TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®  •  TODAYINSCI ®
Celebrating 24 Years on the Web
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Order

Order Quotes (638 quotes)

... I should think that anyone who considered it more reasonable for the whole universe to move in order to let the Earth remain fixed would be more irrational than one who should climb to the top of your cupola just to get a view of the city and its environs, and then demand that the whole countryside should revolve around him so that he would not have to take the trouble to turn his head.
In Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (1632).
Science quotes on:  |  City (87)  |  Consider (428)  |  Demand (131)  |  Earth (1076)  |  More (2558)  |  Move (223)  |  Remain (355)  |  Revolve (26)  |  Think (1122)  |  Top (100)  |  Trouble (117)  |  Turn (454)  |  Universe (900)  |  View (496)  |  Whole (756)

… just as the astronomer, the physicist, the geologist, or other student of objective science looks about in the world of sense, so, not metaphorically speaking but literally, the mind of the mathematician goes forth in the universe of logic in quest of the things that are there; exploring the heights and depths for facts—ideas, classes, relationships, implications, and the rest; observing the minute and elusive with the powerful microscope of his Infinitesimal Analysis; observing the elusive and vast with the limitless telescope of his Calculus of the Infinite; making guesses regarding the order and internal harmony of the data observed and collocated; testing the hypotheses, not merely by the complete induction peculiar to mathematics, but, like his colleagues of the outer world, resorting also to experimental tests and incomplete induction; frequently finding it necessary, in view of unforeseen disclosures, to abandon one hopeful hypothesis or to transform it by retrenchment or by enlargement:—thus, in his own domain, matching, point for point, the processes, methods and experience familiar to the devotee of natural science.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 26
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Astronomer (97)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Class (168)  |  Colleague (51)  |  Complete (209)  |  Data (162)  |  Depth (97)  |  Devotee (7)  |  Disclosure (7)  |  Domain (72)  |  Elusive (8)  |  Enlargement (8)  |  Experience (494)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Exploration (161)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Familiar (47)  |  Find (1014)  |  Forth (14)  |  Frequently (21)  |  Geologist (82)  |  Guess (67)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Height (33)  |  Hopeful (6)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Idea (881)  |  Implication (25)  |  Incomplete (31)  |  Induction (81)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Infinitesimal (30)  |  Internal (69)  |  Limitless (14)  |  Literally (30)  |  Located (2)  |  Logic (311)  |  Look (584)  |  Making (300)  |  Match (30)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Merely (315)  |  Metaphor (37)  |  Method (531)  |  Microscope (85)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Minute (129)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Science (133)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Objective (96)  |  Observe (179)  |  Observed (149)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outer (13)  |  Peculiar (115)  |  Physicist (270)  |  Point (584)  |  Powerful (145)  |  Process (439)  |  Quest (39)  |  Regard (312)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Resort (8)  |  Rest (287)  |  Sense (785)  |  Speak (240)  |  Speaking (118)  |  Student (317)  |  Telescope (106)  |  Test (221)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Transform (74)  |  Unforeseen (11)  |  Universe (900)  |  Vast (188)  |  View (496)  |  World (1850)

… the embryological record, as it is usually presented to us, is both imperfect and misleading. It may be compared to an ancient manuscript, with many of the sheets lost, others displaced, and with spurious passages interpolated by a later hand. … Like the scholar with his manuscript, the embryologist has by a process of careful and critical examination to determine where the gaps are present, to detect the later insertions, and to place in order what has been misplaced.
A Treatise on Comparative Embryology (1885), Vol. 1, 3-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (198)  |  Both (496)  |  Careful (28)  |  Comparison (108)  |  Critical (73)  |  Detect (45)  |  Detection (19)  |  Determine (152)  |  Displace (9)  |  Embryologist (3)  |  Embryology (18)  |  Examination (102)  |  Gap (36)  |  Imperfect (46)  |  Insertion (2)  |  Lost (34)  |  Manuscript (10)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Other (2233)  |  Passage (52)  |  Present (630)  |  Process (439)  |  Record (161)  |  Scholar (52)  |  Sheet (8)  |  Spurious (3)  |  Usually (176)

… the reasoning process [employed in mathematics] is not different from that of any other branch of knowledge, … but there is required, and in a great degree, that attention of mind which is in some part necessary for the acquisition of all knowledge, and in this branch is indispensably necessary. This must be given in its fullest intensity; … the other elements especially characteristic of a mathematical mind are quickness in perceiving logical sequence, love of order, methodical arrangement and harmony, distinctness of conception.
In Treatise on Infinitesimal Calculus (1868), Vol. 8, 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (46)  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Attention (196)  |  Branch (155)  |  Characteristic (154)  |  Conception (160)  |  Degree (277)  |  Different (595)  |  Element (322)  |  Employ (115)  |  Great (1610)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Indispensable (31)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Logical (57)  |  Love (328)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Methodical (8)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perceive (46)  |  Process (439)  |  Quickness (5)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Required (108)  |  Sequence (68)

…it ought to be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well under the new.
The Prince (1532). W. K. Marriott (translator) and Rob McMahon (editor), The Prince (2008), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (362)  |  Conduct (70)  |  Defender (5)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Do (1905)  |  Enemy (86)  |  Innovation (49)  |  Introduction (37)  |  Lead (391)  |  Lukewarm (2)  |  More (2558)  |  New (1273)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Old (499)  |  Peril (9)  |  Remember (189)  |  Success (327)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Uncertain (45)

…reality is a system, completely ordered and fully intelligible, with which thought in its advance is more and more identifying itself. We may look at the growth of knowledge … as an attempt by our mind to return to union with things as they are in their ordered wholeness…. and if we take this view, our notion of truth is marked out for us. Truth is the approximation of thought to reality … Its measure is the distance thought has travelled … toward that intelligible system … The degree of truth of a particular proposition is to be judged in the first instance by its coherence with experience as a whole, ultimately by its coherence with that further whole, all comprehensive and fully articulated, in which thought can come to rest.
In The Nature of Thought (1921), Vol II, 264.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (298)  |  Approximation (32)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Completely (137)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Degree (277)  |  Distance (171)  |  Experience (494)  |  First (1302)  |  Growth (200)  |  Intelligible (35)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Law (913)  |  Look (584)  |  Marked (55)  |  Measure (241)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Notion (120)  |  Proposition (126)  |  Reality (274)  |  Rest (287)  |  Return (133)  |  Scientific Method (200)  |  System (545)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thought (995)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Ultimately (56)  |  Union (52)  |  View (496)  |  Whole (756)  |  Wholeness (9)

“In order to ascertain the height of the tree I must be in such a position that the top of the tree is exactly in a line with the top of a measuring-stick—or any straight object would do, such as an umbrella—which I shall secure in an upright position between my feet. Knowing then that the ratio that the height of the tree bears to the length of the measuring stick must equal the ratio that the distance from my eye to the base of the tree bears to my height, and knowing (or being able to find out) my height, the length of the measuring stick and the distance from my eye to the base of the tree, I can, therefore, calculate the height of the tree.”
“What is an umbrella?”
In Mr. Fortune’s Maggot (1927), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Ascertain (41)  |  Base (120)  |  Bear (162)  |  Being (1276)  |  Calculate (58)  |  Distance (171)  |  Do (1905)  |  Eye (440)  |  Find (1014)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Height (33)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Measure (241)  |  Must (1525)  |  Object (438)  |  Ratio (41)  |  Straight (75)  |  Surveying (6)  |  Top (100)  |  Tree (269)  |  Umbrella (4)

“Wu Li” was more than poetic. It was the best definition of physics that the conference would produce. It caught that certain something, that living quality that we were seeking to express in a book, that thing without which physics becomes sterile. “Wu” can mean either “matter” or “energy.” “Li” is a richly poetic word. It means “universal order” or “universal law.” It also means “organic patterns.” The grain in a panel of wood is Li. The organic pattern on the surface of a leaf is also Li, and so is the texture of a rose petal. In short, Wu Li, the Chinese word for physics, means “patterns of organic energy” (“matter/ energy” [Wu] + “universal order/organic patterns” [Li]). This is remarkable since it reflects a world view which the founders of western science (Galileo and Newton) simply did not comprehend, but toward which virtually every physical theory of import in the twentieth century is pointing!
In The Dancing Wu Li Masters: An Overview of the New Physics (1979), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (40)  |  Become (821)  |  Best (467)  |  Book (413)  |  Catch (34)  |  Century (319)  |  Certain (557)  |  Chinese (22)  |  Comprehend (44)  |  Conference (18)  |  Definition (238)  |  Energy (373)  |  Express (192)  |  Founder (26)  |  Galileo Galilei (134)  |  Grain (50)  |  Law (913)  |  Leaf (73)  |  Living (492)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  More (2558)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (363)  |  Organic (161)  |  Panel (2)  |  Pattern (116)  |  Petal (4)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physics (564)  |  Poem (104)  |  Produce (117)  |  Quality (139)  |  Remarkable (50)  |  Rose (36)  |  Seek (218)  |  Short (200)  |  Something (718)  |  Sterile (24)  |  Surface (223)  |  Texture (8)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Universal (198)  |  View (496)  |  Western (45)  |  Wood (97)  |  Word (650)  |  World (1850)  |  World View (3)

(1) A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
(2) A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the first law.
(3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.
'The Three Laws of Robotics', in I, Robot (1950), Frontispiece.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Conflict (77)  |  Existence (481)  |  First (1302)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Law (913)  |  Long (778)  |  Must (1525)  |  Obey (46)  |  Protect (65)  |  Protection (41)  |  Robot (14)  |  Through (846)

[1665-06-10] ...In the evening home to supper, and there to my great trouble hear that the plague is come into the City (though it hath these three or four weeks since its beginning been wholly out of the City); but where it begin but in my good friend and neighbour's, Dr Burnett in Fanchurch Street - which in both points troubles me mightily. To the office to finish my letters, and then home to bed, being troubled at the sickness ... and particularly how to put my things and estate in order, in case it should please God to call me away.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (10 Jun 1665)
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (275)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Being (1276)  |  Both (496)  |  Call (781)  |  City (87)  |  Finish (62)  |  Friend (180)  |  God (776)  |  Good (906)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hear (144)  |  Home (184)  |  Letter (117)  |  Office (71)  |  Plague (42)  |  Please (68)  |  Point (584)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Supper (10)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Trouble (117)  |  Week (73)  |  Wholly (88)

[1665-08-31] Up, and after putting several things in order to my removal to Woolwich, the plague having a great increase this week beyond all expectation, of almost 2000 - making the general Bill 7000, odd 100 and the plague above 6000 .... Thus this month ends, with great sadness upon the public through the greateness of the plague, everywhere through the Kingdom almost. Every day sadder and sadder news of its increase. In the City died this week 7496; and all of them, 6102 of the plague. But it is feared that the true number of the dead this week is near 10000 - partly from the poor that cannot be taken notice of through the greatness of the number, and partly from the Quakers and others that will not have any bell ring for them. As to myself, I am very well; only, in fear of the plague, and as much of an Ague, by being forced to go early and late to Woolwich, and my family to lie there continually.
Diary of Samuel Pepys (31 August 1665)
Science quotes on:  |  2000 (15)  |  Being (1276)  |  Bell (35)  |  Beyond (316)  |  City (87)  |  Early (196)  |  End (603)  |  Everywhere (98)  |  Expectation (67)  |  Family (101)  |  Fear (212)  |  General (521)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greatness (55)  |  Increase (225)  |  Kingdom (80)  |  Late (119)  |  Lie (370)  |  Making (300)  |  Month (91)  |  Myself (211)  |  New (1273)  |  News (36)  |  Notice (81)  |  Number (710)  |  Other (2233)  |  Plague (42)  |  Poor (139)  |  Sadness (36)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Through (846)  |  Week (73)  |  Will (2350)

[A man] must learn to understand the motives of human beings, their illusions, and their sufferings human beings, their illusions, and their sufferings in order to acquire a proper relationship to individual fellow-men and to the community. These precious things … primarily constitutes and preserves culture. This is what I have in mind when I recommend the “humanities” as important, not just dry specialized knowledge in the fields of history and philosophy.
From interview with Benjamin Fine, 'Einstein Stresses Critical Thinking', New York Times (5 Oct 1952), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Community (111)  |  Constitute (99)  |  Culture (157)  |  Dry (65)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Field (378)  |  History (716)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Humanities (21)  |  Illusion (68)  |  Important (229)  |  Individual (420)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Learn (672)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Motive (62)  |  Must (1525)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Precious (43)  |  Preserve (91)  |  Proper (150)  |  Recommend (27)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Specialized (9)  |  Suffering (68)  |  Sufferings (2)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Understand (648)

[About any invention] (1) everything that’s already in the world when you’re born is just normal; (2) anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it; (3) anything that gets invented after you’re thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it until it’s been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really.
In News Review section, Sunday Times (29 Aug 1999).
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (509)  |  Already (226)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Birth (154)  |  Career (86)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Creative (144)  |  End (603)  |  Everything (489)  |  Exciting (50)  |  Gradual (30)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Incredible (43)  |  Invention (400)  |  Know (1538)  |  Luck (44)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Order (6)  |  Normal (29)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thirty (6)  |  Turn (454)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

[Edward Teller is a conceptual thinker,] an ‘order of magnitude’ man. That’s his language. He’s like the architect who likes to make the big drawing, the broad sketch, and not worry himself about the plumbing details.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Architect (32)  |  Big (55)  |  Broad (28)  |  Conceptual (11)  |  Detail (150)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Himself (461)  |  Language (308)  |  Magnitude (88)  |  Man (2252)  |  Order Of Magnitude (5)  |  Plumbing (5)  |  Sketch (8)  |  Edward Teller (43)  |  Thinker (41)  |  Worry (34)

[Engineers are] the direct and necessary instrument of coalition by which alone the new social order can commence.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Direct (228)  |  Engineer (136)  |  Engineering (188)  |  Instrument (158)  |  Necessary (370)  |  New (1273)  |  Social (261)  |  Society (350)

[John Scott Haldane] preferred to work on himself or other human beings who were sufficiently interested in the work to ignore pain or fear … [His] object was not to achieve this state of [pain or fear] but to achieve knowledge which could save other men's lives. His attitute was much more like a good soldier who will risk his life and endure wounds in order to gain victory than that of an ascetic who deliberately undergoes pain. The soldier does not get himself wounded deliberately, and my father did not seek pain in his work though he greeted pain which would have made some people writhe or groan, with laughter.
In R.W. Clark, JBS: The Life and Work of J.B.S. Haldane (1968), quoted in Lawrence K. Altman, Who Goes First? (1986), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Biography (254)  |  Father (113)  |  Fear (212)  |  Gain (146)  |  Good (906)  |  John Scott Haldane (3)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Ignore (52)  |  Interest (416)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Laughter (34)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  More (2558)  |  Object (438)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pain (144)  |  People (1031)  |  Risk (68)  |  Save (126)  |  Seek (218)  |  Soldier (28)  |  State (505)  |  Victory (40)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)  |  Wound (26)

[M]y work, which I’ve done for a long time, was not pursued in order to gain the praise I now enjoy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which I notice resides in me more than in most other men. And therewithal, whenever I found out anything remarkable, I have thought it my duty to put down my discovery on paper, so that all ingenious people might be informed thereof.
Letter (27 Jun 1716) thanking the University of Louvain for ending him a medal designed in honour of his research. (Leeuwenhoek was then in his 84th year.) As cited by Charles-Edward Amory Winslow in The Conquest of Epidemic Disease: A Chapter in the History of Ideas (), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Craving (5)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Down (455)  |  Duty (71)  |  Find (1014)  |  Gain (146)  |  Inform (50)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Long (778)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Notice (81)  |  Other (2233)  |  Paper (192)  |  People (1031)  |  Praise (28)  |  Remarkable (50)  |  Research (753)  |  Reside (25)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Work (1402)  |  Write (250)

[My work as a photographer is a] mission to document endangered species and landscapes in order to show a world worth saving.
On the 'About' page of his web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Document (7)  |  Endangered Species (6)  |  Landscape (46)  |  Mission (23)  |  Saving (20)  |  Show (353)  |  Species (435)  |  Work (1402)  |  World (1850)  |  Worth (172)

[Presently, science undergraduates] do not learn to write clearly and briefly, marshalling their points in due and aesthetically satisfying order, and eliminating inessentials. They are inept at those turns of phrase or happy analogy which throw a flying bridge across a chasm of misunderstanding and make contact between mind and mind.
From essay in Thomas Rice Henn, The Apple and the Spectroscope: Being Lectures on Poetry Designed (in the Main) for Science Students (1951), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Analogy (76)  |  Bridge (49)  |  Chasm (9)  |  Clarity (49)  |  Contact (66)  |  Do (1905)  |  Due (143)  |  Elimination (26)  |  Flying (74)  |  Happy (108)  |  Inept (4)  |  Learn (672)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Misunderstanding (13)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Point (584)  |  Throw (45)  |  Turn (454)  |  Undergraduate (17)  |  Write (250)

[Science] dissipates errors born of ignorance about our true relations with nature, errors the more damaging in that the social order should rest only on those relations. TRUTH! JUSTICE! Those are the immutable laws. Let us banish the dangerous maxim that it is sometimes useful to depart from them and to deceive or enslave mankind to assure its happiness.
Exposition du Système du Monde (1796), 2, 312, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  Banish (11)  |  Damage (38)  |  Dangerous (108)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Dissipate (8)  |  Enslave (2)  |  Error (339)  |  Happiness (126)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Immutable (26)  |  Justice (40)  |  Law (913)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Maxim (19)  |  More (2558)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Rest (287)  |  Social (261)  |  Social Order (8)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Useful (260)  |  Usefulness (92)

[Scientific research reveals] the majestic spectacle of the order of nature gradually unfolding itself to man’s consciousness and placing in his hands the implements of ever augmenting power to control his destinies and attain that ultimate comprehension of the universe which has in all ages constituted the supreme aspiration of man.
As quoted in book review by Ian Clunies Ross, "The Spirit of Research', The Australian Quarterly (Dec 1931), 3, No. 12, 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Aspiration (35)  |  Attain (126)  |  Comprehension (69)  |  Consciousness (132)  |  Control (182)  |  Destiny (54)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Implement (13)  |  Majestic (17)  |  Man (2252)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Power (771)  |  Research (753)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Spectacle (35)  |  Supreme (73)  |  Ultimate (152)  |  Unfold (15)  |  Unfolding (16)  |  Universe (900)

[We] can easily distinguish what relates to Mathematics in any question from that which belongs to the other sciences. But as I considered the matter carefully it gradually came to light that all those matters only were referred to Mathematics in which order and measurements are investigated, and that it makes no difference whether it be in numbers, figures, stars, sounds or any other object that the question of measurement arises. I saw consequently that there must be some general science to explain that element as a whole which gives rise to problems about order and measurement, restricted as these are to no special subject matter. This, I perceived was called “Universal Mathematics,” not a far-fetched asignation, but one of long standing which has passed into current use, because in this science is contained everything on account of which the others are called parts of Mathematics.
Rules for the Direction of the Mind (written 1628). As translated by Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane and George Robert Thomson Ross in The Philosophical Works of Descartes (1911, 1931), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Arise (162)  |  Belong (168)  |  Call (781)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Consider (428)  |  Current (122)  |  Difference (355)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Element (322)  |  Everything (489)  |  Explain (334)  |  Figure (162)  |  General (521)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Investigate (106)  |  Light (635)  |  Long (778)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Matter (821)  |  Measurement (178)  |  Must (1525)  |  Number (710)  |  Object (438)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pass (241)  |  Problem (731)  |  Question (649)  |  Rise (169)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sound (187)  |  Special (188)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Subject (543)  |  Universal (198)  |  Use (771)  |  Whole (756)

[About Pierre de Fermat] It cannot be denied that he has had many exceptional ideas, and that he is a highly intelligent man. For my part, however, I have always been taught to take a broad overview of things, in order to be able to deduce from them general rules, which might be applicable elsewhere.
Quoted, without source, in The Grolier Library of Science Biographies (1996), Vol. 3, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (31)  |  Application (257)  |  Broad (28)  |  Elsewhere (10)  |  Exceptional (19)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  General (521)  |  Idea (881)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Man (2252)  |  Overview (2)  |  Rule (307)  |  Thing (1914)

Branches or types are characterized by the plan of their structure,
Classes, by the manner in which that plan is executed, as far as ways and means are concerned,
Orders, by the degrees of complication of that structure,
Families, by their form, as far as determined by structure,
Genera, by the details of the execution in special parts, and
Species, by the relations of individuals to one another and to the world in which they live, as well as by the proportions of their parts, their ornamentation, etc.
Essay on Classification (1857). Contributions to the Natural History of the United States of America (1857), Vol. I, 170.
Science quotes on:  |  Classification (102)  |  Complication (30)  |  Concern (239)  |  Degree (277)  |  Detail (150)  |  Execution (25)  |  Form (976)  |  Individual (420)  |  Live (650)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Plan (122)  |  Proportion (140)  |  Special (188)  |  Species (435)  |  Structure (365)  |  Type (171)  |  Way (1214)  |  World (1850)

Combien de gens se font abstraits pour paraître profonds! La plupart des termes abstraits sont des ombres qui cachent des vides.
How many people become abstract in order to appear profound! Most abstract terms are shadows that conceal a void.
Quoted in M. Paul De Raynal, Pensées de J. Joubert (1862), 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Become (821)  |  Most (1728)  |  People (1031)  |  Profound (105)  |  Shadow (73)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)  |  Void (31)

Dass die bis jetzt unzerlegten chemischen Elemente absolut unzerlegbare Stoffe seien, ist gegenwärtig mindestens sehr unwahrscheinlich. Vielmehr scheint es, dass die Atome der Elemente nicht die letzten, sondern nur die näheren Bestandtheile der Molekeln sowohl der Elemente wie der Verbindungen bilden, die Molekeln oder Molecule als Massentheile erster, die Atome als solche zweiter Ordnung anzusehen sind, die ihrerseits wiederum aus Massentheilchen einer dritten höheren Ordnung bestehen werden.
That the as yet undivided chemical elements are absolutely irreducible substances, is currently at least very unlikely. Rather it seems, that the atoms of elements are not the final, but only the immediate constituents of the molecules of both the elements and the compounds—the Molekeln or molecule as foremost division of matter, the atoms being considered as second order, in turn consisting of matter particles of a third higher order.
[Speculating in 1870, on the existence of subatomic particles, in opening remark of the paper by which he became established as co-discoverer of the Periodic Law.]
'Die Natur der chemischen Elemente als Function ihrer Atomgewichte' ('The Nature of the Chemical Elements as a Function of their Atomic Weight'), Annalen der Chemie (1870), supp. b, 354. Original German paper reprinted in Lothar Meyer and Dmitry Ivanovich Mendeleyev, Das natürliche System der chemischen Elemente: Abhandlungen (1895), 9. Translation by Webmaster, with punctuation faithful to the original, except a comma was changed to a dash to improve readability.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Atom (381)  |  Being (1276)  |  Both (496)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Compound (117)  |  Consider (428)  |  Consisting (5)  |  Constituent (47)  |  Discoverer (43)  |  Division (67)  |  Element (322)  |  Existence (481)  |  Final (121)  |  Immediate (98)  |  Irreducible (7)  |  Law (913)  |  Matter (821)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Paper (192)  |  Particle (200)  |  Periodic Law (6)  |  Subatomic (10)  |  Substance (253)  |  Turn (454)  |  Undivided (3)  |  Unlikely (15)

Every teacher certainly should know something of non-euclidean geometry. Thus, it forms one of the few parts of mathematics which, at least in scattered catch-words, is talked about in wide circles, so that any teacher may be asked about it at any moment. … Imagine a teacher of physics who is unable to say anything about Röntgen rays, or about radium. A teacher of mathematics who could give no answer to questions about non-euclidean geometry would not make a better impression.
On the other hand, I should like to advise emphatically against bringing non-euclidean into regular school instruction (i.e., beyond occasional suggestions, upon inquiry by interested pupils), as enthusiasts are always recommending. Let us be satisfied if the preceding advice is followed and if the pupils learn to really understand euclidean geometry. After all, it is in order for the teacher to know a little more than the average pupil.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (57)  |  Advise (7)  |  Against (332)  |  Answer (389)  |  Ask (420)  |  Average (89)  |  Better (493)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Bring (95)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Circle (117)  |  Emphatically (8)  |  Enthusiast (9)  |  Euclidean (3)  |  Follow (389)  |  Form (976)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Give (208)  |  Imagine (176)  |  Impression (118)  |  Inquiry (88)  |  Instruction (101)  |  Interest (416)  |  Know (1538)  |  Learn (672)  |  Least (75)  |  Let (64)  |  Little (717)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Moment (260)  |  More (2558)  |  Non-Euclidean (7)  |  Occasional (23)  |  On The Other Hand (40)  |  Other (2233)  |  Part (235)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Precede (23)  |  Pupil (62)  |  Question (649)  |  Radium (29)  |  Ray (115)  |  Really (77)  |  Recommend (27)  |  Regular (48)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Say (989)  |  Scatter (7)  |  School (227)  |  Something (718)  |  Suggestion (49)  |  Talk (108)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Unable (25)  |  Understand (648)  |  Wide (97)  |  Word (650)  |  X-ray (43)

In primis, hominis est propria VERI inquisitio atque investigato. Itaque cum sumus negotiis necessariis, curisque vacui, tum avemus aliquid videre, audire, ac dicere, cognitionemque rerum, aut occultarum aut admirabilium, ad benè beatéque vivendum necessariam ducimus; —ex quo intelligitur, quod VERUM, simplex, sincerumque sit, id esse naturæ hominis aptissimum. Huic veri videndi cupiditati adjuncta est appetitio quædam principatûs, ut nemini parere animus benè a naturâ informatus velit, nisi præcipienti, aut docenti, aut utilitatis causâ justè et legitimè imperanti: ex quo animi magnitudo existit, et humanarum rerum contemtio.
Before all other things, man is distinguished by his pursuit and investigation of TRUTH. And hence, when free from needful business and cares, we delight to see, to hear, and to communicate, and consider a knowledge of many admirable and abstruse things necessary to the good conduct and happiness of our lives: whence it is clear that whatsoever is TRUE, simple, and direct, the same is most congenial to our nature as men. Closely allied with this earnest longing to see and know the truth, is a kind of dignified and princely sentiment which forbids a mind, naturally well constituted, to submit its faculties to any but those who announce it in precept or in doctrine, or to yield obedience to any orders but such as are at once just, lawful, and founded on utility. From this source spring greatness of mind and contempt of worldly advantages and troubles.
In De Officiis, Book 1. Sect. 13. As given in epigraph to John Frederick William Herschel, A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1830), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (12)  |  Advantage (144)  |  Announce (13)  |  Business (156)  |  Care (203)  |  Communicate (39)  |  Communication (101)  |  Conduct (70)  |  Congenial (3)  |  Consider (428)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Delight (111)  |  Dignified (13)  |  Dignity (44)  |  Direct (228)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Distinguished (84)  |  Doctrine (81)  |  Faculty (76)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Free (239)  |  Good (906)  |  Greatness (55)  |  Happiness (126)  |  Hear (144)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Kind (564)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Longing (19)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Obedience (20)  |  Other (2233)  |  Precept (10)  |  Pursuit (128)  |  See (1094)  |  Simple (426)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Spring (140)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Trouble (117)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Utility (52)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Yield (86)

L’analyse mathématique … dans l’étude de tous les phénomènes; elle les interprète par le même langage, comme pour attester l’unité et la simplicité du plan de l’univers, et rendre encore plus manifeste cet ordre immuable qui préside à toutes les causes naturelles.
Mathematical analysis … in the study of all phenomena, interprets them by the same language, as if to attest the unity and simplicity of the plan of the universe, and to make still more evident that unchangeable order which presides over all natural causes.
From Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), xv, translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (244)  |  Attest (4)  |  Cause (561)  |  Evident (92)  |  Interpret (25)  |  Language (308)  |  Mathematical Analysis (23)  |  More (2558)  |  Natural (810)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Plan (122)  |  Plus (43)  |  Preside (3)  |  Same (166)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Still (614)  |  Study (701)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Unity (81)  |  Universe (900)

