Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Sacrifice

Sacrifice Quotes (24 quotes)

Combination does not produce though mergers and combinations are still the accepted panacea. In Big business there appears to be increasing aridity, bureaucracy, and stultifying sacrifice of initiative and above all fear.
Aphorism listed Frederick Seitz, The Cosmic Inventor: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) (1999), 55, being Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Held at Philadelphia For Promoting Useful Knowledge, Vol. 86, Pt. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (41)  |  Appearance (77)  |  Big Business (2)  |  Bureaucracy (5)  |  Combination (69)  |  Fear (113)  |  Increase (107)  |  Initiative (12)  |  Panacea (2)  |  Production (105)  |  Stultify (4)

Les Leucocytes Et L'esprit De Sacrifice. — Il semble, d'après les recherches de De Bruyne (Phagocytose, 1895) et de ceux qui le citent, que les leucocytes des Lamellibranches — probablement lorsqu'ils ont phagocyté, qu'ils se sont chargés de résidus et de déchets, qu'ils ont, en un mot, accompli leur rôle et bien fait leur devoir — sortent du corps de l'animal et vont mourir dans le milieu ambiant. Ils se sacrifient. Après avoir si bien servi l'organisme par leur activité, ils le servent encore par leur mort en faisant place aux cellules nouvelles, plus jeunes.
N'est-ce pas la parfaite image du désintéressement le plus noble, et n'y a-t-il point là un exemple et un modèle? Il faut s'en inspirer: comme eux, nous sommes les unités d'un grand corps social; comme eux, nous pouvons le servir et envisager la mort avec sérénité, en subordonnant notre conscience individuelle à la conscience collective.
(30 Jan 1896)
Leukocytes and The Spirit Of Sacrifice. - It seems, according to research by De Bruyne (Phagocytosis, 1885) and those who quote it, that leukocytes of Lamellibranches [bivalves] - likely when they have phagocytized [ingested bacteria], as they become residues and waste, they have, in short, performed their role well and done their duty - leave the body of the animal and will die in the environment. They sacrifice themselves. Having so well served the body by their activities, they still serve in their death by making room for new younger cells.
Isn't this the perfect image of the noblest selflessness, and thereby presents an example and a model? It should be inspiring: like them, we are the units of a great social body, like them, we can serve and contemplate death with equanimity, subordinating our individual consciousness to collective consciousness.
In Recueil d'Œuvres de Léo Errera: Botanique Générale (1908), 194. Google translation by Webmaster. Please give feedback if you can improve it.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Animal (309)  |  Body (193)  |  Cell (125)  |  Collective (16)  |  Consciousness (71)  |  Contemplation (37)  |  Death (270)  |  Duty (51)  |  Equanimity (2)  |  Example (57)  |  Image (38)  |  Individual (177)  |  Inspiration (50)  |  Leaving (10)  |  Leukocyte (2)  |  Model (64)  |  New (340)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Performance (27)  |  Research (517)  |  Residue (6)  |  Role (35)  |  Service (54)  |  Society (188)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Subordination (3)  |  Waste (57)  |  Younger (3)

Proof is an idol before whom the pure mathematician tortures himself. In physics we are generally content to sacrifice before the lesser shrine of Plausibility.
In Gifford Lecture (1927), Edinburgh, as collected in 'Science and Mysticism', The Nature of the Physical World (1928), 337.
Science quotes on:  |  Idol (3)  |  Physics (301)  |  Plausibility (6)  |  Proof (192)  |  Pure Mathematics (27)  |  Shrine (6)  |  Torture (13)

