Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Companion

Companion Quotes (19 quotes)

A possible explanation for the observed excess noise is the one given by Dicke, Peebles, Roll, and Wilkinson (1965) in a companion letter in this issue.
[The low-key announcement of the detection of the cosmic microwave background radiation which is the afterglow of the Big Bang. Co-author with Robert Wilson. They received the 1978 Nobel Prize for their discovery.]
'A measurement of excess antenna temperature at 4080 Mc/s'. In Astrophysical Journal (1965). Reprinted in R. B. Partridge, 3 K the cosmic microwave background radiation? (1995), Appendix A, 355.
Science quotes on:  |  Announcement (15)  |  Author (167)  |  Background (43)  |  Background Radiation (3)  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (39)  |  Co-Author (2)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Detection (16)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Excess (22)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Give (202)  |  Issue (42)  |  Letter (109)  |  Low (80)  |  Microwave (4)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Noise (37)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Possible (552)  |  Radiation (44)  |  Receive (114)  |  Roll (40)

During the long ages of class rule, which are just beginning to cease, only one form of sovereignty has been assigned to all men—that, namely, over all women. Upon these feeble and inferior companions all men were permitted to avenge the indignities they suffered from so many men to whom they were forced to submit.
In “Common Sense” Applied to Woman Suffrage (1894), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Avenge (2)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Cease (79)  |  Class (164)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Form (959)  |  Indignity (2)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Permit (58)  |  Rule (294)  |  Sovereignty (6)  |  Submit (18)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Woman (151)

Every variety of philosophical and theological opinion was represented there [The Metaphysical Society], and expressed itself with entire openness; most of my colleagues were -ists of one sort or another; and, however kind and friendly they might be, I, the man without a rag of a label to cover himself with, could not fail to have some of the uneasy feelings which must have beset the historical fox when, after leaving the trap in which his tail remained, he presented himself to his normally elongated companions. So I took thought, and invented what I conceived to be the appropriate title of “agnostic” .
'Agnosticism' (1889). In Collected Essays (1894), Vol. 5, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Agnostic (9)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Express (186)  |  Fail (185)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Himself (461)  |  Historical (70)  |  Kind (557)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Openness (7)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Present (619)  |  Remain (349)  |  Represent (155)  |  Society (326)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thought (953)  |  Variety (132)

Had we lived, I should have had a tale to tell of the hardihood, endurance and courage of my companions which would have stirred the heart of every Englishman. These rough notes and our dead bodies must tell the tale, but surely, a great rich country like ours will see that those who are dependent on us are properly provided for.
[Final words in a 'Message to the Public' left written in his diary dated 25 March 1912, shortly before he died on the Ross Ice Barrier, Antarctica. When searchers found his body, on 12 Nov 1912, Scott was discovered sitting upright against the pole of the tent with the diary behind his head, as if for a pillow.]
Final words in a 'Message to the Public' left written in his diary dated 25 March 1912, shortly before he died on the Ross Ice Barrier, Antarctica. In Logan Marshall, The Story of Polar Conquest: The Complete History of Arctic and Antarctic (1913), 24-25. by Logan Marshall - Polar regions - 1913
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Antarctica (7)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Behind (137)  |  Body (537)  |  Country (251)  |  Courage (69)  |  Death (388)  |  Discover (553)  |  Endurance (6)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Final (118)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heart (229)  |  Ice (54)  |  March (46)  |  Message (49)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pole (46)  |  See (1081)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Surely (101)  |  Tale (16)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tent (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Hope is the companion of power and the mother of success, for those of us who hope strongest have within us the gift of miracles.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Gift (104)  |  Hope (299)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Mother (114)  |  Power (746)  |  Strong (174)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Success (302)

