (120)  |  Often (106)  |  Physical (508)  |  Pi (13)  |  Product (160)  |  Provincial (2)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Saw (160)  |  Short (197)  |  Something (719)  |  Strict (17)  |  Stupidity (39)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Test (211)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thought (953)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Type (167)  |  Vitality (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Winter (44)  |  Worker (31)  |  Young (227)

Although man is not armed by nature nor is naturally swiftest in flight, yet he has something better by far—reason. For by the possession of this function he exceeds the beasts to such a degree that he subdues. … You see, therefore, how much the gift of reason surpasses mere physical equipment.
As given in Toby E. Huff, The Rise of Early Modern Science: Islam, China and the West (2003), 102, citing Tina Stiefel, Science, Reason, and Faith in the Twelfth Century (1976), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Armed (2)  |  Beast (55)  |  Better (486)  |  Degree (276)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Flight (98)  |  Function (228)  |  Gift (104)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possession (65)  |  Reason (744)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Subdue (7)  |  Surpassing (12)  |  Swiftness (4)

An acquaintance of mine, a notary by profession, who, by perpetual writing, began first to complain of an excessive wariness of his whole right arm which could be removed by no medicines, and which was at last succeeded by a perfect palsy of the whole arm. … He learned to write with his left hand, which was soon thereafter seized with the same disorder.
Concerning a notary, a scribe skilled in rapid writing, in a translation published by the University of Chicago Press (1940).
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Excessive (23)  |  First (1283)  |  Health (193)  |  Last (426)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mine (76)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Profession (99)  |  Right (452)  |  Soon (186)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Whole (738)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

An honest man, armed with all the knowledge available to us now, could only state that in some sense, the origin of life appears at the moment to be almost a miracle, so many are the conditions which would have had to have been satisfied to get it going. But this should not be taken to imply that there are good reasons to believe that it could not have started on the earth by a perfectly reasonable sequence of fairly ordinary chemical reactions. The plain fact is that the time available was too long, the many microenvironments on the earth's surface too diverse, the various chemical possibilities too numerous and our own knowledge and imagination too feeble to allow us to be able to unravel exactly how it might or might not have happened such a long time ago, especially as we have no experimental evidence from that era to check our ideas against.
In Life Itself: Its Origin and Nature (1981), 88.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Available (78)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Condition (356)  |  Earth (996)  |  Era (51)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Good (889)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Honest (50)  |  Idea (843)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Moment (253)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Origin (239)  |  Origin Of Life (36)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Start (221)  |  State (491)  |  Surface (209)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unravel (14)  |  Various (200)

Architects who have aimed at acquiring manual skill without scholarship have never been able to reach a position of authority to correspond to their pains, while those who relied only upon theories and scholarship were obviously hunting the shadow, not the substance. But those who have a thorough knowledge of both, like men armed at all points, have the sooner attained their object and carried authority with them.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 1, Sec. 2. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Architect (29)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Authority (95)  |  Both (493)  |  Education (378)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Manual (7)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Pain (136)  |  Point (580)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rely (11)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Skill (109)  |  Substance (248)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thorough (40)

Armed with all the powers, enjoying all the wealth they owe to science, our societies are still trying to practice and to teach systems of values already destroyed at the roots by that very science. Man knows at last that he is alone in the indifferent immensity of the universe, whence which he has emerged by chance. His duty, like his fate, is written nowhere.
In Jacques Monod and Austryn Wainhouse (trans.), Chance and Necessity: An Essay on the Natural Philosophy of Modern Biology (1971), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Already (222)  |  Chance (239)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Fate (72)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Owe (71)  |  Power (746)  |  Practice (204)  |  Religion (361)  |  Root (120)  |  Science (3879)  |  Still (613)  |  System (537)  |  Teach (277)  |  Trying (144)  |  Universe (857)  |  Value (365)  |  Wealth (94)

Ask a follower of Bacon what [science] the new philosophy, as it was called in the time of Charles the Second, has effected for mankind, and his answer is ready; “It has lengthened life; it has mitigated pain; it has extinguished diseases; it has increased the fertility of the soil; it has given new securities to the mariner; it has furnished new arms to the warrior; it has spanned great rivers and estuaries with bridges of form unknown to our fathers; it has guided the thunderbolt innocuously from heaven to earth; it has lighted up the night with the splendour of the day; it has extended the range of the human vision; it has multiplied the power of the human muscles; it has accelerated motion; it has annihilated distance; it has facilitated intercourse, correspondence, all friendly offices, all dispatch of business; it has enabled man to descend to the depths of the sea, to soar into the air, to penetrate securely into the noxious recesses of the earth, to traverse the land in cars which whirl along without horses, to cross the ocean in ships which run ten knots an hour against the wind. These are but a part of its fruits, and of its first-fruits; for it is a philosophy which never rests, which has never attained, which is never perfect. Its law is progress. A point which yesterday was invisible is its goal to-day, and will be its starting-point to-morrow.”
From essay (Jul 1837) on 'Francis Bacon' in Edinburgh Review. In Baron Thomas Babington Macaulay and Lady Trevelyan (ed.) The Works of Lord Macaulay Complete (1871), Vol. 6, 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Against (332)  |  Agriculture (68)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arms (37)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Automobile (22)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Business (149)  |  Call (769)  |  Car (71)  |  Cave (15)  |  Correspondence (23)  |  Depth (94)  |  Descend (47)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Estuary (3)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Extend (128)  |  Father (110)  |  Fertility (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Horse (74)  |  Hour (186)  |  Human (1468)  |  Invisibility (5)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Knot (11)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Lighting (5)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mining (18)  |  Motion (310)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Noxious (6)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Oceanography (17)  |  Office (71)  |  Pain (136)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Progress (465)  |  Range (99)  |  Rest (280)  |  River (119)  |  Run (174)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Soar (23)  |  Soil (86)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Strength (126)  |  Telegraph (38)  |  Thunderbolt (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Tomorrow (60)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vision (123)  |  Warrior (6)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Yesterday (36)

Creatures that by a rule in nature teach
The act of order to a peopled kingdom.
They have a king and officers of sorts;
Where some, like magistrates, correct at home,
Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad,
Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings,
Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds;
Which pillage they with merry march bring home
To the tent-royal of their emperor.
Who, busied in his majesty, surveys
The singing masons building roofs of gold;
The civil citizens kneading up the honey;
The poor mechanic porters crowding
Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate;
The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum,
Delivering o'er to executors pale
The lazy yawning drone.
Henry V (1599), I, ii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abroad (18)  |  Act (272)  |  Building (156)  |  Burden (27)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Civil (26)  |  Creature (233)  |  Drone (4)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Gate (32)  |  Gold (97)  |  Home (170)  |  Honey (15)  |  Justice (39)  |  King (35)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Magistrate (2)  |  Majesty (21)  |  March (46)  |  Mason (2)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Officer (12)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Porter (2)  |  Roof (13)  |  Royal (57)  |  Rule (294)  |  Singing (19)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Sting (3)  |  Summer (54)  |  Survey (33)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Tent (11)  |  Velvet (4)

Each workman would receive two or three important parts and would affix them together and pass them on to the next who would add a part and pass the growing article to another who would do the same … until the complete arm is put together.
Describing the first factory assembly line process. The product was Colt’s revolving chamber gun, nicknamed the “equalizer.”
Science quotes on:  |  Assembly Line (3)  |  Complete (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  Growing (98)  |  Next (236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Receive (114)  |  Technology (257)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)

