Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index L > Category: Leisure

Leisure Quotes (24 quotes)

... I left Caen, where I was living, to go on a geologic excursion under the auspices of the School of Mines. The incidents of the travel made me forget my mathematical work. Having reached Coutances, we entered an omnibus to go to some place or other. At the moment when I put my foot on the step, the idea came to me, without anything in my former thoughts seeming to have paved the way for it, that the transformations I had used to define the Fuchsian functions were identical with those of non-Eudidean geometry. I did not verify the idea; I should not have had time, as upon taking my seat in the omnibus, I went on with a conversation already commenced, but I felt a perfect certainty. On my return to Caen, for convenience sake, I verified the result at my leisure.
Quoted in Sir Roger Penrose, The Emperor's New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (1990), 541. Science and Method (1908) 51-52, 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Enter (141)  |  Excursion (11)  |  Forget (115)  |  Former (137)  |  Function (228)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Idea (843)  |  Identical (53)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Living (491)  |  Mine (76)  |  Moment (253)  |  Non-Euclidian (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Return (124)  |  Sake (58)  |  School (219)  |  Step (231)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Travel (114)  |  Verify (23)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

And having thus passed the principles of arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and geography, with a general compact of physics, they may descend in mathematics to the instrumental science of trigonometry, and from thence to fortification, architecture, engineering, or navigation. And in natural philosophy they may proceed leisurely from the history of meteors, minerals, plants, and living creatures, as far as anatomy. Then also in course might be read to them out of some not tedious writer the institution of physic. … To set forward all these proceedings in nature and mathematics, what hinders but that they may procure, as oft as shall be needful, the helpful experiences of hunters, fowlers, fishermen, shepherds, gardeners, apothecaries; and in other sciences, architects, engineers, mariners, anatomists.
In John Milton and Robert Fletcher (ed.), 'On Education', The Prose Works of John Milton: With an Introductory Review (1834), 100.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Apothecary (10)  |  Architect (29)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Compact (13)  |  Course (409)  |  Creature (233)  |  Descend (47)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fisherman (7)  |  Fortification (6)  |  Forward (102)  |  Gardener (4)  |  General (511)  |  Geography (36)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Helpful (16)  |  Hinder (12)  |  History (673)  |  Hunter (24)  |  Institution (69)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Meteor (18)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Navigation (25)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plant (294)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Read (287)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Education (15)  |  Set (394)  |  Shepherd (6)  |  Tedious (14)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  Writer (86)

By these pleasures it is permitted to relax the mind with play, in turmoils of the mind, or when our labors are light, or in great tension, or as a method of passing the time. A reliable witness is Cicero, when he says (De Oratore, 2): 'men who are accustomed to hard daily toil, when by reason of the weather they are kept from their work, betake themselves to playing with a ball, or with knucklebones or with dice, or they may also contrive for themselves some new game at their leisure.'
The Book of Games of Chance (1663), final sentences, trans. Sydney Henry Gould. In Oysten Ore, The Gambling Scholar (1953), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Ball (62)  |  Chance (239)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Daily (87)  |  Dice (21)  |  Game (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Labor (107)  |  Light (607)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Passing (76)  |  Playing (42)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Tension (24)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toil (25)  |  Turmoil (8)  |  Weather (44)  |  Witness (54)  |  Work (1351)

Detest it as lewd intercourse, it can deprive you of all your leisure, your health, your rest, and the whole happiness of your life.
Having himself spent a lifetime unsuccessfully trying to prove Euclid’s postulate that parallel lines do not meet, Farkas discouraged his son János from any further attempt.
Letter (1820), to his son, János Bolyai. Translation as in Dirk Jan Struik, A concise history of mathematics (2nd Ed., 1948), 253.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Deprive (12)  |  Detest (5)  |  Do (1908)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Health (193)  |  Himself (461)  |  Lewd (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Parallel (43)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rest (280)  |  Spent (85)  |  Trying (144)  |  Whole (738)

