Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Tent

Tent Quotes (11 quotes)

But how shall we this union well expresse?
Naught tyes the soule: her subtiltie is such
She moves the bodie, which she doth possesse.
Yet no part toucheth, but by Vertue's touch.
Then dwels she not therein as in a tent;
Nor as a pilot in his Ship doth sit;
Nor as the spider in his web is pent;
Nor as the Waxe retaines the print in it;
Nor as a Vessell water doth containe;
Nor as one Liquor in another shed;
Nor as the heate dath in the fire remaine;
Nor as a voice throughout the ayre is spred;
But as the faire and cheerfull morning light,
Doth here, and there, her silver beames impart,
And in an instant doth her selfe unite
To the transparent Aire, in all, and part:
Still resting whole, when blowes the Aire devide;
Abiding pure, when th' Aire is most corrupted;
Throughout the Aire her beames dispersing wide,
And when the Aire is tost, not interrupted:
So doth the piercing Soule the body fill;
Being all in all, and all in part diffus'd;
Indivisible, incorruptible still,
Not forc't, encountred, troubled or confus'd.
And as the Sunne above the light doth bring,
Tough we behold it in the Aire below;
So from th'eternall light the Soule doth spring,
Though in the Bodie she her powers do show.
From 'Nosce Teipsum' (1599), in Claire Howard (ed.), The Poems of Sir John Davies (1941), 151-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fire (189)  |  Impart (23)  |  Indivisible (21)  |  Instant (45)  |  Light (607)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Naught (10)  |  Power (746)  |  Pure (291)  |  Ship (62)  |  Show (346)  |  Silver (46)  |  Spider (14)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Sun (385)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Touch (141)  |  Tough (19)  |  Transparent (16)  |  Union (51)  |  Unite (42)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wide (96)

Creatures that by a rule in nature teach
The act of order to a peopled kingdom.
They have a king and officers of sorts;
Where some, like magistrates, correct at home,
Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad,
Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings,
Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds;
Which pillage they with merry march bring home
To the tent-royal of their emperor.
Who, busied in his majesty, surveys
The singing masons building roofs of gold;
The civil citizens kneading up the honey;
The poor mechanic porters crowding
Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate;
The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum,
Delivering o'er to executors pale
The lazy yawning drone.
Henry V (1599), I, ii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abroad (18)  |  Act (272)  |  Arm (81)  |  Building (156)  |  Burden (27)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Civil (26)  |  Creature (233)  |  Drone (4)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Gate (32)  |  Gold (97)  |  Home (170)  |  Honey (15)  |  Justice (39)  |  King (35)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Magistrate (2)  |  Majesty (21)  |  March (46)  |  Mason (2)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Officer (12)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Porter (2)  |  Roof (13)  |  Royal (57)  |  Rule (294)  |  Singing (19)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Sting (3)  |  Summer (54)  |  Survey (33)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Velvet (4)

Had we lived, I should have had a tale to tell of the hardihood, endurance and courage of my companions which would have stirred the heart of every Englishman. These rough notes and our dead bodies must tell the tale, but surely, a great rich country like ours will see that those who are dependent on us are properly provided for.
[Final words in a 'Message to the Public' left written in his diary dated 25 March 1912, shortly before he died on the Ross Ice Barrier, Antarctica. When searchers found his body, on 12 Nov 1912, Scott was discovered sitting upright against the pole of the tent with the diary behind his head, as if for a pillow.]
Final words in a 'Message to the Public' left written in his diary dated 25 March 1912, shortly before he died on the Ross Ice Barrier, Antarctica. In Logan Marshall, The Story of Polar Conquest: The Complete History of Arctic and Antarctic (1913), 24-25. by Logan Marshall - Polar regions - 1913
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Antarctica (7)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Behind (137)  |  Body (537)  |  Companion (19)  |  Country (251)  |  Courage (69)  |  Death (388)  |  Discover (553)  |  Endurance (6)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Final (118)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Ice (54)  |  March (46)  |  Message (49)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pole (46)  |  See (1081)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Surely (101)  |  Tale (16)  |  Tell (340)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Herschel removed the speckled tent-roof from the world and exposed the immeasurable deeps of space, dim-flecked with fleets of colossal suns sailing their billion-leagued remoteness.
'The Secret History of Eddypus', in Mark Twain and David Ketterer (ed.), Tales of Wonder (2003), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Billion (95)  |  Colossal (15)  |  Deep (233)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Sir William Herschel (14)  |  Remoteness (9)  |  Roof (13)  |  Sailing (14)  |  Space (500)  |  Speckled (3)  |  Sun (385)  |  World (1774)