Edmund Wilson attacked the pedantry of scholarly editions of literary classics, which (he claimed) took the pleasure out of reading. Extensive footnotes … spoiled the reader’s pleasure in the text. Wilson’s friend Lewis Mumford had compared footnote numbers … to “barbed wire” keeping the reader at arm’s length.
In Academic Instincts (2001), 39.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Attack (84)  |  Barbed Wire (2)  |  Claim (146)  |  Compared (8)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Footnote (5)  |  Friend (168)  |  Lewis Mumford (15)  |  Number (699)  |  Pedantry (5)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reading (133)  |  Spoil (7)  |  Edmund Beecher Wilson (8)  |  Wire (35)

ENGINEER, in the military art, an able expert man, who, by a perfect knowledge in mathematics, delineates upon paper, or marks upon the ground, all sorts of forts, and other works proper for offence and defence. He should understand the art of fortification, so as to be able, not only to discover the defects of a place, but to find a remedy proper for them; as also how to make an attack upon, as well as to defend, the place. Engineers are extremely necessary for these purposes: wherefore it is requisite that, besides being ingenious, they should be brave in proportion. When at a siege the engineers have narrowly surveyed the place, they are to make their report to the general, by acquainting him which part they judge the weakest, and where approaches may be made with most success. Their business is also to delineate the lines of circumvallation and contravallation, taking all the advantages of the ground; to mark out the trenches, places of arms, batteries, and lodgments, taking care that none of their works be flanked or discovered from the place. After making a faithful report to the general of what is a-doing, the engineers are to demand a sufficient number of workmen and utensils, and whatever else is necessary.
In Encyclopaedia Britannica or a Dictionary of Arts and Sciences (1771), Vol. 2, 497.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Arms (37)  |  Art (657)  |  Attack (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brave (12)  |  Business (149)  |  Care (186)  |  Defect (31)  |  Defence (14)  |  Delineate (2)  |  Demand (123)  |  Discover (553)  |  Doing (280)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Expert (65)  |  Find (998)  |  Fort (2)  |  Fortification (6)  |  General (511)  |  Ground (217)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Judge (108)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Military (40)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Number (699)  |  Offence (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paper (182)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Proper (144)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Success (302)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Survey (33)  |  Trench (6)  |  Understand (606)  |  Utensil (2)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)

Fleets are not confined to the ocean, but now sail over the land. … All the power of the British Navy has not been able to prevent Zeppelins from reaching England and attacking London, the very heart of the British Empire. Navies do not protect against aerial attack. … Heavier-than-air flying machines of the aeroplane type have crossed right over the heads of armies, of million of men, armed with the most modern weapons of destruction, and have raided places in the rear. Armies do not protect against aerial war.
In 'Preparedness for Aerial Defense', Addresses Before the Eleventh Annual Convention of the Navy League of the United States, Washington, D.C., April 10-13, 1916 (1916), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Aerial (10)  |  Against (332)  |  Air (347)  |  Airplane (41)  |  All (4108)  |  Army (33)  |  Attack (84)  |  British (41)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Do (1908)  |  England (40)  |  Fleet (4)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Heart (229)  |  London (12)  |  Machine (257)  |  Modern (385)  |  Most (1731)  |  Navy (9)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Power (746)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Raid (4)  |  Right (452)  |  Sail (36)  |  Type (167)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Zeppelin (4)

Having made a sufficient opening to admit my finger into the abdomen, I passed it between the intestines to the spine, and felt the aorta greatly enlarged, and beating with excessive force. By means of my finger nail, I scratched through the peritoneum on the left side of the aorta, and then gradually passed my finger between the aorta and the spine, and again penetrated the peritoneum, on the right side of the aorta. I had now my finger under the artery, and by its side I conveyed the blunt aneurismal needle, armed with a single ligature behind it...
Describing the first ligation of the aorta in 1817 for left femoral aneurysm.
Frederick Tyrell (Ed.), 'Lecture 15, On the Operation for Aneurism', The Lectures of Sir Astley Cooper (1824), Vol. 2, 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Abdomen (5)  |  Aorta (2)  |  Artery (10)  |  Behind (137)  |  Excessive (23)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Operation (213)  |  Pass (238)  |  Right (452)  |  Scratch (13)  |  Side (233)  |  Single (353)  |  Spine (9)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Through (849)

He who gives a portion of his time and talent to the investigation of mathematical truth will come to all other questions with a decided advantage over his opponents. He will be in argument what the ancient Romans were in the field: to them the day of battle was a day of comparative recreation, because they were ever accustomed to exercise with arms much heavier than they fought; and reviews differed from a real battle in two respects: they encountered more fatigue, but the victory was bloodless.
Reflection 352, in Lacon: or Many things in Few Words; Addressed to Those Who Think (1820), 159.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Argument (138)  |  Arms (37)  |  Battle (34)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Decide (41)  |  Differ (85)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Field (364)  |  Fight (44)  |  Give (202)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Opponent (19)  |  Other (2236)  |  Portion (84)  |  Question (621)  |  Real (149)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Respect (207)  |  Review (26)  |  Roman (36)  |  Talent (94)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Victory (39)  |  Will (2355)

He [Lord Bacon] appears to have been utterly ignorant of the discoveries which had just been made by Kepler’s calculations … he does not say a word about Napier’s Logarithms, which had been published only nine years before and reprinted more than once in the interval. He complained that no considerable advance had been made in Geometry beyond Euclid, without taking any notice of what had been done by Archimedes and Apollonius. He saw the importance of determining accurately the specific gravities of different substances, and himself attempted to form a table of them by a rude process of his own, without knowing of the more scientific though still imperfect methods previously employed by Archimedes, Ghetaldus and Porta. He speaks of the εὕρηκα of Archimedes in a manner which implies that he did not clearly appreciate either the problem to be solved or the principles upon which the solution depended. In reviewing the progress of Mechanics, he makes no mention either of Archimedes, or Stevinus, Galileo, Guldinus, or Ghetaldus. He makes no allusion to the theory of Equilibrium. He observes that a ball of one pound weight will fall nearly as fast through the air as a ball of two, without alluding to the theory of acceleration of falling bodies, which had been made known by Galileo more than thirty years before. He proposed an inquiry with regard to the lever,—namely, whether in a balance with arms of different length but equal weight the distance from the fulcrum has any effect upon the inclination—though the theory of the lever was as well understood in his own time as it is now. … He speaks of the poles of the earth as fixed, in a manner which seems to imply that he was not acquainted with the precession of the equinoxes; and in another place, of the north pole being above and the south pole below, as a reason why in our hemisphere the north winds predominate over the south.
From Spedding’s 'Preface' to De Interpretations Naturae Proœmium, in The Works of Francis Bacon (1857), Vol. 3, 511-512. [Note: the Greek word “εὕρηκα” is “Eureka” —Webmaster.]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acceleration (12)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Advance (280)  |  Air (347)  |  Apollonius (6)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (184)  |  Balance (77)  |  Ball (62)  |  Being (1278)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Complain (8)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Depend (228)  |  Determine (144)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effect (393)  |  Employ (113)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Equinox (5)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Eureka (11)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fast (45)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Fulcrum (3)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Hemisphere (5)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Johannes Kepler (91)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Known (454)  |  Length (23)  |  Lever (13)  |  Logarithm (12)  |  Lord (93)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mention (82)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  John Napier (3)  |  Nearly (137)  |  North Pole (5)  |  North Wind (2)  |  Notice (77)  |  Observe (168)  |  Pole (46)  |  Pound (14)  |  Precession (4)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  South (38)  |  South Pole (3)  |  Speak (232)  |  Specific (95)  |  Specific Gravity (2)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Table (104)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)  |  Weight (134)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