A first step in the study of civilization is to dissect it into details, and to classify these in their proper groups. Thus, in examining weapons, they are to be classed under spear, club, sling, bow and arrow, and so forth; among textile arts are to be ranged matting, netting, and several grades of making and weaving threads; myths are divided under such headings as myths of sunrise and sunset, eclipse-myths, earthquake-myths, local myths which account for the names of places by some fanciful tale, eponymic myths which account for the parentage of a tribe by turning its name into the name of an imaginary ancestor; under rites and ceremonies occur such practices as the various kinds of sacrifice to the ghosts of the dead and to other spiritual beings, the turning to the east in worship, the purification of ceremonial or moral uncleanness by means of water or fire. Such are a few miscellaneous examples from a list of hundreds … To the ethnographer, the bow and arrow is the species, the habit of flattening children’s skulls is a species, the practice of reckoning numbers by tens is a species. The geographical distribution of these things, and their transmission from region to region, have to be studied as the naturalist studies the geography of his botanical and zoological species.
In Primitive Culture (1871), Vol. 1, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (35)  |  Arrow (13)  |  Botany (47)  |  Bow (9)  |  Ceremony (4)  |  Child (189)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Classification (79)  |  Club (4)  |  Death (270)  |  Distribution (21)  |  Earthquake (27)  |  Eclipse (16)  |  Fanciful (4)  |  Fire (117)  |  Geography (25)  |  Ghost (20)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Means (109)  |  Moral (100)  |  Myth (43)  |  Name (118)  |  Naturalist (49)  |  Parent (39)  |  Purification (6)  |  Rite (3)  |  Skull (5)  |  Sling (2)  |  Spear (4)  |  Species (181)  |  Spiritual (45)  |  Step (67)  |  Study (331)  |  Sunrise (7)  |  Sunset (15)  |  Tale (12)  |  Textile (2)  |  Thread (14)  |  Transmission (23)  |  Tribe (10)  |  Various (25)  |  Water (244)  |  Weapon (57)  |  Weaving (2)  |  Worship (22)  |  Zoological (5)

According to Gandhi, the seven sins are wealth without works, pleasure without conscience, knowledge without character, commerce without morality, science without humanity, worship without sacrifice, and politics without principle. Well, Hubert Humphrey may have sinned in the eyes of God, as we all do, but according to those definitions of Gandhi’s, it was Hubert Humphrey without sin.
Eulogy at funeral of Vice President Hubert Humphrey, St. Paul, Minnesota (16 Jan 1978). In Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Jimmy Carter (1978), Vol. 1, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  According (8)  |  Biography (227)  |  Character (82)  |  Commerce (14)  |  Conscience (36)  |  Definition (152)  |  Eulogy (2)  |  Eye (159)  |  God (454)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Morality (33)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Politics (77)  |  Principle (228)  |  Science (1699)  |  Seven (5)  |  Sin (27)  |  Wealth (50)  |  Work (457)  |  Worship (22)

Entrepreneurs must devote a portion of their minds to constantly processing uncertainty. So you sacrifice a degree of being present.
Replying to question, “What have you sacrificed for success.” In Issie Lapowsky, 'Scott Belsky', Inc. (Nov 2013), 140. Biography in Context,
Science quotes on:  |  Devote (23)  |  Entrepreneur (5)  |  Mind (544)  |  Portion (14)  |  Present (103)  |  Uncertainty (37)

Heroes and scholars represent the opposite extremes... The scholar struggles for the benefit of all humanity, sometimes to reduce physical effort, sometimes to reduce pain, and sometimes to postpone death, or at least render it more bearable. In contrast, the patriot sacrifices a rather substantial part of humanity for the sake of his own prestige. His statue is always erected on a pedestal of ruins and corpses... In contrast, all humanity crowns a scholar, love forms the pedestal of his statues, and his triumphs defy the desecration of time and the judgment of history.
From Reglas y Consejos sobre Investigacíon Cientifica: Los tónicos de la voluntad. (1897), as translated by Neely and Larry W. Swanson, in Advice for a Young Investigator (1999) 41-42.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (54)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Corpse (5)  |  Crown (19)  |  Death (270)  |  Defiance (5)  |  Effort (94)  |  Hero (29)  |  History (302)  |  Humanity (104)  |  Judgment (72)  |  Love (164)  |  Opposite (39)  |  Pain (82)  |  Part (146)  |  Patriot (3)  |  Pedestal (2)  |  Prestige (9)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Render (17)  |  Ruin (23)  |  Sake (17)  |  Scholar (31)  |  Statue (9)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Substantial (7)  |  Time (439)  |  Triumph (33)