Le savant n’étudie pas la nature parce que cela est utile; il l’étudie parce qu’il y prend plaisir et il y prend plaisir parce qu’elle est belle. Si la nature n’était pas belle, elle ne vaudrait pas la peine d’être connue, la vie ne vaudrait pas la peine d’être vécue.
The scientist does not study nature because it is useful to do so. He studies it because he takes pleasure in it, and he takes pleasure in it because it is beautiful. If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and life would not be worth living. I am not speaking, of course, of the beauty which strikes the senses, of the beauty of qualities and appearances. I am far from despising this, but it has nothing to do with science. What I mean is that more intimate beauty which comes from the harmonious order of its parts, and which a pure intelligence can grasp.
In Science et Méthode (1920), 48, as translated by Francis Maitland, in Science and Method (1908, 1952), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (145)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Course (413)  |  Despising (3)  |  Do (1905)  |  Harmonious (18)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Life (1870)  |  Living (492)  |  Mean (810)  |  More (2558)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Pure (299)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Sense (785)  |  Speaking (118)  |  Strike (72)  |  Study (701)  |  Useful (260)  |  Worth (172)

Mi è impossibile cingere i fianchi di una ragazza con il mio braccio destro e serrare il suo sorriso nella mia mano sinistra, per poi tentare di studiare i due oggetti separatamente. Allo stesso modo, non ci è possibile separare la vita dalla materia vivente, allo scopo di studiare la sola materia vivente e le sue reazioni. Inevitabilmente, studiando la materia vivente e le sue reazioni, studiamo la vita stessa.
It is impossible to encircle the hips of a girl with my right arm and hold her smile in my left hand, then proceed to study the two items separately. Similarly, we can not separate life from living matter, in order to study only living matter and its reactions. Inevitably, studying living matter and its reactions, we study life itself
In The Nature of Life (1948).
Science quotes on:  |  Arm (82)  |  Due (143)  |  Encircle (2)  |  Girl (38)  |  Hip (3)  |  Hold (96)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Life (1870)  |  Living (492)  |  Matter (821)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Right (473)  |  Separate (151)  |  Smile (34)  |  Study (701)  |  Studying (70)  |  Two (936)

Question: Explain why, in order to cook food by boiling, at the top of a high mountain, you must employ a different method from that used at the sea level.
Answer: It is easy to cook food at the sea level by boiling it, but once you get above the sea level the only plan is to fry it in its own fat. It is, in fact, impossible to boil water above the sea level by any amount of heat. A different method, therefore, would have to be employed to boil food at the top of a high mountain, but what that method is has not yet been discovered. The future may reveal it to a daring experimentalist.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 178-9, Question 11. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Amount (153)  |  Answer (389)  |  Boil (24)  |  Boiling (3)  |  Cooking (12)  |  Daring (17)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Easy (213)  |  Employ (115)  |  Examination (102)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Experimenter (40)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Fat (11)  |  Food (213)  |  Frying (2)  |  Future (467)  |  Heat (180)  |  High (370)  |  Howler (15)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Method (531)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Must (1525)  |  Plan (122)  |  Question (649)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Sea (326)  |  Sea Level (5)  |  Top (100)  |  Water (503)  |  Why (491)

Rassemblons des faits pour nous donner des idées.
Let us gather facts in order to get ourselves thinking.
'Histoire des Animaux', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. 2, 18. Quoted in Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth- Century French Thought, ed. Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 440.
Science quotes on:  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Gather (76)  |  Observation (593)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Thinking (425)

Socrates: Very good; let us begin then, Protarchus, by asking whether all this which they call the universe is left to the guidance of unreason and chance medley, or, on the contrary, as our fathers have declared, ordered and governed by a marvellous intelligence and wisdom.
Protarchus: Wide asunder are the two assertions, illustrious Socrates, for that which you were just now saying to me appears to be blasphemy, but the other assertion, that mind orders all things, is worthy of the aspect of the world…
Plato
From 'Philebus', collected in The Dialogues of Plato (1875), Vol. 4, 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (74)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Assertion (35)  |  Begin (275)  |  Blasphemy (8)  |  Call (781)  |  Chance (244)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Declared (24)  |  Father (113)  |  Good (906)  |  Govern (66)  |  Governed (4)  |  Guidance (30)  |  Illustrious (10)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Other (2233)  |  Reason (766)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Two (936)  |  Universe (900)  |  Wide (97)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  World (1850)

~~[Unverified]~~ Through steady observation and a meaningful contact with the divined order of the world’s structure, arranged by God’s wisdom,–who would not be guided to admire the Builder who creates all!
As quoted, without citation, in Adam Mabry, Life and Doctrine: How the Truth and Grace of Christian Story Change Everything (2001, 2014), 17. Also seen, without citation, in Katherine Katsanis, 'In This Age of Science And Technology, How Can we Accept The Reality of Miracles?', Orthodox Observer (Sep 1997), 21, attributed to Nikolai Copernicus. As yet, Webmaster cannot identify a trustworthy primary source, is therefore presently skeptical, and meanwhile labels the quote as unverified.
Science quotes on:  |  Admire (19)  |  Arrange (33)  |  Builder (16)  |  Contact (66)  |  Create (245)  |  Divine (112)  |  God (776)  |  Guide (107)  |  Meaningful (19)  |  Observation (593)  |  Steady (45)  |  Structure (365)  |  Through (846)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  World (1850)

A fact is like a sack which won’t stand up if it’s empty. In order that it may stand up, one has to put into it the reason and sentiment which caused it to exist.
Character, The Father, in play Six Characters in Search of an Author (1921), Act 1. Collected in John Gassner and Burns Mantle, A Treasury of the Theatre (1935), Vol. 2, 507.
Science quotes on:  |  Cause (561)  |  Empty (82)  |  Exist (458)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Reason (766)  |  Sack (2)  |  Sentiment (16)  |  Stand (284)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
In Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long (1973), 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Act (278)  |  Alone (324)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Balance (82)  |  Being (1276)  |  Bone (101)  |  Build (211)  |  Building (158)  |  Butcher (9)  |  Change (639)  |  Comfort (64)  |  Computer (131)  |  Cooking (12)  |  Cooperation (38)  |  Death (406)  |  Design (203)  |  Diaper (2)  |  Efficiency (46)  |  Equation (138)  |  Fight (49)  |  Gallant (2)  |  Hog (4)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Insect (89)  |  Invasion (9)  |  Manure (8)  |  Meal (19)  |  New (1273)  |  Pitch (17)  |  Plan (122)  |  Problem (731)  |  Program (57)  |  Set (400)  |  Ship (69)  |  Solution (282)  |  Solve (145)  |  Sonnet (5)  |  Specialization (24)  |  Wall (71)  |  Write (250)  |  Writing (192)

A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life depends on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dead (65)  |  Depend (238)  |  Exert (40)  |  Give In (3)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Inner (72)  |  Labor (200)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Measure (241)  |  Must (1525)  |  Myself (211)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outer (13)  |  Receive (117)  |  Remind (16)  |  Still (614)  |  Time (1911)

Sigmund Freud quote: A layman will no doubt find it hard to understand how pathological disorders of the body and mind can be el
A layman will no doubt find it hard to understand how pathological disorders of the body and mind can be eliminated by 'mere' words. He will feel that he is being asked to believe in magic. And he will not be so very wrong, for the words which we use in our everyday speech are nothing other than watered-down magic. But we shall have to follow a roundabout path in order to explain how science sets about restoring to words a part at least of their former magical power.
Psychical (or Mental) Treatment (1905), In James Strachey (ed.), The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (1953), Vol. 7, 283.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (420)  |  Being (1276)  |  Body (557)  |  Disorder (45)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Down (455)  |  Everyday (32)  |  Explain (334)  |  Feel (371)  |  Find (1014)  |  Follow (389)  |  Former (138)  |  Hard (246)  |  Layman (21)  |  Magic (92)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Other (2233)  |  Path (159)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Power (771)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Set (400)  |  Speech (66)  |  Understand (648)  |  Use (771)  |  Water (503)  |  Will (2350)  |  Word (650)  |  Wrong (246)

A mathematical problem should be difficult in order to entice us, yet not completely inaccessible, lest it mock at our efforts. It should be to us a guide post on the mazy paths to hidden truths, and ultimately a reminder of our pleasure in the successful solution.
In Mathematical Problems', Bulletin American Mathematical Society, 8, 438.
Science quotes on:  |  Completely (137)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Effort (243)  |  Guide (107)  |  Hide (70)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Lest (3)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mock (7)  |  Path (159)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Post (8)  |  Problem (731)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Solution (282)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Successful (134)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Ultimately (56)

A mind which has once imbibed a taste for scientific enquiry, and has learnt the habit of applying its principles readily to the cases which occur, has within itself an inexhaustable source of pure and exciting contemplations:— One would think that Shakespeare had such a mind in view when he describes a contemplative man as finding
    “Tongues in trees—books in running brooks—
    Sermons in stones—and good in everything.”
Accustomed to trace the operations of general causes and the exemplification of general laws, in circumstances where the uninformed and uninquiring eye, perceives neither novelty nor beauty, he walks in the midst of wonders; every object which falls in his way elucidates some principle, affords some instruction and impresses him with a sense of harmony and order. Nor is it a mere passive pleasure which is thus communicated. A thousand questions are continually arising in his mind, a thousand objects of enquiry presenting themselves, which keep his faculties in constant exercise, and his thoughts perpetually on the wing, so that lassitude is excluded from his life, and that craving after artificial excitement and dissipation of the mind, which leads so many into frivolous, unworthy, and destructive pursuits, is altogether eradicated from his bosom.
In Dionysius Lardner (ed.), Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Vol 1, Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy (1831), 14-15.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Arising (22)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Book (413)  |  Bosom (14)  |  Cause (561)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Constant (148)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Describe (132)  |  Enquiry (89)  |  Everything (489)  |  Excitement (61)  |  Exciting (50)  |  Exercise (113)  |  Eye (440)  |  Fall (243)  |  Frivolous (8)  |  General (521)  |  Good (906)  |  Habit (174)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Instruction (101)  |  Lassitude (4)  |  Law (913)  |  Lead (391)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Novelty (31)  |  Object (438)  |  Occur (151)  |  Operation (221)  |  Operations (107)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Principle (530)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pursuit (128)  |  Question (649)  |  Running (61)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Sense (785)  |  Sermon (9)  |  Stone (168)  |  Taste (93)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Tongue (44)  |  Trace (109)  |  Tree (269)  |  Unworthy (18)  |  View (496)  |  Walk (138)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wing (79)  |  Wonder (251)

A soil adapted to the growth of plants, is necessarily prepared and carefully preserved; and, in the necessary waste of land which is inhabited, the foundation is laid for future continents, in order to support the system of the living world.
In 'Concerning and System of the Earth, its Duration and Stability', a Dissertation presented to the Royal Society of Edinburgh (Mar-Apr 1785). The surviving Abstract is excerpted in Frank H. T. Rhodes, Richard O. Stone and Bruce D. Malamud (eds.), Language of the Earth: A Literary Anthology (2002, 2nd. ed. 2008), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (70)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Continent (79)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Future (467)  |  Growth (200)  |  Land (131)  |  Living (492)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Plant (320)  |  Prepared (5)  |  Preserved (3)  |  Soil (98)  |  Support (151)  |  System (545)  |  Waste (109)  |  World (1850)

A theory with mathematical beauty is more likely to be correct than an ugly one that fits some experimental data. God is a mathematician of a very high order, and He used very advanced mathematics in constructing the universe.
In Scientific American (May 1963). As quoted and cited in The Hutchinson Encyclopedia of Science (1998), 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (298)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Construct (129)  |  Correct (95)  |  Data (162)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Fit (139)  |  God (776)  |  High (370)  |  Likely (36)  |  Mathematical Beauty (19)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  More (2558)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Ugly (14)  |  Universe (900)

A true anecdote which illustrates his unworldly nature is of the instruction he received in 1922 to appear at Buckingham Palace to receive the accolade of the Order of Knighthood; he replied that as the date coincided with that of a meeting of the Physiological Society, he would be unable to attend.
Charles Lovatt Evans, Reminiscences of Bayliss and Starling (1964), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Attend (67)  |  Sir William Bayliss (3)  |  Instruction (101)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Physiological (64)  |  Receive (117)  |  Society (350)

A universe without law would be a universe without order, without the possibility of science, and the manifestations of an intelligent governor and creator.
Presidential address to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (22 Aug 1850),The Papers of Joseph Henry, Vol. 8, 99.
Science quotes on:  |  Creator (97)  |  Governor (13)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Law (913)  |  Manifestation (61)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Universe (900)

A world that did not lift a finger when Hitler was wiping out six million Jewish men, women, and children is now saying that the Jewish state of Israel will not survive if it does not come to terms with the Arabs. My feeling is that no one in this universe has the right and the competence to tell Israel what it has to do in order to survive. On the contrary, it is Israel that can tell us what to do. It can tell us that we shall not survive if we do not cultivate and celebrate courage, if we coddle traitors and deserters, bargain with terrorists, court enemies, and scorn friends.
In Before the Sabbath (1979), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Arab (5)  |  Bargain (5)  |  Celebrate (21)  |  Child (333)  |  Children (201)  |  Competence (13)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Courage (82)  |  Court (35)  |  Cultivate (24)  |  Do (1905)  |  Enemy (86)  |  Feel (371)  |  Feeling (259)  |  Finger (48)  |  Friend (180)  |  Adolf Hitler (20)  |  Israel (6)  |  Jewish (15)  |  Lift (57)  |  Million (124)  |  Right (473)  |  Say (989)  |  Scorn (12)  |  State (505)  |  Survive (87)  |  Tell (344)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)  |  Terrorist (2)  |  Traitor (3)  |  Universe (900)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wipe (6)  |  Woman (160)  |  World (1850)

About 85 per cent of my “thinking” time was spent getting into a position to think, to make a decision, to learn something I needed to know. Much more time went into finding or obtaining information than into digesting it. Hours went into the plotting of graphs... When the graphs were finished, the relations were obvious at once, but the plotting had to be done in order to make them so.
From article 'Man-Computer Symbiosis', in IRE Transactions on Human Factors in Electronics (Mar 1960), Vol. HFE-1, 4-11.
Science quotes on:  |  Decision (98)  |  Digesting (2)  |  Finding (34)  |  Finish (62)  |  Graph (8)  |  Hour (192)  |  Information (173)  |  Know (1538)  |  Learn (672)  |  More (2558)  |  Need (320)  |  Obtaining (5)  |  Obvious (128)  |  Relation (166)  |  Something (718)  |  Spent (85)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Time (1911)

According to Democritus, atoms had lost the qualities like colour, taste, etc., they only occupied space, but geometrical assertions about atoms were admissible and required no further analysis. In modern physics, atoms lose this last property, they possess geometrical qualities in no higher degree than colour, taste, etc. The atom of modern physics can only be symbolized by a partial differential equation in an abstract multidimensional space. Only the experiment of an observer forces the atom to indicate a position, a colour and a quantity of heat. All the qualities of the atom of modern physics are derived, it has no immediate and direct physical properties at all, i.e. every type of visual conception we might wish to design is, eo ipso, faulty. An understanding of 'the first order' is, I would almost say by definition, impossible for the world of atoms.
Philosophic Problems of Nuclear Science, trans. F. C. Hayes (1952), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  According (236)  |  Admissible (6)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Atom (381)  |  Conception (160)  |  Definition (238)  |  Degree (277)  |  Design (203)  |  Differential Equation (18)  |  Direct (228)  |  Equation (138)  |  Experiment (736)  |  First (1302)  |  Force (497)  |  Heat (180)  |  Immediate (98)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Indicate (62)  |  Last (425)  |  Lose (165)  |  Modern (402)  |  Modern Physics (23)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physics (564)  |  Possess (157)  |  Property (177)  |  Quantity (136)  |  Quantum Physics (19)  |  Required (108)  |  Say (989)  |  Space (523)  |  Taste (93)  |  Type (171)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Wish (216)  |  World (1850)

After having a wash I proceeded to the bar where—believe it or not—there was a white-coated barman who was not only serving drinks but also cigarettes! I hastened forward and rather timidly said ‘Can I have some cigarettes?’
‘What’s your rank?’ was the slightly unexpected reply.
‘I am afraid I haven’t got one,’ I answered.
‘Nonsense—everyone who comes here has a rank.’
‘I’m sorry but I just don’t have one.’
‘Now that puts me in a spot,’ said the barman, ‘for orders about cigarettes in this camp are clear—twenty for officers and ten for other ranks. Tell me what exactly are you?’
Now I really wanted those cigarettes so I drew myself up and said ‘I am the Professor of Chemistry at Manchester University.’
The barman contemplated me for about thirty seconds and then said ‘I’ll give you five.’
Since that day I have had few illusions about the importance of professors!
In A Time to Remember: The Autobiography of a Chemist (1983), 59. This event took place after a visit to the Defence Research Establishment at Porton to observe a demonstration of a new chemical anti-tank weapon (1941).
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Bar (9)  |  Belief (615)  |  Camp (12)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Cigarette (26)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Defence (16)  |  Demonstration (120)  |  Drink (56)  |  Forward (104)  |  Hasten (13)  |  Illusion (68)  |  Importance (299)  |  Manchester (6)  |  Myself (211)  |  New (1273)  |  Nonsense (48)  |  Officer (12)  |  Other (2233)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Proceeding (38)  |  Professor (133)  |  Rank (69)  |  Reply (58)  |  Second (66)  |  Serving (15)  |  Sorry (31)  |  Tell (344)  |  Timid (6)  |  Unexpected (55)  |  University (130)  |  Want (504)  |  Wash (23)  |  White (132)

After I had addressed myself to this very difficult and almost insoluble problem, the suggestion at length came to me how it could be solved with fewer and much simpler constructions than were formerly used, if some assumptions (which are called axioms) were granted me. They follow in this order.
There is no one center of all the celestial circles or spheres.
The center of the earth is not the center of the universe, but only of gravity and of the lunar sphere.
All the spheres revolve about the sun as their mid-point, and therefore the sun is the center of the universe.
The ratio of the earth’s distance from the sun to the height of the firmament is so much smaller than the ratio of the earth’s radius to its distance from the sun that the distance from the earth to the sun is imperceptible in comparison with the height of the firmament.
Whatever motion appears in the firmament arises not from any motion of the firmament, but from the earth’s motion. The earth together with its circumjacent elements performs a complete rotation on its fixed poles in a daily motion, while the firmament and highest heaven abide unchanged.
What appears to us as motions of the sun arise not from its motion but from the motion of the earth and our sphere, with which we revolve about the sun like any other planet. The earth has, then, more than one motion.
The apparent retrograde and direct motion of the planets arises not from their motion but from the earth’s. The motion of the earth alone, therefore, suffices to explain so many apparent inequalities in the heavens.
'The Commentariolus', in Three Copernican Treatises (c.1510), trans. E. Rosen (1939), 58-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Arise (162)  |  Assumption (96)  |  Axiom (65)  |  Call (781)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Circle (117)  |  Comparison (108)  |  Complete (209)  |  Construction (114)  |  Daily (91)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Direct (228)  |  Distance (171)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Element (322)  |  Explain (334)  |  Firmament (18)  |  Follow (389)  |  Grant (76)  |  Gravity (140)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  More (2558)  |  Motion (320)  |  Myself (211)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perform (123)  |  Planet (402)  |  Point (584)  |  Pole (49)  |  Problem (731)  |  Ratio (41)  |  Retrograde (8)  |  Revolve (26)  |  Rotation (13)  |  Sphere (118)  |  Suggestion (49)  |  Sun (407)  |  Together (392)  |  Universe (900)  |  Whatever (234)

After that, I thought about what a proposition generally needs in order to be true and certain because, since I had just found one that I knew was such, I thought I should also know what this certainty consists in. Having noticed that there is nothing at all in the proposition “I think, therefore I am” [cogito ergo sum] which convinces me that I speak the truth, apart from the fact that I see very clearly that one has to exist in order to think, I judged that I could adopt as a general rule that those things we conceive very clearly and distinctly are all true. The only outstanding difficulty is in recognizing which ones we conceive distinctly.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 4, 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (557)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Cogito Ergo Sum (4)  |  Conceive (100)  |  Consist (223)  |  Convince (43)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Exist (458)  |  Fact (1257)  |  General (521)  |  Know (1538)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Outstanding (16)  |  Proposition (126)  |  Rule (307)  |  See (1094)  |  Speak (240)  |  Sum (103)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Truth (1109)

After the discovery of spectral analysis no one trained in physics could doubt the problem of the atom would be solved when physicists had learned to understand the language of spectra. So manifold was the enormous amount of material that has been accumulated in sixty years of spectroscopic research that it seemed at first beyond the possibility of disentanglement. An almost greater enlightenment has resulted from the seven years of Röntgen spectroscopy, inasmuch as it has attacked the problem of the atom at its very root, and illuminates the interior. What we are nowadays hearing of the language of spectra is a true 'music of the spheres' in order and harmony that becomes ever more perfect in spite of the manifold variety. The theory of spectral lines will bear the name of Bohr for all time. But yet another name will be permanently associated with it, that of Planck. All integral laws of spectral lines and of atomic theory spring originally from the quantum theory. It is the mysterious organon on which Nature plays her music of the spectra, and according to the rhythm of which she regulates the structure of the atoms and nuclei.
Atombau und Spektrallinien (1919), viii, Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines, trans. Henry L. Brose (1923), viii.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Amount (153)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Atom (381)  |  Atomic Theory (16)  |  Attack (86)  |  Bear (162)  |  Become (821)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Niels Bohr (55)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Enlightenment (21)  |  First (1302)  |  Greater (288)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Hearing (50)  |  Integral (26)  |  Interior (35)  |  Language (308)  |  Law (913)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Manifold (23)  |  Material (366)  |  More (2558)  |  Music (133)  |  Music Of The Spheres (3)  |  Mysterious (83)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Name (359)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nucleus (54)  |  Organon (2)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Perfection (131)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physicist (270)  |  Physics (564)  |  Max Planck (83)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Problem (731)  |  Quantum (118)  |  Quantum Theory (67)  |  Regulation (25)  |  Research (753)  |  Result (700)  |  Rhythm (21)  |  Wilhelm Röntgen (8)  |  Root (121)  |  Solution (282)  |  Spectral Analysis (4)  |  Spectral Line (5)  |  Spectroscopy (11)  |  Spectrum (35)  |  Sphere (118)  |  Spite (55)  |  Spring (140)  |  Structure (365)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Time (1911)  |  Train (118)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Variety (138)  |  Will (2350)  |  Year (963)

All are born to observe order, but few are born to establish it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (162)  |  Establish (63)  |  Observe (179)

All material Things seem to have been composed of the hard and solid Particles … variously associated with the first Creation by the Counsel of an intelligent Agent. For it became him who created them to set them in order: and if he did so, it is unphilosophical to seek for any other Origin of the World, or to pretend that it might arise out of a Chaos by the mere Laws of Nature.
From Opticks (1704, 2nd ed., 1718), 377-378.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (73)  |  Arise (162)  |  Associated (2)  |  Big Bang (45)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Composed (3)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Creation (350)  |  First (1302)  |  Hard (246)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Law (913)  |  Material (366)  |  Mere (86)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Origin (250)  |  Origin Of The Earth (13)  |  Origin Of The Universe (20)  |  Other (2233)  |  Particle (200)  |  Pretend (18)  |  Seek (218)  |  Set (400)  |  Solid (119)  |  Thing (1914)  |  World (1850)

All power, all subordination rests on the executioner: he is the horror and the bond of human association. Remove this incomprehensible agent from the world, and the very moment order gives way to chaos, thrones topple, and society disappears
In Joseph de Maistre and Richard A. Lebrun (trans.), The St. Petersburg Dialogues (1993), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Agent (73)  |  Association (49)  |  Bond (46)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Disappear (84)  |  Give (208)  |  Horror (15)  |  Human (1512)  |  Incomprehensible (31)  |  Moment (260)  |  Power (771)  |  Remove (50)  |  Rest (287)  |  Society (350)  |  Subordination (5)  |  Throne (8)  |  Topple (2)  |  Way (1214)  |  World (1850)

All that concerns the Mediterranean is of the deepest interest to civilized man, for the history of its progress is the history of the development of the world; the memory of the great men who have lived and died around its banks; the recollection of the undying works that have come thence to delight us for ever; the story of patient research and brilliant discoveries connected with every physical phenomenon presented by its waves and currents, and with every order of creatures dwelling in and around its waters.
From Literary Papers (1855), 106. As quoted in On Early Explorations in the Mediterranean.In George Wilson and Archibald Geikie, Memoir of Edward Forbes F.R.S. (1861), 279. Geike introduces the Forbes quote as “the recollection of these, his earliest explorations in the Mediterranean,” as written down years later.
Science quotes on:  |  Bank (31)  |  Brilliant (57)  |  Concern (239)  |  Connect (126)  |  Creature (242)  |  Current (122)  |  Delight (111)  |  Development (441)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Great (1610)  |  History (716)  |  Interest (416)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mediterranean (9)  |  Mediterranean Sea (6)  |  Memory (144)  |  Patient (209)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Physical (518)  |  Present (630)  |  Progress (492)  |  Recollection (12)  |  Research (753)  |  Story (122)  |  Water (503)  |  Wave (112)  |  Work (1402)  |  World (1850)

All the different classes of beings which taken together make up the universe are, in the ideas of God who knows distinctly their essential gradations, only so many ordinates of a single curve so closely united that it would be impossible to place others between any two of them, since that would imply disorder and imperfection. Thus men are linked with the animals, these with the plants and these with the fossils which in turn merge with those bodies which our senses and our imagination represent to us as absolutely inanimate. And, since the law of continuity requires that when the essential attributes of one being approximate those of another all the properties of the one must likewise gradually approximate those of the other, it is necessary that all the orders of natural beings form but a single chain, in which the various classes, like so many rings, are so closely linked one to another that it is impossible for the senses or the imagination to determine precisely the point at which one ends and the next begins?all the species which, so to say, lie near the borderlands being equivocal, at endowed with characters which might equally well be assigned to either of the neighboring species. Thus there is nothing monstrous in the existence zoophytes, or plant-animals, as Budaeus calls them; on the contrary, it is wholly in keeping with the order of nature that they should exist. And so great is the force of the principle of continuity, to my thinking, that not only should I not be surprised to hear that such beings had been discovered?creatures which in some of their properties, such as nutrition or reproduction, might pass equally well for animals or for plants, and which thus overturn the current laws based upon the supposition of a perfect and absolute separation of the different orders of coexistent beings which fill the universe;?not only, I say, should I not be surprised to hear that they had been discovered, but, in fact, I am convinced that there must be such creatures, and that natural history will perhaps some day become acquainted with them, when it has further studied that infinity of living things whose small size conceals them for ordinary observation and which are hidden in the bowels of the earth and the depth of the sea.
Lettre Prétendue de M. De Leibnitz, à M. Hermann dont M. Koenig a Cité le Fragment (1753), cxi-cxii, trans. in A. O. Lovejoy, Great Chain of Being: A Study of the History of an Idea (1936), 144-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Animal (651)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Attribute (65)  |  Become (821)  |  Begin (275)  |  Being (1276)  |  Borderland (6)  |  Bowel (17)  |  Call (781)  |  Character (259)  |  Continuity (39)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Creature (242)  |  Current (122)  |  Curve (49)  |  Depth (97)  |  Determine (152)  |  Different (595)  |  Discover (571)  |  Disorder (45)  |  Earth (1076)  |  End (603)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Equally (129)  |  Essential (210)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exist (458)  |  Existence (481)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Force (497)  |  Form (976)  |  Fossil (143)  |  God (776)  |  Gradation (17)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hear (144)  |  History (716)  |  Idea (881)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Imperfection (32)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Infinity (96)  |  Know (1538)  |  Law (913)  |  Lie (370)  |  Living (492)  |  Must (1525)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural History (77)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Next (238)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Nutrition (25)  |  Observation (593)  |  Ordinary (167)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pass (241)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Plant (320)  |  Point (584)  |  Precisely (93)  |  Principle (530)  |  Represent (157)  |  Reproduction (74)  |  Require (229)  |  Say (989)  |  Sea (326)  |  Sense (785)  |  Separation (60)  |  Single (365)  |  Small (489)  |  Species (435)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Together (392)  |  Turn (454)  |  Two (936)  |  Universe (900)  |  Various (205)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Will (2350)