He, who for an ordinary cause, resigns the fate of his patient to mercury, is a vile enemy to the sick; and, if he is tolerably popular, will, in one successful season, have paved the way for the business of life, for he has enough to do, ever afterward, to stop the mercurial breach of the constitutions of his dilapidated patients. He has thrown himself in fearful proximity to death, and has now to fight him at arm's length as long as the patient maintains a miserable existence.
Quoted by William M. Scribner, 'Treatment of Pneumonia and Croup, Once More, Etc,' in The Medical World (1885), 3, 187.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Business (149)  |  Cause (541)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Enough (340)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fate (72)  |  Himself (461)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Patient (199)  |  Poison (40)  |  Season (47)  |  Sick (81)  |  Successful (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Here I most violently want you to
Avoid one fearful error, a vicious flaw.
Don’t think that our bright eyes were made that we
Might look ahead; that hips and knees and ankles
So intricately bend that we might take
Big strides, and the arms are strapped to the sturdy shoulders
And hands are given for servants to each side
That we might use them to support our lives.
All other explanations of this sort
Are twisted, topsy-turvy logic, for
Nothing what is born produces its own use.
Sight was not born before the light of the eyes,
Nor were words and pleas created before the tongue
Rather the tongue's appearance long preceded
Speech, and the ears were formed far earlier than
The sound first heard. To sum up, all the members Existed, I should think, before their use, So use has not caused them to have grown.
On the Nature of Things, trans. Anthony M. Esolen (1995), Book 4, lines 820-8, 145.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Arms (37)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Bright (79)  |  Ear (68)  |  Error (321)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Form (959)  |  Light (607)  |  Live (628)  |  Logic (287)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Servant (39)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Side (233)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speech (61)  |  Stride (15)  |  Sum (102)  |  Support (147)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Twist (8)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)  |  Word (619)

Holding then to science with one hand—the left hand—we give the right hand to religion, and cry: ‘Open Thou mine eyes, that I may behold wondrous things, more wondrous than the shining worlds can tell.’ Obedient to the promise, religion does awaken faculties within us, does teach our eyes to the beholding of more wonderful things. Those great worlds blazing like suns die like feeble stars in the glory of the morning, in the presence of this new light. The soul knows that an infinite sea of love is all about it, throbbing through it, everlasting arms of affection lift it, and it bathes itself in the clear consciousness of a Father’s love.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Affection (43)  |  All (4108)  |  Arms (37)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Bathe (3)  |  Behold (18)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Clear (100)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cry (29)  |  Die (86)  |  Everlasting (8)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Father (110)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Give (202)  |  Glory (58)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hold (95)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lift (55)  |  Light (607)  |  Love (309)  |  Mine (76)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  New (1216)  |  Obedient (9)  |  Open (274)  |  Presence (63)  |  Promise (67)  |  Religion (361)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shine (45)  |  Shining (35)  |  Soul (226)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (385)  |  Teach (277)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thou (9)  |  Throb (6)  |  Through (849)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  World (1774)

I am absolutely convinced that no wealth in the world can help humanity forward, even in the hands of the most devoted worker. The example of great and pure individuals is the only thing that can lead us to noble thoughts and deeds. Money only appeals to selfishness and irresistibly invites abuse. Can anyone imagine Moses, Jesus or Ghandi armed with the moneybags of Carnegie?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Abuse (22)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Appeal (45)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Deed (34)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Example (94)  |  Forward (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hand (143)  |  Help (105)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Individual (404)  |  Invite (9)  |  Jesus (9)  |  Lead (384)  |  Money (170)  |  Moses (6)  |  Most (1731)  |  Noble (90)  |  Pure (291)  |  Selfishness (8)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Worker (31)  |  World (1774)

I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction. “When I hear you give your reasons,” I remarked, “the thing always appears to me to be so ridiculously simple that I could easily do it myself, though at each successive instance of your reasoning I am baffled, until you explain your process. And yet I believe that my eyes are as good as yours.”
“Quite so,” he answered, lighting a cigarette, and throwing himself down into an arm-chair. “You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear. For example, you have frequently seen the steps which lead up from the hall to this room.”
“Frequently.”
“How often?”
“'Well, some hundreds of times.”
“Then how many are there?”
“How many! I don't know.”
“Quite so! You have not observed. And yet you have seen. That is just my point. Now, I know that there seventeen steps, because I have both seen and observed.”
From 'Adventure I.—A Scandal in Bohemia', Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, in The Strand Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly (Jul 1891), Vol. 2, 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Both (493)  |  Chair (24)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Eye (419)  |  Good (889)  |  Hear (139)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Myself (212)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Point (580)  |  Process (423)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  See (1081)  |  Simple (406)  |  Step (231)  |  Successive (73)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Time (1877)

I do not forget that Medicine and Veterinary practice are foreign to me. I desire judgment and criticism upon all my contributions. Little tolerant of frivolous or prejudiced contradiction, contemptuous of that ignorant criticism which doubts on principle, I welcome with open arms the militant attack which has a method of doubting and whose rule of conduct has the motto “More light.”
In Louis Pasteur and Harold Clarence Ernst (trans), The Germ Theory and Its Application to Medicine and Surgery, Chap. 12. Reprinted in Charles W. Eliot (ed.), The Harvard Classics: Scientific Papers: Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology (1897, 1910), Vol. 38, 401-402. Cited as read before French Academy of Science (20 Apr 1878), published in Comptes Rendus de l’Académie des Sciences, 84, 1037-43.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attack (84)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Desire (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forget (115)  |  Frivolous (7)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Method (505)  |  Militant (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Motto (28)  |  Open (274)  |  Practice (204)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Principle (507)  |  Rule (294)  |  Tolerant (3)  |  Veterinary (2)  |  Welcome (16)

I don’t know if I would call it a miracle. I would call it a spectacular example of what people can do. To me, it’s like putting the first man on the moon or splitting the atom. We’ve shown that if the right treatment is given to people who have a catastrophic injury that they could walk away from it.
Expressing optimism for further recovery for Kevin Everett, a Buffalo Bills football player who suffered a paralyzing spinal injury during a game (9 Sep 2007), but after two days of hospital treatment had begun voluntarily moving his arms and legs. Green credits as significant to the recovery was that within minutes of his injury, the patient was quickly treated with intravenous ice-cold saline solution to induce hypothermia.
Quoted in John Wawrow, 'Bills' Everett Improves, May Walk Again', Associated Press news report, Washington Post (12 Sep 2007).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arms (37)  |  Atom (355)  |  Buffalo (7)  |  Call (769)  |  Catastrophic (9)  |  Cold (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Football (10)  |  Game (101)  |  Green (63)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Ice (54)  |  Induce (22)  |  Injury (36)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leg (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Minute (125)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Moon (237)  |  Neurosurgery (3)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Patient (199)  |  People (1005)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Right (452)  |  Significant (74)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Splitting The Atom (4)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)

I think that I shall never see
A poem as lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;
A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
A tree that may in Summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.
Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.
Trees and Other Poems (1914), 19.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Arms (37)  |  Bosom (13)  |  Branch (150)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fool (116)  |  God (757)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Lift (55)  |  Live (628)  |  Look (582)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nest (23)  |  Never (1087)  |  Poem (96)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Rain (62)  |  Robin (4)  |  See (1081)  |  Snow (37)  |  Summer (54)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tree (246)