I am a firm believer in the theory that you can do or be anything that you wish in this world, within reason, if you are prepared to make the sacrifices, think and work hard enough and long enough.
From Cameron Prize Lecture (1928), delivered before the University of Edinburgh. As quoted and cited in Editorial Section, 'Sir Frederick Banting', Canadian Public Health Journal (May 1941), 32, No. 5, 266-267.
Science quotes on:  |  Believer (8)  |  Enough (6)  |  Firm (19)  |  Hard (70)  |  Long (95)  |  Prepare (19)  |  Reason (330)  |  Theory (582)  |  Think (205)  |  Wish (62)  |  Work (457)  |  World (667)

If a man is in any sense a real mathematician, then it is a hundred to one that his mathematics will be far better than anything else he can do, and that it would be silly if he surrendered any decent opportunity of exercising his one talent in order to do undistinguished work in other fields. Such a sacrifice could be justified only by economic necessity of age.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Better (131)  |  Economics (30)  |  Field (119)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Justification (33)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Real (95)  |  Silly (10)  |  Surrender (13)  |  Talent (49)  |  Undistinguished (3)  |  Work (457)

If ever there can be a cause worthy to be upheld by all toil or sacrifice that the human heart can endure, it is the cause of education.
Thoughts Selected from the Writings of Horace Mann (1872), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (231)  |  Education (280)  |  Toil (10)

Natural knowledge has not forgone emotion. It has simply taken for itself new ground of emotion, under impulsion from and in sacrifice to that one of its 'values', Truth.
Man on His Nature (1940), 404.
Science quotes on:  |  Emotion (62)  |  Forgo (2)  |  Impulse (24)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Natural (128)  |  Truth (750)  |  Value (180)

One of the greatest gifts science has brought to the world is continuing elimination of the supernatural, and it was a lesson that my father passed on to me, that knowledge liberates mankind from superstition. We can live our lives without the constant fear that we have offended this or that deity who must be placated by incantation or sacrifice, or that we are at the mercy of devils or the Fates. With increasing knowledge, the intellectual darkness that surrounds us is illuminated and we learn more of the beauty and wonder of the natural world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (171)  |  Bring (53)  |  Constant (40)  |  Continue (38)  |  Darkness (25)  |  Deity (11)  |  Devil (18)  |  Elimination (17)  |  Fate (38)  |  Father (44)  |  Fear (113)  |  Gift (47)  |  Great (300)  |  Illuminate (12)  |  Incantation (4)  |  Increase (107)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Learn (160)  |  Lesson (32)  |  Liberate (8)  |  Live (186)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Mercy (9)  |  Natural World (21)  |  Offend (4)  |  Pass (60)  |  Science (1699)  |  Supernatural (19)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Surround (17)  |  Wonder (134)  |  World (667)

Our ancestors, when about to build a town or an army post, sacrificed some of the cattle that were wont to feed on the site proposed and examined their livers. If the livers of the first victims were dark-coloured or abnormal, they sacrificed others, to see whether the fault was due to disease or their food. They never began to build defensive works in a place until after they had made many such trials and satisfied themselves that good water and food had made the liver sound and firm. …healthfulness being their chief object.
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 1, Chap 4, Sec. 9. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Abnormal (4)  |  Ancestor (35)  |  Cattle (13)  |  Disease (257)  |  Examine (24)  |  Feed (22)  |  Firm (19)  |  Food (139)  |  Healthy (17)  |  Liver (12)  |  Sound (59)  |  Town (18)  |  Water (244)