All things began in Order, so shall they end, and so shall they begin again, according to the Ordainer of Order, and the mystical mathematicks of the City of Heaven.
In 'Garden of Cyrus', Religio Medici and Other Writings (1909), 229.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Begin (275)  |  City (87)  |  End (603)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mystical (9)  |  Thing (1914)

All women scientists should marry, rear children, cook, and clean in order to achieve fulfillment, to be a complete woman.
Quoted in The Chemical Educator, vol. 7, No. 2, in a book review of Eugene Straus, Rosalyn Yalow, Nobel Laureate: Her Life and Work in Medicine.
Science quotes on:  |  Children (201)  |  Clean (52)  |  Complete (209)  |  Fulfillment (20)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Woman (160)  |  Women Scientists (18)

Almost everyone... seems to be quite sure that the differences between the methodologies of history and of the natural sciences are vast. For, we are assured, it is well known that in the natural sciences we start from observation and proceed by induction to theory. And is it not obvious that in history we proceed very differently? Yes, I agree that we proceed very differently. But we do so in the natural sciences as well.
In both we start from myths—from traditional prejudices, beset with error—and from these we proceed by criticism: by the critical elimination of errors. In both the role of evidence is, in the main, to correct our mistakes, our prejudices, our tentative theories—that is, to play a part in the critical discussion, in the elimination of error. By correcting our mistakes, we raise new problems. And in order to solve these problems, we invent conjectures, that is, tentative theories, which we submit to critical discussion, directed towards the elimination of error.
The Myth of the Framework: In Defence of Science and Rationality (1993), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (496)  |  Conjecture (51)  |  Correction (42)  |  Critical (73)  |  Criticism (85)  |  Difference (355)  |  Direct (228)  |  Discussion (78)  |  Do (1905)  |  Elimination (26)  |  Error (339)  |  Everyone (35)  |  Evidence (267)  |  History (716)  |  Induction (81)  |  Known (453)  |  Methodology (14)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Myth (58)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Science (133)  |  New (1273)  |  Observation (593)  |  Obvious (128)  |  Prejudice (96)  |  Problem (731)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Role (86)  |  Solve (145)  |  Start (237)  |  Tentative (18)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Tradition (76)  |  Vast (188)

An amoeba never is torn apart through indecision, though, for even if two parts of the amoeba are inclined to go in different directions, a choice is always made. We could interpret this as schizophrenia or just confusion, but it could also be a judicious simultaneous sampling of conditions, in order to make a wise choice of future direction.
In The Center of Life: A Natural History of the Cell (1977, 1978), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Amoeba (21)  |  Choice (114)  |  Condition (362)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Direction (185)  |  Future (467)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indecision (4)  |  Interpretation (89)  |  Never (1089)  |  Sample (19)  |  Schizophrenia (4)  |  Simultaneous (23)  |  Through (846)  |  Torn (17)  |  Two (936)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  Wise (143)

An ignorant or half-informed teacher may present science as an accumulation of unconnected facts. … To teach in that fashion is like going to the tree of science with its glorious fruit in order to pick up a handful of the dry fallen leaves from the ground.
In Inaugural Presidential Address (9 Sep 1885) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Aberdeen, Scotland, 'Relations of Science to the Public Weal', Report to the Fifty-Fifth Meeting of the British Association (1886), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (51)  |  Dry (65)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fallen (2)  |  Fashion (34)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Glorious (49)  |  Ground (222)  |  Handful (14)  |  Ignorant (91)  |  Inform (50)  |  Leaf (73)  |  Pick (16)  |  Present (630)  |  Teach (299)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Tree (269)  |  Unconnected (10)

An Individual, whatever species it might be, is nothing in the Universe. A hundred, a thousand individuals are still nothing. The species are the only creatures of Nature, perpetual creatures, as old and as permanent as it. In order to judge it better, we no longer consider the species as a collection or as a series of similar individuals, but as a whole independent of number, independent of time, a whole always living, always the same, a whole which has been counted as one in the works of creation, and which, as a consequence, makes only a unity in Nature.
'De la Nature: Seconde Vue', Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1765), Vol. 13, i. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (493)  |  Collection (68)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Consider (428)  |  Count (107)  |  Creation (350)  |  Creature (242)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Individual (420)  |  Judge (114)  |  Living (492)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Number (710)  |  Old (499)  |  Permanent (67)  |  Perpetual (59)  |  Series (153)  |  Species (435)  |  Still (614)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Time (1911)  |  Unity (81)  |  Universe (900)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (756)  |  Work (1402)

And by the influence of heat, light, and electrical powers, there is a constant series of changes [in animal and vegetal substances]; matter assumes new forms, the destruction of one order of beings tends to the conservation of another, solution and consolidation, decay and renovation, are connected, and whilst the parts of the system, continue in a state of fluctuation and change, the order and harmony of the whole remain unalterable.
The Elements of Agricultural Chemistry (1813), in J. Davy (ed.) The Collected Works of Sir Humphry Davy(1839-40), Vol 7, 182.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (651)  |  Being (1276)  |  Change (639)  |  Connect (126)  |  Conservation (187)  |  Consolidation (4)  |  Constant (148)  |  Continue (179)  |  Decay (59)  |  Destruction (135)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Fluctuation (15)  |  Form (976)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Heat (180)  |  Influence (231)  |  Light (635)  |  Matter (821)  |  New (1273)  |  Power (771)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Remain (355)  |  Series (153)  |  Solution (282)  |  State (505)  |  Substance (253)  |  System (545)  |  Tend (124)  |  Vegetal (2)  |  Whole (756)

And for rejecting such a Medium, we have the Authority of those the oldest and most celebrated Philosophers of Greece and Phoenicia, who made a Vacuum, and Atoms, and the Gravity of Atoms, the first Principles of their Philosophy; tacitly attributing Gravity to some other Cause than dense Matter. Later Philosophers banish the Consideration of such a Cause out of natural Philosophy, feigning Hypotheses for explaining all things mechanically, and referring other Causes to Metaphysicks: Whereas the main Business of natural Philosophy is to argue from Phaenomena without feigning Hypotheses, and to deduce Causes from Effects, till we come to the very first Cause, which certainly is not mechanical; and not only to unfold the Mechanism of the World, but chiefly to resolve these and such like Questions. What is there in places almost empty of Matter, and whence is it that the Sun and Planets gravitate towards one another, without dense Matter between them? Whence is it that Nature doth nothing in vain; and whence arises all that Order and Beauty which we see in the World? ... does it not appear from phaenomena that there is a Being incorporeal, living, intelligent, omnipresent, who in infinite space, as it were in his Sensory, sees the things themselves intimately, and thoroughly perceives them, and comprehends them wholly by their immediate presence to himself.
In Opticks, (1704, 2nd. Ed. 1718), Book 3, Query 28, 343-5. Newton’s reference to “Nature does nothing in vain” recalls the axiom from Aristotle, which may be seen as “Natura nihil agit frustra” in the Aristotle Quotes on this web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (162)  |  Atom (381)  |  Authority (99)  |  Banish (11)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Being (1276)  |  Business (156)  |  Cause (561)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Effect (414)  |  Empty (82)  |  First (1302)  |  God (776)  |  Gravity (140)  |  Greek (109)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hypothesis (314)  |  Immediate (98)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Living (492)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mechanical (145)  |  Mechanism (102)  |  Metaphysics (53)  |  Most (1728)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Omnipresent (3)  |  Other (2233)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Planet (402)  |  Presence (63)  |  Principle (530)  |  Question (649)  |  Rejection (36)  |  Resolve (43)  |  See (1094)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Space (523)  |  Sun (407)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Vacuum (41)  |  Vain (86)  |  Wholly (88)  |  World (1850)

And if one look through a Prism upon a white Object encompassed with blackness or darkness, the reason of the Colours arising on the edges is much the same, as will appear to one that shall a little consider it. If a black Object be encompassed with a white one, the Colours which appear through the Prism are to be derived from the Light of the white one, spreading into the Regions of the black, and therefore they appear in a contrary order to that, when a white Object is surrounded with black. And the same is to be understood when an Object is viewed, whose parts are some of them less luminous than others. For in the borders of the more and less luminous Parts, Colours ought always by the same Principles to arise from the Excess of the Light of the more luminous, and to be of the same kind as if the darker parts were black, but yet to be more faint and dilute.
Opticks (1704), Book I, Part 2, Prop. VIII, Prob. III, 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (162)  |  Arising (22)  |  Color (155)  |  Consider (428)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Darkness (72)  |  Edge (51)  |  Excess (23)  |  Kind (564)  |  Light (635)  |  Little (717)  |  Look (584)  |  Luminosity (6)  |  Luminous (19)  |  More (2558)  |  Object (438)  |  Other (2233)  |  Principle (530)  |  Prism (8)  |  Ray (115)  |  Reason (766)  |  Through (846)  |  Understood (155)  |  View (496)  |  White (132)  |  Will (2350)

And, notwithstanding a few exceptions, we do undoubtedly find that the most truly eminent men have had not only their affections, but also their intellect, greatly influenced by women. I will go even farther; and I will venture to say that those who have not undergone that influence betray a something incomplete and mutilated. We detect, even in their genius, a certain frigidity of tone; and we look in vain for that burning fire, that gushing and spontaneous nature with which our ideas of genius are indissolubly associated. Therefore, it is, that those who are most anxious that the boundaries of knowledge should be enlarged, ought to be most eager that the influence of women should be increased, in order that every resource of the human mind may be at once and quickly brought into play.
Lecture (19 Mar 1858) at the Royal Institution, 'The Influence Of Women On The Progress Of Knowledge', collected in The Miscellaneous and Posthumous Works of Henry Thomas Buckle (1872), Vol. 1, 17. Published in Frazier’s Magazine (Apr 1858).
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (44)  |  Burning (49)  |  Certain (557)  |  Detect (45)  |  Do (1905)  |  Eminent (20)  |  Exception (74)  |  Farther (51)  |  Find (1014)  |  Fire (203)  |  Genius (301)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Idea (881)  |  Incomplete (31)  |  Influence (231)  |  Intellect (251)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Look (584)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Most (1728)  |  Mutilated (2)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Say (989)  |  Something (718)  |  Spontaneous (29)  |  Tone (22)  |  Truly (118)  |  Vain (86)  |  Will (2350)  |  Women (9)

Animals, even plants, lie to each other all the time, and we could restrict the research to them, putting off the real truth about ourselves for the several centuries we need to catch our breath. What is it that enables certain flowers to resemble nubile insects, or opossums to play dead, or female fireflies to change the code of their flashes in order to attract, and then eat, males of a different species?
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler's Ninth Symphony(1984), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (651)  |  Attraction (61)  |  Breath (61)  |  Century (319)  |  Certain (557)  |  Change (639)  |  Code (31)  |  Death (406)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Eat (108)  |  Eating (46)  |  Enable (122)  |  Enabling (7)  |  Female (50)  |  Firefly (8)  |  Flash (49)  |  Flower (112)  |  Insect (89)  |  Lie (370)  |  Lying (55)  |  Male (26)  |  Opossum (3)  |  Other (2233)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Plant (320)  |  Put Off (2)  |  Reality (274)  |  Research (753)  |  Resemble (65)  |  Resembling (2)  |  Restriction (14)  |  Species (435)  |  Time (1911)  |  Truth (1109)

Anthropology has reached that point of development where the careful investigation of facts shakes our firm belief in the far-reaching theories that have been built up. The complexity of each phenomenon dawns on our minds, and makes us desirous of proceeding more cautiously. Heretofore we have seen the features common to all human thought. Now we begin to see their differences. We recognize that these are no less important than their similarities, and the value of detailed studies becomes apparent. Our aim has not changed, but our method must change. We are still searching for the laws that govern the growth of human culture, of human thought; but we recognize the fact that before we seek for what is common to all culture, we must analyze each culture by careful and exact methods, as the geologist analyzes the succession and order of deposits, as the biologist examines the forms of living matter. We see that the growth of human culture manifests itself in the growth of each special culture. Thus we have come to understand that before we can build up the theory of the growth of all human culture, we must know the growth of cultures that we find here and there among the most primitive tribes of the Arctic, of the deserts of Australia, and of the impenetrable forests of South America; and the progress of the civilization of antiquity and of our own times. We must, so far as we can, reconstruct the actual history of mankind, before we can hope to discover the laws underlying that history.
The Jesup North Pacific Expedition: Memoir of the American Museum of Natural History (1898), Vol. 1, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (118)  |  Aim (175)  |  America (143)  |  Anthropology (61)  |  Antiquity (34)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Arctic (10)  |  Australia (11)  |  Become (821)  |  Begin (275)  |  Belief (615)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Build (211)  |  Change (639)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Common (447)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Culture (157)  |  Dawn (31)  |  Desert (59)  |  Desirous (2)  |  Detail (150)  |  Development (441)  |  Difference (355)  |  Discover (571)  |  Examine (84)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (1014)  |  Firm (47)  |  Forest (161)  |  Form (976)  |  Geologist (82)  |  Govern (66)  |  Growth (200)  |  History (716)  |  History Of Mankind (15)  |  Hope (321)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Culture (10)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Know (1538)  |  Law (913)  |  Living (492)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Matter (821)  |  Method (531)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Point (584)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Proceeding (38)  |  Progress (492)  |  Reach (286)  |  Recognize (136)  |  See (1094)  |  Seek (218)  |  Shake (43)  |  South (39)  |  South America (6)  |  Special (188)  |  Still (614)  |  Succession (80)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Tribe (26)  |  Underlying (33)  |  Understand (648)  |  Value (393)

Anyone who thinks we can continue to have world wars but make them nice polite affairs by outlawing this weapon or that should meditate upon the outlawing of the cross-bow by Papal authority. Setting up the machinery for international law and order must surely precede disarmament. The Wild West did not abandon its shooting irons till after sheriffs and courts were established.
Speech, American Library Assiciation Conference (3 Jul 1947), as quoted by Lawrence E. Davies in 'Army's Atomic Bid Viewed in Making', New York Times (4 Jul 1947), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Affair (29)  |  Atomic Bomb (115)  |  Authority (99)  |  Bow (15)  |  Continue (179)  |  Court (35)  |  Crossbow (2)  |  Disarmament (6)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Gun (10)  |  International (40)  |  Iron (99)  |  Law (913)  |  Law And Order (5)  |  Machinery (59)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nice (15)  |  Polite (9)  |  Pope (10)  |  Precede (23)  |  Setting (44)  |  Surely (101)  |  Think (1122)  |  War (233)  |  Weapon (98)  |  Wild (96)  |  Wild West (2)  |  World (1850)

Art and religion first; then philosophy; lastly science. That is the order of the great subjects of life, that’s their order of importance.
Dialog by the character Miss Brodie, in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1961, 2004), 23-24.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (680)  |  First (1302)  |  Great (1610)  |  Importance (299)  |  Life (1870)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Religion (369)  |  Subject (543)

Art is an expression of the world order and is, therefore, orderly, organic, subject to mathematical law, and susceptible to mathematical analysis.
In 'The Theosophic View of the Art of Architecture', The Beautiful Necessity, Seven Essays on Theosophy and Architecture (2nd ed., 1922), Preface to the Second Edition, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (244)  |  Art (680)  |  Expression (181)  |  Law (913)  |  Mathematical Analysis (23)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Organic (161)  |  Subject (543)  |  Susceptible (8)  |  World (1850)

As a second year high school chemistry student, I still have a vivid memory of my excitement when I first saw a chart of the periodic table of elements. The order in the universe seemed miraculous, and I wanted to study and learn as much as possible about the natural sciences.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 555.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (254)  |  Chart (7)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Element (322)  |  Excitement (61)  |  First (1302)  |  High (370)  |  High School (15)  |  Learn (672)  |  Memory (144)  |  Miraculous (11)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Science (133)  |  Periodic (3)  |  Periodic Table (19)  |  Possible (560)  |  Saw (160)  |  School (227)  |  Seemed (3)  |  Still (614)  |  Student (317)  |  Study (701)  |  Table (105)  |  Universe (900)  |  Vivid (25)  |  Want (504)  |  Year (963)

As an antiquary of a new order, I have been obliged to learn the art of deciphering and restoring these remains, of discovering and bringing together, in their primitive arrangement, the scattered and mutilated fragments of which they are composed, of reproducing in all their original proportions and characters, the animals to which these fragments formerly belonged, and then of comparing them with those animals which still live on the surface of the earth; an art which is almost unknown, and which presupposes, what had scarcely been obtained before, an acquaintance with those laws which regulate the coexistence of the forms by which the different parts of organized being are distinguished.
'Preliminary discourse', to Recherches sur les Ossemens Fossiles (1812), trans. R. Kerr Essay on the Theory of the Earth (1813), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (38)  |  Animal (651)  |  Antiquary (4)  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Art (680)  |  Being (1276)  |  Belong (168)  |  Character (259)  |  Classification (102)  |  Different (595)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Distinguished (84)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Form (976)  |  Fossil (143)  |  Fragment (58)  |  Law (913)  |  Learn (672)  |  Live (650)  |  New (1273)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Primitive (79)  |  Proportion (140)  |  Remain (355)  |  Scarcely (75)  |  Still (614)  |  Surface (223)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  Together (392)  |  Unknown (195)

As far as the meaning of life in general, or in the abstract, as far as I can see, there is none. If all of life were suddenly to disappear from earth and anywhere else it may exist, or if none had ever formed in the first place, I think the Universe would continue to exist without perceptible change. However, it is always possible for an individual to invest his own life with meaning that he can find significant. He can so order his life that he may find as much beauty and wisdom in it as he can, and spread as much of that to others as possible.
In a book proposal for The Meaning of Life edited by Hugh S. Moorhead, 1989.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Change (639)  |  Continue (179)  |  Disappear (84)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Exist (458)  |  Find (1014)  |  First (1302)  |  Form (976)  |  General (521)  |  Individual (420)  |  Invest (20)  |  Life (1870)  |  Meaning (244)  |  Other (2233)  |  Possible (560)  |  See (1094)  |  Significant (78)  |  Spread (86)  |  Suddenly (91)  |  Think (1122)  |  Universe (900)  |  Wisdom (235)

As for me ... I would much rather be a perfected ape than a degraded Adam. Yes, if it is shown to me that my humble ancestors were quadrupedal animals, arboreal herbivores, brothers or cousins of those who were also the ancestors of monkeys and apes, far from blushing in shame for my species because of its genealogy and parentage, I will be proud of all that evolution has accomplished, of the continuous improvement which takes us up to the highest order, of the successive triumphs that have made us superior to all of the other species ... the splendid work of progress.
I will conclude in saying: the fixity of species is almost impossible, it contradicts the mode of succession and of the distribution of species in the sequence of extant and extinct creatures. It is therefore extremely likely that species are variable and are subject to evolution. But the causes, the mechanisms of this evolution are still unknown.
'Discussion sur la Machoire Humaine de la Naulette (Belgique)', Bulletin de la Societé d'Anthropologie de Paris, 2nd Series, I (1866), 595. Trans. Erik Trinkaus and Pat Shipman, The Neanderthals: Changing the Image of Mankind (1993), 103-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancestor (63)  |  Animal (651)  |  Ape (54)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Brother (47)  |  Cause (561)  |  Conclude (66)  |  Continuous (83)  |  Contradict (42)  |  Cousin (12)  |  Creature (242)  |  Distribution (51)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Extinct (25)  |  Humble (54)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Improvement (117)  |  Mechanism (102)  |  Monkey (57)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Progress (492)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Species (435)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Still (614)  |  Subject (543)  |  Succession (80)  |  Successive (73)  |  Superior (88)  |  Triumph (76)  |  Unknown (195)  |  Variable (37)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

As historians, we refuse to allow ourselves these vain speculations which turn on possibilities that, in order to be reduced to actuality, suppose an overturning of the Universe, in which our globe, like a speck of abandoned matter, escapes our vision and is no longer an object worthy of our regard. In order to fix our vision, it is necessary to take it such as it is, to observe well all parts of it, and by indications infer from the present to the past.
'Second Discours: Histoire et Theorie de la Terre', Histoire Naturelle, Ginerale et Particulière, Avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi (1749), Vol. 1, 98-9. Trans. Phillip R. Sloan.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (73)  |  Actuality (6)  |  Escape (85)  |  Historian (59)  |  Indication (33)  |  Matter (821)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Object (438)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observe (179)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Past (355)  |  Present (630)  |  Refuse (45)  |  Regard (312)  |  Speck (25)  |  Speculation (137)  |  Suppose (158)  |  Turn (454)  |  Universe (900)  |  Vain (86)  |  Vision (127)

As is well known the principle of virtual velocities transforms all statics into a mathematical assignment, and by D'Alembert's principle for dynamics, the latter is again reduced to statics. Although it is is very much in order that in gradual training of science and in the instruction of the individual the easier precedes the more difficult, the simple precedes the more complicated, the special precedes the general, yet the min, once it has arrived at the higher standpoint, demands the reverse process whereby all statics appears only as a very special case of mechanics.
Collected Works (1877), Vol. 5, 25-26. Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 412.
Science quotes on:  |  Assignment (12)  |  Complicated (117)  |  Jean le Rond D’Alembert (13)  |  Demand (131)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Easier (53)  |  General (521)  |  Individual (420)  |  Instruction (101)  |  Known (453)  |  Mechanic (120)  |  Mechanics (137)  |  More (2558)  |  Principle (530)  |  Process (439)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Simple (426)  |  Special (188)  |  Special Case (9)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Statics (6)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Training (92)  |  Transform (74)

As mineralogy constitutes a part of chemistry, it is clear that this arrangement [of minerals] must derive its principles from chemistry. The most perfect mode of arrangement would certainly be to allow bodies to follow each other according to the order of their electro-chemical properties, from the most electro-negative, oxygen, to the most electro-positive, potassium; and to place every compound body according to its most electro-positive ingredient.
An Attempt to Establish a Pure Scientific System of Mineralogy (1814), trans. J. Black, 48.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Body (557)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Classification (102)  |  Compound (117)  |  Constitute (99)  |  Derive (70)  |  Electrochemistry (5)  |  Follow (389)  |  Ingredient (16)  |  Mineral (66)  |  Mineralogy (24)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Negative (66)  |  Other (2233)  |  Oxygen (77)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Positive (98)  |  Potassium (12)  |  Principle (530)

As soon … as it was observed that the stars retained their relative places, that the times of their rising and setting varied with the seasons, that sun, moon, and planets moved among them in a plane, … then a new order of things began.… Science had begun, and the first triumph of it was the power of foretelling the future; eclipses were perceived to recur in cycles of nineteen years, and philosophers were able to say when an eclipse was to be looked for. The periods of the planets were determined. Theories were invented to account for their eccentricities; and, false as those theories might be, the position of the planets could be calculated with moderate certainty by them.
Lecture delivered to the Royal Institution (5 Feb 1864), 'On the Science of History'. Collected in Notices of the Proceedings at the Meetings of the Members of the Royal Institution of Great Britain with Abstracts of the Discourses (1866), Vol. 4, 187.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Calculation (134)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Cycle (42)  |  Eclipse (25)  |  First (1302)  |  Foretelling (4)  |  Future (467)  |  Look (584)  |  Moon (252)  |  New (1273)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observed (149)  |  Period (200)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Plane (22)  |  Planet (402)  |  Power (771)  |  Recurring (12)  |  Retain (57)  |  Rising (44)  |  Say (989)  |  Season (47)  |  Setting (44)  |  Soon (187)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (407)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Time (1911)  |  Triumph (76)  |  Year (963)

As the nineteenth century drew to a close, scientists could reflect with satisfaction that they had pinned down most of the mysteries of the physical world: electricity, magnetism, gases, optics, acoustics, kinetics and statistical mechanics … all had fallen into order before them. They had discovered the X ray, the cathode ray, the electron, and radioactivity, invented the ohm, the watt, the Kelvin, the joule, the amp, and the little erg.
A Short History of Nearly Everything. In Clifford A. Pickover, Archimedes to Hawking: Laws of Science and the Great Minds Behind Them (2008), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (41)  |  Acoustic (3)  |  Acoustics (4)  |  Close (77)  |  Discover (571)  |  Down (455)  |  Draw (140)  |  Electricity (168)  |  Electron (96)  |  Fall (243)  |  Gas (89)  |  Invent (57)  |  Joule (3)  |  Kinetic (12)  |  Little (717)  |  Magnetism (43)  |  Mechanic (120)  |  Mechanics (137)  |  Most (1728)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Ohm (5)  |  Optics (24)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physical World (30)  |  Pin (20)  |  Radioactivity (33)  |  Reflect (39)  |  Satisfaction (76)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Statistical Mechanics (7)  |  Watt (2)  |  World (1850)  |  X-ray (43)

As usual, the author in his thorough, unobjective fashion has marshalled up all the good, indifferent and bad arguments ... I offer the following detailed comments ... though I realize that many of them will arouse him to a vigorous, if not violent rebuttal. In order to preserve the pH of Dr. Brown's digestive system I would not require a rebuttal as a condition of publication...
With heartiest greetings of the season to you and yours! Jack Roberts
PS The above comments should (help) to reduce your winter heating bill!
Jack Roberts' referee's report on Herbert Charles Brown's paper with Rachel Kornblum on the role of steric strain in carbonium ion reactions.
As quoted by D. A. Davenport, in 'On the Comparative Unimportance of the Invective Effect', Chemtech (Sep 1987), 17, 530.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (145)  |  Author (175)  |  Bad (185)  |  Brown (23)  |  Condition (362)  |  Detail (150)  |  Good (906)  |  Greeting (10)  |  Ion (21)  |  Offer (142)  |  Paper (192)  |  Preserve (91)  |  Publication (102)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Realize (157)  |  Reduce (100)  |  Referee (8)  |  Require (229)  |  Role (86)  |  Season (47)  |  System (545)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Will (2350)  |  Winter (46)