I waited for Rob and, linking arms, we took our final steps together onto the rooftop of the world. It was 8.15 am on 24 May 2004; there was nowhere higher on the planet that we could go, the world lay at our feet. Holding each other tightly, we tried to absorb where we were. To be standing here, together, exactly three years since Rob’s cancer treatment, was nothing short of a miracle. Standing on top of Everest was more than just climbing a mountain - it was a gift of life. With Pemba and Nawang we crowded together, wrapping our arms around each other. They had been more than Sherpas, they had been our guardian angels.
Jo Gambi
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Angel (44)  |  Arms (37)  |  Cancer (55)  |  Climb (35)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Everest (10)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Final (118)  |  Foot (60)  |  Gift (104)  |  Guardian (3)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Link (43)  |  Linking (8)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nowhere (28)  |  Other (2236)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rob (6)  |  Short (197)  |  Stand (274)  |  Step (231)  |  Tightly (2)  |  Together (387)  |  Top (96)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Try (283)  |  Wait (58)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrap (7)  |  Year (933)

If it be urged that the action of the potato is chemical and mechanical only, and that it is due to the chemical and mechanical effects of light and heat, the answer would seem to lie in an enquiry whether every sensation is not chemical and mechanical in its operation? Whether those things which we deem most purely spiritual are anything but disturbances of equilibrium in an infinite series of levers, beginning with those that are too small for microscopic detection, and going up to the human arm and the appliances which it makes use of? Whether there be not a molecular action of thought, whence a dynamical theory of the passions shall be deducible?
In Erewhon, Or, Over the Range (1872), 192.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Answer (366)  |  Appliance (9)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Detection (16)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Due (141)  |  Dynamical (15)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human (1468)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Lever (13)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Operation (213)  |  Passion (114)  |  Potato (10)  |  Purely (109)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Series (149)  |  Small (477)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Use (766)

In a sense, the galaxy hardest for us to see is our own. For one thing, we are imprisoned within it, while the others can be viewed as a whole from outside… . Furthermore, we are far out from the center, and to make matters worse, we lie in a spiral arm clogged with dust. In other words, we are on a low roof on the outskirts of the city on a foggy day.
In The Intelligent Man's Guide to the Physical Sciences (1960, 1968), 64. Also in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 185.
Science quotes on:  |  Center (33)  |  City (78)  |  Clog (5)  |  Dust (64)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Hardest (3)  |  Imprison (10)  |  Lie (364)  |  Low (80)  |  Matter (798)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Outskirts (2)  |  Roof (13)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Thing (1915)  |  View (488)  |  Whole (738)  |  Word (619)

In Amsterdam the water is the mistress and the land the vassal, throughout the city there are as many canals and drawbridges as bracelets on a Gypsy’s bronzed arms.
In The Mirror of Souls, and Other Essays (1966), 335.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arms (37)  |  Bracelet (2)  |  Bronze (5)  |  Canal (17)  |  City (78)  |  Gypsy (2)  |  Land (115)  |  Mistress (7)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Water (481)

In arms and science tis the same
Our rival’s hurts create our fame.
'Alma, or, The Progress of the Mind', in The Poetical Works of Matthew Prior (1779) Vol. 1, 358, Canto 1, line 196.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arms (37)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Fame (50)  |  Hurt (12)  |  Rival (19)  |  Science (3879)

In the animal world we have seen that the vast majority of species live in societies, and that they find in association the best arms for the struggle for life: understood, of course, in its wide Darwinian sense—not as a struggle for the sheer means of existence, but as a struggle against all natural conditions unfavourable to the species. The animal species, in which individual struggle has been reduced to its narrowest limits, and the practice of mutual aid has attained the greatest development, are invariably the most numerous, the most prosperous, and the most open to further progress. The mutual protection which is obtained in this case, the possibility of attaining old age and of accumulating experience, the higher intellectual development, and the further growth of sociable habits, secure the maintenance of the species, its extension, and its further progressive evolution. The unsociable species, on the contrary, are doomed to decay.
Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution (1902), 293.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Aid (97)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arms (37)  |  Association (46)  |  Attain (125)  |  Best (459)  |  Condition (356)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Course (409)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Decay (53)  |  Development (422)  |  Doom (32)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Extension (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Growth (187)  |  Habit (168)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Invariably (35)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Live (628)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Natural (796)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Open (274)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Practice (204)  |  Progress (465)  |  Protection (36)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Species (401)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Understood (156)  |  Vast (177)  |  Wide (96)  |  World (1774)

It certainly strikes the beholder with astonishment, to perceive what vast difficulties can be overcome by the pigmy arms of little mortal man, aided by science and directed by superior skill.
About his visit to Lockport on the Erie Canal, in Letter IX, to a friend in England from Lockport, New York (25 Jul 1831), collected in Narrative of a Tour in North America (1834), Vol. 1, 233-234,
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Arms (37)  |  Astonishment (30)  |  Beholder (2)  |  Canal (17)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direct (225)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Pigmy (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Skill (109)  |  Strike (68)  |  Superior (81)  |  Vast (177)  |  Canvass White (5)

It is a sure criterion of the civilisation of ancient Egypt that the soldiers did not carry arms except on duty, and that the private citizens did not carry them at all.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Ancient Egypt (4)  |  Arms (37)  |  Carry (127)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Civilisation (20)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Duty (68)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Weapon (92)

It is by the aid of iron that we construct houses, cleave rocks, and perform so many other useful offices of life. But it is with iron also that wars, murders, and robberies are effected, and this, not only hand to hand, but from a distance even, by the aid of missiles and winged weapons, now launched from engines, now hurled by the human arm, and now furnished with feathery wings. This last I regard as the most criminal artifice that has been devised by the human mind; for, as if to bring death upon man with still greater rapidity, we have given wings to iron and taught it to fly. ... Nature, in conformity with her usual benevolence, has limited the power of iron, by inflicting upon it the punishment of rust; and has thus displayed her usual foresight in rendering nothing in existence more perishable, than the substance which brings the greatest dangers upon perishable mortality.
Natural History of Pliny, translation (1857, 1898) by John Bostock and H. T. Riley, 205-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (97)  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Cleave (2)  |  Construct (124)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Danger (115)  |  Death (388)  |  Display (56)  |  Distance (161)  |  Effect (393)  |  Engine (98)  |  Existence (456)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Foresight (6)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greatest (328)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Iron (96)  |  Last (426)  |  Launch (20)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Missile (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Most (1731)  |  Murder (13)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Office (71)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Perish (50)  |  Power (746)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Regard (305)  |  Robbery (6)  |  Rock (161)  |  Rust (7)  |  Spear (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Substance (248)  |  Useful (250)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Wing (75)

It is not knowledge, but the act of learning, not possession but the act of getting there, which grants the greatest enjoyment. When I have clarified and exhausted a subject, then I turn away from it, in order to go into darkness again; the never-satisfied man is so strange if he has completed a structure, then it is not in order to dwell in it peacefully,but in order to begin another. I imagine the world conqueror must feel thus, who, after one kingdom is scarcely conquered, stretches out his arms for others.
Letter to Farkas Wolfgang Bolyai (2 Sep 1808). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Arms (37)  |  Begin (260)  |  Biography (240)  |  Completed (30)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Conqueror (8)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Feel (367)  |  Grant (73)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possession (65)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Strange (157)  |  Structure (344)  |  Subject (521)  |  Turn (447)  |  World (1774)