How hard to realize that every camp of men or beast has this glorious starry firmament for a roof! In such places standing alone on the mountain-top it is easy to realize that whatever special nests we make - leaves and moss like the marmots and birds, or tents or piled stone - we all dwell in a house of one room - the world with the firmament for its roof - and are sailing the celestial spaces without leaving any track.
John Muir
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Beast (55)  |  Bird (149)  |  Camp (10)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Dwell (15)  |  Easy (204)  |  Firmament (18)  |  Glorious (48)  |  Hard (243)  |  House (140)  |  Leave (130)  |  Moss (10)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nest (23)  |  Pile (12)  |  Place (177)  |  Realize (147)  |  Roof (13)  |  Room (40)  |  Sail (36)  |  Sailing (14)  |  Space (500)  |  Special (184)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stone (162)  |  Top (96)  |  Track (38)  |  Whatever (234)  |  World (1774)

If a man has a tent made of linen of which the apertures have all been stopped up, and be it twelve bracchia across (over twenty-five feet) and twelve in depth, he will be able to throw himself down from any height without sustaining injury. [His concept of the parachute.]
In Isaac Asimov and Jason A. Shulman, Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 3-4, which notes twelve bracchia is over 25 feet. There are other translations with different units. Da Vinci’s illustration in his notebook showed a pyramid-shaped parachute below which hung a man suspended by a few short cords.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  All (4108)  |  Aperture (5)  |  Concept (221)  |  Depth (94)  |  Down (456)  |  Himself (461)  |  Injury (36)  |  Linen (8)  |  Man (2251)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Will (2355)

Mock on, mock on, Voltaire, Rousseau!
Mock on, mock on: 'Tis all in vain!
You throw the sand against the wind,
And the wind blows it back again.
And every sand becomes a gem
Reflected in the beams divine;
Blown back they blind the mocking eye,
But still in Israel's paths they shine.
The atoms of Democritus
And Newton's particles of light
Are sands upon the Red Sea shore,
Where Israel's tents do shine so bright.
Notebook Drafts (c. 1804). In W. H. Stevenson (ed.), The Poems of William Blake (1971), 481.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Back (390)  |  Beam (24)  |  Become (815)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blow (44)  |  Bright (79)  |  Democritus of Abdera (17)  |  Divine (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eye (419)  |  Gem (16)  |  Israel (6)  |  Light (607)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Particle (194)  |  Path (144)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Sand (62)  |  Sea (308)  |  Still (613)  |  Vain (83)  |  Francois Marie Arouet Voltaire (38)  |  Wind (128)

My father, and the father of my father, pitched their tents here before me. … For twelve hundred years have the true believers—and, praise be to God! all true wisdom is with them alone—been settled in this country, and not one of them ever heard of a palace underground. Neither did they who went before them. But lo! here comes a Frank from many days’ journey off, and he walks up to the very place, and he takes a stick … and makes a line here, and makes a line there. Here, says he, is the palace; there, says he, is the gate; and he shows us what has been all our lives beneath our feet, without our having known anything about it. Wonderful! Wonderful! Is it by books, is it by magic, is it by your prophets, that you have learnt wisdom?
(c. 1850) To Austin Layard, the English archaeologist who discovered and excavated Nineveh and Nimrud, 1845-1861.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Archaeology (49)  |  Believer (25)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Book (392)  |  Country (251)  |  Father (110)  |  Gate (32)  |  God (757)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Journey (42)  |  Known (454)  |  Live (628)  |  Magic (86)  |  Palace (8)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Say (984)  |  Settled (34)  |  Show (346)  |  Underground (11)  |  Walk (124)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Year (933)