At the entrance to the observatory Stjerneborg located underground, Tycho Brahe built a Ionic portal. On top of this were three sculptured lions. On both sides were inscriptions and on the backside was a longer inscription in gold letters on a porfyr stone: Consecrated to the all-good, great God and Posterity. Tycho Brahe, Son of Otto, who realized that Astronomy, the oldest and most distinguished of all sciences, had indeed been studied for a long time and to a great extent, but still had not obtained sufficient firmness or had been purified of errors, in order to reform it and raise it to perfection, invented and with incredible labour, industry, and expenditure constructed various exact instruments suitable for all kinds of observations of the celestial bodies, and placed them partly in the neighbouring castle of Uraniborg, which was built for the same purpose, partly in these subterranean rooms for a more constant and useful application, and recommending, hallowing, and consecrating this very rare and costly treasure to you, you glorious Posterity, who will live for ever and ever, he, who has both begun and finished everything on this island, after erecting this monument, beseeches and adjures you that in honour of the eternal God, creator of the wonderful clockwork of the heavens, and for the propagation of the divine science and for the celebrity of the fatherland, you will constantly preserve it and not let it decay with old age or any other injury or be removed to any other place or in any way be molested, if for no other reason, at any rate out of reverence to the creator’s eye, which watches over the universe. Greetings to you who read this and act accordingly. Farewell!
(Translated from the original in Latin)
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Age (509)  |  Application (257)  |  Astronomy (251)  |  Both (496)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Constant (148)  |  Construct (129)  |  Creator (97)  |  Decay (59)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Distinguished (84)  |  Divine (112)  |  Entrance (16)  |  Error (339)  |  Eternal (113)  |  Everything (489)  |  Expenditure (16)  |  Extent (142)  |  Eye (440)  |  Finish (62)  |  Glorious (49)  |  God (776)  |  Gold (101)  |  Good (906)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greeting (10)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Honour (58)  |  Incredible (43)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Industry (159)  |  Injury (36)  |  Inscription (12)  |  Instrument (158)  |  Island (49)  |  Kind (564)  |  Labor (200)  |  Letter (117)  |  Lion (23)  |  Live (650)  |  Long (778)  |  Monument (45)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observatory (18)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Old (499)  |  Old Age (35)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perfection (131)  |  Portal (9)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Preserve (91)  |  Propagation (15)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Rare (94)  |  Read (308)  |  Reason (766)  |  Reform (22)  |  Research (753)  |  Side (236)  |  Still (614)  |  Stone (168)  |  Sufficient (133)  |  Time (1911)  |  Top (100)  |  Treasure (59)  |  Underground (12)  |  Universe (900)  |  Useful (260)  |  Various (205)  |  Way (1214)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wonderful (155)

Attempts have been made from a study of the changes produced by mutation to obtain the relative order of the bases within various triplets, but my own view is that these are premature until there is more extensive and more reliable data on the composition of the triplets.
In Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1962). Collected in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1942-1962 (1964).
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (266)  |  Base (120)  |  Change (639)  |  Composition (86)  |  Data (162)  |  Extensive (34)  |  More (2558)  |  Mutation (40)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Premature (22)  |  Produced (187)  |  Relative (42)  |  Study (701)  |  Triplet (2)  |  Various (205)  |  View (496)

Available energy is energy which we can direct into any desired channel. Dissipated energy is energy which we cannot lay hold of and direct at pleasure, such as the energy of the confused agitation of molecules which we call heat. Now, confusion, like the correlative term order, is not a property of material things in themselves, but only in relation to the mind which perceives them. A memorandum-book does not, provided it is neatly written, appear confused to an illiterate person, or to the owner who understands it thoroughly, but to any other person able to read it appears to be inextricably confused. Similarly the notion of dissipated energy could not occur to a being who could not turn any of the energies of nature to his own account, or to one who could trace the motion of every molecule and seize it at the right moment. It is only to a being in the intermediate stage, who can lay hold of some forms of energy while others elude his grasp, that energy appears to be passing inevitably from the available to the dissipated state.
'Diffusion', Encyclopaedia Britannica (1878). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 646.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Agitation (10)  |  Available (80)  |  Being (1276)  |  Book (413)  |  Call (781)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Direct (228)  |  Dissipate (8)  |  Elude (11)  |  Energy (373)  |  Form (976)  |  Heat (180)  |  Illiterate (6)  |  Intermediate (38)  |  Material (366)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Moment (260)  |  Motion (320)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Notion (120)  |  Occur (151)  |  Other (2233)  |  Passing (76)  |  Person (366)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Property (177)  |  Read (308)  |  Right (473)  |  Stage (152)  |  State (505)  |  Term (357)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thoroughly (67)  |  Trace (109)  |  Turn (454)  |  Understand (648)

Beneath all the wealth of detail in a geological map lies an elegant, orderly simplicity.
As quoted in G.D. Garland, 'John Tuzo Wilson', Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society (Nov 1995), 552.
Science quotes on:  |  Beneath (68)  |  Detail (150)  |  Elegant (37)  |  Geology (240)  |  Lie (370)  |  Map (50)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Wealth (100)

Both science and art have to do with ordered complexity.
In The Griffin (1957), 6, No 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (680)  |  Both (496)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Do (1905)  |  Science And Art (195)

Both the man of science and the man of art live always at the edge of mystery, surrounded by it; both always, as to the measure of their creation, have had to do with the harmonization of what is new with what is familiar, with the balance between novelty and synthesis, with the struggle to make partial order in total chaos.
Address at the close of the year-long Bicentennial Celebration of Columbia University (26 Dec 54). Printed in 'Prospects in the Arts and Sciences', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1955), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (342)  |  Art (680)  |  Balance (82)  |  Both (496)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Creation (350)  |  Do (1905)  |  Edge (51)  |  Harmony (105)  |  Live (650)  |  Man (2252)  |  Measure (241)  |  Men Of Science (147)  |  Mystery (188)  |  New (1273)  |  Novelty (31)  |  Struggle (111)  |  Synthesis (58)  |  Total (95)

But here it may be objected, that the present Earth looks like a heap of Rubbish and Ruines; And that there are no greater examples of confusion in Nature than Mountains singly or jointly considered; and that there appear not the least footsteps of any Art or Counsel either in the Figure and Shape, or Order and Disposition of Mountains and Rocks. Wherefore it is not likely they came so out of God's hands ... To which I answer, That the present face of the Earth with all its Mountains and Hills, its Promontaries and Rocks, as rude and deformed as they appear, seems to me a very beautiful and pleasant object, and with all the variety of Hills, and Valleys, and Inequalities far more grateful to behold, than a perfectly level Countrey without any rising or protuberancy, to terminate the sight: As anyone that hath but seen the Isle of Ely, or any the like Countrey must need acknowledge.
John Ray
Miscellaneous Discourses Concerning the Dissolution and Changes of the World (1692), 165-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Acknowledgment (13)  |  Answer (389)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Art (680)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Consider (428)  |  Consideration (143)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Country (269)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Disposition (44)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Example (98)  |  Face (214)  |  Figure (162)  |  Footstep (5)  |  God (776)  |  Gratitude (14)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hand (149)  |  Heap (15)  |  Hill (23)  |  Inequality (9)  |  Isle (6)  |  Look (584)  |  More (2558)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Object (438)  |  Objection (34)  |  Pleasantness (3)  |  Present (630)  |  Promontory (3)  |  Protuberance (3)  |  Rise (169)  |  Rising (44)  |  Rock (176)  |  Rubbish (12)  |  Rudeness (5)  |  Ruin (44)  |  Shape (77)  |  Sight (135)  |  Termination (4)  |  Valley (37)  |  Variety (138)

But I think that in the repeated and almost entire changes of organic types in the successive formations of the earth—in the absence of mammalia in the older, and their very rare appearance (and then in forms entirely. unknown to us) in the newer secondary groups—in the diffusion of warm-blooded quadrupeds (frequently of unknown genera) through the older tertiary systems—in their great abundance (and frequently of known genera) in the upper portions of the same series—and, lastly, in the recent appearance of man on the surface of the earth (now universally admitted—in one word, from all these facts combined, we have a series of proofs the most emphatic and convincing,—that the existing order of nature is not the last of an uninterrupted succession of mere physical events derived from laws now in daily operation: but on the contrary, that the approach to the present system of things has been gradual, and that there has been a progressive development of organic structure subservient to the purposes of life.
'Address to the Geological Society, delivered on the Evening of the 18th of February 1831', Proceedings of the Geological Society (1834), 1, 305-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (21)  |  Abundance (26)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Approach (112)  |  Blood (144)  |  Change (639)  |  Combination (150)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Daily (91)  |  Development (441)  |  Diffusion (13)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Emphasis (18)  |  Event (222)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (976)  |  Formation (100)  |  Genus (27)  |  Gradual (30)  |  Great (1610)  |  Known (453)  |  Last (425)  |  Law (913)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mammal (41)  |  Man (2252)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Operation (221)  |  Organic (161)  |  Physical (518)  |  Portion (86)  |  Present (630)  |  Progression (23)  |  Proof (304)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Rare (94)  |  Recent (78)  |  Repeat (44)  |  Secondary (15)  |  Series (153)  |  Structure (365)  |  Subservience (4)  |  Succession (80)  |  Successive (73)  |  Surface (223)  |  Surface Of The Earth (36)  |  System (545)  |  Tertiary (4)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Through (846)  |  Type (171)  |  Uninterrupted (7)  |  Unknown (195)  |  Warm (74)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  Word (650)

But if any skillful minister of nature shall apply force to matter, and by design torture and vex it, in order to [effect] its annihilation, it, on the contrary being brought under this necessity, changes and transforms itself into a strange variety of shapes and appearances; for nothing but the power of the Creator can annihilate, or truly destroy it.
As quoted in M.J. Gorton, 'The Weather', Popular Science News (1889), 23, No. 8, 115.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (10)  |  Annihilation (15)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Apply (170)  |  Being (1276)  |  Change (639)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Creator (97)  |  Design (203)  |  Destroy (189)  |  Effect (414)  |  Force (497)  |  Matter (821)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Power (771)  |  Skillful (17)  |  Strange (160)  |  Torture (30)  |  Transform (74)  |  Truly (118)  |  Variety (138)  |  Vex (10)

But it seems to me equally obvious that the orderliness is not all-pervasive. There are streaks of order to be found among the chaos, and the nature of scientific method is to seek these out and to stick to them when found and to reject or neglect the chaos. It is obvious that we have succeeded in finding some order in nature, but this fact in itself does not prove anything farther.
Scientific Method: An Inquiry into the Character and Validy of Natural Law (1923), 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (99)  |  Equally (129)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Farther (51)  |  Method (531)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Obvious (128)  |  Orderliness (9)  |  Prove (261)  |  Prove Anything (7)  |  Reject (67)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientific Method (200)  |  Seek (218)  |  Succeed (114)

But to proceed; as in order and place, so also in matter of her Creation, Woman far excells Man. things receive their value from the matter they are made of, and the excellent skill of their maker: Pots of common clay must not contend with China-dishes, nor pewter utensils vye dignity with those of silver…. Woman was not composed of any inanimate or vile dirt, but of a more refined and purified substance, enlivened and actuated by a Rational Soul, whose operations speak it a beam, or bright ray of Divinity.
In Female Pre-eminence: Or, The Dignity and Excellency of that Sex above the Male, translation (1670).
Science quotes on:  |  Beam (26)  |  Bright (81)  |  China (27)  |  Clay (11)  |  Common (447)  |  Creation (350)  |  Dignity (44)  |  Dirt (17)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Excel (4)  |  Maker (34)  |  Man (2252)  |  Matter (821)  |  More (2558)  |  Must (1525)  |  Operation (221)  |  Operations (107)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Rational (95)  |  Ray (115)  |  Receive (117)  |  Silver (49)  |  Skill (116)  |  Soul (235)  |  Speak (240)  |  Substance (253)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Utensil (3)  |  Value (393)  |  Woman (160)

But when science, passing beyond its own limits, assumes to take the place of theology, and sets up its own conception of the order of Nature as a sufficient account of its cause, it is invading a province of thought to which it has no claim, and not unreasonably provokes the hostility of its best friends.
Presidential Address (14 Aug 1872) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Brighton, reprinted in The Journal of the Society of Arts (16 Aug 1872), 20, No. 1030, 799, penultimate sentence.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Assume (43)  |  Best (467)  |  Best Friend (4)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Cause (561)  |  Claim (154)  |  Conception (160)  |  Friend (180)  |  Hostility (16)  |  Invade (5)  |  Limit (294)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Pass (241)  |  Passing (76)  |  Place (192)  |  Province (37)  |  Provoke (9)  |  Set (400)  |  Sufficient (133)  |  Theology (54)  |  Thought (995)

But, as we consider the totality of similarly broad and fundamental aspects of life, we cannot defend division by two as a natural principle of objective order. Indeed, the ‘stuff’ of the universe often strikes our senses as complex and shaded continua, admittedly with faster and slower moments, and bigger and smaller steps, along the way. Nature does not dictate dualities, trinities, quarterings, or any ‘objective’ basis for human taxonomies; most of our chosen schemes, and our designated numbers of categories, record human choices from a cornucopia of possibilities offered by natural variation from place to place, and permitted by the flexibility of our mental capacities. How many seasons (if we wish to divide by seasons at all) does a year contain? How many stages shall we recognize in a human life?
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admittedly (2)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Basis (180)  |  Big (55)  |  Broad (28)  |  Capacity (105)  |  Category (19)  |  Choice (114)  |  Choose (116)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Complex (202)  |  Consider (428)  |  Contain (68)  |  Continua (3)  |  Defend (32)  |  Designation (13)  |  Dictate (11)  |  Divide (77)  |  Division (67)  |  Fast (49)  |  Faster (50)  |  Flexibility (6)  |  Fundamental (264)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Life (32)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Life (1870)  |  Mental (179)  |  Moment (260)  |  Most (1728)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Number (710)  |  Objective (96)  |  Offer (142)  |  Often (109)  |  Permit (61)  |  Place (192)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Principle (530)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Record (161)  |  Scheme (62)  |  Season (47)  |  Sense (785)  |  Shade (35)  |  Similarly (4)  |  Slow (108)  |  Small (489)  |  Stage (152)  |  Step (234)  |  Strike (72)  |  Stuff (24)  |  Taxonomy (19)  |  Totality (17)  |  Two (936)  |  Universe (900)  |  Variation (93)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wish (216)  |  Year (963)

By its very nature the uterus is a field for growing the seeds, that is to say the ova, sown upon it. Here the eggs are fostered, and here the parts of the living [fetus], when they have further unfolded, become manifest and are made strong. Yet although it has been cast off by the mother and sown, the egg is weak and powerless and so requires the energy of the semen of the male to initiate growth. Hence in accordance with the laws of Nature, and like the other orders of living things, women produce eggs which, when received into the chamber of the uterus and fecundated by the semen of the male, unfold into a new life.
'On the Developmental Process', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 2, 861.
Science quotes on:  |  Accordance (10)  |  Become (821)  |  Cast (69)  |  Chamber (7)  |  Egg (71)  |  Embryology (18)  |  Energy (373)  |  Field (378)  |  Foster (12)  |  Fostering (4)  |  Growing (99)  |  Growth (200)  |  Initiate (13)  |  Law (913)  |  Law Of Nature (80)  |  Life (1870)  |  Living (492)  |  Male (26)  |  Mother (116)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Other (2233)  |  Ovum (4)  |  Production (190)  |  Reception (16)  |  Require (229)  |  Say (989)  |  Seed (97)  |  Semen (5)  |  Strong (182)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Uterus (2)  |  Weak (73)  |  Woman (160)

By the fruit one judges the tree; the tree of science grows exceedingly slowly; centuries elapse before one can pluck the ripe fruits; even today it is hardly possible for us to shell and appraise the kernel of the teachings that blossomed in the seventeenth century. He who sows cannot therefore judge the worth of the corn. He must have faith in the fruitfulness of the seed in order that he may follow untiringly his chosen furrow when he casts his ideas to the four winds of heaven.
As quoted in Philipp Frank, Modern Science and its Philosophy (1949), 62, which cites Évolution de la Mécanique (1903).
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (20)  |  Appraise (2)  |  Blossom (22)  |  Cast (69)  |  Century (319)  |  Choose (116)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Corn (20)  |  Elapse (3)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Faith (209)  |  Follow (389)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Fruitfulness (2)  |  Furrow (5)  |  Grow (247)  |  Heaven (266)  |  Idea (881)  |  Judge (114)  |  Kernel (4)  |  Must (1525)  |  Pluck (5)  |  Possible (560)  |  Ripe (5)  |  Seed (97)  |  Shell (69)  |  Slowly (19)  |  Sow (11)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Teachings (11)  |  Today (321)  |  Tree (269)  |  Wind (141)  |  Worth (172)

Casting off the dark fog of verbal philosophy and vulgar medicine, which inculcate names alone ... I tried a series of experiments to explain more clearly many phenomena, particularly those of physiology. In order that I might subject as far as possible the reasonings of the Galenists and Peripatetics to sensory criteria, I began, after trying experiments, to write dialogues in which a Galenist adduced the better-known and stronger reasons and arguments; these a mechanist surgeon refuted by citing to the contrary the experiments I had tried, and a third, neutral interlocutor weighed the reasons advanced by both and provided an opportunity for further progress.
'Malpighi at Pisa 1656-1659', in H. B. Adelmann (ed.), Marcello Malpighi and the Evolution of Embryology (1966), Vol. 1, 155-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Argument (145)  |  Better (493)  |  Both (496)  |  Casting (10)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Dark (145)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Explain (334)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Fog (10)  |  Galen (20)  |  Inculcate (7)  |  Known (453)  |  Mechanist (3)  |  Medicine (392)  |  More (2558)  |  Name (359)  |  Neutral (15)  |  Opportunity (95)  |  Peripatetic (3)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Physiology (101)  |  Possible (560)  |  Progress (492)  |  Reason (766)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Sensory (16)  |  Series (153)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Subject (543)  |  Surgeon (64)  |  Trying (144)  |  Vulgar (33)  |  Weigh (51)  |  Write (250)

Causality may be considered as a mode of perception by which we reduce our sense impressions to order.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Causality (11)  |  Consider (428)  |  Impression (118)  |  Mode (43)  |  Perception (97)  |  Reduce (100)  |  Sense (785)

Chaos often breeds life when order breeds habit.
The Education of Henry Adams (1907, 1918), 249.
Science quotes on:  |  Breed (26)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Habit (174)  |  Life (1870)

Chaos was the law of nature; order was the dream of man.
From his autobiography, The Education of Henry Adams (1907, 1918), 451.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (99)  |  Dream (222)  |  Law (913)  |  Law Of Nature (80)  |  Man (2252)  |  Nature (2017)

Chemistry is an art that has furnished the world with a great number of useful facts, and has thereby contributed to the improvement of many arts; but these facts lie scattered in many different books, involved in obscure terms, mixed with many falsehoods, and joined to a great deal of false philosophy; so that it is not great wonder that chemistry has not been so much studied as might have been expected with regard to so useful a branch of knowledge, and that many professors are themselves but very superficially acquainted with it. But it was particularly to be expected, that, since it has been taught in universities, the difficulties in this study should have been in some measure removed, that the art should have been put into form, and a system of it attempted—the scattered facts collected and arranged in a proper order. But this has not yet been done; chemistry has not yet been taught but upon a very narrow plan. The teachers of it have still confined themselves to the purposes of pharmacy and medicine, and that comprehends a small branch of chemistry; and even that, by being a single branch, could not by itself be tolerably explained.
John Thomson, An Account of the Life, Lectures and Writings of William Cullen, M.D. (1832), Vol. 1, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (680)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Being (1276)  |  Book (413)  |  Branch (155)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Deal (192)  |  Different (595)  |  Expect (203)  |  Explain (334)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Falsehood (30)  |  Form (976)  |  Furnish (97)  |  Great (1610)  |  Improvement (117)  |  Involved (90)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Lie (370)  |  Measure (241)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Narrow (85)  |  Number (710)  |  Obscure (66)  |  Pharmacy (4)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Plan (122)  |  Professor (133)  |  Proper (150)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Regard (312)  |  Single (365)  |  Small (489)  |  Still (614)  |  Study (701)  |  System (545)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Term (357)  |  Terms (184)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Useful (260)  |  Wonder (251)  |  World (1850)

Chemistry is the science or study of those effects and qualities of matter which are discovered by mixing bodies variously together, or applying them to one another with a view to mixture, and by exposing them to different degrees of heat, alone, or in mixture with one another, in order to enlarge our knowledge of nature, and to promote the useful arts.
From the first of a series of lectures on chemistry, collected in John Robison (ed.), Lectures on the Elements of Chemistry: Delivered in the University of Edinburgh (1807), Vol. 1, 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Art (680)  |  Body (557)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Degree (277)  |  Different (595)  |  Discover (571)  |  Effect (414)  |  Enlarge (37)  |  Expose (28)  |  Heat (180)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Matter (821)  |  Mixture (44)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Promote (32)  |  Quality (139)  |  Study (701)  |  Together (392)  |  Useful (260)  |  View (496)

Chemistry is the study of material transformations. Yet a knowledge of the rate, or time dependence, of chemical change is of critical importance for the successful synthesis of new materials and for the utilization of the energy generated by a reaction. During the past century it has become clear that all macroscopic chemical processes consist of many elementary chemical reactions that are themselves simply a series of encounters between atomic or molecular species. In order to understand the time dependence of chemical reactions, chemical kineticists have traditionally focused on sorting out all of the elementary chemical reactions involved in a macroscopic chemical process and determining their respective rates.
'Molecular Beam Studies of Elementary Chemical Processes', Nobel Lecture, 8 Dec 1986. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1981-1990 (1992), 320.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Century (319)  |  Change (639)  |  Chemical (303)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Chemical Reaction (17)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Consist (223)  |  Critical (73)  |  Dependence (46)  |  Elementary (98)  |  Energy (373)  |  Focus (36)  |  Importance (299)  |  Involved (90)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Material (366)  |  Matter (821)  |  New (1273)  |  Past (355)  |  Process (439)  |  Rate (31)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Series (153)  |  Species (435)  |  Study (701)  |  Successful (134)  |  Synthesis (58)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1911)  |  Transformation (72)  |  Understand (648)  |  Utilization (16)

Chemists must unite in order to force upon the reluctant world the power of their discoveries.
Shortly after World War I. Quoted, as a memory of Pope, in Sir William Jackson Pope Memorial Lecture by Leslie H. Lampitt, 'Sir William Jackson Pope: His Influence on Scientific Organisation' Journal of the Royal Society of Arts (31 Jan 1947), 95, No. 4736, 174. Webmaster notes that this is given as a memory, and the wording therefore may not be verbatim.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemist (169)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Force (497)  |  Must (1525)  |  Power (771)  |  Reluctant (4)  |  Unite (43)  |  World (1850)

Children are to be guided to make a beginning in all the arts and sciences without interference with their spontaneity, the instinct of imitation being so used as to give them order without constraining them.
In Friedrich Fröbel and Josephine Jarvis (trans.), 'American Preface', The Education of Man (1885), vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (680)  |  Begin (275)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Being (1276)  |  Child (333)  |  Children (201)  |  Constrain (11)  |  Guide (107)  |  Imitation (24)  |  Instinct (91)  |  Interference (22)  |  Spontaneity (7)

Concepts that have proven useful in ordering thi ngs easily achieve such authority over us that we forget their earthly origins and accept them as unalterable givens.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Achieve (75)  |  Authority (99)  |  Concept (242)  |  Earthly (8)  |  Easily (36)  |  Forget (125)  |  Givens (2)  |  Origin (250)  |  Prove (261)  |  Unalterable (7)  |  Useful (260)

Confined to its true domain, mathematical reasoning is admirably adapted to perform the universal office of sound logic: to induce in order to deduce, in order to construct. … It contents itself to furnish, in the most favorable domain, a model of clearness, of precision, and consistency, the close contemplation of which is alone able to prepare the mind to render other conceptions also as perfect as their nature permits. Its general reaction, more negative than positive, must consist, above all, in inspiring us everywhere with an invincible aversion for vagueness, inconsistency, and obscurity, which may always be really avoided in any reasoning whatsoever, if we make sufficient effort.
In Synthèse Subjective (1856), 98. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 202-203. From the original French, “Bornée à son vrai domaine, la raison mathématique y peut admirablement remplir l’office universel de la saine logique: induire pour déduire, afin de construire. … Elle se contente de former, dans le domaine le plus favorable, un type de clarté, de précision, et de consistance, dont la contemplation familière peut seule disposer l’esprit à rendre les autres conceptions aussi parfaites que le comporte leur nature. Sa réaction générale, plus négative que positive, doit surtout consister à nous inspirer partout une invincible répugnance pour le vague, l’incohérence, et l’obscurité, que nous pouvons réellement éviter envers des pensées quelconques, si nous y faisons assez d’efforts.”
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (70)  |  Alone (324)  |  Aversion (9)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Close (77)  |  Conception (160)  |  Confine (26)  |  Consist (223)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (50)  |  Construct (129)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Content (75)  |  Deduce (27)  |  Domain (72)  |  Effort (243)  |  Everywhere (98)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Furnish (97)  |  General (521)  |  Inconsistent (9)  |  Induce (24)  |  Inspire (58)  |  Invincible (6)  |  Logic (311)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mathematics And Logic (27)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Model (106)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Negative (66)  |  Obscurity (28)  |  Office (71)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Perform (123)  |  Permit (61)  |  Positive (98)  |  Precision (72)  |  Prepare (44)  |  Reaction (106)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Render (96)  |  Sound (187)  |  Sufficient (133)  |  True (239)  |  Universal (198)  |  Vagueness (15)  |  Whatsoever (41)

Connected by innumerable ties with abstract science, Physiology is yet in the most intimate relation with humanity; and by teaching us that law and order, and a definite scheme of development, regulate even the strangest and wildest manifestations of individual life, she prepares the student to look for a goal even amidst the erratic wanderings of mankind, and to believe that history offers something more than an entertaining chaos—a journal of a toilsome, tragi-comic march nowither.
In 'Educational Value of Natural History Sciences', Lay Sermons, Addresses, and Reviews (1870), 97.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (141)  |  Belief (615)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Comic (5)  |  Connect (126)  |  Definite (114)  |  Development (441)  |  Entertaining (9)  |  Erratic (4)  |  Goal (155)  |  History (716)  |  Humanity (186)  |  Individual (420)  |  Innumerable (56)  |  Intimate (21)  |  Journal (31)  |  Law (913)  |  Law And Order (5)  |  Life (1870)  |  Look (584)  |  Manifestation (61)  |  Mankind (356)  |  March (48)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Offer (142)  |  Physiology (101)  |  Prepare (44)  |  Scheme (62)  |  Something (718)  |  Strange (160)  |  Student (317)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Tie (42)  |  Toil (29)  |  Tragic (19)  |  Wild (96)

Coterminous with space and coeval with time is the kingdom of Mathematics; within this range her dominion is supreme; otherwise than according to her order nothing can exist; in contradiction to her laws nothing takes place. On her mysterious scroll is to be found written for those who can read it that which has been, that which is, and that which is to come.
From Presidential Address (Aug 1878) to the British Association, Dublin, published in the Report of the 48th Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1878), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Contradiction (69)  |  Dominion (11)  |  Exist (458)  |  Kingdom (80)  |  Law (913)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Mysterious (83)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Place (192)  |  Range (104)  |  Read (308)  |  Space (523)  |  Supreme (73)  |  Time (1911)  |  Written (6)

Creatures that by a rule in nature teach
The act of order to a peopled kingdom.
They have a king and officers of sorts;
Where some, like magistrates, correct at home,
Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad,
Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings,
Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds;
Which pillage they with merry march bring home
To the tent-royal of their emperor.
Who, busied in his majesty, surveys
The singing masons building roofs of gold;
The civil citizens kneading up the honey;
The poor mechanic porters crowding
Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate;
The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum,
Delivering o'er to executors pale
The lazy yawning drone.
Henry V (1599), I, ii.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (19)  |  Act (278)  |  Arm (82)  |  Building (158)  |  Burden (30)  |  Citizen (52)  |  Civil (26)  |  Creature (242)  |  Drone (4)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Gate (33)  |  Gold (101)  |  Home (184)  |  Honey (15)  |  Justice (40)  |  King (39)  |  Kingdom (80)  |  Magistrate (2)  |  Majesty (21)  |  March (48)  |  Mason (2)  |  Mechanic (120)  |  Merchant (7)  |  Narrow (85)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Officer (12)  |  Other (2233)  |  Poor (139)  |  Porter (2)  |  Roof (14)  |  Royal (56)  |  Rule (307)  |  Singing (19)  |  Soldier (28)  |  Sting (3)  |  Summer (56)  |  Survey (36)  |  Teach (299)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Tent (13)  |  Velvet (4)