It is one of the laws of life that each acquisition has its cost. No organism can exercise power without yielding up part of its substance. The physiological law of Transfer of Energy is the basis of human success and happiness. There is no action without expenditure of energy and if energy be not expended the power to generate it is lost. This law shows itself in a thousand ways in the life of man. The arm which is not used becomes palsied. The wealth which comes by chance weakens and destroys. The good which is unused turns to evil. The charity which asks no effort cannot relieve the misery she creates.
In The Strength of Being Clean: A Study of the Quest for Unearned Happiness (1900), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Action (327)  |  Ask (411)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Charity (11)  |  Cost (86)  |  Create (235)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Effort (227)  |  Energy (344)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expend (3)  |  Expenditure (15)  |  Generate (16)  |  Good (889)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lost (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Misery (30)  |  Organism (220)  |  Palsy (3)  |  Part (222)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Power (746)  |  Relieve (5)  |  Show (346)  |  Substance (248)  |  Success (302)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Turn (447)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weaken (4)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Yield (81)

It is unlikely that we will ever see a star being born. Stars are like animals in the wild. We may see the very young, but never their actual birth, which is a veiled and secret event. Stars are born inside thick clouds of dust and gas in the spiral arms of the galaxy, so thick that visible light cannot penetrate them.
Perfect Symmetry: The Search for the Beginning of Time (1985), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arms (37)  |  Being (1278)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Dust (64)  |  Event (216)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Gas (83)  |  Light (607)  |  Never (1087)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Thick (6)  |  Veil (26)  |  Visible (84)  |  Visible Light (2)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)  |  Young (227)

It was on the 25th November 1740 that I cut the first polyp. I put the two parts in a flat glass, which only contained water to the height of four to five lignes. It was thus easy for me to observe these portions of the polyp with a fairly powerful lens.
I shall indicate farther on the precautions I took in making my experiments on these cut polyps and the technique I adopted to cut them. It will suffice to say here that I cut the polyp concerned transversely, a little nearer the anterior than the posterior end. The first part was thus a little shorter than the second.
The instant that I cut the polyp, the two parts contracted so that at first they only appeared like two little grains of green matter at the bottom of the glass in which I put them—for green, as I have already said, is the colour of the first polyps that I possessed. The two parts expanded on the same day on which I separated them. They were very easy to distinguish from one another. The first had its anterior end adorned with the fine threads that serve the polyp as legs and arms, which the second had none.
The extensions of the first part was not the only sign of life that it gave on the same day that it was separated from the other. I saw it move its arms; and the next day, the first time I came to observe it, I found that it had changed its position; and shortly afterwards I saw it take a step. The second part was extended as on the previous day and in the same place. I shook the glass a little to see if it were still alive. This movement made it contract, from which I judged that it was alive. Shortly afterwards it extended again. On the following days I .’ saw the same thing.
Mémoires, pour servir à l'histoire d'un genre de polyps d'eau douce à bras en forme de cornes (1744), 7-16. Trans. John R. Baker, in Abraham Trembley of Geneva: Scientist and Philosopher 1710-1784 (1952), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Already (222)  |  Anterior (4)  |  Arms (37)  |  Concern (228)  |  Cut (114)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Easy (204)  |  End (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Farther (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Flat (33)  |  Glass (92)  |  Grain (50)  |  Green (63)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Instant (45)  |  Leg (34)  |  Lens (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possess (156)  |  Posterior (7)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Precaution (5)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Step (231)  |  Still (613)  |  Technique (80)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

Man armed with science is like a baby with a box of matches.
Daedalus or Science and the Future (1924), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (28)  |  Box (22)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Science (3879)

Mars was surprising in its way but not flabbergasting; it was a disappointment not to find evidences of life, and there was some sadness in the pictures sent back to earth from the Mars Lander, that lonely long-legged apparatus poking about with its jointed arm, picking up sample after sample of the barren Mars soil, looking for any flicker of life and finding none; the only sign of life on Mars was the Lander itself, an extension of the human mind all the way from earth to Mars, totally alone.
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler’s Ninth Symphony (1984), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Back (390)  |  Barren (30)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Extension (59)  |  Find (998)  |  Flicker (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Joint (31)  |  Leg (34)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Long (790)  |  Looking (189)  |  Mars (44)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Pick (16)  |  Picture (143)  |  Poke (5)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Sample (19)  |  Send (22)  |  Sign (58)  |  Soil (86)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Totally (5)  |  Way (1217)

On the afternoon of October 19, 1899, I climbed a tall cherry tree and, armed with a saw which I still have, and a hatchet, started to trim the dead limbs from the cherry tree. It was one of the quiet, colorful afternoons of sheer beauty which we have in October in New England, and as I looked towards the fields at the east, I imagined how wonderful it would be to make some device which had even the possibility of ascending to Mars. I was a different boy when I descended the tree from when I ascended for existence at last seemed very purposive.
In The Papers of Robert H. Goddard: 1898-1924 (1970), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (5)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Boy (94)  |  Climb (35)  |  Colorful (2)  |  Dead (59)  |  Descend (47)  |  Device (70)  |  Different (577)  |  Existence (456)  |  Field (364)  |  Hatchet (2)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Last (426)  |  Limb (8)  |  Look (582)  |  Mars (44)  |  New (1216)  |  New England (2)  |  October (4)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Saw (160)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Tall (11)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trim (3)  |  Wonderful (149)

Our methods of communication with our fellow men take many forms. We share with other animals the ability to transmit information by such diverse means as the posture of our bodies, by the movements of our eyes, head, arms, and hands, and by our utterances of non-specific sounds. But we go far beyond any other species on earth in that we have evolved sophisticated forms of pictorial representation, elaborate spoken and written languages, ingenious methods of recording music and language on discs, on magnetic tape and in a variety of other kinds of code.
As quoted in epigraph before title page in John Wolfenden, Hermann Bondi, et al., The Languages of Science: A Survey of Techniques of Communication (1963), i.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arms (37)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Code (31)  |  Communication (94)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Earth (996)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Form (959)  |  Hand (143)  |  Head (81)  |  Information (166)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Kind (557)  |  Language (293)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Movement (155)  |  Music (129)  |  Other (2236)  |  Picture (143)  |  Posture (7)  |  Record (154)  |  Recording (13)  |  Representation (53)  |  Share (75)  |  Sophisticated (15)  |  Sound (183)  |  Species (401)  |  Specific (95)  |  Spoken (3)  |  Tape (5)  |  Utterance (10)  |  Variety (132)  |  Written (6)

Probably if half a kilogram [of radium] were in a bottle on that table it would kill us all. It would almost certainly destroy our sight and burn our skins to such an extent that we could not survive. The smallest bit placed on one’s arm would produce a blister which it would need months to heal.
As quoted in 'Radium', New York Times (22 Feb 1903), 6. Note that X-rays were discovered only a few years before, in 1895, radioactivity in 1896, and the electron in 1897. Full knowledge of the harmful radiation did not exist at the time. Nevertheless, Crookes’ remark, in the words of the reporter, “would seem to indicate that it [radium] emits something more than light. Heat and actinic energy must make up a large part of its radiation. It also emits electrons with [great] velocity…”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Blister (2)  |  Bottle (15)  |  Burn (87)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Extent (139)  |  Healing (25)  |  Kill (100)  |  Killing (14)  |  Kilogram (3)  |  Month (88)  |  Radium (25)  |  Sight (132)  |  Skin (47)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survive (79)  |  Table (104)