I can see him [Sylvester] now, with his white beard and few locks of gray hair, his forehead wrinkled o’er with thoughts, writing rapidly his figures and formulae on the board, sometimes explaining as he wrote, while we, his listeners, caught the reflected sounds from the board. But stop, something is not right, he pauses, his hand goes to his forehead to help his thought, he goes over the work again, emphasizes the leading points, and finally discovers his difficulty. Perhaps it is some error in his figures, perhaps an oversight in the reasoning. Sometimes, however, the difficulty is not elucidated, and then there is not much to the rest of the lecture. But at the next lecture we would hear of some new discovery that was the outcome of that difficulty, and of some article for the Journal, which he had begun. If a text-book had been taken up at the beginning, with the intention of following it, that text-book was most likely doomed to oblivion for the rest of the term, or until the class had been made listeners to every new thought and principle that had sprung from the laboratory of his mind, in consequence of that first difficulty. Other difficulties would soon appear, so that no text-book could last more than half of the term. In this way his class listened to almost all of the work that subsequently appeared in the Journal. It seemed to be the quality of his mind that he must adhere to one subject. He would think about it, talk about it to his class, and finally write about it for the Journal. The merest accident might start him, but once started, every moment, every thought was given to it, and, as much as possible, he read what others had done in the same direction; but this last seemed to be his real point; he could not read without finding difficulties in the way of understanding the author. Thus, often his own work reproduced what had been done by others, and he did not find it out until too late.
A notable example of this is in his theory of cyclotomic functions, which he had reproduced in several foreign journals, only to find that he had been greatly anticipated by foreign authors. It was manifest, one of the critics said, that the learned professor had not read Rummer’s elementary results in the theory of ideal primes. Yet Professor Smith’s report on the theory of numbers, which contained a full synopsis of Kummer’s theory, was Professor Sylvester’s constant companion.
This weakness of Professor Sylvester, in not being able to read what others had done, is perhaps a concomitant of his peculiar genius. Other minds could pass over little difficulties and not be troubled by them, and so go on to a final understanding of the results of the author. But not so with him. A difficulty, however small, worried him, and he was sure to have difficulties until the subject had been worked over in his own way, to correspond with his own mode of thought. To read the work of others, meant therefore to him an almost independent development of it. Like the man whose pleasure in life is to pioneer the way for society into the forests, his rugged mind could derive satisfaction only in hewing out its own paths; and only when his efforts brought him into the uncleared fields of mathematics did he find his place in the Universe.
In Florian Cajori, Teaching and History of Mathematics in the United States (1890), 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Adhere (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Appear (118)  |  Article (22)  |  Author (167)  |  Beard (7)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Board (12)  |  Book (392)  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (164)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Constant (144)  |  Contain (68)  |  Correspond (9)  |  Critic (20)  |  Derive (65)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doom (32)  |  Effort (227)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Elucidate (4)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Error (321)  |  Example (94)  |  Explain (322)  |  Field (364)  |  Figure (160)  |  Final (118)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forehead (2)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Forest (150)  |  Formula (98)  |  Full (66)  |  Function (228)  |  Genius (284)  |  Give (202)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Hair (25)  |  Half (56)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hear (139)  |  Help (105)  |  Hew (3)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Independent (67)  |  Intention (46)  |  Journal (30)  |  Ernst Eduard Kummer (3)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Likely (34)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listener (7)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mere (84)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mode (41)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Notable (5)  |  Number (699)  |  Oblivion (10)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outcome (13)  |  Oversight (4)  |  Pass (238)  |  Path (144)  |  Pause (6)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Place (177)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prime (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Professor (128)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Read (287)  |  Real (149)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Report (38)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Rugged (7)  |  Rum (3)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Seem (145)  |  Several (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smith (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spring (133)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Subject (521)  |  Subsequently (2)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Synopsis (2)  |  Talk (100)  |  Term (349)  |  Textbook (36)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weakness (48)  |  White (127)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Wrinkle (4)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)

I have spent much time in the study of the abstract sciences; but the paucity of persons with whom you can communicate on such subjects disgusted me with them. When I began to study man, I saw that these abstract sciences are not suited to him, and that in diving into them, I wandered farther from my real object than those who knew them not, and I forgave them for not having attended to these things. I expected then, however, that I should find some companions in the study of man, since it was so specifically a duty. I was in error. There are fewer students of man than of geometry.
Thoughts of Blaise Pascal (1846), 137.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Attend (65)  |  Communicate (36)  |  Communication (94)  |  Disgust (10)  |  Error (321)  |  Expect (200)  |  Farther (51)  |  Find (998)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Man (2251)  |  Object (422)  |  Person (363)  |  Saw (160)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spent (85)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wander (35)

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured and far away.
In Walden: Or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1906), 358.
Science quotes on:  |  Different (577)  |  Drummer (3)  |  Eccentric (11)  |  Far (154)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Keep (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measure (232)  |  Music (129)  |  Pace (14)  |  Step (231)