Discoveries are not generally made in the order of their scientific arrangement: their connexions and relations are made out gradually; and it is only when the fermentation of invention has subsided that the whole clears into simplicity and order.
In 'The Equilibrium of Forces on a Point', Elementary Treatise on Mechanics (1819), Vol. 1, Preface, iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Clear (111)  |  Connection (171)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Fermentation (15)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Invention (400)  |  Relation (166)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Subside (5)  |  Whole (756)

Each nerve cell receives connections from other nerve cells at six sites called synapses. But here is an astonishing fact—there are about one million billion connections in the cortical sheet. If you were to count them, one connection (or synapse) per second, you would finish counting some thirty-two million years after you began. Another way of getting a feeling for the numbers of connections in this extraordinary structure is to consider that a large match-head’s worth of your brain contains about a billion connections. Notice that I only mention counting connections. If we consider how connections might be variously combined, the number would be hyperastronomical—on the order of ten followed by millions of zeros. (There are about ten followed by eighty zero’s worth of positively charged particles in the whole known universe!)
Bright and Brilliant Fire, On the Matters of the Mind (1992), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonishing (29)  |  Billion (104)  |  Brain (281)  |  Call (781)  |  Connection (171)  |  Consider (428)  |  Count (107)  |  Counting (26)  |  Extraordinary (83)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Feeling (259)  |  Finish (62)  |  Follow (389)  |  Known (453)  |  Large (398)  |  Match (30)  |  Mention (84)  |  Nerve (82)  |  Neurobiology (4)  |  Notice (81)  |  Number (710)  |  Other (2233)  |  Particle (200)  |  Receive (117)  |  Structure (365)  |  Two (936)  |  Universe (900)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whole (756)  |  Worth (172)  |  Year (963)  |  Zero (38)

Edward [Teller] isn’t the cloistered kind of scientist. He gets his ideas in conversation and develops them by trying them out on people. We were coming back from Europe on the Ile de France and I was standing in the ship’s nightclub when he came up and said, 'Freddie, I think I have an idea.’ It was something he’d just thought of about magnetohydrodynamics. I was a bachelor then and I’d located several good-looking girls on the ship, but I knew what I had to do, so I disappeared and started working on the calculations. I’d get something finished and start prowling on the deck again when Edward would turn up out of the night and we’d walk the deck together while he talked and I was the brick wall he was bouncing these things off of. By the end of the trip we had a paper. He’d had the ideas, and I’d done some solving of equations. But he insisted that we sign in alphabetical order, which put my name first.
As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 61-62.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (395)  |  Bounce (2)  |  Brick (20)  |  Brick Wall (2)  |  Calculation (134)  |  Coming (114)  |  Conversation (46)  |  Develop (278)  |  Disappear (84)  |  Do (1905)  |  End (603)  |  Equation (138)  |  Finish (62)  |  First (1302)  |  Girl (38)  |  Good (906)  |  Idea (881)  |  Insist (22)  |  Kind (564)  |  Looking (191)  |  Name (359)  |  Paper (192)  |  People (1031)  |  Reclusive (2)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Ship (69)  |  Solve (145)  |  Something (718)  |  Start (237)  |  Edward Teller (43)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Together (392)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (454)  |  Walk (138)  |  Wall (71)

EFFECT, n. The second of two phenomena which always occur together in the same order. The first, called a Cause, is said to generate the other—which is no more sensible than it would be for one who has never seen a dog except in pursuit of a rabbit to declare the rabbit the cause of the dog.
The Cynic's Word Book (1906), 86. Later published as The Devil's Dictionary.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (781)  |  Cause (561)  |  Declare (48)  |  Dog (70)  |  Effect (414)  |  First (1302)  |  Generate (16)  |  More (2558)  |  Never (1089)  |  Occur (151)  |  Other (2233)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Pursuit (128)  |  Rabbit (10)  |  Same (166)  |  Sensible (28)  |  Together (392)  |  Two (936)

Einstein’s space is no closer to reality than Van Gogh’s sky. The glory of science is not in a truth more absolute than the truth of Bach or Tolstoy, but in the act of creation itself. The scientist’s discoveries impose his own order on chaos, as the composer or painter imposes his; an order that always refers to limited aspects of reality, and is based on the observer's frame of reference, which differs from period to period as a Rembrandt nude differs from a nude by Manet.
In The Act of Creation (1964), 252.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Act (278)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Bach (7)  |  Bach_Johann (2)  |  Base (120)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Closer (43)  |  Composer (7)  |  Creation (350)  |  Differ (88)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (624)  |  Frame of Reference (5)  |  Glory (66)  |  Impose (22)  |  Limit (294)  |  Limited (102)  |  More (2558)  |  Nude (3)  |  Observer (48)  |  Painter (30)  |  Period (200)  |  Reality (274)  |  Refer (14)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Sky (174)  |  Space (523)  |  Count Leo Tolstoy (18)  |  Truth (1109)

Either an ordered Universe or a medley heaped together mechanically but still an order; or can order subsist in you and disorder in the Whole! And that, too, when all things are so distinguished and yet intermingled and sympathetic.
A. S. L. Farquharson (ed.), The Meditations of the Emperor Marcus Antoninus Aurelius (1944), Vol. I, Book IV, 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (99)  |  Disorder (45)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Distinguished (84)  |  Still (614)  |  Sympathetic (10)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Together (392)  |  Universe (900)  |  Whole (756)

Energy of the tides is continuously being dissipated at a rate whose order of magnitude is a billion horsepower!
In The Tides: Pulse of the Earth (1968), 133.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Billion (104)  |  Continuous (83)  |  Dissipate (8)  |  Energy (373)  |  Horsepower (2)  |  Magnitude (88)  |  Order Of Magnitude (5)  |  Rate (31)  |  Tide (37)

Engineering is more closely akin to the arts than perhaps any other of the professions; first, because it requires the maximum of natural aptitude and of liking for the work in order to offset other factors; second, because it demands, like the arts, an almost selfless consecration to the job; and, third, because out of the hundreds who faithfully devote themselves to the task, only a few are destined to receive any significant reward—in either money or fame.
As coauthor with Frank W. Skinner, and Harold E. Wessman, 'Foreward', Vocational Guidance in Engineering Lines (1933), vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Art (680)  |  Consecration (3)  |  Demand (131)  |  Destined (42)  |  Devote (45)  |  Engineering (188)  |  Factor (47)  |  Faithful (13)  |  Fame (51)  |  Few (15)  |  First (1302)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Job (86)  |  Maximum (16)  |  Money (178)  |  More (2558)  |  Natural (810)  |  Offset (3)  |  Other (2233)  |  Profession (108)  |  Receive (117)  |  Require (229)  |  Reward (72)  |  Selfless (2)  |  Significant (78)  |  Task (152)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Work (1402)

Environmentalism opposes reckless innovation and makes conservation the central order of business.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Business (156)  |  Central (81)  |  Conservation (187)  |  Environmentalism (9)  |  Innovation (49)  |  Oppose (27)  |  Reckless (6)

Euclidean mathematics assumes the completeness and invariability of mathematical forms; these forms it describes with appropriate accuracy and enumerates their inherent and related properties with perfect clearness, order, and completeness, that is, Euclidean mathematics operates on forms after the manner that anatomy operates on the dead body and its members. On the other hand, the mathematics of variable magnitudes—function theory or analysis—considers mathematical forms in their genesis. By writing the equation of the parabola, we express its law of generation, the law according to which the variable point moves. The path, produced before the eyes of the student by a point moving in accordance to this law, is the parabola.
If, then, Euclidean mathematics treats space and number forms after the manner in which anatomy treats the dead body, modern mathematics deals, as it were, with the living body, with growing and changing forms, and thus furnishes an insight, not only into nature as she is and appears, but also into nature as she generates and creates,—reveals her transition steps and in so doing creates a mind for and understanding of the laws of becoming. Thus modern mathematics bears the same relation to Euclidean mathematics that physiology or biology … bears to anatomy.
In Die Mathematik die Fackelträgerin einer neuen Zeit (1889), 38. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 112-113.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  According (236)  |  Accuracy (81)  |  Analysis (244)  |  Anatomy (75)  |  Appear (122)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Bear (162)  |  Become (821)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (232)  |  Body (557)  |  Change (639)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Consider (428)  |  Create (245)  |  Dead (65)  |  Deal (192)  |  Describe (132)  |  Doing (277)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Equation (138)  |  Euclid (60)  |  Express (192)  |  Eye (440)  |  Form (976)  |  Function (235)  |  Furnish (97)  |  Generate (16)  |  Generation (256)  |   Genesis (26)  |  Grow (247)  |  Growing (99)  |  Inherent (43)  |  Insight (107)  |  Invariability (6)  |  Law (913)  |  Living (492)  |  Living Body (3)  |  Magnitude (88)  |  Manner (62)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Member (42)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Modern (402)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Move (223)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Number (710)  |  On The Other Hand (40)  |  Operate (19)  |  Other (2233)  |  Parabola (2)  |  Path (159)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Physiology (101)  |  Point (584)  |  Produce (117)  |  Produced (187)  |  Property (177)  |  Relate (26)  |  Relation (166)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Same (166)  |  Space (523)  |  Step (234)  |  Student (317)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Transition (28)  |  Treat (38)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Variable (37)  |  Write (250)  |  Writing (192)

Every lecture should state one main point and repeat it over and over, like a theme with variations. An audience is like a herd of cows, moving slowly in the direction they are being driven towards. If we make one point, we have a good chance that the audience will take the right direction; if we make several points, then the cows will scatter all over the field. The audience will lose interest and everyone will go back to the thoughts they interrupted in order to come to our lecture.
In 'Ten Lessons I Wish I Had Been Taught', Indiscrete Thoughts (2008), 196.
Science quotes on:  |  Audience (28)  |  Back (395)  |  Being (1276)  |  Chance (244)  |  Cow (42)  |  Direction (185)  |  Drive (61)  |  Field (378)  |  Good (906)  |  Herd (17)  |  Interest (416)  |  Interrupt (6)  |  Lecture (111)  |  Lose (165)  |  Main (29)  |  Move (223)  |  Point (584)  |  Repeat (44)  |  Right (473)  |  Scatter (7)  |  Slowly (19)  |  State (505)  |  Theme (17)  |  Thought (995)  |  Toward (45)  |  Variation (93)  |  Will (2350)

Every new discovery of science is a further 'revelation' of the order which God has built into His universe.
Magazine, Look (5 Apr 1955), 30.
Science quotes on:  |  Building (158)  |  Discovery (837)  |  God (776)  |  New (1273)  |  Revelation (51)  |  Universe (900)

Every time a significant discovery is being made one sets in motion a tremendous activity in laboratories and industrial enterprises throughout the world. It is like the ant who suddenly finds food and walks back to the anthill while sending out material called food attracting substance. The other ants follow the path immediately in order to benefit from the finding and continue to do so as long as the supply is rich.
Nobel Banquet speech (10 Dec 1982). In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1982 (1983)
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (218)  |  Ant (34)  |  Back (395)  |  Being (1276)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Call (781)  |  Continue (179)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Do (1905)  |  Enterprise (56)  |  Find (1014)  |  Follow (389)  |  Food (213)  |  Immediately (115)  |  Long (778)  |  Material (366)  |  Motion (320)  |  Other (2233)  |  Path (159)  |  Set (400)  |  Significant (78)  |  Substance (253)  |  Suddenly (91)  |  Supply (100)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1911)  |  Tremendous (29)  |  Walk (138)  |  World (1850)

Everything material which is the subject of knowledge has number, order, or position; and these are her first outlines for a sketch of the universe. If our feeble hands cannot follow out the details, still her part has been drawn with an unerring pen, and her work cannot be gainsaid. So wide is the range of mathematical sciences, so indefinitely may it extend beyond our actual powers of manipulation that at some moments we are inclined to fall down with even more than reverence before her majestic presence. But so strictly limited are her promises and powers, about so much that we might wish to know does she offer no information whatever, that at other moments we are fain to call her results but a vain thing, and to reject them as a stone where we had asked for bread. If one aspect of the subject encourages our hopes, so does the other tend to chasten our desires, and he is perhaps the wisest, and in the long run the happiest, among his fellows, who has learned not only this science, but also the larger lesson which it directly teaches, namely, to temper our aspirations to that which is possible, to moderate our desires to that which is attainable, to restrict our hopes to that of which accomplishment, if not immediately practicable, is at least distinctly within the range of conception.
From Presidential Address (Aug 1878) to the British Association, Dublin, published in the Report of the 48th Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1878), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (102)  |  Actual (118)  |  Ask (420)  |  Aspect (129)  |  Aspiration (35)  |  Attainable (3)  |  Beyond (316)  |  Bread (42)  |  Call (781)  |  Chasten (2)  |  Conception (160)  |  Desire (212)  |  Detail (150)  |  Directly (25)  |  Distinctly (5)  |  Down (455)  |  Draw (140)  |  Encourage (43)  |  Everything (489)  |  Extend (129)  |  Fall (243)  |  Feeble (28)  |  Fellow (88)  |  First (1302)  |  Follow (389)  |  Hand (149)  |  Happy (108)  |  Hope (321)  |  Immediately (115)  |  In The Long Run (18)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Indefinitely (10)  |  Information (173)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Large (398)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Least (75)  |  Lesson (58)  |  Limit (294)  |  Limited (102)  |  Majestic (17)  |  Manipulation (19)  |  Material (366)  |  Moderate (6)  |  Moment (260)  |  More (2558)  |  Namely (11)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Number (710)  |  Offer (142)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outline (13)  |  Part (235)  |  Pen (21)  |  Position (83)  |  Possible (560)  |  Power (771)  |  Practicable (2)  |  Presence (63)  |  Promise (72)  |  Range (104)  |  Reject (67)  |  Restrict (13)  |  Result (700)  |  Reverence (29)  |  Sketch (8)  |  Still (614)  |  Stone (168)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Subject (543)  |  Teach (299)  |  Temper (12)  |  Tend (124)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Unerring (4)  |  Universe (900)  |  Vain (86)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wide (97)  |  Wise (143)  |  Wish (216)  |  Work (1402)

Facts, and facts alone, are the foundation of science... When one devotes oneself to experimental research it is in order to augment the sum of known facts, or to discover their mutual relations.
Precis elementaire de Physiologie (1816), ii. Trans. J. M. D. Olmsted, François Magendie: Pioneer in Experimental Physiology and Scientific Medicine in XIX Century France (1944), 62.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Augment (12)  |  Devotion (37)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Foundation (177)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Known (453)  |  Mutual (54)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Research (753)  |  Sum (103)

Far from becoming discouraged, the philosopher should applaud nature, even when she appears miserly of herself or overly mysterious, and should feel pleased that as he lifts one part of her veil, she allows him to glimpse an immense number of other objects, all worthy of investigation. For what we already know should allow us to judge of what we will be able to know; the human mind has no frontiers, it extends proportionately as the universe displays itself; man, then, can and must attempt all, and he needs only time in order to know all. By multiplying his observations, he could even see and foresee all phenomena, all of nature's occurrences, with as much truth and certainty as if he were deducing them directly from causes. And what more excusable or even more noble enthusiasm could there be than that of believing man capable of recognizing all the powers, and discovering through his investigations all the secrets, of nature!
'Des Mulets', Oeuvres Philosophiques, ed. Jean Piveteau (1954), 414. Quoted in Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, ed. Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 458.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (226)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Capable (174)  |  Cause (561)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Display (59)  |  Enquiry (89)  |  Enthusiasm (59)  |  Extend (129)  |  Feel (371)  |  Foresee (22)  |  Frontier (41)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Immense (89)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Judge (114)  |  Know (1538)  |  Lift (57)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Must (1525)  |  Mysterious (83)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Noble (93)  |  Number (710)  |  Object (438)  |  Observation (593)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Other (2233)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Power (771)  |  Secret (216)  |  See (1094)  |  Through (846)  |  Time (1911)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Universe (900)  |  Veil (27)  |  Will (2350)

Finally, since I thought that we could have all the same thoughts, while asleep, as we have while we are awake, although none of them is true at that time, I decided to pretend that nothing that ever entered my mind was any more true than the illusions of my dreams. But I noticed, immediately afterwards, that while I thus wished to think that everything was false, it was necessarily the case that I, who was thinking this, was something. When I noticed that this truth “I think, therefore I am” was so firm and certain that all the most extravagant assumptions of the sceptics were unable to shake it, I judged that I could accept it without scruple as the first principle of the philosophy for which I was searching. Then, when I was examining what I was, I realized that I could pretend that I had no body, and that there was no world nor any place in which I was present, but I could not pretend in the same way that I did not exist. On the contrary, from the very fact that I was thinking of doubting the truth of other things, it followed very evidently and very certainly that I existed; whereas if I merely ceased to think, even if all the rest of what I had ever imagined were true, I would have no reason to believe that I existed. I knew from this that I was a substance, the whole essence or nature of which was to think and which, in order to exist, has no need of any place and does not depend on anything material. Thus this self—that is, the soul by which I am what I am—is completely distinct from the body and is even easier to know than it, and even if the body did not exist the soul would still be everything that it is.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 4, 24-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Assumption (96)  |  Awake (19)  |  Body (557)  |  Certain (557)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Completely (137)  |  Contrary (143)  |  Depend (238)  |  Distinct (98)  |  Dream (222)  |  Easier (53)  |  Enter (145)  |  Essence (85)  |  Everything (489)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Exist (458)  |  Extravagant (10)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1302)  |  Follow (389)  |  Illusion (68)  |  Immediately (115)  |  Know (1538)  |  Material (366)  |  Merely (315)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Other (2233)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Present (630)  |  Principle (530)  |  Reason (766)  |  Rest (287)  |  Self (268)  |  Shake (43)  |  Something (718)  |  Soul (235)  |  Still (614)  |  Substance (253)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whole (756)  |  Wish (216)  |  World (1850)

First, In showing in how to avoid attempting impossibilities. Second, In securing us from important mistakes in attempting what is, in itself possible, by means either inadequate or actually opposed to the end in view. Thirdly, In enabling us to accomplish our ends in the easiest, shortest, most economical, and most effectual manner. Fourth, In inducing us to attempt, and enabling us to accomplish, object which, but for such knowledge, we should never have thought of understanding.
On the ways that a knowledge of the order of nature can be of use.
Quoted in Robert Routledge, Discoveries and Inventions of the 19th Century (1890), 665.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (266)  |  Avoid (123)  |  End (603)  |  First (1302)  |  Inadequate (20)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Never (1089)  |  Object (438)  |  Possible (560)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Thought (995)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Use (771)  |  View (496)  |  Way (1214)

Following the example of Archimedes who wished his tomb decorated with his most beautiful discovery in geometry and ordered it inscribed with a cylinder circumscribed by a sphere, James Bernoulli requested that his tomb be inscribed with his logarithmic spiral together with the words, “Eadem mutata resurgo,” a happy allusion to the hope of the Christians, which is in a way symbolized by the properties of that curve.
From 'Eloge de M. Bernoulli', Oeuvres de Fontenelle, t. 5 (1768), 112. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 143-144. [The Latin phrase, Eadem numero mutata resurgo means as “Though changed, I arise again exactly the same”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Allusion (2)  |  Archimedes (63)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Jacob Bernoulli (6)  |  Christian (44)  |  Circumscribe (3)  |  Curve (49)  |  Cylinder (11)  |  Decorate (2)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Example (98)  |  Follow (389)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Happy (108)  |  Hope (321)  |  Inscribe (4)  |  Logarithmic (5)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Most (1728)  |  Property (177)  |  Request (7)  |  Sphere (118)  |  Spiral (19)  |  Symbolize (8)  |  Together (392)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wish (216)  |  Word (650)

For any one who is pervaded with the sense of causal law in all that happens, who accepts in real earnest the assumption of causality, the idea of a Being who interferes with the sequence of events in the world is absolutely impossible! Neither the religion of fear nor the social-moral religion can have, any hold on him. A God who rewards and punishes is for him unthinkable, because man acts in accordance with an inner and outer necessity, and would, in the eyes of God, be as little responsible as an inanimate object is for the movements which it makes. Science, in consequence, has been accused of undermining morals—but wrongly. The ethical behavior of man is better based on sympathy, education and social relationships, and requires no support from religion. Man’s plight would, indeed, be sad if he had to be kept in order through fear of punishment and hope of rewards after death.
From 'Religion and Science', The New York Times Magazine, (9 Nov 1930), 1. Article in full, reprinted in Edward H. Cotton (ed.), Has Science Discovered God? A Symposium of Modern Scientific Opinion (1931), 101. The wording differs significantly from the version collected in 'Religion And Science', Ideas And Opinions (1954), 39, giving its source as: “Written expressly for the New York Times Magazine. Appeared there November 9, 1930 (pp. 1-4). The German text was published in the Berliner Tageblatt, November 11, 1930.” This variant form of the quote from the book begins, “The man who is thoroughly convinced of the universal operation of the law of causation….” and is also on the Albert Einstein Quotes page on this website. As for why the difference, Webmaster speculates the book form editor perhaps used a revised translation from Einstein’s German article.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Accused (3)  |  Act (278)  |  Assumption (96)  |  Behavior (95)  |  Being (1276)  |  Better (493)  |  Causality (11)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Death (406)  |  Education (423)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Event (222)  |  Eye (440)  |  Fear (212)  |  God (776)  |  Happen (282)  |  Hope (321)  |  Idea (881)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Inanimate (18)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Inner (72)  |  Interfere (17)  |  Law (913)  |  Little (717)  |  Man (2252)  |  Moral (203)  |  Movement (162)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Object (438)  |  Outer (13)  |  Plight (5)  |  Punish (8)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Religion (369)  |  Require (229)  |  Responsible (19)  |  Reward (72)  |  Sadness (36)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Sense (785)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Social (261)  |  Support (151)  |  Sympathy (35)  |  Through (846)  |  Undermine (6)  |  Unthinkable (8)  |  World (1850)  |  Wrong (246)

For centuries we have dreamt of flying; recently we made that come true: we have always hankered for speed; now we have speeds greater than we can stand: we wanted to speak to far parts of the Earth; we can: we wanted to explore the sea bottom; we have: and so on, and so on. And, too, we wanted the power to smash our enemies utterly; we have it. If we had truly wanted peace, we should have had that as well. But true peace has never been one of the genuine dreams—we have got little further than preaching against war in order to appease out consciences.
The Outward Urge (1959)
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Appease (6)  |  Conscience (52)  |  Dream (222)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Flying (74)  |  Genuine (54)  |  Greater (288)  |  Little (717)  |  Never (1089)  |  Peace (116)  |  Power (771)  |  Sea (326)  |  Speak (240)  |  Speed (66)  |  Stand (284)  |  Truly (118)  |  Want (504)  |  War (233)

For in disease the most voluntary or most special movements, faculties, etc., suffer first and most, that is in an order the exact opposite of evolution. Therefore I call this the principle of Dissolution.
'On the Anatomical and Physiological Localisation of Movements in the Brain' (1875), Preface. In James Taylor (ed.), Selected Writings of John Hughlings Jackson, Vol. 1 (1931), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Brain (281)  |  Call (781)  |  Disease (340)  |  Dissolution (11)  |  Evolution (635)  |  First (1302)  |  Most (1728)  |  Movement (162)  |  Nomenclature (159)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Principle (530)  |  Special (188)

For it is owing to their wonder that men now both begin and at first began to philosophize; they wondered originally at the obvious difficulties, then advanced little by little and stated difficulties about the greater matters, e.g. about the phenomena of the moon and those of the sun and the stars, and about the genesis of the universe. And a man who is puzzled and wonders thinks himself ignorant (whence even the lover of myth is in a sense a lover of wisdom, for myth is composed of wonders); therefore since they philosophized in order to escape from ignorance, evidently they were pursuing science in order to know, and not for any utilitarian end. And this is confirmed by the facts; for it was when almost all the necessities of life and the things that make for comfort and recreation were present, that such knowledge began to be sought. Evidently then we do not seek it for the sake of any advantage; but as the man is free, we say, who exists for himself and not for another, so we pursue this as the only free science, for it alone exists for itself.
Aristotle
Metaphysics, 982b, 12-27. In Jonathan Baines (ed.), The Complete Works of Aristotle (1984), Vol. 2, 1554.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (144)  |  Alone (324)  |  Begin (275)  |  Both (496)  |  Comfort (64)  |  Confirm (58)  |  Do (1905)  |  End (603)  |  Escape (85)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Exist (458)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1302)  |  Free (239)  |   Genesis (26)  |  Greater (288)  |  Himself (461)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Ignorant (91)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Life (1870)  |  Little (717)  |  Man (2252)  |  Matter (821)  |  Moon (252)  |  Myth (58)  |  Obvious (128)  |  Owing (39)  |  Present (630)  |  Pursue (63)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Sake (61)  |  Say (989)  |  Seek (218)  |  Sense (785)  |  Star (460)  |  Stars (304)  |  Sun (407)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Universe (900)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  Wonder (251)

For man being the minister and interpreter of nature, acts and understands so far as he has observed of the order, the works and mind of nature, and can proceed no further; for no power is able to loose or break the chain of causes, nor is nature to be conquered but by submission: whence those twin intentions, human knowledge and human power, are really coincident; and the greatest hindrance to works is the ignorance of causes.
In The Great lnstauration.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Being (1276)  |  Break (109)  |  Cause (561)  |  Chain (51)  |  Coincident (2)  |  Conquer (39)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greatest (330)  |  Hindrance (9)  |  Human (1512)  |  Ignorance (254)  |  Intention (46)  |  Interpreter (8)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Loose (14)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Minister (10)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Observe (179)  |  Observed (149)  |  Power (771)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Submission (4)  |  Twin (16)  |  Understand (648)  |  Work (1402)

For me, the first challenge for computing science is to discover how to maintain order in a finite, but very large, discrete universe that is intricately intertwined. And a second, but not less important challenge is how to mould what you have achieved in solving the first problem, into a teachable discipline: it does not suffice to hone your own intellect (that will join you in your grave), you must teach others how to hone theirs. The more you concentrate on these two challenges, the clearer you will see that they are only two sides of the same coin: teaching yourself is discovering what is teachable.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (75)  |  Challenge (91)  |  Clear (111)  |  Coin (13)  |  Compute (19)  |  Concentrate (28)  |  Discipline (85)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discrete (11)  |  Finite (60)  |  First (1302)  |  Grave (52)  |  Hone (3)  |  Important (229)  |  Intellect (251)  |  Intertwine (4)  |  Join (32)  |  Large (398)  |  Less (105)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mold (37)  |  More (2558)  |  Must (1525)  |  Other (2233)  |  Problem (731)  |  Same (166)  |  Second (66)  |  See (1094)  |  Side (236)  |  Solve (145)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Teach (299)  |  Teachable (2)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Theirs (3)  |  Two (936)  |  Universe (900)  |  Will (2350)

For me, the idea of a creation is not conceivable without invoking the necessity of design. One cannot be exposed to the law and order of the universe without concluding that there must be design and purpose behind it all.
In letter to California State board of Education (14 Sep 1972).
Science quotes on:  |  Behind (139)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Conceive (100)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Creation (350)  |  Design (203)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Exposure (9)  |  Idea (881)  |  Law (913)  |  Law And Order (5)  |  Must (1525)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Origin Of The Universe (20)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Universe (900)

For most of history, man has had to fight nature to survive; in this century he is beginning to realize that, in order to survive, he must protect it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (275)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Century (319)  |  Fight (49)  |  History (716)  |  Man (2252)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Protect (65)  |  Realize (157)  |  Survive (87)

For my own part I would as soon be descended from that heroic little monkey, who braved his dreaded enemy in order to save the life of his keeper; or from that old baboon, who, descending from the mountains, carried away in triumph his young comrade from a crowd of astonished dogs—as from a savage who delights to torture his enemies, offers up bloody sacrifices, practices infanticide without remorse, treats his wives like slaves, knows no decency, and is haunted by the grossest superstitions.
The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 404-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonish (39)  |  Decency (5)  |  Delight (111)  |  Descend (49)  |  Dog (70)  |  Enemy (86)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Human Nature (71)  |  Know (1538)  |  Life (1870)  |  Little (717)  |  Monkey (57)  |  Mountain (202)  |  Offer (142)  |  Old (499)  |  Practice (212)  |  Remorse (9)  |  Sacrifice (58)  |  Savage (33)  |  Save (126)  |  Slave (40)  |  Soon (187)  |  Superstition (70)  |  Torture (30)  |  Triumph (76)  |  Young (253)