Scientific research was much like prospecting: you went out and you hunted, armed with your maps and instruments, but in the ened your preparations did not matter, or even your intuition. You needed your luck, and whatever benefits accrued to the diligent, through sheer, grinding hard work.
The Andromeda Strain (1969)
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Luck (42)  |  Map (44)  |  Matter (798)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Through (849)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Work (1351)

Several times every day I observed the portions of the polyp with a magnifying glass. On the 4th December, that is to say on the ninth day after having cut the polyp, I seemed in the morning to be able to perceive, on the edges of the anterior end of the second part (the part that had neither head nor arms), three little points arising from those edges. They immediately made me think of the horns that serve as the legs and arms of the polyp. Nevertheless I did not want to decide at once that these were actually arms that were beginning to grow. Throughout the next day I continually observed these points: this excited me extremely, and awaited with impatience the moment when I should know with certainty what they were. At last, on the following day, they were so big that there was no longer any room for doubt that they were actually arms growing at the anterior extremity of this second part. The next day two more arms started to grow out, and a few days later three more. The second part thus had eight of them, and they were all in a short time as long as those of the first part, that is to say as long as those the polyp possessed before it was cut. I then no longer found any difference between the second part and a polyp that had never been cut. I had remarked the same thing about the first part since the day after the operation. When I observed them with the magnifying glass with all the attention of which I was capable, each of the two appeared perceptibly to be a complete polyp, and they performed all the functions that were known to me: they extended, contracted, and walked.
Mémoires, pour servir à l'histoire d'un genre de polyps d'eau douce à bras en forme de cornes (1744), 7-16. Trans. John R. Baker, in Abraham Trembley of Geneva: Scientist and Philosopher 1710-1784 (1952), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anterior (4)  |  Appeared (4)  |  Arising (22)  |  Arms (37)  |  Attention (190)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Complete (204)  |  Cut (114)  |  Difference (337)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Edge (47)  |  End (590)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extremity (7)  |  First (1283)  |  Function (228)  |  Glass (92)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Horn (18)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impatience (13)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Leg (34)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Magnifying (2)  |  Magnifying Glass (3)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Morning (94)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Operation (213)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performed (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possess (156)  |  Remark (28)  |  Room (40)  |  Say (984)  |  Short (197)  |  Start (221)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Walk (124)  |  Want (497)

Soon shall thy arm, UNCONQUER’D STEAM! afar
Drag the slow barge, or drive the rapid car;
Or on wide-waving wings expanded bear
The flying-chariot through the fields of air.
From 'Botanic Garden' (1781), part 1, canto 1, lines 289-92. The Botanic Garden, with Philosophical Notes (4th Ed., 1799). At the time Erasmus Darwin penned his poem, he would have been aware of a limited history of steam power: Edward Someset, 2nd Marquis of Worcester steam pump (1663), Thomas Savery's steam pump (1698), Thomas Newcomen atmospheric engine (1712), Matthew Boulton and James Watt first commercial steam engine (1776). Watt did not build his first 'double acting' engine, which enabled using a flywheel, until 1783 (two years after Darwin's poem). It was also after Darwin's poem was written that the first steamboat, using paddles, the Pyroscaphe steamed up a French river on 15 Jul 1783. Darwin's predicted future for the steam engine car did not come to pass until Richard Trevithick tested his Camborne road engine (1801). The Wrights' first airplane flight came a century later, in 1903.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Bear (159)  |  Car (71)  |  Chariot (9)  |  Expand (53)  |  Field (364)  |  Flying (72)  |  Poem (96)  |  Slow (101)  |  Soon (186)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Through (849)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wing (75)

The brain that isn’t used rusts. The brain that is used responds. The brain is exactly like any other part of the body: it can be strengthened by proper exercise, by proper use. Put your arm in a sling and keep it there for a considerable length of time, and, when you take it out, you find that you can’t use it. In the same way, the brain that isn’t used suffers atrophy.
As quoted from an interview by B.C. Forbes in The American Magazine (Jan 1921), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Body (537)  |  Brain (270)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Find (998)  |  Other (2236)  |  Proper (144)  |  Rust (7)  |  Sling (4)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)

The experimental investigation by which Ampere established the law of the mechanical action between electric currents is one of the most brilliant achievements in science. The whole theory and experiment, seems as if it had leaped, full grown and full armed, from the brain of the 'Newton of Electricity'. It is perfect in form, and unassailable in accuracy, and it is summed up in a formula from which all the phenomena may be deduced, and which must always remain the cardinal formula of electro-dynamics.
A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism (1873), Vol. 2, 162.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Current (118)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Law (894)  |  Leap (53)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Summary (11)  |  Theory (970)  |  Whole (738)

The experimental investigation by which Ampère established the law of the mechanical action between electric currents is one of the most brilliant achievements in science. The whole, theory and experiment, seems as if it had leaped, full grown and full armed, from the brain of the “Newton of Electricity”. It is perfect in form, and unassailable in accuracy, and it is summed up in a formula from which all the phenomena may be deduced, and which must always remain the cardinal formula of electro-dynamics.
In James Clerk Maxwell, Electricity and Magnetism (1881), Vol. 2, 163
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  André-Marie Ampère (11)  |  Brain (270)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Current (118)  |  Deduce (25)  |  Electric (76)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Establish (57)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Form (959)  |  Formula (98)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Law (894)  |  Leap (53)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Remain (349)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unassailable (3)  |  Whole (738)

The hostility of the state would be assured toward any system or science that might not strengthen its arm.
In The Degradation of the Democratic Dogma (1919), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Assure (15)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Politics (15)  |  State (491)  |  Strengthen (23)  |  System (537)

The incessant driving of the pen over paper causes intense fatigue of the hand and the whole arm because of the continuous ... strain on the muscles and tendons.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (541)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Driving (28)  |  Fatigue (12)  |  Health (193)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pen (20)  |  Whole (738)

The Mathematics, I say, which effectually exercises, not vainly deludes or vexatiously torments studious Minds with obscure Subtilties, perplexed Difficulties, or contentious Disquisitions; which overcomes without Opposition, triumphs without Pomp, compels without Force, and rules absolutely without Loss of Liberty; which does not privately over-reach a weak Faith, but openly assaults an armed Reason, obtains a total Victory, and puts on inevitable Chains; whose Words are so many Oracles, and Works as many Miracles; which blabs out nothing rashly, nor designs anything from the Purpose, but plainly demonstrates and readily performs all Things within its Verge; which obtrudes no false Shadow of Science, but the very Science itself, the Mind firmly adhering to it, as soon as possessed of it, and can never after desert it of its own Accord, or be deprived of it by any Force of others: Lastly the Mathematics, which depends upon Principles clear to the Mind, and agreeable to Experience; which draws certain Conclusions, instructs by profitable Rules, unfolds pleasant Questions; and produces wonderful Effects; which is the fruitful Parent of, I had almost said all, Arts, the unshaken Foundation of Sciences, and the plentiful Fountain of Advantage to human Affairs.
Address to the University of Cambridge upon being elected Lucasian Professor of Mathematics (14 Mar 1664). In Mathematical Lectures (1734), xxviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Agreeable (18)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chain (50)  |  Compel (30)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Delude (3)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Depend (228)  |  Desert (56)  |  Design (195)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Draw (137)  |  Effect (393)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Experience (467)  |  Faith (203)  |  False (100)  |  Force (487)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Liberty (25)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Opposition (48)  |  Oracle (4)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Parent (76)  |  Perform (121)  |  Pomp (2)  |  Possess (156)  |  Principle (507)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Rashly (2)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rule (294)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Soon (186)  |  Studious (5)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Torment (18)  |  Total (94)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Verge (10)  |  Victory (39)  |  Weak (71)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