Do not mistake a crowd of big wage-earners for the leisure class.
As quoted, without citation, in William Safire and Leonard Safir, Words of Wisdom (1990), 251.
Science quotes on:  |  Class (164)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Do (1908)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Wage (5)

Few men live lives of more devoted self-sacrifice than the family physician, but he may become so completely absorbed in work that leisure is unknown…. More than most men he feels the tragedy of isolation—that inner isolation so well expressed in Matthew Arnold’s line “We mortal millions live alone.”
Address to the Canadian Medical Association, Montreal (17 Sep 1902), 'Chauvinism in Medicine', published in The Montreal Medical Journal (1902), 31, 267. Collected in Aequanimitas, with Other Addresses to Medical Students, Nurses and Practitioners of Medicine (1904), 299.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Alone (311)  |  Matthew Arnold (14)  |  Become (815)  |  Completely (135)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Express (186)  |  Family (94)  |  Feel (367)  |  Inner (71)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Live (628)  |  Millions (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Most (1731)  |  Physician (273)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Sacrifice (5)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Work (1351)

For it is too bad that there are so few who seek the truth and so few who do not follow a mistaken method in philosophy. This is not, however, the place to lament the misery of our century, but to rejoice with you over such beautiful ideas for proving the truth. So I add only, and I promise, that I shall read your book at leisure; for I am certain that I shall find the noblest things in it. And this I shall do the more gladly, because I accepted the view of Copernicus many years ago, and from this standpoint I have discovered from their origins many natural phenomena, which doubtless cannot be explained on the basis of the more commonly accepted hypothesis.
Letter (4 Aug 1597) to Kepler, expressing thanks and interest in the book Kepler sent him. As quoted in translation in Jackson J. Spielvogel, Western Civilization: Alternate Volume: Since 1300 (2010), Vol. 2, 494.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Bad (180)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Book (392)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Common (436)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lament (11)  |  Method (505)  |  Misery (30)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Origin (239)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Promise (67)  |  Prove (250)  |  Read (287)  |  Rejoice (11)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Seek (213)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Year (933)

For it is too bad that there are so few who seek the truth and so few who do not follow a mistaken method in philosophy. This is not, however, the place to lament the misery of our century, but to rejoice with you over such beautiful ideas for proving the truth. So I add only, and I promise, that I shall read your book at leisure; for I am certain that I shall find the noblest things in it. And this I shall do the more gladly, because I accepted the view of Copernicus many years ago, and from this standpoint I have discovered from their origins many natural phenomena, which doubtless cannot be explained on the basis of the more commonly accepted hypothesis.
In Letter to Johannes Kepler. As quoted in The Portable Renaissance Reader (1968), 597.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Bad (180)  |  Basis (173)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Book (392)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explain (322)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lament (11)  |  Method (505)  |  Misery (30)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Origin (239)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Promise (67)  |  Read (287)  |  Seek (213)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  View (488)  |  Year (933)

How many famous men be there in this our age, which make scruple to condemne these old witches, thinking it to bee nothing but a melancholike humour which corrupteth thei imagination, and filleth them with all these vaines toyes. I will not cast my selfe any further into the depth of this question, the matter craveth a man of more leisure.
Describing melancholy as the innocent affliction of those regarded as witches instead of Satanic influence, while distancing himself from the controversy.
Discours de la conservation de la veue; des maladies mélancholiques, des catarrhes, et de la vieillese (1594). In Richard Surphlet (trans.) A Discourse of the Preservation of the Sight: of Melancholike Diseases; of Rheumes, and of Old Age (1599), 98-9. Quoted in Michael Heyd, Be sober and Reasonable (), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Bee (40)  |  Cast (66)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Depth (94)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humour (116)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Influence (222)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Melancholy (17)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old (481)  |  Question (621)  |  Regard (305)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Will (2355)  |  Witch (4)

I have made this one [letter] longer than usual because I did not have the leisure to make it shorter.
The Provincial Letters, Letter XVI, to the Reverend Jesuit Fathers (4 Dec 1656), ed. A. J. Krailsheimer (1967), 257.
Science quotes on:  |  Length (23)  |  Letter (109)