For myself, I found that I was fitted for nothing so well as for the study of Truth; as having a mind nimble and versatile enough to catch the resemblances of things (which is the chief point) , and at the same time steady enough to fix and distinguish their subtler differences; as being gifted by nature with desire to seek, patience to doubt, fondness to meditate, slowness to assert, readiness to reconsider, carefulness to dispose and set in order; and as being a man that neither affects what is new nor admires what is old, and that hates every kind of imposture. So I thought my nature had a kind of familiarity and relationship with Truth.
From 'Progress of philosophical speculations. Preface to intended treatise De Interpretatione Naturæ (1603), in Francis Bacon and James Spedding (ed.), Works of Francis Bacon (1868), Vol. 3, 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (61)  |  Affectation (4)  |  Assert (69)  |  Assertion (35)  |  Being (1276)  |  Catch (34)  |  Chief (99)  |  Desire (212)  |  Difference (355)  |  Disposition (44)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Enough (341)  |  Familiarity (21)  |  Fix (34)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Gift (105)  |  Gifted (25)  |  Hate (68)  |  Imposture (6)  |  Kind (564)  |  Man (2252)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Myself (211)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Nimble (2)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Old (499)  |  Patience (58)  |  Point (584)  |  Readiness (9)  |  Reconsideration (3)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Resemblance (39)  |  Seek (218)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Set (400)  |  Setting (44)  |  Slowness (6)  |  Steady (45)  |  Study (701)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Versatile (6)

For that which can shewn only in a certain Light is questionable. Truth, ’tis suppos’d, may bear all Lights: and one of those principal Lights or natural Mediums, by which Things are to be view’d, in order to a thorow Recognition, is Ridicule it-self.
Also seen in short form: “Ridicule is the test of truth.”
In 'An Essay on the Freedom of Wit and Humour', Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times (1723), Vol. 1, 61.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (162)  |  Certain (557)  |  Form (976)  |  Light (635)  |  Natural (810)  |  Principal (69)  |  Questionable (3)  |  Recognition (93)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Self (268)  |  Short (200)  |  Suppose (158)  |  Test (221)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Truth (1109)  |  View (496)

For the evolution of science by societies the main requisite is the perfect freedom of communication between each member and anyone of the others who may act as a reagent.
The gaseous condition is exemplified in the soiree, where the members rush about confusedly, and the only communication is during a collision, which in some instances may be prolonged by button-holing.
The opposite condition, the crystalline, is shown in the lecture, where the members sit in rows, while science flows in an uninterrupted stream from a source which we take as the origin. This is radiation of science. Conduction takes place along the series of members seated round a dinner table, and fixed there for several hours, with flowers in the middle to prevent any cross currents.
The condition most favourable to life is an intermediate plastic or colloidal condition, where the order of business is (1) Greetings and confused talk; (2) A short communication from one who has something to say and to show; (3) Remarks on the communication addressed to the Chair, introducing matters irrelevant to the communication but interesting to the members; (4) This lets each member see who is interested in his special hobby, and who is likely to help him; and leads to (5) Confused conversation and examination of objects on the table.
I have not indicated how this programme is to be combined with eating.
Letter to William Grylls Adams (3 Dec 1873). In P. M. Harman (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1995), Vol. 2, 1862-1873, 949-50.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Business (156)  |  Chair (25)  |  Collision (16)  |  Colloid (5)  |  Communication (101)  |  Condition (362)  |  Conduction (8)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Conversation (46)  |  Crystal (71)  |  Current (122)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Eat (108)  |  Eating (46)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Examination (102)  |  Flow (89)  |  Flower (112)  |  Freedom (145)  |  Gas (89)  |  Greeting (10)  |  Hobby (14)  |  Hour (192)  |  Interest (416)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Intermediate (38)  |  Irrelevant (11)  |  Lead (391)  |  Lecture (111)  |  Life (1870)  |  Matter (821)  |  Most (1728)  |  Object (438)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Origin (250)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Plastic (30)  |  Prevent (98)  |  Program (57)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Radiation (48)  |  Reagent (8)  |  Remark (28)  |  Requisite (12)  |  Say (989)  |  See (1094)  |  Series (153)  |  Short (200)  |  Show (353)  |  Society (350)  |  Something (718)  |  Something To Say (4)  |  Special (188)  |  Stream (83)  |  Table (105)  |  Talk (108)  |  Uninterrupted (7)

For the first time I saw a medley of haphazard facts fall into line and order. All the jumbles and recipes and Hotchpotch of the inorganic chemistry of my boyhood seemed to fit into the scheme before my eyes-as though one were standing beside a jungle and it suddenly transformed itself into a Dutch garden. “But it’s true,” I said to myself “It’s very beautiful. And it’s true.”
How the Periodic Table was explained in a first-term university lecture to the central character in the novel by C.P. Snow, The Search (1935), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Boyhood (4)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Dutch (3)  |  Enlightenment (21)  |  Eye (440)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fall (243)  |  First (1302)  |  Fit (139)  |  Garden (64)  |  Haphazard (3)  |  Inorganic Chemistry (4)  |  Jumble (10)  |  Jungle (24)  |  Myself (211)  |  Periodic Table (19)  |  Recipe (8)  |  Saw (160)  |  Scheme (62)  |  Suddenly (91)  |  Time (1911)  |  Transform (74)

For the holy Bible and the phenomena of nature proceed alike from the divine Word, the former as the dictate of the Holy Ghost and the latter as the observant executrix of God's commands. It is necessary for the Bible, in order to be accommodated to the understanding of every man, to speak many things which appear to differ from the absolute truth so far as the bare meaning of the words is concerned. But Nature, on the other hand, is inexorable and immutable; she never transgresses the laws imposed upon her, or cares a whit whether her abstruse reasons and methods of operation are understandable to men. For that reason it appears that nothing physical which sense-experience sets before our eyes, or which necessary demonstrations prove to us, ought to be called in question (much less condemned) upon the testimony of biblical passages which may have some different meaning beneath their words.
Letter to Madame Christina of Lorraine, Grand Duchess of Tuscany: Concerning the Use of Biblical Quotations in Matters of Science (1615), trans. Stillman Drake, Discoveries and Opinions of Galileo (1957), 182-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Abstruse (12)  |  Alike (60)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beneath (68)  |  Call (781)  |  Care (203)  |  Command (60)  |  Concern (239)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Demonstration (120)  |  Differ (88)  |  Different (595)  |  Divine (112)  |  Experience (494)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Eye (440)  |  Former (138)  |  Ghost (36)  |  God (776)  |  Holy (35)  |  Immutable (26)  |  Inexorable (10)  |  Law (913)  |  Man (2252)  |  Meaning (244)  |  Method (531)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Never (1089)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Observation (593)  |  Operation (221)  |  Other (2233)  |  Passage (52)  |  Physical (518)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Prove (261)  |  Question (649)  |  Reason (766)  |  Sense (785)  |  Set (400)  |  Speak (240)  |  Testimony (21)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Understandable (12)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Word (650)

For the philosopher, order is the entirety of repetitions manifested, in the form of types or of laws, by perceived objects. Order is an intelligible relation. For the biologist, order is a sequence in space and time. However, according to Plato, all things arise out of their opposites. Order was born of the original disorder, and the long evolution responsible for the present biological order necessarily had to engender disorder.
An organism is a molecular society, and biological order is a kind of social order. Social order is opposed to revolution, which is an abrupt change of order, and to anarchy, which is the absence of order.
I am presenting here today both revolution and anarchy, for which I am fortunately not the only one responsible. However, anarchy cannot survive and prosper except in an ordered society, and revolution becomes sooner or later the new order. Viruses have not failed to follow the general law. They are strict parasites which, born of disorder, have created a very remarkable new order to ensure their own perpetuation.
'Interaction Among Virus, Cell, and Organism', Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1965). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1963-1970 (1972), 174.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Anarchy (8)  |  Arise (162)  |  Become (821)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (70)  |  Both (496)  |  Cell (146)  |  Change (639)  |  Disorder (45)  |  Ensure (27)  |  Entirety (6)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Fail (191)  |  Follow (389)  |  Form (976)  |  General (521)  |  Intelligible (35)  |  Kind (564)  |  Law (913)  |  Long (778)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  New (1273)  |  Object (438)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Organism (231)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Perpetuation (4)  |  Philosopher (269)  |  Plato (80)  |  Present (630)  |  Prosper (8)  |  Repetition (29)  |  Revolution (133)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Social (261)  |  Social Order (8)  |  Society (350)  |  Space (523)  |  Space And Time (38)  |  Survive (87)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Time (1911)  |  Today (321)  |  Type (171)  |  Virus (32)

For the world was built in order,
And the atoms march in tune.
In poem, 'Monadnock', collected in Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1883), 533.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (381)  |  Built (7)  |  March (48)  |  Tune (20)  |  World (1850)

Former arbiters of taste must have felt (as so many apostles of ‘traditional values’ and other highminded tags for restriction and conformity do today) that maintaining the social order required a concept of unalloyed heroism. Human beings so designated as role models had to embody all virtues of the paragon–which meant, of course, that they could not be described in their truly human and ineluctably faulted form.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Apostle (3)  |  Arbiter (5)  |  Being (1276)  |  Concept (242)  |  Conformity (15)  |  Course (413)  |  Describe (132)  |  Designation (13)  |  Do (1905)  |  Embody (18)  |  Fault (58)  |  Feel (371)  |  Form (976)  |  Former (138)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Ineluctably (2)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mean (810)  |  Model (106)  |  Must (1525)  |  Of Course (22)  |  Other (2233)  |  Paragon (4)  |  Require (229)  |  Required (108)  |  Restriction (14)  |  Role (86)  |  Role Model (9)  |  Social (261)  |  Social Order (8)  |  Taste (93)  |  Today (321)  |  Traditional (16)  |  Truly (118)  |  Value (393)  |  Virtue (117)

Formerly one sought the feeling of the grandeur of man by pointing to his divine origin: this has now become a forbidden way, for at its portal stands the ape, together with other gruesome beasts, grinning knowingly as if to say: no further in this direction! One therefore now tries the opposite direction: the way mankind is going shall serve as proof of his grandeur and kinship with God. Alas this, too, is vain! At the end of this way stands the funeral urn of the last man and gravedigger (with the inscription “nihil humani a me alienum puto”). However high mankind may have evolved—and perhaps at the end it will stand even lower than at the beginning!— it cannot pass over into a higher order, as little as the ant and the earwig can at the end of its “earthly course” rise up to kinship with God and eternal life. The becoming drags the has-been along behind it: why should an exception to this eternal spectacle be made on behalf of some little star or for any little species upon it! Away with such sentimentalities!
Daybreak: Thoughts on the Prejudices of Morality (1881), trans. R. J. Hollingdale (1982), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ant (34)  |  Ape (54)  |  Beast (58)  |  Become (821)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Behind (139)  |  Course (413)  |  Direction (185)  |  Divine (112)  |  End (603)  |  Eternal (113)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exception (74)  |  Feeling (259)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Funeral (5)  |  God (776)  |  Grandeur (35)  |  High (370)  |  Inscription (12)  |  Kinship (5)  |  Last (425)  |  Life (1870)  |  Little (717)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mankind (356)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Origin (250)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pass (241)  |  Portal (9)  |  Proof (304)  |  Rise (169)  |  Say (989)  |  Species (435)  |  Spectacle (35)  |  Stand (284)  |  Star (460)  |  Together (392)  |  Vain (86)  |  Vanity (20)  |  Way (1214)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2350)

Freudian psychoanalytical theory is a mythology that answers pretty well to Levi-Strauss's descriptions. It brings some kind of order into incoherence; it, too, hangs together, makes sense, leaves no loose ends, and is never (but never) at a loss for explanation. In a state of bewilderment it may therefore bring comfort and relief … give its subject a new and deeper understanding of his own condition and of the nature of his relationship to his fellow men. A mythical structure will be built up around him which makes sense and is believable-in, regardless of whether or not it is true.
From 'Science and Literature', The Hope of Progress: A Scientist Looks at Problems in Philosophy, Literature and Science (1973), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Believable (3)  |  Bewilderment (8)  |  Comfort (64)  |  Condition (362)  |  Deeper (4)  |  Description (89)  |  End (603)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Sigmund Freud (70)  |  Freudian (4)  |  Hang (46)  |  Incoherence (2)  |  Kind (564)  |  Loose End (3)  |  Loss (117)  |  Myth (58)  |  Mythology (19)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Never (1089)  |  New (1273)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Relief (30)  |  Sense (785)  |  State (505)  |  Structure (365)  |  Subject (543)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Together (392)  |  True (239)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Will (2350)

From this fountain (the free will of God) it is those laws, which we call the laws of nature, have flowed, in which there appear many traces of the most wise contrivance, but not the least shadow of necessity. These therefore we must not seek from uncertain conjectures, but learn them from observations and experimental. He who is presumptuous enough to think that he can find the true principles of physics and the laws of natural things by the force alone of his own mind, and the internal light of his reason, must either suppose the world exists by necessity, and by the same necessity follows the law proposed; or if the order of Nature was established by the will of God, the [man] himself, a miserable reptile, can tell what was fittest to be done.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (324)  |  Appear (122)  |  Call (781)  |  Conjecture (51)  |  Contrivance (12)  |  Enough (341)  |  Establish (63)  |  Exist (458)  |  Experimental (193)  |  Find (1014)  |  Fit (139)  |  Flow (89)  |  Follow (389)  |  Force (497)  |  Fountain (18)  |  Free (239)  |  Free Will (15)  |  God (776)  |  Himself (461)  |  Internal (69)  |  Law (913)  |  Learn (672)  |  Least (75)  |  Light (635)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Miserable (8)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Natural (810)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Observation (593)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Presumptuous (3)  |  Principle (530)  |  Propose (24)  |  Reason (766)  |  Reptile (33)  |  Same (166)  |  Seek (218)  |  Shadow (73)  |  Suppose (158)  |  Tell (344)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Trace (109)  |  True (239)  |  Uncertain (45)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wise (143)  |  World (1850)

From whatever I have been able to observe up to this time the series of strata which form the visible crust of the earth appear to me classified in four general and successive orders. These four orders can be conceived to be four very large strata, as they really are, so that wherever they are exposed, they are disposed one above the other, always in the same order.
Quoted in Francesco Rodolico, 'Arduino', In Charles Coulston Gillispie (ed.), Dictionary of Scientific Biography (1970), Vol. 1, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Classification (102)  |  Crust (43)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Form (976)  |  General (521)  |  Geology (240)  |  Large (398)  |  Observation (593)  |  Observe (179)  |  Other (2233)  |  Series (153)  |  Strata (37)  |  Successive (73)  |  Time (1911)  |  Visible (87)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Wherever (51)

Furthermore, it’s equally evident that what goes on is actually one degree better than self-reproduction, for organisms appear to have gotten more elaborate in the course of time. Today's organisms are phylogenetically descended from others which were vastly simpler than they are, so much simpler, in fact, that it’s inconceivable, how any kind of description of the latter, complex organism could have existed in the earlier one. It’s not easy to imagine in what sense a gene, which is probably a low order affair, can contain a description of the human being which will come from it. But in this case you can say that since the gene has its effect only within another human organism, it probably need not contain a complete description of what is to happen, but only a few cues for a few alternatives. However, this is not so in phylogenetic evolution. That starts from simple entities, surrounded by an unliving amorphous milieu, and produce, something more complicated. Evidently, these organisms have the ability to produce something more complicated than themselves.
From lecture series on self-replicating machines at the University of Illinois, Lecture 5 (Dec 1949), 'Re-evaluation of the Problems of Complicated Automata—Problems of Hierarchy and Evolution', Theory of Self-Reproducing Automata (1966).
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (162)  |  Alternative (32)  |  Amorphous (6)  |  Being (1276)  |  Better (493)  |  Complete (209)  |  Complex (202)  |  Complicated (117)  |  Course (413)  |  Degree (277)  |  Descend (49)  |  Easy (213)  |  Effect (414)  |  Elaborate (31)  |  Equally (129)  |  Evident (92)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Exist (458)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Gene (105)  |  Happen (282)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Imagine (176)  |  Kind (564)  |  Low (86)  |  Milieu (5)  |  More (2558)  |  Organism (231)  |  Other (2233)  |  Phylogenetic (3)  |  Produce (117)  |  Reproduction (74)  |  Say (989)  |  Self (268)  |  Sense (785)  |  Simple (426)  |  Something (718)  |  Start (237)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1911)  |  Today (321)  |  Will (2350)

Geology is part of that remarkable dynamic process of the human mind which is generally called science and to which man is driven by an inquisitive urge. By noticing relationships in the results of his observations, he attempts to order and to explain the infinite variety of phenomena that at first sight may appear to be chaotic. In the history of civilization this type of progressive scientist has been characterized by Prometheus stealing the heavenly fire, by Adam eating from the tree of knowledge, by the Faustian ache for wisdom.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 454.
Science quotes on:  |  Ache (7)  |  Adam (7)  |  Appear (122)  |  Attempt (266)  |  Call (781)  |  Called Science (14)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Characterize (22)  |  Civilization (220)  |  Dynamic (16)  |  Eating (46)  |  Explain (334)  |  Faustian (2)  |  Fire (203)  |  First (1302)  |  First Sight (6)  |  Geology (240)  |  Heavenly (8)  |  History (716)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Mind (133)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Observation (593)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Process (439)  |  Progressive (21)  |  Prometheus (7)  |  Relationship (114)  |  Remarkable (50)  |  Result (700)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Sight (135)  |  Tree (269)  |  Tree Of Knowledge (8)  |  Type (171)  |  Urge (17)  |  Variety (138)  |  Wisdom (235)

God created, Linnaeus ordered.
Quoting the witticism current in the late eighteenth century in 'The Two Faces of Linnaeus', in Tore Frängsmyr (ed.), Linnaeus: The Man and his Work (1983), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Classification (102)  |  God (776)  |  Carolus Linnaeus (36)  |  French Saying (67)

God has ordered all his Creation by Weight and Measure.
Written over the door of the world's first instructional laboratory, founded at Giessen, 1824.
As given in Patterns of Survival: An Anatomy of Life (1938), 2. It is based on a line from the Bible in Wisdom of Solomon, Chap. 11, Verse 20. Webmaster presumes this is the English translation, but Liebig used the dictum written in German. Contact webmaster if you know the specific wording of the original.
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (350)  |  Door (94)  |  First (1302)  |  God (776)  |  Laboratory (214)  |  Measure (241)  |  Weight (140)  |  World (1850)

Great thinkers build their edifices with subtle consistency. We do our intellectual forebears an enormous disservice when we dismember their visions and scan their systems in order to extract a few disembodied ‘gems’–thoughts or claims still accepted as true. These disarticulated pieces then become the entire legacy of our ancestors, and we lose the beauty and coherence of older systems that might enlighten us by their unfamiliarity–and their consequent challenge in our fallible (and complacent) modern world.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Ancestor (63)  |  Beauty (313)  |  Become (821)  |  Build (211)  |  Challenge (91)  |  Claim (154)  |  Coherence (13)  |  Complacent (7)  |  Consequent (19)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Disembodied (6)  |  Dismember (2)  |  Disservice (4)  |  Do (1905)  |  Edifice (26)  |  Enlighten (32)  |  Enormous (44)  |  Entire (50)  |  Extract (40)  |  Fallible (6)  |  Gem (17)  |  Great (1610)  |  Intellectual (258)  |  Legacy (14)  |  Lose (165)  |  Modern (402)  |  Modern World (5)  |  Old (499)  |  Piece (39)  |  Scan (4)  |  Still (614)  |  Subtle (37)  |  System (545)  |  Thinker (41)  |  Thought (995)  |  True (239)  |  Unfamiliarity (5)  |  Vision (127)  |  World (1850)

Groves hated the weather, and the weathermen; they represented chaos and the messengers of chaos. Weather violated boundaries, ignored walls and gates, failed to adhere to deadlines, disobeyed orders. Weather caused delays. The weather forecasters had opposed the [atomic bomb] test date for months—it was set within a window of unfavorable conditions: thunderstorms, rain, high winds, inversion layers. Groves had overridden them. … Groves saw it as a matter of insubordination when the weather forecasters refused to forecast good weather for the test.
In Atomic Spaces: Living on the Manhattan Project (1999), 312. For the attitude of Groves toward the weather see his, 'Some Recollections of July 16, 1945', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Jun 1970), 26, No. 6, 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (115)  |  Boundary (55)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Condition (362)  |  Delay (21)  |  Disobedience (4)  |  Fail (191)  |  Forecast (15)  |  Gate (33)  |  Good (906)  |  Leslie Richard Groves (13)  |  High (370)  |  Layer (41)  |  Matter (821)  |  Month (91)  |  Rain (70)  |  Represent (157)  |  Saw (160)  |  Schedule (5)  |  Set (400)  |  Test (221)  |  Thunderstorm (7)  |  Trinity (9)  |  Wall (71)  |  Weather (49)  |  Wind (141)  |  Window (59)

He who has mastered the Darwinian theory, he who recognizes the slow and subtle process of evolution as the way in which God makes things come to pass, … sees that in the deadly struggle for existence that has raged throughout countless aeons of time, the whole creation has been groaning and travailing together in order to bring forth that last consummate specimen of God’s handiwork, the Human Soul
In The Destiny of Man Viewed in the Light of his Origin (1884), 32. Collected in Studies in Religion (1902), 19–20.
Science quotes on:  |  Bring Forth (2)  |  Consummate (5)  |  Countless (39)  |  Creation (350)  |  Charles Darwin (322)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Eon (12)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Existence (481)  |  God (776)  |  Groan (6)  |  Handiwork (6)  |  Human (1512)  |  Last (425)  |  Master (182)  |  Pass (241)  |  Process (439)  |  Rage (10)  |  Recognize (136)  |  See (1094)  |  Slow (108)  |  Soul (235)  |  Specimen (32)  |  Struggle (111)  |  Subtle (37)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (43)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Time (1911)  |  Together (392)  |  Travail (5)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whole (756)

He who studies it [Nature] has continually the exquisite pleasure of discerning or half discerning and divining laws; regularities glimmer through an appearance of confusion, analogies between phenomena of a different order suggest themselves and set the imagination in motion; the mind is haunted with the sense of a vast unity not yet discoverable or nameable. There is food for contemplation which never runs short; you are gazing at an object which is always growing clearer, and yet always, in the very act of growing clearer, presenting new mysteries.
From 'Natural History', Macmillan's Magazine (1875), 31, 366.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (278)  |  Analogy (76)  |  Appearance (145)  |  Clearer (4)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Continuing (4)  |  Different (595)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Discover (571)  |  Exquisite (27)  |  Food (213)  |  Gaze (23)  |  Glimmer (5)  |  Growing (99)  |  Half (63)  |  Haunting (3)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Law (913)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Motion (320)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Never (1089)  |  New (1273)  |  Object (438)  |  Phenomenon (334)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Presenting (2)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Run (158)  |  Sense (785)  |  Set (400)  |  Short (200)  |  Study (701)  |  Suggestion (49)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Through (846)  |  Unity (81)  |  Vast (188)

How do we discover the individual laws of Physics, and what is their nature? It should be remarked, to begin with, that we have no right to assume that any physical law exists, or if they have existed up to now, that they will continue to exist in a similar manner in the future. It is perfectly conceivable that one fine day Nature should cause an unexpected event to occur which would baffle us all; and if this were to happen we would be powerless to make any objection, even if the result would be that, in spite of our endeavors, we should fail to introduce order into the resulting confusion. In such an event, the only course open to science would be to declare itself bankrupt. For this reason, science is compelled to begin by the general assumption that a general rule of law dominates throughout Nature.
Max Planck, Walter Henry Johnston, The Universe in the Light of Modern Physics (1931), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Assumption (96)  |  Begin (275)  |  Cause (561)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Continue (179)  |  Course (413)  |  Declare (48)  |  Discover (571)  |  Do (1905)  |  Endeavor (74)  |  Event (222)  |  Exist (458)  |  Existence (481)  |  Fail (191)  |  Future (467)  |  General (521)  |  Happen (282)  |  Individual (420)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Law (913)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Objection (34)  |  Occur (151)  |  Open (277)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physical (518)  |  Physical Law (15)  |  Physics (564)  |  Reason (766)  |  Result (700)  |  Right (473)  |  Rule (307)  |  Similar (36)  |  Spite (55)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Unexpected (55)  |  Will (2350)

How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people–first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Base (120)  |  Being (1276)  |  Bind (26)  |  Bound (120)  |  Brief (37)  |  Daily (91)  |  Daily Life (18)  |  Dead (65)  |  Deep (241)  |  Dependent (26)  |  Destiny (54)  |  Exert (40)  |  Exist (458)  |  First (1302)  |  Give In (3)  |  Happiness (126)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Inner (72)  |  Know (1538)  |  Labor (200)  |  Life (1870)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Lot (151)  |  Measure (241)  |  Mortal (55)  |  Must (1525)  |  Myself (211)  |  Other (2233)  |  Outer (13)  |  People (1031)  |  Purpose (336)  |  Receive (117)  |  Reflection (93)  |  Remind (16)  |  Same (166)  |  Sense (785)  |  Smile (34)  |  Sometimes (46)  |  Still (614)  |  Strange (160)  |  Sympathy (35)  |  Think (1122)  |  Tie (42)  |  Time (1911)  |  Unknown (195)  |  Well-Being (5)  |  Wholly (88)

However improbable we regard [the spontaneous origin of life],… it will almost certainly happen at least once…. The time… is of the order of two billion years.… Given so much time, the “impossible” becomes possible, the possible probable, and the probable virtually certain. One only has to wait: time itself performs the miracles.
In 'The Origin of Life', Scientific American (Aug 1954), 191, No. 2, 46. Note that the quoted time of 2 billion years is rejected as impossibly short by such authors as H. J. Morowitz, in Energy Flow in Biology (1968), 317.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (821)  |  Billion (104)  |  Certain (557)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Event (222)  |  Generation (256)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happening (59)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Improbable (15)  |  Life (1870)  |  Miracle (85)  |  Once (4)  |  Origin (250)  |  Origin Of Life (37)  |  Perform (123)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Possible (560)  |  Probability (135)  |  Regard (312)  |  Spontaneous (29)  |  Spontaneous Generation (9)  |  Time (1911)  |  Two (936)  |  Virtual (5)  |  Wait (66)  |  Will (2350)  |  Year (963)  |  Years (5)

I am astonished that in the United States a scientist gets into such trouble because of his scientific beliefs; that your activity in 1957 and 1958 in relation to the petition to the United Nations asking for a bomb-test agreement causes you now to be called before the authorities and ordered to give the names of the scientists who have the same opinions that you have and who have helped you to gather signatures to the petition. I think that I must be dreaming!
Letter to Linus Pauling (23 Jul 1960). As quoted on the Linus Pauling and the International Peace Movement website at scarc.library.oregonstate.edu.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (218)  |  Agreement (55)  |  Asking (74)  |  Astonish (39)  |  Authority (99)  |  Belief (615)  |  Bomb (20)  |  Call (781)  |  Cause (561)  |  Dreaming (3)  |  Gather (76)  |  Must (1525)  |  Name (359)  |  Nation (208)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Petition (4)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Signature (4)  |  State (505)  |  Test (221)  |  Think (1122)  |  Trouble (117)  |  United Nations (3)