The nuclear arms race is like two sworn enemies standing waist deep in gasoline, one with three matches, the other with five.
[A summary version; not verbatim.]
A summary version, as written by Kristen Ghodsee in Lost in Transition: Ethnographies of Everyday Life After Communism (2011), 2-3. Note the author states it as “I remember,” and the wording is not verbatim from Sagan's original remark made during a panel discussion in ABC News Viewpoint following the TV movie The Day After (20 Nov 1983). The verbatim quote is also on this page. It begins, “Imagine a room…”
Science quotes on:  |  Arms (37)  |  Arms Race (2)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Deep (233)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Gasoline (4)  |  Match (29)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Race (268)  |  Standing (11)  |  Summary (11)  |  Two (937)  |  Verbatim (4)

The object of the present volume is to point out the effects and the advantages which arise from the use of tools and machines;—to endeavour to classify their modes of action;—and to trace both the causes and the conséquences of applying machinery to supersede the skill and power of the human arm.
Opening statement in 'Introduction', Economy of Machinery and Manufactures (1st ed., 1832), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Apply (160)  |  Arise (158)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Effect (393)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Human (1468)  |  Machine (257)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Object (422)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Skill (109)  |  Supersede (7)  |  Tool (117)  |  Trace (103)  |  Use (766)

The only truly secure system is one that is powered off, cast in a block of concrete and sealed in a lead-lined room with armed guards—and even then I have my doubts.
As quoted in epigraph to A.K. Dewdney, 'Computer Recreations: Of Worms, Viruses and Core War' by A. K. Dewdney in Scientific American (Mar 1989), 110. Also on the koth.org website.
Science quotes on:  |  Block (12)  |  Cast (66)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Guard (18)  |  Lead (384)  |  Power (746)  |  Room (40)  |  Seal (18)  |  Secure (22)  |  System (537)  |  Truly (116)

The oppressive weight of disaster and tragedy in our lives does not arise from a high percentage of evil among the summed total of all acts, but from the extraordinary power of exceedingly rare incidents of depravity to inflict catastrophic damage, especially in our technological age when airplanes can become powerful bombs. (An even more evil man, armed only with a longbow, could not have wreaked such havoc at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Age (499)  |  Airplane (41)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Battle (34)  |  Become (815)  |  Bomb (18)  |  Catastrophic (9)  |  Damage (34)  |  Depravity (3)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Especially (31)  |  Evil (116)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Havoc (7)  |  High (362)  |  Incident (4)  |  Inflict (4)  |  Live (628)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Oppressive (2)  |  Percentage (6)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Rare (89)  |  Sum (102)  |  Technological (61)  |  Total (94)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Weight (134)

The partitions of knowledge are not like several lines that meet in one angle, and so touch not in a point; but are like branches of a tree, that meet in a stem, which hath a dimension and quantity of entireness and continuance, before it come to discontinue and break itself into arms and boughs.
Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu (Ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1852), Vol. 1, 193.
Science quotes on:  |  Arms (37)  |  Bough (9)  |  Break (99)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Discontinue (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Point (580)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Stem (31)  |  Touch (141)  |  Tree (246)

The personal adventures of a geologist would form an amusing narrative. He is trudging along, dusty and weather­beaten, with his wallet at his back, and his hammer on his shoulder, and he is taken for a stone-mason travelling in search of work. In mining-countries, he is supposed to be in quest of mines, and receives many tempting offers of shares in the ‘Wheel Dream’, or the ‘Golden Venture’;—he has been watched as a smuggler; it is well if he has not been committed as a vagrant, or apprehended as a spy, for he has been refused admittance to an inn, or has been ushered into the room appropriated to ostlers and postilions. When his fame has spread among the more enlightened part of the community of a district which he has been exploring, and inquiries are made of the peasantry as to the habits and pursuits of the great philosopher who has been among them, and with whom they have become familiar, it is found that the importance attached by him to shells and stones, and such like trumpery, is looked upon as a species of derangement, but they speak with delight of his affability, sprightliness, and good-humour. They respect the strength of his arm, and the weight of his hammer, as they point to marks which he inflicted on the rocks, and they recount with wonder his pedestrian performances, and the voracious appetite with which, at the close of a long day’s work he would devour the coarsest food that was set before him.
In Practical Geology and Mineralogy: With Instructions for the Qualitative Analysis of Minerals (1841), 31-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Affability (2)  |  Appetite (17)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Back (390)  |  Become (815)  |  Community (104)  |  Delight (108)  |  Derangement (2)  |  Devour (29)  |  Dream (208)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fame (50)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Geologist (75)  |  Golden (45)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Habit (168)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Humour (116)  |  Importance (286)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Mine (76)  |  Mining (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Offer (141)  |  Performance (48)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Point (580)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Quest (39)  |  Receive (114)  |  Respect (207)  |  Rock (161)  |  Search (162)  |  Set (394)  |  Share (75)  |  Shell (63)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Spread (83)  |  Spy (8)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strength (126)  |  Tempting (10)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Vagrant (5)  |  Venture (18)  |  Watch (109)  |  Weather (44)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)

The physician being, then, truly a blind man, armed with a club, who, as chance directs the weight of his blow, will be certain of annihilating nature or the disease.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blow (44)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chance (239)  |  Club (4)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disease (328)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physician (273)  |  Truly (116)  |  Weight (134)  |  Will (2355)

The profound mathematical ability of Bolyai János showed itself physically not only in his handling of the violin, where he was a master, but also of arms, where he was unapproachable.
In János Bolyai, Science Absolute of Space, translated from the Latin by George Bruce Halsted (1896), Translator's Introduction, xxix. [Bolyai was the victor in many duels. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Arms (37)  |  János Bolyai (6)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Physical (508)  |  Profound (104)  |  Show (346)  |  Violin (6)

The train, panting up past lonely farms,
Fed by the fireman's restless arms…
Past cotton grass and moorland boulder,
Shoveling white steam over her shoulder.
Poem written as narration for documentary film "Night Mail" (1936), made for the British Post Office.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arms (37)  |  Boulder (8)  |  Farm (26)  |  Grass (46)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Moorland (2)  |  Past (337)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Train (114)  |  White (127)

Throughout the centuries there were men who took first steps, down new roads, armed with nothing but their own vision.
Ayn Rand
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Century (310)  |  Down (456)  |  First (1283)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Road (64)  |  Step (231)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Vision (123)

Timorous readers, however, need entertain no feverish fear, on, visiting the Isle of Sheppey, of encountering either wild elephants, crocodiles, sharks, serpents, or man-eating birds of huge dimensions, bearing strange names, and armed with sets of teeth for masticating and digestive purposes, as the author can assure them that they all died out a million or so of years ago, before he undertook to look up their records and write the history of this wonderful little island. Visitors may, however, honestly deplore the absence of the feathery palm trees bearing the luscious date and the lacteous cocoa-nut; but by prosecuting a diligent search they may, at least, be consoled by procuring some of these, rare fossil remains, reminiscent of an incalculable period of time when our particular portion of this hemisphere performed its diurnal revolutions in the immediate zone of the tropics.
Quoted in Augustus A. Daly, History of the Isle of Sheppey (1975), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Author (167)  |  Bird (149)  |  Crocodile (14)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Eating (45)  |  Elephant (31)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feverish (6)  |  Fossil (136)  |  History (673)  |  Honestly (10)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Island (46)  |  Little (707)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Name (333)  |  Perform (121)  |  Period (198)  |  Portion (84)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Rare (89)  |  Record (154)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Search (162)  |  Set (394)  |  Shark (10)  |  Strange (157)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Write (230)  |  Year (933)