In the spring of 1760, [I] went to William and Mary college, where I continued two years. It was my great good fortune, and what probably fixed the destinies of my life, that Dr. William Small of Scotland, was then Professor of Mathematics, a man profound in most of the useful branches of science, with a happy talent of communication, correct and gentlemanly manners, and an enlarged and liberal mind. He, most happily for me, became soon attached to me, and made me his daily companion when not engaged in the school; and from his conversation I got my first views of the expansion of science, and of the system of things in which we are placed.
In Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Adgate Lipscomb (ed.), The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1904), Vol. 1, 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Biography (240)  |  College (66)  |  Communication (94)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Daily (87)  |  Expansion (41)  |  First (1283)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Professor (128)  |  Profound (104)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scotland (5)  |  Small (477)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spring (133)  |  System (537)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Useful (250)  |  View (488)  |  Year (933)

It has been my misfortune never to have had any neighbours whose studies have led them towards the pursuit of natural knowledge; so that, for want of a companion to quicken my industry and sharpen my attention, I have made but slender progress in a kind of information to which I have been attached from my childhood.
In Letter to Thomas Pennant (4 Aug 1767), in The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne (1789), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Attention (190)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Industry (137)  |  Information (166)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Misfortune (12)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Never (1087)  |  Progress (465)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Sharpen (22)  |  Study (653)  |  Want (497)

It is much better to learn the elements of geology, of botany, or ornithology and astronomy by word of mouth from a companion than dully from a book.
'Concord Walks'. The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1904), Vol. 12, 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Botany (57)  |  Element (310)  |  Geology (220)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Ornithology (21)  |  Word (619)

It is related of the Socratic philosopher Aristippus that, being shipwrecked and cast ashore on the coast of the Rhodians, he observed geometrical figures drawn thereon, and cried out to his companions:"Let us be of good cheer, for I see the traces of man."
Vitruvius
In Vitruvius Pollio and Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), 'Book VI: Introduction', Vitruvius, the Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 167. From the original Latin, “Aristippus philosophus Socraticus, naufragio cum ejectus ad Rhodiensium litus animaduertisset Geometrica schemata descripta, exclama uisse ad comites ita dicitur, Bene speremus, hominum enim vestigia video.” In De Architectura libri decem (1552), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Aristippus The Cyrenaic (4)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cast (66)  |  Coast (13)  |  Draw (137)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Figure (160)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Good (889)  |  Man (2251)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  See (1081)  |  Shipwreck (7)  |  Shore (24)  |  Socrates (16)  |  Trace (103)

Most people regard scientists as explorers … Imagine a handful of people shipwrecked on a strange island and setting out to explore it. One of them cuts a solitary path through the jungle, going on and on until he is exhausted or lost or both. He eventually returns to his companions, and they listen to him with goggling eyes as he describes what he saw; what he fell into, and what bit him. After a rest he demands more supplies and sets off again to explore the unknown. Many of his companions will be doing the same, each choosing his own direction and pursuing his pioneering path.
In The Development of Design (1981), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Cut (114)  |  Demand (123)  |  Describe (128)  |  Direction (175)  |  Doing (280)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Exhaustion (16)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Eye (419)  |  Handful (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Island (46)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Lost (34)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Path (144)  |  People (1005)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Regard (305)  |  Rest (280)  |  Return (124)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Set (394)  |  Setting (44)  |  Solitary (15)  |  Strange (157)  |  Through (849)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)

Nature has been for me, for as long as I remember a source of solace, inspiration, adventure, and delight; a home, a teacher, a companion.
In Sisters of the Earth: Women’s Prose and Poetry (1991), Preface, xv.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  Delight (108)  |  Home (170)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Long (790)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Remember (179)  |  Solace (7)  |  Source (93)  |  Teacher (143)

One summer night, out on a flat headland, all but surrounded by the waters of the bay, the horizons were remote and distant rims on the edge of space. Millions of stars blazed in darkness, and on the far shore a few lights burned in cottages. Otherwise there was no reminder of human life. My companion and I were alone with the stars: the misty river of the Milky Way flowing across the sky, the patterns of the constellations standing out bright and clear, a blazing planet low on the horizon. It occurred to me that if this were a sight that could be seen only once in a century, this little headland would be thronged with spectators. But it can be seen many scores of nights in any year, and so the lights burned in the cottages and the inhabitants probably gave not a thought to the beauty overhead; and because they could see it almost any night, perhaps they never will.
In The Sense of Wonder (1956), as condensed in Reader’s Digest (1986), 129, 174.
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Bay (5)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Bright (79)  |  Burn (87)  |  Century (310)  |  Clear (100)  |  Constellation (17)  |  Cottage (4)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Distant (33)  |  Edge (47)  |  Far (154)  |  Flat (33)  |  Flow (83)  |  Give (202)  |  Headland (2)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Low (80)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Millions (17)  |  Misty (6)  |  Never (1087)  |  Night (120)  |  Occur (150)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Planet (356)  |  Probably (49)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rim (5)  |  River (119)  |  Score (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Shore (24)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sky (161)  |  Space (500)  |  Spectator (10)  |  Stand (274)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Summer (54)  |  Surround (30)  |  Thought (953)  |  Throng (3)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Our friends should be companions who inspire us, who help us rise to our best.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Friend (168)  |  Help (105)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Rise (166)