I am very astonished that the scientific picture of the real world around me is deficient. It gives a lot of factual information, puts all our experience in a magnificently consistent order, but it is ghastly silent about all and sundry that is really near to our heart, that really matters to us. It cannot tell us a word about red and blue, bitter and sweet, physical pain and physical delight; it knows nothing of beautiful and ugly, good or bad, God and eternity. Science sometimes pretends to answer questions in these domains, but the answers are very often so silly that we are not inclined to take them seriously.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Astonish (39)  |  Astonished (10)  |  Bad (185)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Blue (63)  |  Consistent (50)  |  Deficient (3)  |  Delight (111)  |  Domain (72)  |  Eternity (64)  |  Experience (494)  |  Factual (8)  |  Ghastly (5)  |  Give (208)  |  God (776)  |  Good (906)  |  Heart (243)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Information (173)  |  Know (1538)  |  Lot (151)  |  Magnificently (2)  |  Matter (821)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Often (109)  |  Pain (144)  |  Physical (518)  |  Picture (148)  |  Pretend (18)  |  Question (649)  |  Real World (15)  |  Really (77)  |  Red (38)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Seriously (20)  |  Silent (31)  |  Silly (17)  |  Sometimes (46)  |  Sundry (4)  |  Sweet (40)  |  Tell (344)  |  Ugly (14)  |  Word (650)  |  World (1850)

I appeal to the contemptible speech made lately by Sir Robert Peel to an applauding House of Commons. 'Orders of merit,' said he, 'were the proper rewards of the military' (the desolators of the world in all ages). 'Men of science are better left to the applause of their own hearts.' Most learned Legislator! Most liberal cotton-spinner! Was your title the proper reward of military prowess? Pity you hold not the dungeon-keys of an English Inquisition! Perhaps Science, like creeds, would flourish best under a little persecution.
Chemical Recreations (1834), 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Best (467)  |  Better (493)  |  Common (447)  |  Creed (28)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Heart (243)  |  House (143)  |  Inquisition (9)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Little (717)  |  Men Of Science (147)  |  Merit (51)  |  Military (45)  |  Most (1728)  |  Persecution (14)  |  Proper (150)  |  Reward (72)  |  Speech (66)  |  World (1850)

I believe that life can go on forever. It takes a million years to evolve a new species, ten million for a new genus, one hundred million for a class, a billion for a phylum—and that’s usually as far as your imagination goes. In a billion years, it seems, intelligent life might be as different from humans as humans are from insects. But what would happen in another ten billion years? It’s utterly impossible to conceive of ourselves changing as drastically as that, over and over again. All you can say is, on that kind of time scale the material form that life would take is completely open. To change from a human being to a cloud may seem a big order, but it’s the kind of change you’d expect over billions of years.
Quoted in Omni (1986), 8, 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1276)  |  Billion (104)  |  Change (639)  |  Class (168)  |  Cloud (111)  |  Completely (137)  |  Conceive (100)  |  Different (595)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Expect (203)  |  Forever (111)  |  Form (976)  |  Genus (27)  |  Happen (282)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Insect (89)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Kind (564)  |  Life (1870)  |  Material (366)  |  New (1273)  |  Open (277)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Say (989)  |  Scale (122)  |  Species (435)  |  Time (1911)  |  Usually (176)  |  Year (963)

I believe—and human psychologists, particularly psychoanalysts should test this—that present-day civilized man suffers from insufficient discharge of his aggressive drive. It is more than probable that the evil effects of the human aggressive drives, explained by Sigmund Freud as the results of a special death wish, simply derive from the fact that in prehistoric times intra-specific selection bred into man a measure of aggression drive for which in the social order today he finds no adequate outlet.
On Aggression, trans. M. Latzke (1966), 209.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (50)  |  Aggression (10)  |  Death (406)  |  Derive (70)  |  Discharge (21)  |  Effect (414)  |  Evil (122)  |  Explain (334)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Find (1014)  |  Sigmund Freud (70)  |  Human (1512)  |  Man (2252)  |  Measure (241)  |  More (2558)  |  Prehistoric (12)  |  Present (630)  |  Psychoanalyst (4)  |  Psychologist (26)  |  Result (700)  |  Selection (130)  |  Social (261)  |  Social Order (8)  |  Special (188)  |  Specific (98)  |  Test (221)  |  Time (1911)  |  Today (321)  |  Wish (216)

I believed that, instead of the multiplicity of rules that comprise logic, I would have enough in the following four, as long as I made a firm and steadfast resolution never to fail to observe them.
The first was never to accept anything as true if I did not know clearly that it was so; that is, carefully to avoid prejudice and jumping to conclusions, and to include nothing in my judgments apart from whatever appeared so clearly and distinctly to my mind that I had no opportunity to cast doubt upon it.
The second was to subdivide each on the problems I was about to examine: into as many parts as would be possible and necessary to resolve them better.
The third was to guide my thoughts in an orderly way by beginning, as if by steps, to knowledge of the most complex, and even by assuming an order of the most complex, and even by assuming an order among objects in! cases where there is no natural order among them.
And the final rule was: in all cases, to make such comprehensive enumerations and such general review that I was certain not to omit anything.
The long chains of inferences, all of them simple and easy, that geometers normally use to construct their most difficult demonstrations had given me an opportunity to think that all the things that can fall within the scope of human knowledge follow from each other in a similar way, and as long as one avoids accepting something as true which is not so, and as long as one always observes the order required to deduce them from each other, there cannot be anything so remote that it cannot be reached nor anything so hidden that it cannot be uncovered.
Discourse on Method in Discourse on Method and Related Writings (1637), trans. Desmond M. Clarke, Penguin edition (1999), Part 2, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (198)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Avoid (123)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Better (493)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Cast (69)  |  Certain (557)  |  Complex (202)  |  Comprehensive (29)  |  Conclusion (266)  |  Construct (129)  |  Demonstration (120)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Easy (213)  |  Enough (341)  |  Examine (84)  |  Fail (191)  |  Fall (243)  |  Final (121)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1302)  |  Follow (389)  |  General (521)  |  Guide (107)  |  Human (1512)  |  Include (93)  |  Inference (45)  |  Judgment (140)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Logic (311)  |  Long (778)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Most (1728)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Natural (810)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Never (1089)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Object (438)  |  Observe (179)  |  Omit (12)  |  Opportunity (95)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Other (2233)  |  Possible (560)  |  Prejudice (96)  |  Problem (731)  |  Reach (286)  |  Remote (86)  |  Required (108)  |  Resolution (24)  |  Resolve (43)  |  Review (27)  |  Rule (307)  |  Scope (44)  |  Simple (426)  |  Something (718)  |  Step (234)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thought (995)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Use (771)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whatever (234)

I can conceive few human states more enviable than that of the man to whom, panting in the foul laboratory, or watching for his life under the tropic forest, Isis shall for a moment lift her sacred veil, and show him, once and for ever, the thing he dreamed not of; some law, or even mere hint of a law, explaining one fact; but explaining with it a thousand more, connecting them all with each other and with the mighty whole, till order and meaning shoots through some old Chaos of scattered observations.
Health and Education (1874), 289.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (99)  |  Conceive (100)  |  Deer (11)  |  Dream (222)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Forest (161)  |  Foul (15)  |  Hint (21)  |  Human (1512)  |  Laboratory (214)  |  Law (913)  |  Life (1870)  |  Lift (57)  |  Man (2252)  |  Meaning (244)  |  Microscope (85)  |  Moment (260)  |  More (2558)  |  Mouse (33)  |  Observation (593)  |  Old (499)  |  Other (2233)  |  Paramecium (2)  |  Rat (37)  |  Sacred (48)  |  Show (353)  |  State (505)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Thousand (340)  |  Through (846)  |  Veil (27)  |  Whole (756)

I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skilful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.
In 'The Science Of Deduction', A Study In Scarlet (1887, 1904), 15-16.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (70)  |  Assortment (5)  |  Attic (3)  |  Best (467)  |  Brain (281)  |  Choose (116)  |  Consider (428)  |  Crowd (25)  |  Depend (238)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Doing (277)  |  Elastic (2)  |  Empty (82)  |  Extent (142)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fool (121)  |  Forget (125)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Importance (299)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Jumble (10)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Large (398)  |  Little (717)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mistake (180)  |  Most (1728)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Something (718)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Time (1911)  |  Tool (129)  |  Useful (260)  |  Useless (38)  |  Wall (71)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

I do not hope for any relief, and that is because I have committed no crime. I might hope for and obtain pardon, if I had erred, for it is to faults that the prince can bring indulgence, whereas against one wrongfully sentenced while he was innocent, it is expedient, in order to put up a show of strict lawfulness, to uphold rigor… . But my most holy intention, how clearly would it appear if some power would bring to light the slanders, frauds, and stratagems, and trickeries that were used eighteen years ago in Rome in order to deceive the authorities!
In Letter to Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc (22 Feb 1635). As quoted in translation in Giorgio de Santillana, The Crime of Galileo (1976), 324.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Authority (99)  |  Commit (43)  |  Crime (39)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Do (1905)  |  Fault (58)  |  Fraud (15)  |  Holy (35)  |  Hope (321)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Innocent (13)  |  Intention (46)  |  Lawfulness (5)  |  Light (635)  |  Most (1728)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Pardon (7)  |  Power (771)  |  Relief (30)  |  Rigor (29)  |  Rome (19)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Sentence (35)  |  Show (353)  |  Slander (3)  |  Stratagem (2)  |  Trickery (2)  |  Year (963)

I find it quite improbable that such order came out of chaos. There has to be some organizing principle. God to me is a mystery, but is the explanation for the miracle of existence, why there is something instead of nothing.
As quoted in John Noble Wilford, 'Sizing up the Cosmos: An Astronomers Quest', New York Times (12 Mar 1991), C10.
Science quotes on:  |  Chaos (99)  |  Existence (481)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Find (1014)  |  God (776)  |  Improbable (15)  |  Instead (23)  |  Miracle (85)  |  Mystery (188)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Organize (33)  |  Principle (530)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Something (718)  |  Why (491)

I had at one time a very bad fever of which I almost died. In my fever I had a long consistent delirium. I dreamt that I was in Hell, and that Hell is a place full of all those happenings that are improbable but not impossible. The effects of this are curious. Some of the damned, when they first arrive below, imagine that they will beguile the tedium of eternity by games of cards. But they find this impossible, because, whenever a pack is shuffled, it comes out in perfect order, beginning with the Ace of Spades and ending with the King of Hearts. There is a special department of Hell for students of probability. In this department there are many typewriters and many monkeys. Every time that a monkey walks on a typewriter, it types by chance one of Shakespeare's sonnets. There is another place of torment for physicists. In this there are kettles and fires, but when the kettles are put on the fires, the water in them freezes. There are also stuffy rooms. But experience has taught the physicists never to open a window because, when they do, all the air rushes out and leaves the room a vacuum.
'The Metaphysician's Nightmare', Nightmares of Eminent Persons and Other Stories (1954), 38-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (366)  |  Arrival (15)  |  Bad (185)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Chance (244)  |  Consistent (50)  |  Curiosity (138)  |  Curious (95)  |  Damned (4)  |  Death (406)  |  Delirium (3)  |  Department (93)  |  Do (1905)  |  Dream (222)  |  Effect (414)  |  Eternity (64)  |  Experience (494)  |  Fever (34)  |  Find (1014)  |  Fire (203)  |  First (1302)  |  Freeze (6)  |  Game (104)  |  Happening (59)  |  Heart (243)  |  Hell (32)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Imagine (176)  |  Impossibility (60)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Improbable (15)  |  Kettle (3)  |  Long (778)  |  Monkey (57)  |  Never (1089)  |  Open (277)  |  Opening (15)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Perfection (131)  |  Physicist (270)  |  Possibility (172)  |  Probability (135)  |  Room (42)  |  Rush (18)  |  William Shakespeare (109)  |  Shuffle (7)  |  Sonnet (5)  |  Special (188)  |  Student (317)  |  Tedium (3)  |  Time (1911)  |  Torment (18)  |  Type (171)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Vacuum (41)  |  Walk (138)  |  Water (503)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Will (2350)  |  Window (59)

I had made up my mind to find that for which I was searching even if it required the remainder of my life. After innumerable failures I finally uncovered the principle for which I was searching, and I was astounded at its simplicity. I was still more astounded to discover the principle I had revealed not only beneficial in the construction of a mechanical hearing aid but it served as well as means of sending the sound of the voice over a wire. Another discovery which came out of my investigation was the fact that when a man gives his order to produce a definite result and stands by that order it seems to have the effect of giving him what might be termed a second sight which enables him to see right through ordinary problems. What this power is I cannot say; all I know is that it exists and it becomes available only when a man is in that state of mind in which he knows exactly what he wants and is fully determined not to quit until he finds it.
As quoted, without citation, in Mack R. Douglas, Making a Habit of Success: How to Make a Habit of Succeeding, How to Win With High Self-Esteem (1966, 1994), 38. Note: Webmaster is dubious of a quote which seems to appear in only one source, without a citation, decades after Bell’s death. If you know a primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (101)  |  Astound (9)  |  Available (80)  |  Become (821)  |  Construction (114)  |  Definite (114)  |  Determined (9)  |  Discover (571)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Effect (414)  |  Enable (122)  |  Exist (458)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Failure (176)  |  Find (1014)  |  Hearing (50)  |  Innumerable (56)  |  Investigation (250)  |  Know (1538)  |  Life (1870)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Mechanical (145)  |  Mind (1377)  |  More (2558)  |  Ordinary (167)  |  Power (771)  |  Principle (530)  |  Problem (731)  |  Remainder (7)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (700)  |  Reveal (152)  |  Revealed (59)  |  Right (473)  |  Say (989)  |  See (1094)  |  Sight (135)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Sound (187)  |  Stand (284)  |  State (505)  |  Still (614)  |  Term (357)  |  Through (846)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Want (504)  |  Wire (36)

I had this experience at the age of eight. My parents gave me a microscope. I don’t recall why, but no matter. I then found my own little world, completely wild and unconstrained, no plastic, no teacher, no books, no anything predictable. At first I did not know the names of the water-drop denizens or what they were doing. But neither did the pioneer microscopists. Like them, I graduated to looking at butterfly scales and other miscellaneous objects. I never thought of what I was doing in such a way, but it was pure science. As true as could be of any child so engaged, I was kin to Leeuwenhoek, who said that his work “was not pursued in order to gain the praise I now enjoy, but chiefly from a craving after knowledge, which I notice resides in me more that most other men.”
In The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth (2010), 143-144.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Book (413)  |  Butterfly (26)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Child (333)  |  Complete (209)  |  Completely (137)  |  Craving (5)  |  Doing (277)  |  Drop (77)  |  Enjoyment (37)  |  Experience (494)  |  Find (1014)  |  First (1302)  |  Gain (146)  |  Graduation (6)  |  Kin (10)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (17)  |  Little (717)  |  Looking (191)  |  Matter (821)  |  Microscope (85)  |  Microscopist (2)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Name (359)  |  Never (1089)  |  Notice (81)  |  Object (438)  |  Other (2233)  |  Parent (80)  |  Pioneer (37)  |  Plastic (30)  |  Praise (28)  |  Predictability (7)  |  Pure (299)  |  Pure Science (30)  |  Pursuit (128)  |  Reside (25)  |  Scale (122)  |  Teacher (154)  |  Thought (995)  |  Unconstrained (2)  |  Water (503)  |  Way (1214)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (96)  |  Work (1402)  |  World (1850)

I have always liked horticulturists, people who make their living from orchards and gardens, whose hands are familiar with the feel of the bark, whose eyes are trained to distinguish the different varieties, who have a form memory. Their brains are not forever dealing with vague abstractions; they are satisfied with the romance which the seasons bring with them, and have the patience and fortitude to gamble their lives and fortunes in an industry which requires infinite patience, which raise hopes each spring and too often dashes them to pieces in fall. They are always conscious of sun and wind and rain; must always be alert lest they lose the chance of ploughing at the right moment, pruning at the right time, circumventing the attacks of insects and fungus diseases by quick decision and prompt action. They are manufacturers of a high order, whose business requires not only intelligence of a practical character, but necessitates an instinct for industry which is different from that required by the city dweller always within sight of other people and the sound of their voices. The successful horticulturist spends much time alone among his trees, away from the constant chatter of human beings.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (48)  |  Action (342)  |  Alert (13)  |  Alone (324)  |  Attack (86)  |  Bark (19)  |  Being (1276)  |  Brain (281)  |  Business (156)  |  Chance (244)  |  Character (259)  |  City (87)  |  Constant (148)  |  Decision (98)  |  Different (595)  |  Disease (340)  |  Distinguish (168)  |  Eye (440)  |  Fall (243)  |  Feel (371)  |  Forever (111)  |  Form (976)  |  Fortune (50)  |  Fungus (8)  |  Garden (64)  |  High (370)  |  Hope (321)  |  Horticulture (10)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Industry (159)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Insect (89)  |  Instinct (91)  |  Intelligence (218)  |  Live (650)  |  Living (492)  |  Lose (165)  |  Memory (144)  |  Moment (260)  |  Must (1525)  |  Other (2233)  |  Patience (58)  |  People (1031)  |  Practical (225)  |  Prompt (14)  |  Pruning (7)  |  Rain (70)  |  Require (229)  |  Required (108)  |  Right (473)  |  Romance (18)  |  Season (47)  |  Sight (135)  |  Sound (187)  |  Spend (97)  |  Spring (140)  |  Successful (134)  |  Sun (407)  |  Time (1911)  |  Train (118)  |  Tree (269)  |  Vague (50)  |  Wind (141)

I have called this principle, by which each slight variation, if useful, is preserved, by the term Natural Selection, in order to mark its relation to man's power of selection. But the expression often used by Mr. Herbert Spencer of the Survival of the Fittest is more accurate, and is sometimes equally convenient.
from Origin of Species (1859, 1888), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (88)  |  Call (781)  |  Equally (129)  |  Expression (181)  |  Man (2252)  |  More (2558)  |  Natural (810)  |  Natural Selection (98)  |  Power (771)  |  Principle (530)  |  Selection (130)  |  Survival (105)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (43)  |  Term (357)  |  Useful (260)  |  Variation (93)

I have destroyed almost the whole race of frogs, which does not happen in that savage Batrachomyomachia of Homer. For in the anatomy of frogs, which, by favour of my very excellent colleague D. Carolo Fracassato, I had set on foot in order to become more certain about the membranous substance of the lungs, it happened to me to see such things that not undeservedly I can better make use of that [saying] of Homer for the present matter—
“I see with my eyes a work trusty and great.”
For in this (frog anatomy) owing to the simplicity of the structure, and the almost complete transparency of the vessels which admits the eye into the interior, things are more clearly shown so that they will bring the light to other more obscure matters.
De Pulmonibus (1661), trans. James Young, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine (1929-30), 23, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (75)  |  Become (821)  |  Better (493)  |  Certain (557)  |  Certainty (180)  |  Colleague (51)  |  Complete (209)  |  Destroy (189)  |  Destruction (135)  |  Eye (440)  |  Frog (44)  |  Great (1610)  |  Happen (282)  |  Happened (88)  |  Homer (11)  |  Interior (35)  |  Light (635)  |  Lung (37)  |  Matter (821)  |  Membrane (21)  |  More (2558)  |  Obscure (66)  |  Obscurity (28)  |  Other (2233)  |  Owing (39)  |  Present (630)  |  Race (278)  |  See (1094)  |  Set (400)  |  Simplicity (175)  |  Structure (365)  |  Substance (253)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Transparency (7)  |  Use (771)  |  Vessel (63)  |  Whole (756)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

I have done a terrible thing: I have postulated a particle that cannot be detected.
After postulating the existence of the neutrino, a particle with no mass and no electric charge, in order to balance an equation. In an article in Mercury, 29, 29, it is stated, without citation, that “the day after making the proposal Pauli told his colleague Walter Baade.” Webmaster has looked, but not yet found a primary source. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Balance (82)  |  Charge (63)  |  Detect (45)  |  Electric (76)  |  Equation (138)  |  Existence (481)  |  Mass (160)  |  Neutrino (11)  |  Particle (200)  |  Postulate (42)  |  Terrible (41)  |  Thing (1914)

I have patiently born with abundance of Clamour and Ralary [raillery], for beginning a new Practice here (for the Good of the Publick) which comes well Recommended, from Gentlemen of Figure & Learning, and which well agrees to Reason, when try’d & duly considered, viz. Artificially giving the Small Pocks, by Inoculation, to One of my Children, and Two of my Slaves, in order to prevent the hazard of Life… . and they never took one grain or drop of Medicine since, & are perfectly well.
By “clamour” he is referring to the public commotion in Boston reacting to his introduction of smallpox inoculation. Public statement in the Gazette (Jul 10-17), No. 85, 1721. As quoted and cited in Reginald H. Fitz, 'Zabdiel Boylston, Inoculator, and the Epidemic of Smallpox in Boston in 1721', Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins Hospital (1911), 22, 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (26)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Children (201)  |  Clamor (7)  |  Consider (428)  |  Drop (77)  |  Figure (162)  |  Good (906)  |  Grain (50)  |  Hazard (21)  |  Healthy (70)  |  Inoculation (9)  |  Learning (291)  |  Life (1870)  |  Medicine (392)  |  Never (1089)  |  New (1273)  |  Practice (212)  |  Prevent (98)  |  Reason (766)  |  Recommend (27)  |  Slave (40)  |  Small (489)  |  Smallpox (14)  |  Try (296)  |  Two (936)

I have to keep going, as there are always people on my track. I have to publish my present work as rapidly as possible in order to keep in the race. The best sprinters in this road of investigation are Becquerel and the Curies...
Letter to his mother (5 Jan1902). Quoted in A. S. Eve, Rutherford: Being the Life and Letters of the Rt. Hon. Lord Rutherford (1939), 80. In Laurie M. Brown, Abraham Pais and A. B. Pippard, Twentieth Century Physics (1995), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Henri Becquerel (5)  |  Best (467)  |  Marie Curie (37)  |  Investigation (250)  |  People (1031)  |  Possible (560)  |  Present (630)  |  Publication (102)  |  Race (278)  |  Rapidly (67)  |  Research (753)  |  Track (42)  |  Work (1402)

I knew, however, that it would cost ten times what I had available in order to build a molecular beam machine. I decided to follow a byway, rather than the highway. It is a procedure I have subsequently recommended to beginning scientists in this country, where research strategy is best modelled on that used by Wolfe at the Plains of Abraham.
(British General James Wolfe defeated the French defending Quebec in 1759 after scaling a cliff for a surprise attack.)
'A Scientist and the World He Lives In', Speech to the Empire Club of Canada (27 Nov 1986) in C. Frank Turner and Tim Dickson (eds.), The Empire Club of Canada Speeches 1986-1987 (1987), 149-161.
Science quotes on:  |  Attack (86)  |  Available (80)  |  Beam (26)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Best (467)  |  British (42)  |  Build (211)  |  Cliff (22)  |  Cost (94)  |  Country (269)  |  Defeat (31)  |  Follow (389)  |  General (521)  |  Machine (271)  |  Procedure (48)  |  Recommend (27)  |  Research (753)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Strategy (13)  |  Surprise (91)  |  Time (1911)

I know of scarcely anything so apt to impress the imagination as the wonderful form of cosmic order expressed by the “Law of Frequency of Error.” The law would have been personified by the Greeks and deified, if they had known of it. It reigns with serenity and in complete self-effacement, amidst the wildest confusion. The huger the mob, and the greater the apparent anarchy, the more perfect is its sway. It is the supreme law of Unreason. Whenever a large sample of chaotic elements are taken in hand and marshaled in the order of their magnitude, an unsuspected and most beautiful form of regularity proves to have been latent all along.
In Natural Inheritance (1894), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Anarchy (8)  |  Apparent (85)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Complete (209)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Cosmic (74)  |  Element (322)  |  Error (339)  |  Express (192)  |  Form (976)  |  Frequency (25)  |  Greater (288)  |  Greek (109)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Impress (66)  |  Know (1538)  |  Known (453)  |  Large (398)  |  Latent (13)  |  Law (913)  |  Magnitude (88)  |  Mob (10)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Prove (261)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Reign (24)  |  Sample (19)  |  Scarcely (75)  |  Self (268)  |  Serenity (11)  |  Supreme (73)  |  Unsuspected (7)  |  Whenever (81)  |  Wonderful (155)

I learned, and later had to unlearn in order to become a scientist myself, that science is simply measurement and the answers are in print.
This View of Life: the World of an Evolutionist (1964), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (389)  |  Become (821)  |  Learn (672)  |  Learned (235)  |  Measurement (178)  |  Myself (211)  |  Print (20)  |  Scientist (881)  |  Unlearn (11)

I presume that few who have paid any attention to the history of the Mathematical Analysis, will doubt that it has been developed in a certain order, or that that order has been, to a great extent, necessary—being determined, either by steps of logical deduction, or by the successive introduction of new ideas and conceptions, when the time for their evolution had arrived. And these are the causes that operate in perfect harmony. Each new scientific conception gives occasion to new applications of deductive reasoning; but those applications may be only possible through the methods and the processes which belong to an earlier stage.
Explaining his choice for the exposition in historical order of the topics in A Treatise on Differential Equations (1859), Preface, v-vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (244)  |  Application (257)  |  Attention (196)  |  Being (1276)  |  Belong (168)  |  Cause (561)  |  Certain (557)  |  Conception (160)  |  Deduction (90)  |  Develop (278)  |  Development (441)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Extent (142)  |  Great (1610)  |  Harmony (105)  |  History (716)  |  Idea (881)  |  Introduction (37)  |  Logic (311)  |  Mathematical Analysis (23)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Method (531)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Necessity (197)  |  New (1273)  |  Occasion (87)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Possible (560)  |  Process (439)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Scientific (955)  |  Stage (152)  |  Step (234)  |  Successive (73)  |  Through (846)  |  Time (1911)  |  Will (2350)

I publish this Essay in its present imperfect state, in order to prevent the furacious attempts of the prowling plagiary, and the insidious pretender to chymistry, from arrogating to themselves, and assuming my invention, in plundering silence: for there are those, who, if they can not be chymical, never fail by stratagem, and mechanical means, to deprive industry of the fruits, and fame of her labours.
Preface to An Essay on Combustion with a View to a New Art of Dyeing and Painting (1794), vii-viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (266)  |  Essay (27)  |  Fail (191)  |  Fame (51)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Imperfect (46)  |  Industry (159)  |  Invention (400)  |  Labor (200)  |  Mean (810)  |  Means (587)  |  Mechanical (145)  |  Never (1089)  |  Plagiarism (10)  |  Present (630)  |  Prevent (98)  |  Publication (102)  |  Silence (62)  |  State (505)  |  Themselves (433)

I shall consider this paper an essay in geopoetry. In order not to travel any further into the realm of fantasy than is absolutely necessary I shall hold as closely as possibly to a uniformitarian approach; even so, at least one great catastrophe will be required early in the Earth's history.
'History of Ocean Basins', in A. E. J. Engel, H. L. James and B. F. Leonard (eds.), Petrologic Studies: A Volume to Honour F. Buddington (1962), 599-600.
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (112)  |  Catastrophe (35)  |  Consider (428)  |  Early (196)  |  Earth (1076)  |  Essay (27)  |  Fantasy (15)  |  Great (1610)  |  History (716)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Paper (192)  |  Plate Tectonics (22)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Realm (87)  |  Required (108)  |  Travel (125)  |  Uniformitarian (4)  |  Will (2350)