I know of the boons that machinery has conferred on men, all tyrants have boons to confer, but service to the dynasty of steam and steel is a hard service and gives little leisure to fancy to flit from field to field.
In 'Romance of Modern Stage', National Review (1911). Quoted in Edward Hale Bierstadt, Dunsany the Dramatist (1917), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Boon (7)  |  Confer (11)  |  Dynasty (7)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Hard (243)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Service (110)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steel (21)  |  Tyrant (9)

I sometimes wonder how we spent leisure time before satellite television and Internet came along…and then I realise that I have spent more than half of my life in the ‘dark ages’!
From interview (5 Dec 2003) days before his 86th birthday with Nalaka Gunawardene, published on the internet sites http://southasia.oneworld.net and arthurcclarke.net.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dark Ages (10)  |  Half (56)  |  Internet (17)  |  Life (1795)  |  More (2559)  |  Realize (147)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Spent (85)  |  Television (30)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wonder (236)

Literature is, in fact, the fruit of leisure.
In Pharaohs, Fellahs and Explorers (1891), 193.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Literature (103)

Man is still by instinct a predatory animal given to devilish aggression.
The discoveries of science have immensely increased productivity of material things. They have increased the standards of living and comfort. They have eliminated infinite drudgery. They have increased leisure. But that gives more time for devilment.
The work of science has eliminated much disease and suffering. It has increased the length of life. That, together with increase in productivity, has resulted in vastly increased populations. Also it increased the number of people engaged in devilment.
Address delivered to Annual Meeting of the York Bible Class, Toronto, Canada (22 Nov 1938), 'The Imperative Need for Moral Re-armament', collected in America's Way Forward (1939), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggression (8)  |  Animal (617)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Drudgery (6)  |  Elimination (25)  |  Increase (210)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  People (1005)  |  Population (110)  |  Predator (6)  |  Productivity (21)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Standard Of Living (4)  |  Still (613)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Work (1351)

The Grand Duke [of Tuscany] …after observing the Medicaean plants several times with me … has now invited me to attach myself to him with the annual salary of one thousand florins, and with the title of Philosopher and Principal Mathematicial to His Highness; without the duties of office to perform, but with the most complete leisure; so that I can complete my Treatises...
From a letter to Kepler. Quoted in John Elliot Drinkwater Bethune, Life of Galileo Galilei (1832), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Attach (56)  |  Complete (204)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Office (71)  |  Patronage (3)  |  Perform (121)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Plant (294)  |  Principal (63)  |  Research (664)  |  Salary (7)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)

The office of the leisure class in social evolution is to retard movement and to conserve what is obsolescent.
In Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions (1899, 1912), 198.
Science quotes on:  |  Class (164)  |  Conserve (6)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Movement (155)  |  Obsolescent (2)  |  Office (71)  |  Retard (4)  |  Social (252)  |  Sociology (46)

The sciences and arts are not cast in a mold, but formed and shaped little by little, by repeated handling and polishing, as bears lick their cubs into shape at leisure.
In Donald M. Frame (trans.), The Complete Essays of Montaigne (1958), 421.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Bear (159)  |  Cast (66)  |  Cub (2)  |  Form (959)  |  Handle (28)  |  Lick (4)  |  Little (707)  |  Mold (33)  |  Polish (15)  |  Repeat (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Shape (72)

There is no doubt but men of genius and leisure may carry our method to greater perfection, but, having had long experience, we have found none equal to it for the commodiousness it affords in working with the Understanding.
In 'Scala Intellectus', The Works of Francis Bacon (1815), Vol. 11, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Carry (127)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Experience (467)  |  Genius (284)  |  Greater (288)  |  Long (790)  |  Method (505)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Understanding (513)