Of all the constituents of the human body, bone is the hardest, the driest, the earthiest, and the coldest; and, excepting only the teeth, it is devoid of sensation. God, the great Creator of all things, formed its substance to this specification with good reason, intending it to be like a foundation for the whole body; for in the fabric of the human body bones perform the same function as do walls and beams in houses, poles in tents, and keels and ribs in boats.
Bones Differentiated by Function
Some bones, by reason of their strength, form as it were props for the body; these include the tibia, the femur, the spinal vertebrae, and most of the bony framework. Others are like bastions, defense walls, and ramparts, affording natural protection to other parts; examples are the skull, the spines and transverse processes of the vertebrae, the breast bone, the ribs. Others stand in front of the joints between certain bones, to ensure that the joint does not move too loosely or bend to too acute an angle. This is the function of the tiny bones, likened by the professors of anatomy to the size of a sesame seed, which are attached to the second internode of the thumb, the first internode of the other four fingers and the first internodes of the five toes. The teeth, on the other hand, serve specifically to cut, crush, pound and grind our food, and similarly the two ossicles in the organ of hearing perform a specifically auditory function.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, 1, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in 'Nature of Bone; Function of Bones', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Angle (20)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Auditory (2)  |  Bastion (3)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bend (12)  |  Boat (16)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Breast (9)  |  Certain (550)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Creator (91)  |  Crush (18)  |  Cut (114)  |  Defense (23)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Driest (2)  |  Ensure (26)  |  Exception (73)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Finger (44)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Form (959)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Framework (31)  |  Function (228)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hardest (3)  |  Hearing (49)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Include (90)  |  Joint (31)  |  Keel (4)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Pole (46)  |  Pound (14)  |  Process (423)  |  Professor (128)  |  Prop (6)  |  Protection (36)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rib (6)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Serve (59)  |  Sesame (2)  |  Size (60)  |  Skull (5)  |  Specification (7)  |  Spine (9)  |  Stand (274)  |  Strength (126)  |  Substance (248)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thumb (17)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Toe (7)  |  Transverse (2)  |  Two (937)  |  Vertebra (4)  |  Wall (67)  |  Whole (738)

The night spread out of the east in a great flood, quenching the red sunlight in a single minute. We wriggled by breathless degrees deep into our sleeping bags. Our sole thought was of comfort; we were not alive to the beauty or the grandeur of our position; we did not reflect on the splendor of our elevation. A regret I shall always have is that I did not muster up the energy to spend a minute or two stargazing. One peep I did make between the tent flaps into the night, and I remember dimly an appalling wealth of stars, not pale and remote as they appear when viewed through the moisture-laden air of lower levels, but brilliant points of electric blue fire standing out almost stereoscopically. It was a sight an astronomer would have given much to see, and here were we lying dully in our sleeping bags concerned only with the importance of keeping warm and comfortable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Alive (90)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Appear (118)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Bag (3)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blue (56)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Comfortable (10)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deep (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Dimly (6)  |  East (18)  |  Electric (76)  |  Elevation (13)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flap (2)  |  Flood (50)  |  Give (202)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Great (1574)  |  Importance (286)  |  Keep (101)  |  Level (67)  |  Lie (364)  |  Low (80)  |  Lying (55)  |  Minute (125)  |  Moisture (20)  |  Muster (2)  |  Night (120)  |  Pale (9)  |  Peep (3)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Red (35)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Regret (30)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remote (83)  |  See (1081)  |  Sight (132)  |  Single (353)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Sole (49)  |  Spend (95)  |  Splendor (17)  |  Spread (83)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  View (488)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Wriggle (2)

When I was living with the Indians, my hostess, a fine looking woman, who wore numberless bracelets, and rings in her ears and on her fingers, and painted her face like a brilliant sunset, one day gave away a very fine horse. I was surprised, for I knew there had been no family talk on the subject, so I asked: “Will your husband like to have you give the horse away?” Her eyes danced, and, breaking into a peal of laughter, she hastened to tell the story to the other women gathered in the tent, and I became the target of many merry eyes. I tried to explain how a white woman would act, but laughter and contempt met my explanation of the white man’s hold upon his wife’s property.
Speech on 'The Legal Conditions of Indian Women', delivered to Evening Session (Thur 29 Mar 1888), collected in Report of the International Council of Women: Assembled by the National Woman Suffrage Association, Washington, D.C., U.S. of America, March 25 to April 1, 1888 (1888), Vol. 1, 240.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bracelet (2)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Ear (68)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Family (94)  |  Finger (44)  |  Gather (72)  |  Give (202)  |  Hasten (13)  |  Horse (74)  |  Hostess (2)  |  Husband (13)  |  Indian (27)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Looking (189)  |  Man (2251)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paint (22)  |  Property (168)  |  Ring (16)  |  Story (118)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Talk (100)  |  Target (9)  |  Tell (340)  |  White (127)  |  Wife (41)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.