Perhaps five or even ten per cent of men can do something rather well. It is a tiny minority who can do anything really well, and the number of men who can do two things well is negligible. If a man has any genuine talent, he should be ready to make almost any sacrifice in order to cultivate it to the full.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Cultivation (23)  |  Full (38)  |  Genuine (19)  |  Minority (16)  |  Negligible (3)  |  Ready (16)  |  Talent (49)

Technology, when misused, poisons air, soil, water and lives. But a world without technology would be prey to something worse: the impersonal ruthlessness of the natural order, in which the health of a species depends on relentless sacrifice of the weak.
Editorial, 'Nature As Demon', (29 Aug 1986), A26.
Science quotes on:  |  Dependance (4)  |  Health (136)  |  Impersonal (4)  |  Misuse (9)  |  Natural Order (3)  |  Poison (32)  |  Prey (9)  |  Relentless (5)  |  Ruthlessness (3)  |  Soil (51)  |  Species (181)  |  Technology (199)  |  Water (244)  |  Weak (36)  |  Worse (17)

The big political doings of our time are so disheartening that in our generation one feels quite alone. It is as if people had lost the passion for justice and dignity and no longer treasure what better generations have won by extraordinary sacrifices.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (61)  |  Better (131)  |  Big (33)  |  Dignity (18)  |  Disheartening (2)  |  Doings (2)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Feel (93)  |  Generation (111)  |  Justice (24)  |  Long (95)  |  Lose (53)  |  Passion (54)  |  People (269)  |  Political (31)  |  Time (439)  |  Treasure (35)  |  Win (25)

The McCarthy period came along … and many of the other scientists who had been working on these same lines gave up. Probably saying “Why should I sacrifice myself? I am a scientist, I am supposed to be working on scientific things, so I don’t need to put myself at risk by talking about these possibilities.” And I have said that perhaps I’m just stubborn… I have said “I don’t like anybody to tell me what to do or to think, except Mrs. Pauling.”
From interview (11 Nov 1990) with Wayne Reynolds, website of the American Academy of Achievement.
Science quotes on:  |  Liking (4)  |  McCarthy_Joseph (2)  |  Period (49)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Risk (29)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Stubbornness (4)  |  Talking (10)  |  Telling (23)  |  Wife (18)  |  Working (20)

The rallying motto of a sectarian name is incapable of exciting to sober, calm, scientific investigation; it only rouses the explosive spirit of accusations of heresy to a fierce volcanic flame. Truth and the weal of humanity should be the only motto of the genuine elucidators of the art, and the watchword of their brotherly, peaceful bond of union, without slavish adherence to any sectarian leader, if we would not see the little good that we know completely sacrificed to party spirit and discord.
In 'View of Professional Liberality at the Commencement of the Nineteenth Century' from the Allgemeiner Anzeiger d. D. No. 32 (1801), collected in R.E. Dudgeon (ed., trans.) The Lesser Writings of Samuel Hahnemann (1851), 363.
Science quotes on:  |  Accusation (5)  |  Brother (16)  |  Calm (13)  |  Discord (9)  |  Good (228)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Leader (19)  |  Motto (22)  |  Party (16)  |  Peace (58)  |  Sect (3)  |  Sober (8)  |  Truth (750)  |  Union (16)

The truth is that the scientific value of Polar exploration is greatly exaggerated. The thing that takes men on such hazardous trips is really not any thirst for knowledge, but simply a yearning for adventure. ... A Polar explorer always talks grandly of sacrificing his fingers and toes to science. It is an amiable pretention, but there is no need to take it seriously.
'Penguin's Eggs'. From the American Mercury (Sep 1930), 123-24. Reprinted in A Second Mencken Chrestomathy: A New Selection from the Writings of America's Legendary Editor, Critic, and Wit (2006), 166.
Science quotes on:  |  Exploration (93)  |  Finger (38)  |  Pretention (2)  |  South Pole (2)  |  Toe (5)