Those who have occasion to enter into the depths of what is oddly, if generously, called the literature of a scientific subject, alone know the difficulty of emerging with an unsoured disposition. The multitudinous facts presented by each corner of Nature form in large part the scientific man's burden to-day, and restrict him more and more, willy-nilly, to a narrower and narrower specialism. But that is not the whole of his burden. Much that he is forced to read consists of records of defective experiments, confused statement of results, wearisome description of detail, and unnecessarily protracted discussion of unnecessary hypotheses. The publication of such matter is a serious injury to the man of science; it absorbs the scanty funds of his libraries, and steals away his poor hours of leisure.
'Physiology, including Experimental Pathology and Experimental Physiology', Reports of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1899, 891-2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absorb (49)  |  Alone (311)  |  Burden (27)  |  Call (769)  |  Consist (223)  |  Corner (57)  |  Depth (94)  |  Detail (146)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Enter (141)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Fund (18)  |  Generous (17)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Injury (36)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Library (48)  |  Literature (103)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  More (2559)  |  Multitudinous (4)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Poor (136)  |  Present (619)  |  Publication (101)  |  Read (287)  |  Record (154)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Serious (91)  |  Specialty (12)  |  Statement (142)  |  Subject (521)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Whole (738)

To be able to fill leisure intelligently is the last product of civilization.
The Conquest of Happiness
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (204)  |  Last (426)  |  Product (160)

When all the discoveries [relating to the necessities and some to the pastimes of life] were fully developed, the sciences which relate neither to pleasure nor yet to the necessities of life were invented, and first in those places where men had leisure. Thus the mathematical sciences originated in the neighborhood of Egypt, because there the priestly class was allowed leisure.
Aristotle
In Metaphysics, 1-981b, as translated by Hugh Tredennick (1933). Also seen translated as “Now that practical skills have developed enough to provide adequately for material needs, one of these sciences which are not devoted to utilitarian ends [mathematics] has been able to arise in Egypt, the priestly caste there having the leisure necessary for disinterested research.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Class (164)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Egypt (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Invent (51)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Neighborhood (12)  |  Originate (36)  |  Pastime (4)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Priest (28)  |  Science (3879)

Whoever is to acquire a competent knowledge of medicine, ought to be possessed of the following advantages: a natural disposition; instructionl a favorable place for the study; early tuition, love of labor; leisure.
The Genuine Works of Hippocrates, trans. Francis Adams (1886), Vol. 2, 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Early (185)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Love (309)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Natural (796)  |  Physician (273)  |  Possess (156)  |  Study (653)  |  Tuition (3)  |  Whoever (42)

With a thousand joys I would accept a nonacademic job for which industriousness, accuracy, loyalty, and such are sufficient without specialized knowledge, and which would give a comfortable living and sufficient leisure, in order to sacrifice to my gods [mathematical research]. For example, I hope to get the editting of the census, the birth and death lists in local districts, not as a job, but for my pleasure and satisfaction...
Letter to Heinrich Olbers (26 Oct 1802). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 415.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Biography (240)  |  Birth (147)  |  Census (4)  |  Death (388)  |  God (757)  |  Hope (299)  |  Job (82)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Living (491)  |  Loyalty (9)  |  Order (632)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Research (664)  |  Sacrifice (50)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Thousand (331)

… the truth is that the knowledge of external nature and of the sciences which that knowledge requires or includes, is not the great or the frequent business of the human mind. Whether we provide for action or conversation, whether we wish to be useful or pleasing, the first requisite is the religious and moral knowledge of right and wrong; the next is an acquaintance with the history of mankind, and with those examples which may be said to embody truth, and prove by events the reasonableness of opinions. Prudence and justice are virtues, and excellencies, of all times and of all places; we are perpetually moralists, but we are geometricians only by chance. Our intercourse with intellectual nature is necessary; our speculations upon matter are voluntary, and at leisure. Physical knowledge is of such rare emergence, that one man may know another half his life without being able to estimate his skill in hydrostatics or astronomy; but his moral and prudential character immediately appears.
In Lives of the Poets (1779-81).
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Being (1278)  |  Business (149)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  Conversation (43)  |  Emergence (33)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Event (216)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Include (90)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Justice (39)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Next (236)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Physical (508)  |  Prove (250)  |  Rare (89)  |  Reasonableness (6)  |  Religious (126)  |  Require (219)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Skill (109)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Useful (250)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wrong (234)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.