Twenty years ago many chemists would have defended the theory of bond arms as a satisfactory explanation because they had become accustomed to thinking of it as unique and as ultimate.
The Nature of Physical Reality: A Philosophy of Modern Physics (1950), 99, n.1.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Arms (37)  |  Become (815)  |  Bond (45)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unique (67)  |  Year (933)

Use now and then a little Exercise a quarter of an Hour before Meals, as to swing a Weight, or swing your Arms about with a small Weight in each Hand; to leap, or the like, for that stirs the Muscles of the Breast.
In Poor Richard's Almanack (1742).
Science quotes on:  |  Arms (37)  |  Breast (9)  |  Diet (54)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Hand (143)  |  Health (193)  |  Hour (186)  |  Leap (53)  |  Little (707)  |  Meal (18)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Small (477)  |  Stir (21)  |  Swing (11)  |  Use (766)  |  Weight (134)

We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried. Most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad Gita: Vishnu is trying to pursue the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says, “Now I am become Death, destroyer of worlds.” I suppose we all thought that one way or another. There was a great deal of solemn talk that this was the end of the great wars of the century.
At the first atomic bomb test (16 Jul 1945), in Len Giovanitti and Fred Freed, The Decision to Drop the Bomb (1965), 197
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Century (310)  |  Cry (29)  |  Deal (188)  |  Death (388)  |  Destroyer (4)  |  Do (1908)  |  Duty (68)  |  End (590)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hindu (3)  |  Impress (64)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Line (91)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Prince (13)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Remember (179)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Silent (29)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Talk (100)  |  Thought (953)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  War (225)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

We sleep, and at length awake to the still reality of a winter morning. The snow lies warm as cotton or down upon the window-sill; the broadened sash and frosted panes admit a dim and private light, which enhances the snug cheer within. The stillness of the morning is impressive... From the eaves and fences hang stalactites of snow, and in the yard stand stalagmites covering some concealed core. The trees and shrubs rear white arms to the sky on every side; and where were walls and fences we see fantastic forms stretching in the frolic gambols across the dusky landscape, as if nature had strewn her fresh designs over the fields by night as models for man’s art.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Across (32)  |  Admit (45)  |  Arms (37)  |  Art (657)  |  Awake (19)  |  Broaden (3)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Core (18)  |  Cotton (8)  |  Cover (37)  |  Covering (14)  |  Design (195)  |  Dim (8)  |  Down (456)  |  Dusky (4)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Fantastic (20)  |  Fence (11)  |  Field (364)  |  Form (959)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Frost (14)  |  Gambol (2)  |  Hang (45)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Length (23)  |  Lie (364)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Model (102)  |  Morning (94)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Night (120)  |  Pane (2)  |  Private (23)  |  Reality (261)  |  Rear (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Shrub (5)  |  Side (233)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Snow (37)  |  Stand (274)  |  Still (613)  |  Stillness (5)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strew (3)  |  Tree (246)  |  Wall (67)  |  Warm (69)  |  White (127)  |  Window (58)  |  Winter (44)  |  Yard (7)

We were able to see the plankton blooms resulting from the upwelling off the coast of Chile. The plankton itself extended along the coastline and had some long tenuous arms reaching out to sea. The arms or lines of plankton were pushed around in a random direction, fairly well-defined yet somewhat weak in color, in contrast with the dark blue ocean. The fishing ought to be good down there.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arms (37)  |  Bloom (9)  |  Blue (56)  |  Coast (13)  |  Coastline (2)  |  Color (137)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Dark (140)  |  Direction (175)  |  Down (456)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fairly (4)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Good (889)  |  Line (91)  |  Long (790)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Plankton (3)  |  Push (62)  |  Random (41)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Tenuous (3)  |  Weak (71)  |  Well-Defined (8)

When I was young Science walked hand-in-hand with Art; now she walks arm-in-arm with Trade.
Clifford Dobell, 'D' Arcy Wentworth Thompson 1860-1948', Obituary Notices of Fellows of the Royal Society 1948-1949 (1949), 613.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Science (3879)  |  Walk (124)  |  Young (227)

Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost between two spiral arms in the outskirts of a galaxy, tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people.
Cosmos (1985), 160.
Science quotes on:  |  Arms (37)  |  Corner (57)  |  Earth (996)  |  Find (998)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Galaxies (29)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Humdrum (2)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Star (427)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)

With the ministry’s motto ‘Research on a Shoestring’ emblazoned on his coat of arms, he has to struggle with a treasury more interested in surtax relief than national survival. [Responding to an earlier statement by British Science Minister, Lord Hailsham, that British scientists were being recruited by the U.S.]
Address at the Imperial College of Science and Technology, London (28 Feb 1963). In 'Hailsham Chided on Science's Role', New York Times (1 Mar 1963), 2. See also aron Hailsham's original statement using the link below.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arms (37)  |  Being (1278)  |  British (41)  |  Baron Quintin Hogg Hailsham of St. Marylebone (3)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lord (93)  |  Ministry (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Motto (28)  |  National (26)  |  Relief (30)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Statement (142)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Survival (94)  |  Treasury (3)

X-rays ... I am afraid of them. I stopped experimenting with them two years ago, when I came near to losing my eyesight and Dally, my assistant practically lost the use of both of his arms.
Quoted in 'Edison Fears Hidden Perils of the X-Rays', New York World (3 Aug 1903), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Arms (37)  |  Both (493)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Eyesight (5)  |  Fear (197)  |  Injury (36)  |  Loss (110)  |  Ray (114)  |  Stop (80)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  X-ray (37)  |  Year (933)

You have … been told that science grows like an organism. You have been told that, if we today see further than our predecessors, it is only because we stand on their shoulders. But this [Nobel Prize Presentation] is an occasion on which I should prefer to remember, not the giants upon whose shoulders we stood, but the friends with whom we stood arm in arm … colleagues in so much of my work.
From Nobel Banquet speech (10 Dec 1960).
Science quotes on:  |  Colleague (50)  |  Friend (168)  |  Further (6)  |  Giant (67)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Organism (220)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  Stand (274)  |  Standing (11)  |  Today (314)  |  Work (1351)

[To elucidate using models] the different combining powers in elementary atoms, I … select my illustrations from that most delightful of games, croquet. Let the croquet balls represent our atoms, and let us distinguish the atoms of different elements by different colours. The white balls are hydrogen, the green ones chlorine atoms; the atoms of fiery oxygen are red, those of nitrogen, blue; the carbon atoms, lastly, are naturally represented by black balls. But we have, in addition, exhibit the different combining powers of these atoms … by screwing into the balls a number of metallic arms (tubes and pins), which correspond respectively to the combining powers of the atoms represented … to join the balls … in imitation of the atomic edifices represented.
Paper presented at the Friday Discourse of the the Royal Institution (7 Apr 1865). 'On the Combining Power of Atoms', Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1865), 4, No. 42, 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Arms (37)  |  Atom (355)  |  Ball (62)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Chlorine (15)  |  Croquet (2)  |  Delightful (17)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Element (310)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Game (101)  |  Green (63)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Model (102)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Number (699)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Pin (18)  |  Power (746)  |  Represent (155)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Select (44)  |  White (127)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.