The ultimate test of man's conscience may be his willingness to sacrifice something today for future generations whose words of thanks will not be heard.
Former governor of Wisconsin, Founder of Earth Day.
Science quotes on:  |  Conscience (36)  |  Future (229)  |  Generation (111)  |  Hearing (27)  |  Test (96)  |  Thanks (8)  |  Ultimate (61)  |  Willingness (9)  |  Word (221)

The universality of parasitism as an offshoot of the predatory habit negatives the position taken by man that it is a pathological phenomenon or a deviation from the normal processes of nature. The pathological manifestations are only incidents in a developing parasitism. As human beings intent on maintaining man's domination over nature we may regard parasitism as pathological insofar as it becomes a drain upon human resources. In our efforts to protect ourselves we may make every kind of sacrifice to limit, reduce, and even eliminate parasitism as a factor in human life. Science attempts to define the terms on which this policy of elimination may or may not succeed. We must first of all thoroughly understand the problem, put ourselves in possession of all the facts in order to estimate the cost. Too often it has been assumed that parasitism was abnormal and that it needed only a slight force to reestablish what was believed to be a normal equilibrium without parasitism. On the contrary, biology teaches us that parasitism is a normal phenomenon and if we accept this view we shall be more ready to pay the price of freedom as a permanent and ever recurring levy of nature for immunity from a condition to which all life is subject. The greatest victory of man over nature in the physical realm would undoubtedly be his own delivery from the heavy encumbrance of parasitism with which all life is burdened.
Parasitism and Disease (1934), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (49)  |  Burden (23)  |  Cost (31)  |  Development (228)  |  Deviation (11)  |  Domination (12)  |  Drain (6)  |  Effort (94)  |  Elimination (17)  |  Encumbrance (3)  |  Equilibrium (16)  |  Estimate (19)  |  Fact (609)  |  Habit (78)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Incident (3)  |  Limitation (20)  |  Maintenance (13)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pathology (11)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Policy (23)  |  Predator (5)  |  Process (201)  |  Protection (23)  |  Reduction (35)  |  Resource (47)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Universality (11)  |  Victory (24)