I should like to compare this rearrangement which the proteins undergo in the animal or vegetable organism to the making up of a railroad train. In their passage through the body parts of the whole may be left behind, and here and there new parts added on. In order to understand fully the change we must remember that the proteins are composed of Bausteine united in very different ways. Some of them contain Bausteine of many kinds. The multiplicity of the proteins is determined by many causes, first through the differences in the nature of the constituent Bausteine; and secondly, through differences in the arrangement of them. The number of Bausteine which may take part in the formation of the proteins is about as large as the number of letters in the alphabet. When we consider that through the combination of letters an infinitely large number of thoughts may be expressed, we can understand how vast a number of the properties of the organism may be recorded in the small space which is occupied by the protein molecules. It enables us to understand how it is possible for the proteins of the sex-cells to contain, to a certain extent, a complete description of the species and even of the individual. We may also comprehend how great and important the task is to determine the structure of the proteins, and why the biochemist has devoted himself with so much industry to their analysis.
'The Chemical Composition of the Cell', The Harvey Lectures (1911), 7, 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (244)  |  Animal (651)  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Behind (139)  |  Biochemist (9)  |  Body (557)  |  Cause (561)  |  Cell (146)  |  Certain (557)  |  Change (639)  |  Combination (150)  |  Compare (76)  |  Complete (209)  |  Consider (428)  |  Constituent (47)  |  Determine (152)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difference (355)  |  Different (595)  |  Enable (122)  |  Express (192)  |  Extent (142)  |  First (1302)  |  Formation (100)  |  Genetics (105)  |  Great (1610)  |  Himself (461)  |  Individual (420)  |  Industry (159)  |  Kind (564)  |  Large (398)  |  Letter (117)  |  Making (300)  |  Model (106)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nature (2017)  |  New (1273)  |  Number (710)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Organism (231)  |  Passage (52)  |  Possible (560)  |  Protein (56)  |  Railroad (36)  |  Rearrangement (5)  |  Record (161)  |  Remember (189)  |  Sex (68)  |  Small (489)  |  Space (523)  |  Species (435)  |  Structure (365)  |  Task (152)  |  Thought (995)  |  Through (846)  |  Train (118)  |  Understand (648)  |  Vast (188)  |  Vegetable (49)  |  Way (1214)  |  Whole (756)  |  Why (491)

I sought excitement and, taking chances, I was all ready to fail in order to achieve something large.
On the official Raymond Loewry website. Also quoted in part in Society of Industrial Artists and Designers, Designer (1980).
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (187)  |  Ambition (46)  |  Chance (244)  |  Excitement (61)  |  Fail (191)  |  Failure (176)  |  Large (398)  |  Ready (43)  |  Risk (68)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Something (718)

I think that in order to achieve progress in the study of language and human cognitive faculties in general it is necessary first to establish 'psychic distance' from the 'mental facts' to which Köhler referred, and then to explore the possibilities for developing explanatory theories... We must recognize that even the most familiar phenomena require explanation and that we have no privileged access to the underlying mechanisms, no more so than in physiology or physics.
Language and Mind (1972, enlarged edition), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (21)  |  Cognitive (7)  |  Distance (171)  |  Explanation (246)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  First (1302)  |  General (521)  |  Human (1512)  |  Wolfgang Köhler (6)  |  Language (308)  |  Mechanism (102)  |  Mental (179)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Physic (515)  |  Physics (564)  |  Physiology (101)  |  Progress (492)  |  Psychic (15)  |  Psychology (166)  |  Recognize (136)  |  Require (229)  |  Study (701)  |  Think (1122)  |  Underlying (33)

I think that the unity we can seek lies really in two things. One is that the knowledge which comes to us at such a terrifyingly, inhumanly rapid rate has some order in it. We are allowed to forget a great deal, as well as to learn. This order is never adequate. The mass of ununderstood things, which cannot be summarized, or wholly ordered, always grows greater; but a great deal does get understood.
The second is simply this: we can have each other to dinner. We ourselves, and with each other by our converse, can create, not an architecture of global scope, but an immense, intricate network of intimacy, illumination, and understanding. Everything cannot be connected with everything in the world we live in. Everything can be connected with anything.
Concluding paragraphs of 'The Growth of Science and the Structure of Culture', Daedalus (Winter 1958), 87, No. 1, 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequate (50)  |  Architecture (50)  |  Connect (126)  |  Connected (8)  |  Converse (9)  |  Create (245)  |  Deal (192)  |  Dinner (15)  |  Everything (489)  |  Forget (125)  |  Global (39)  |  Great (1610)  |  Greater (288)  |  Grow (247)  |  Illumination (15)  |  Immense (89)  |  Intimacy (6)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Learn (672)  |  Lie (370)  |  Live (650)  |  Mass (160)  |  Network (21)  |  Never (1089)  |  Other (2233)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Rapid (37)  |  Rate (31)  |  Scope (44)  |  Seek (218)  |  Summarize (10)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Think (1122)  |  Two (936)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Understood (155)  |  Unity (81)  |  Wholly (88)  |  World (1850)

I thought that the wisdom of our City had certainly designed the laudable practice of taking and distributing these accompts [parish records of christenings and deaths] for other and greater uses than [merely casual comments], or, at least, that some other uses might be made of them; and thereupon I ... could, and (to be short) to furnish myself with as much matter of that kind ... the which when I had reduced into tables ... so as to have a view of the whole together, in order to the more ready comparing of one Year, Season, Parish, or other Division of the City, with another, in respect of all Burials and Christnings, and of all the Diseases and Casualties happening in each of them respectively...
Moreover, finding some Truths and not-commonly-believed opinions to arise from my meditations upon these neglected Papers, I proceeded further to consider what benefit the knowledge of the same would bring to the world, ... with some real fruit from those ayrie blossoms.
From Natural and Political Observations Mentioned in a Following Index and Made upon Bills of Mortality (1662), Preface. Reproduced in Cornelius Walford, The Insurance Cyclopaedia (1871), Vol. 1, 286-287.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (244)  |  Arise (162)  |  Benefit (123)  |  Blossom (22)  |  Burial (8)  |  Casualty (3)  |  Certainly (185)  |  City (87)  |  Comparison (108)  |  Consider (428)  |  Data (162)  |  Death (406)  |  Design (203)  |  Disease (340)  |  Division (67)  |  Fruit (108)  |  Furnish (97)  |  Greater (288)  |  Happening (59)  |  Kind (564)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Matter (821)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Merely (315)  |  More (2558)  |  Myself (211)  |  Neglect (63)  |  Neglected (23)  |  Opinion (291)  |  Other (2233)  |  Paper (192)  |  Practice (212)  |  Proceed (134)  |  Record (161)  |  Respect (212)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Season (47)  |  Short (200)  |  Statistics (170)  |  Table (105)  |  Thought (995)  |  Together (392)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Use (771)  |  View (496)  |  Whole (756)  |  Wisdom (235)  |  World (1850)  |  Year (963)

I trust ... I have succeeded in convincing you that modern chemistry is not, as it has so long appeared, an ever-growing accumulation of isolated facts, as impossible for a single intellect to co-ordinate as for a single memory to grasp.
The intricate formulae that hang upon these walls, and the boundless variety of phenomena they illustrate, are beginning to be for us as a labyrinth once impassable, but to which we have at length discovered the clue. A sense of mastery and power succeeds in our minds to the sort of weary despair with which we at first contemplated their formidable array. For now, by the aid of a few general principles, we find ourselves able to unravel the complexities of these formulae, to marshal the compounds which they represent in orderly series; nay, even to multiply their numbers at our will, and in a great measure to forecast their nature ere we have called them into existence. It is the great movement of modern chemistry that we have thus, for an hour, seen passing before us. It is a movement as of light spreading itself over a waste of obscurity, as of law diffusing order throughout a wilderness of confusion, and there is surely in its contemplation something of the pleasure which attends the spectacle of a beautiful daybreak, something of the grandeur belonging to the conception of a world created out of chaos.
Concluding remark for paper presented at the Friday Discourse of the the Royal Institution (7 Apr 1865). 'On the Combining Power of Atoms', Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1865), 4, No. 42, 416.
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (51)  |  Aid (101)  |  Attend (67)  |  Beautiful (271)  |  Beginning (312)  |  Belonging (36)  |  Boundless (28)  |  Call (781)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Chemistry (376)  |  Clue (20)  |  Complexity (121)  |  Compound (117)  |  Conception (160)  |  Confusion (61)  |  Contemplation (75)  |  Despair (40)  |  Discover (571)  |  Existence (481)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Facts (553)  |  Find (1014)  |  First (1302)  |  Forecast (15)  |  Formula (102)  |  General (521)  |  Grandeur (35)  |  Great (1610)  |  Growing (99)  |  Hang (46)  |  Hour (192)  |  Impossible (263)  |  Intellect (251)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Isolated (15)  |  Labyrinth (12)  |  Law (913)  |  Light (635)  |  Long (778)  |  Mastery (36)  |  Measure (241)  |  Memory (144)  |  Mind (1377)  |  Modern (402)  |  Movement (162)  |  Multiply (40)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Number (710)  |  Obscurity (28)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Ourselves (247)  |  Passing (76)  |  Pleasure (191)  |  Power (771)  |  Principle (530)  |  Represent (157)  |  Sense (785)  |  Series (153)  |  Single (365)  |  Something (718)  |  Spectacle (35)  |  Succeed (114)  |  Surely (101)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Trust (72)  |  Unravel (16)  |  Variety (138)  |  Wall (71)  |  Waste (109)  |  Weary (11)  |  Wilderness (57)  |  Will (2350)  |  World (1850)

I was pretty good in science. But again, because of the small budget, in science class we couldn’t do experiments in order to prove theories. We just believed everything. Actually I think that class was call Religion. Religion was always an easy class. All you had to do was suspend the logic and reasoning you were taught in all the other classes.
In autobiography, Brain Droppings (1998), 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (615)  |  Biography (254)  |  Budget (4)  |  Call (781)  |  Class (168)  |  Do (1905)  |  Easiness (4)  |  Easy (213)  |  Everything (489)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Good (906)  |  Logic (311)  |  Other (2233)  |  Proof (304)  |  Prove (261)  |  Reasoning (212)  |  Religion (369)  |  School (227)  |  Science And Religion (337)  |  Small (489)  |  Suspension (7)  |  Teaching (190)  |  Theory (1015)  |  Think (1122)

I was suffering from a sharp attack of intermittent fever, and every day during the cold and succeeding hot fits had to lie down for several hours, during which time I had nothing to do but to think over any subjects then particularly interesting me. One day something brought to my recollection Malthus's 'Principles of Population', which I had read about twelve years before. I thought of his clear exposition of 'the positive checks to increase'—disease, accidents, war, and famine—which keep down the population of savage races to so much lower an average than that of more civilized peoples. It then occurred to me that these causes or their equivalents are continually acting in the case of animals also; and as animals usually breed much more rapidly than does mankind, the destruction every year from these causes must be enormous in order to keep down the numbers of each species, since they evidently do not increase regularly from year to year, as otherwise the world would long ago have been densely crowded with those that breed most quickly. Vaguely thinking over the enormous and constant destruction which this implied, it occurred to me to ask the question, Why do some die and some live? The answer was clearly, that on the whole the best fitted live. From the effects of disease the most healthy escaped; from enemies, the strongest, swiftest, or the most cunning; from famine, the best hunters or those with the best digestion; and so on. Then it suddenly flashed upon me that this self-acting process would necessarily improve the race, because in every generation the inferior would inevitably be killed off and the superior would remain—that is, the fittest would survive.
[The phrase 'survival of the fittest,' suggested by the writings of Thomas Robert Malthus, was expressed in those words by Herbert Spencer in 1865. Wallace saw the term in correspondence from Charles Darwin the following year, 1866. However, Wallace did not publish anything on his use of the expression until very much later, and his recollection is likely flawed.]
My Life: A Record of Events and Opinions (1905), Vol. 1, 361-362, or in reprint (2004), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (92)  |  Animal (651)  |  Answer (389)  |  Ask (420)  |  Attack (86)  |  Average (89)  |  Best (467)  |  Cause (561)  |  Cold (115)  |  Constant (148)  |  Correspondence (24)  |  Cunning (17)  |  Destruction (135)  |  Digestion (29)  |  Disease (340)  |  Do (1905)  |  Down (455)  |  Effect (414)  |  Equivalent (46)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Evolution (635)  |  Express (192)  |  Expression (181)  |  Extinction (80)  |  Famine (18)  |  Fever (34)  |  Fit (139)  |  Flash (49)  |  Flaw (18)  |  Generation (256)  |  Healthy (70)  |  Hot (63)  |  Hour (192)  |  Hunter (28)  |  Increase (225)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Kill (100)  |  Lie (370)  |  Live (650)  |  Long (778)  |  Thomas Robert Malthus (13)  |  Mankind (356)  |  More (2558)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Necessarily (137)  |  Nothing (1000)  |  Number (710)  |  People (1031)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Population (115)  |  Positive (98)  |  Principle (530)  |  Process (439)  |  Question (649)  |  Race (278)  |  Rapidly (67)  |  Read (308)  |  Remain (355)  |  Saw (160)  |  Self (268)  |  Small (489)  |  Something (718)  |  Species (435)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Subject (543)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Suddenly (91)  |  Suffering (68)  |  Superior (88)  |  Survival (105)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (43)  |  Survive (87)  |  Term (357)  |  Think (1122)  |  Thinking (425)  |  Thought (995)  |  Time (1911)  |  Use (771)  |  Usually (176)  |  War (233)  |  Whole (756)  |  Why (491)  |  Word (650)  |  World (1850)  |  Writing (192)  |  Year (963)

I will ask you to mark again that rather typical feature of the development of our subject; how so much progress depends on the interplay of techniques, discoveries and new ideas, probably in that order of decreasing importance.
This is the original quote, which gave rise to the commonly seen misstated shortened quote as: “Progress in science depends on new techniques, new discoveries and new ideas, probably in that order”—with the qualifying words “interplay” and “decreasing importance” omitted. From Brenner’s own handwritten notes of a Speech (20 Mar 1980), 'Biology in the 1980s', at the Friedrich Miescher Institute in Basel, Switzerland. Reproduced in his article 'Life sentences: Detective Rummage investigates', The Scientist (19 Aug 2002), 16, No. 16, 15. He reflects on the original wording of the quote, from his notes that he “came across”, while rummaging through “the piles of papers that I have accumulated,” (hence “Detective Rummage” in the title). See more on the commonly seen misstated shortened quote also on the Sydney Brenner Quotes web page of this site, beginning, “Progress in science…”.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (420)  |  Decrease (16)  |  Depend (238)  |  Development (441)  |  Discovery (837)  |  Feature (49)  |  Idea (881)  |  Importance (299)  |  Interplay (9)  |  New (1273)  |  New Idea (3)  |  Probably (50)  |  Progress (492)  |  Subject (543)  |  Technique (84)  |  Typical (16)  |  Will (2350)

I’m not an atheist and I don’t think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It doe s not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn’t know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Atheist (16)  |  Attitude (84)  |  Being (1276)  |  Book (413)  |  Call (781)  |  Child (333)  |  Different (595)  |  Dimly (6)  |  Enter (145)  |  Fill (67)  |  God (776)  |  Huge (30)  |  Human (1512)  |  Human Being (185)  |  Intelligent (108)  |  Know (1538)  |  Language (308)  |  Library (53)  |  Little (717)  |  Most (1728)  |  Must (1525)  |  Myself (211)  |  Mysterious (83)  |  Position (83)  |  Seem (150)  |  Someone (24)  |  Suspect (18)  |  Think (1122)  |  Toward (45)  |  Write (250)

If a man is in any sense a real mathematician, then it is a hundred to one that his mathematics will be far better than anything else he can do, and that it would be silly if he surrendered any decent opportunity of exercising his one talent in order to do undistinguished work in other fields. Such a sacrifice could be justified only by economic necessity of age.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 2012), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (509)  |  Better (493)  |  Decent (12)  |  Do (1905)  |  Economic (84)  |  Economics (44)  |  Field (378)  |  Hundred (240)  |  Justification (52)  |  Man (2252)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Necessity (197)  |  Opportunity (95)  |  Other (2233)  |  Real (159)  |  Sacrifice (58)  |  Sense (785)  |  Silly (17)  |  Surrender (21)  |  Talent (99)  |  Undistinguished (3)  |  Will (2350)  |  Work (1402)

If all the elements are arranged in the order of their atomic weights, a periodic repetition of properties is obtained. This is expressed by the law of periodicity.
Principles of Chemistry (1905), Vol. 2, 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Element (322)  |  Express (192)  |  Law (913)  |  Obtain (164)  |  Periodic Table (19)  |  Periodicity (6)  |  Property (177)  |  Repetition (29)  |  Weight (140)

If Bacon erred here [in valuing mathematics only for its uses], we must acknowledge that we greatly prefer his error to the opposite error of Plato. We have no patience with a philosophy which, like those Roman matrons who swallowed abortives in order to preserve their shapes, takes pains to be barren for fear of being homely.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 396.
Science quotes on:  |  Abortive (2)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Sir Francis Bacon (188)  |  Barren (33)  |  Being (1276)  |  Error (339)  |  Fear (212)  |  Homely (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1395)  |  Must (1525)  |  Opposite (110)  |  Pain (144)  |  Patience (58)  |  Philosophy (409)  |  Plato (80)  |  Preserve (91)  |  Roman (39)  |  Shape (77)  |  Swallow (32)  |  Use (771)  |  Value (393)

If diphtheria is a disease caused by a microorganism, it is essential that three postulates be fulfilled. The fulfilment of these postulates is necessary in order to demonstrate strictly the parasitic nature of a disease:
1) The organism must be shown to be constantly present in characteristic form and arrangement in the diseased tissue.
2) The organism which, from its behaviour appears to be responsible for the disease, must be isolated and grown in pure culture.
3) The pure culture must be shown to induce the disease experimentally.
An early statement of Koch's postulates.
Mittheilungen aus den Kaiserliche Gesundheitsamt (1884) Vol. 2. Trans. T. D. Brock, Robert Koch: A Life in Medicine and Bacteriology (1988), 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (93)  |  Behaviour (42)  |  Characteristic (154)  |  Culture (157)  |  Demonstrate (79)  |  Diphtheria (2)  |  Disease (340)  |  Early (196)  |  Essential (210)  |  Experiment (736)  |  Form (976)  |  Induce (24)  |  Isolation (32)  |  Microorganism (29)  |  Must (1525)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Organism (231)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Postulate (42)  |  Present (630)  |  Pure (299)  |  Statement (148)  |  Tissue (51)

If it were always necessary to reduce everything to intuitive knowledge, demonstration would often be insufferably prolix. This is why mathematicians have had the cleverness to divide the difficulties and to demonstrate separately the intervening propositions. And there is art also in this; for as the mediate truths (which are called lemmas, since they appear to be a digression) may be assigned in many ways, it is well, in order to aid the understanding and memory, to choose of them those which greatly shorten the process, and appear memorable and worthy in themselves of being demonstrated. But there is another obstacle, viz.: that it is not easy to demonstrate all the axioms, and to reduce demonstrations wholly to intuitive knowledge. And if we had chosen to wait for that, perhaps we should not yet have the science of geometry.
In Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz and Alfred Gideon Langley (trans.), New Essays Concerning Human Understanding (1896), 413-414.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (101)  |  Appear (122)  |  Art (680)  |  Assign (15)  |  Axiom (65)  |  Being (1276)  |  Call (781)  |  Choose (116)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Cleverness (15)  |  Demonstrate (79)  |  Demonstration (120)  |  Difficulty (201)  |  Digression (3)  |  Divide (77)  |  Easy (213)  |  Everything (489)  |  Geometry (271)  |  Insufferable (2)  |  Intervene (8)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Lemma (2)  |  Mathematician (407)  |  Mediate (4)  |  Memorable (4)  |  Memory (144)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Obstacle (42)  |  Often (109)  |  Process (439)  |  Prolix (2)  |  Proposition (126)  |  Reduce (100)  |  Separate (151)  |  Shorten (5)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Truth (1109)  |  Understand (648)  |  Understanding (527)  |  Wait (66)  |  Way (1214)  |  Wholly (88)  |  Why (491)  |  Worthy (35)

If man were by nature a solitary animal, the passions of the soul by which he was conformed to things so as to have knowledge of them would be sufficient for him; but since he is by nature a political and social animal it was necessary that his conceptions be made known to others. This he does through vocal sound. Therefore there had to be significant vocal sounds in order that men might live together. Whence those who speak different languages find it difficult to live together in social unity.
As quoted in Jeffrey J. Maciejewski, Thomas Aquinas on Persuasion: Action, Ends, and Natural Rhetoric (2013), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (651)  |  Conception (160)  |  Different (595)  |  Difficult (263)  |  Find (1014)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Known (453)  |  Language (308)  |  Linguistics (39)  |  Live (650)  |  Man (2252)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Other (2233)  |  Passion (121)  |  Political (124)  |  Significant (78)  |  Social (261)  |  Solitary (16)  |  Soul (235)  |  Sound (187)  |  Speak (240)  |  Sufficient (133)  |  Thing (1914)  |  Through (846)  |  Together (392)  |  Unity (81)  |  Voice (54)

If matter is not eternal, its first emergence into being is a miracle beside which all others dwindle into absolute insignificance. But, as has often been pointed out, the process is unthinkable; the sudden apocalypse of a material world out of blank nonentity cannot be imagined; its emergence into order out of chaos when “without form and void” of life, is merely a poetic rendering of the doctrine of its slow evolution.
In Nineteenth Century (Sep c.1879?). Quoted in John Tyndall, 'Professor Virchow and Evolution', Fragments of Science (1879), Vol. 2, 377.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (153)  |  Apocalypse (2)  |  Being (1276)  |  Big Bang (45)  |  Black (46)  |  Chaos (99)  |  Doctrine (81)  |  Dwindle (6)  |  Dwindling (3)  |  Emergence (35)  |  Eternal (113)  |  Evolution (635)  |  First (1302)  |  Form (976)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Insignificance (12)  |  Life (1870)  |  Material (366)  |  Matter (821)  |  Merely (315)  |  Miracle (85)  |  Nonentity (2)  |  Other (2233)  |  Poetry (150)  |  Point (584)  |  Pointing (4)  |  Process (439)  |  Rendering (6)  |  Slow (108)  |  Sudden (70)  |  Unthinkable (8)  |  Void (31)  |  World (1850)

If one of these people, in whom the chance-worship of our remoter ancestors thus strangely survives, should be within reach of the sea when a heavy gale is blowing, let him betake himself to the shore and watch the scene. Let him note the infinite variety of form and size of the tossing waves out at sea; or against the curves of their foam-crested breakers, as they dash against the rocks; let him listen to the roar and scream of the shingle as it is cast up and torn down the beach; or look at the flakes of foam as they drive hither and thither before the wind: or note the play of colours, which answers a gleam of sunshine as it falls upon their myriad bubbles. Surely here, if anywhere, he will say that chance is supreme, and bend the knee as one who has entered the very penetralia of his divinity. But the man of science knows that here, as everywhere, perfect order is manifested; that there is not a curve of the waves, not a note in the howling chorus, not a rainbow-glint on a bubble, which is other than a necessary consequence of the ascertained laws of nature; and that with a sufficient knowledge of the conditions, competent physico-mathematical skill could account for, and indeed predict, every one of these 'chance' events.
In 'On the Reception of the Origin of Species'. In Francis Darwin (ed.), The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Including an Autobiographical Chapter (1888), Vol. 2, 200-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (195)  |  Against (332)  |  Ancestor (63)  |  Answer (389)  |  Ascertain (41)  |  Beach (23)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Bubble (23)  |  Cast (69)  |  Chance (244)  |  Chorus (6)  |  Condition (362)  |  Consequence (220)  |  Curve (49)  |  Divinity (23)  |  Down (455)  |  Enter (145)  |  Event (222)  |  Everywhere (98)  |  Fall (243)  |  Form (976)  |  Himself (461)  |  Indeed (323)  |  Infinite (243)  |  Know (1538)  |  Knowledge (1647)  |  Law (913)  |  Listen (81)  |  Look (584)  |  Man (2252)  |  Myriad (32)  |  Nature (2017)  |  Necessary (370)  |  Other (2233)  |  People (1031)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Predict (86)  |  Rainbow (17)  |  Reach (286)  |  Rock (176)  |  Say (989)  |  Scene (36)  |  Sea (326)  |  Skill (116)  |  Sufficient (133)  |  Supreme (73)  |  Surely (101)  |  Survive (87)  |  Torn (17)  |  Variety (138)  |  Watch (118)  |  Wave (112)  |  Will (2350)  |  Wind (141)  |  Worship (32)

If order appeals to the intellect, then disorder titillates the imagination.
Quoted in the original French, “Si l’ordre satisfait la raison, /Le désordre fait les deélices de l’imagination,” in P.H. Gaskell (ed.), Structure of Non-crystalline Materials 1976: Symposium Proceedings (1977), 260. As translated in Alan A. Mackay, A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1991), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Appeal (46)  |  Disorder (45)  |  Imagination (349)  |  Intellect (251)

If some race of quadrumanous animals, especially one of the most perfect of them, were to lose, by force of circumstances or some other cause, the habit of climbing trees and grasping the branches with its feet in the same way as with its hands, in order to hold on to them; and if the individuals of this race were forced for a series of generations to use their feet only for walking, and to give up using their hands like feet; there is no doubt, according to the observations detailed in the preceding chapter, that these quadrumanous animals would at length be transformed into bimanous, and that the thumbs on their feet would cease to be separated from the other digits, when they only used their feet for walking.
Philosophie Zoologique (1809), Vol. 1, 349, trans. Hugh Elliot (1914), 170.
Science quotes on:  |  According (236)  |  Animal (651)  |  Ape (54)  |  Cause (561)  |  Cease (81)  |  Circumstance (139)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Climb (39)  |  Detail (150)  |  Doubt (314)  |  Force (497)  |  Generation (256)  |  Habit (174)  |  Individual (420)  |  Lose (165)  |  Most (1728)  |  Observation (593)  |  Other (2233)  |  Perfect (223)  |  Race (278)  |  Series (153)  |  Thumb (18)  |  Transform (74)  |  Tree (269)  |  Use (771)  |  Way (1214)

If that's how it all started, then we might as well face the fact that what's left out there is a great deal of shrapnel and a whole bunch of cinders (one of which is, fortunately, still hot enough and close enough to be good for tanning). Trying to find some sense and order in this mess may be as futile as trying to … reconstruct the economy of Iowa from a bowl of popcorn. [On searching for evidence of the Big Bang.]
From essay 'First Person Secular: Blocking the Gates to Heaven', Mother Jones Magazine (Jun 1986), 48. Collected in The Worst Years of our Lives: Irreverent Notes from a Decade of Greed (1995), 267.
Science quotes on:  |  Bang (29)  |  Big Bang (45)  |  Bowl (4)  |  Bunch (7)  |  Cinder (6)  |  Close (77)  |  Deal (192)  |  Economy (59)  |  Enough (341)  |  Evidence (267)  |  Face (214)  |  Fact (1257)  |  Find (1014)  |  Futile (13)  |  Futility (7)  |  Good (906)  |  Great (1610)  |  Hot (63)  |  Left (15)  |  Mess (14)  |  Origin Of The Universe (20)  |  Reconstruction (16)  |  Sense (785)  |  Start (237)  |  Still (614)  |  Tanning (3)  |  Try (296)  |  Trying (144)  |  Universe (900)  |  Whole (756)

If the actual order of the bases on one of the pair of chains were given, one could write down the exact order of the bases on the other one, because of the specific pairing. Thus one chain is, as it were, the complement of the other, and it is this feature which suggests how the deoxyribonucleic acid molecule might duplicate itself.
[Co-author with Francis Crick]
In 'Genetic Implications of the Structure of Deoxyribonucleic Acid', Nature (1958), 171, 965-966.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Actual (118)  |  Author (175)  |  Base (120)  |  Chain (51)  |  Complement (6)  |  Deoxyribonucleic Acid (3)  |  Down (455)  |  Duplicate (9)  |  Exact (75)  |  Molecule (185)  |  Other (2233)  |  Pair (10)  |  Specific (98)  |  Suggest (38)  |  Write (250)  |  Writing (192)

Georges Lemaître quote: If the world has begun with a single quantum, the notions of space and would altogether fail to have any