This is the question
Marry
Children—(if it Please God)—Constant companion (& friend in old age) who will feel interested in one—object to be beloved and played with—better than a dog anyhow. Home, & someone to take care of house—Charms of music and female chit-chat.—These things good for one’s health.—but terrible loss of time.—
My God, it is Intolerable to think of spending ones whole life, like a neuter bee, working, working—& nothing after all.—No, no, won’t do. Imagine living all one’s day solitary in smoky dirty London House.—Only picture to yourself a nice soft wife on a sofa with good fire, & books & music perhaps-—Compare this vision with the dingy reality of Grt. Marlbro’ Street.
Not Marry
Freedom to go where one liked—choice of Society and little of it. —Conversation of clever men at clubs—Not forced to visit relatives, & to bend in every trifle. —to have the expense and anxiety of children—perhaps quarreling—Loss of time. —cannot read in the Evenings—fatness & idleness—Anxiety & responsibility—less money for books &c—if many children forced to gain one’s bread. —(but then it is very bad for ones health to work too much)
Perhaps my wife won’t like London; then the sentence is banishment & degradation into indolent, idle fool.
Marry—Marry—Marry Q.E.D.
It being proved necessary to Marry When? Soon or late?
Notes on Marriage, July 1838. In F. Burkhardt and S. Smith (eds.), The Correspondence of Charles Darwin 1837-1843 (1986), Vol. 2, 444.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bee (40)  |  Being (1278)  |  Better (486)  |  Biography (240)  |  Book (392)  |  Bread (39)  |  Care (186)  |  Charm (51)  |  Children (200)  |  Choice (110)  |  Clever (38)  |  Compare (69)  |  Constant (144)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Dirty (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Feel (367)  |  Female (50)  |  Fire (189)  |  Fool (116)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Friend (168)  |  Gain (145)  |  God (757)  |  Good (889)  |  Health (193)  |  Home (170)  |  House (140)  |  Idle (33)  |  Idleness (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Interest (386)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Loss (110)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Money (170)  |  Music (129)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Picture (143)  |  Please (65)  |  Question (621)  |  Read (287)  |  Reality (261)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Society (326)  |  Soft (29)  |  Soon (186)  |  Spending (24)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vision (123)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wife (41)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

We should like to propose instead that the specificity of DNA self replication is accomplished without recourse to specific protein synthesis and that each of our complementary DNA chains serves as a template or mould for the formation onto itself of a new companion chain.
[Co-author with Francis Crick]
In James D. Watson and Francis H. C. Crick, 'The Structure of DNA', Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology (1953), 18, 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Author (167)  |  Complementary (14)  |  DNA (77)  |  Formation (96)  |  Mold (33)  |  New (1216)  |  Proposal (17)  |  Protein (54)  |  Recourse (12)  |  Replication (9)  |  Self (267)  |  Serve (59)  |  Specific (95)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Template (3)

You ask me how, with so much study, I manage to retene my health. ... Morpheous is my last companion ; without 8 or 9 hours of him yr correspondent is not worth one scavenger's peruke. My practices did at ye first hurt my stomach, but now I eat heartily enou' as y’ will see when I come down beside you. [On the value of sleep, and harm of eating poorly while intent on study.]
Letter to Dr. Law (15 Dec 1716) as quoted in Norman Lockyer, (ed.), Nature (25 May 1881), 24, 39. The source refers to it as an unpublished letter.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ask (411)  |  Down (456)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  First (1283)  |  Food (199)  |  Health (193)  |  Heartily (3)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hurt (12)  |  Last (426)  |  Manage (23)  |  Practice (204)  |  Scavenger (4)  |  See (1081)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Study (653)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worth (169)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.