There is no area in our minds reserved for superstition, such as the Greeks had in their mythology; and superstition, under cover of an abstract vocabulary, has revenged itself by invading the entire realm of thought. Our science is like a store filled with the most subtle intellectual devices for solving the most complex problems, and yet we are almost incapable of applying the elementary principles of rational thought. In every sphere, we seem to have lost the very elements of intelligence: the ideas of limit, measure, degree, proportion, relation, comparison, contingency, interdependence, interrelation of means and ends. To keep to the social level, our political universe is peopled exclusively by myths and monsters; all it contains is absolutes and abstract entities. This is illustrated by all the words of our political and social vocabulary: nation, security, capitalism, communism, fascism, order, authority, property, democracy. We never use them in phrases such as: There is democracy to the extent that... or: There is capitalism in so far as... The use of expressions like “to the extent that” is beyond our intellectual capacity. Each of these words seems to represent for us an absolute reality, unaffected by conditions, or an absolute objective, independent of methods of action, or an absolute evil; and at the same time we make all these words mean, successively or simultaneously, anything whatsoever. Our lives are lived, in actual fact, among changing, varying realities, subject to the casual play of external necessities, and modifying themselves according to specific conditions within specific limits; and yet we act and strive and sacrifice ourselves and others by reference to fixed and isolated abstractions which cannot possibly be related either to one another or to any concrete facts. In this so-called age of technicians, the only battles we know how to fight are battles against windmills. [p.222]
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Abstract (43)  |  Abstraction (29)  |  Accord (21)  |  Act (80)  |  Action (151)  |  Actual (34)  |  Age (137)  |  Apply (38)  |  Area (18)  |  Authority (50)  |  Battle (30)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Capacity (42)  |  Capitalism (7)  |  Casual (6)  |  Change (291)  |  Communism (8)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Complex (78)  |  Concrete (21)  |  Condition (119)  |  Contain (37)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Cover (23)  |  Degree (48)  |  Democracy (21)  |  Device (24)  |  Element (129)  |  Elementary (30)  |  End (141)  |  Entire (29)  |  Entity (23)  |  Evil (67)  |  Exclusively (8)  |  Expression (82)  |  Extent (30)  |  External (45)  |  Fact (609)  |  Far (77)  |  Fascism (3)  |  Fight (37)  |  Fill (35)  |  Fix (10)  |  Greek (46)  |  Idea (440)  |  Illustrate (5)  |  Incapable (11)  |  Independent (41)  |  Intellectual (79)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Interrelation (6)  |  Invade (4)  |  Isolate (10)  |  Keep (47)  |  Know (321)  |  Level (51)  |  Limit (86)  |  Live (186)  |  Lose (53)  |  Mean (63)  |  Means (109)  |  Measure (70)  |  Method (154)  |  Mind (544)  |  Modify (11)  |  Monster (21)  |  Myth (43)  |  Mythology (11)  |  Nation (111)  |  Necessity (125)  |  Objective (49)  |  Order (167)  |  Ourselves (34)  |  P (2)  |  People (269)  |  Phrase (21)  |  Play (60)  |  Political (31)  |  Possibly (9)  |  Principle (228)  |  Problem (362)  |  Property (96)  |  Proportion (47)  |  Rational (42)  |  Reality (140)  |  Realm (40)  |  Reference (17)  |  Relate (5)  |  Relation (96)  |  Represent (27)  |  Reserve (7)  |  Revenge (6)  |  Same (92)  |  Science (1699)  |  Security (27)  |  Seem (89)  |  Simultaneous (12)  |  So-Called (18)  |  Social (93)  |  Solve (41)  |  Specific (30)  |  Sphere (40)  |  Store (17)  |  Strive (35)  |  Subject (129)  |  Subtle (26)  |  Superstition (50)  |  Technician (5)  |  Themselves (45)  |  Thought (374)  |  Time (439)  |  Unaffected (4)  |  Universe (563)  |  Vary (14)  |  Vocabulary (3)  |  Whatsoever (6)  |  Windmill (4)  |  Word (221)

To preach conservation at such a time, when all our resources, national and otherwise are being sacrificed in unprecedented measure, might seem to some anomalous, even ironical. ... But we firmly believe, and now are more acutely aware than ever, that conservation is basically related to the peace of the world and the future of the race.
Breaking New Ground
Science quotes on:  |  Acutely (2)  |  Aware (18)  |  Basically (4)  |  Belief (400)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Firmly (2)  |  Future (229)  |  Measure (70)  |  National (20)  |  Otherwise (16)  |  Peace (58)  |  Preach (9)  |  Race (76)  |  Relate (5)  |  Resource (47)  |  Seem (89)  |  Time (439)  |  Unprecedented (7)  |  World (667)

[Young] was afterwards accustomed to say, that at no period of his life was he particularly fond of repeating experiments, or even of very frequently attempting to originate new ones; considering that, however necessary to the advancement of science, they demanded a great sacrifice of time, and that when the fact was once established, that time was better employed in considering the purposes to which it might be applied, or the principles which it might tend to elucidate.
Hudson Gurney, Memoir of the Life of Thomas Young, M.D. F.R.S. (1831), 12-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Application (117)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Consideration (65)  |  Demand (52)  |  Elucidation (6)  |  Establishment (29)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fond (9)  |  Frequently (13)  |  Life (917)  |  Necessary (89)  |  New (340)  |  Origination (7)  |  Particular (54)  |  Period (49)  |  Principle (228)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Repeat (27)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Time (439)  |  Thomas Young (13)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.