Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The Superfund legislation... may prove to be as far-reaching and important as any accomplishment of my administration. The reduction of the threat to America's health and safety from thousands of toxic-waste sites will continue to be an urgent…issue …”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Text

Text Quotes (14 quotes)

According to our ancient Buddhist texts, a thousand million solar systems make up a galaxy. … A thousand million of such galaxies form a supergalaxy. … A thousand million supergalaxies is collectively known as supergalaxy Number One. Again, a thousand million supergalaxy Number Ones form a Supergalaxy Number Two. A thousand million supergalaxy Number Twos make up a supergalaxy Number Three, and of these, it is stated in the texts that there are a countless number in the universe.
In 'Reactions to Man’s Landing on the Moon Show Broad Variations in Opinions', The New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (103)  |  Buddhist (5)  |  Countless (21)  |  Form (308)  |  Galaxy (46)  |  Million (111)  |  Solar System (61)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Universe (683)

Each year, it seems, larger and more daunting mountains of text rise from the lush lowlands of visual reproduction.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Daunting (3)  |  Large (130)  |  Lush (3)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Reproduction (61)  |  Rise (70)  |  Seem (143)  |  Visual (15)  |  Year (299)

If atoms do, by chance, happen to combine themselves into so many shapes, why have they never combined together to form a house or a slipper? By the same token, why do we not believe that if innumerable letters of the Greek alphabet were poured all over the market-place they would eventually happen to form the text of the Iliad?
The Essays of Michel de Montaigne, Book 2, Chapter 12, 'Apology for Raymond Sebond', trans. M. A. Screech (1991), 612.
Science quotes on:  |  Alphabet (9)  |  Atom (280)  |  Belief (503)  |  Chance (159)  |  Combination (91)  |  Formation (58)  |  Greek (71)  |  House (43)  |  Innumerable (23)  |  Letter (50)  |  Pour (10)  |  Shape (69)  |  Token (4)

If texts are unified by a central logic of argument, then their pictorial illustrations are integral to the ensemble, not pretty little trifles included only for aesthetic or commercial value. Primates are visual animals, and (particularly in science) illustration has a language and set of conventions all its own.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aesthetic (34)  |  Animal (356)  |  Argument (81)  |  Central (33)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Convention (14)  |  Ensemble (4)  |  Illustration (28)  |  Include (40)  |  Integral (14)  |  Language (217)  |  Little (184)  |  Logic (247)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Pictorial (2)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Primate (8)  |  Science (2043)  |  Set (97)  |  Trifle (13)  |  Unified (9)  |  Value (240)  |  Visual (15)

In a scientific journal, a major consideration is whether the book reviewed has made a contribution to medical science. Cynics may well say that they know of no psychiatric text that would meet such conditions, and they may be right.
Myre Sim
In book review by Myre Sim, about 'Ending the Cycle of Abuse', The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry (May 1997), 42:4, 425.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (160)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Contribution (60)  |  Cynic (6)  |  Journal (19)  |  Major (32)  |  Making (27)  |  Medicine (343)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  French Saying (67)

In my youth I regarded the universe as an open book, printed in the language of physical equations, whereas now it appears to me as a text written in invisible ink, of which in our rare moments of grace we are able to decipher a small fragment.
From Epilogue in Bricks to Babel (1980).
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (115)  |  Book (257)  |  Decipher (7)  |  Equation (93)  |  Fragment (25)  |  Grace (17)  |  Ink (10)  |  Invisible (38)  |  Language (217)  |  Moment (106)  |  Open (66)  |  Physical (129)  |  Printed (3)  |  Rare (47)  |  Regard (93)  |  Universe (683)  |  Written (5)  |  Youth (75)

In preparing the present volume, it has been the aim of the author to do full justice to the ample material at his command, and, where possible, to make the illustrations tell the main story to anatomists. The text of such a memoir may soon lose its interest, and belong to the past, but good figures are of permanent value. [Justifying elaborate illustrations in his monographs.]
In Dinocerata: a monograph of an extinct order of gigantic mammals (1884), Preface, xvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomist (17)  |  Figure (68)  |  Good (345)  |  Illustration (28)  |  Interest (235)  |  Memoir (11)  |  Past (150)  |  Permanent (28)  |  Story (72)  |  Value (240)

Teach to the the problems, not to the text.
As quoted, without citation, in Howard W. Eves Return to Mathematical Circles, (1988), 159. [Note the E. Kim Nebeuts is probably a pen name since reversed it reads Mike Stueben —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Problem (490)  |  Teach (179)

The average English author [of mathematical texts] leaves one under the impression that he has made a bargain with his reader to put before him the truth, the greater part of the truth, and nothing but the truth; and that if he has put the facts of his subject into his book, however difficult it may be to unearth them, he has fulfilled his contract with his reader. This is a very much mistaken view, because effective teaching requires a great deal more than a bare recitation of facts, even if these are duly set forth in logical order—as in English books they often are not. The probable difficulties which will occur to the student, the objections which the intelligent student will naturally and necessarily raise to some statement of fact or theory—these things our authors seldom or never notice, and yet a recognition and anticipation of them by the author would be often of priceless value to the student. Again, a touch of humour (strange as the contention may seem) in mathematical works is not only possible with perfect propriety, but very helpful; and I could give instances of this even from the pure mathematics of Salmon and the physics of Clerk Maxwell.
In Perry, Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 59-61.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipation (14)  |  Author (61)  |  Average (41)  |  Bare (11)  |  Bargain (4)  |  Book (257)  |  Contention (10)  |  Contract (11)  |  Deal (49)  |  Difficult (116)  |  Difficulty (144)  |  Effective (29)  |  English (34)  |  Fact (725)  |  Forth (13)  |  Fulfill (19)  |  Great (524)  |  Helpful (15)  |  Humour (103)  |  Impression (69)  |  Instance (32)  |  Intelligent (47)  |  Leave (127)  |  Logical (54)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  James Clerk Maxwell (82)  |  Mistake (131)  |  Naturally (10)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Nothing (385)  |  Notice (34)  |  Objection (18)  |  Occur (43)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (239)  |  Part (220)  |  Perfect (83)  |  Physics (346)  |  Possible (155)  |  Priceless (5)  |  Probable (20)  |  Propriety (4)  |  Pure Mathematics (63)  |  Raise (34)  |  Reader (38)  |  Recitation (2)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Require (79)  |  Salmon (6)  |  Seem (143)  |  Seldom (28)  |  Set (97)  |  Statement (72)  |  Strange (94)  |  Student (201)  |  Subject (235)  |  Teach (179)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (31)  |  Theory (690)  |  Touch (76)  |  Truth (914)  |  Unearth (2)  |  Value (240)  |  View (171)  |  Work (626)

The large collection of problems which our modern Cambridge books supply will be found to be almost an exclusive peculiarity of these books; such collections scarcely exist in foreign treatises on mathematics, nor even in English treatises of an earlier date. This fact shows, I think, that a knowledge of mathematics may be gained without the perpetual working of examples. … Do not trouble yourselves with the examples, make it your main business, I might almost say your exclusive business, to understand the text of your author.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Author (61)  |  Book (257)  |  Business (84)  |  Cambridge (15)  |  Collection (44)  |  Date (12)  |  Early (61)  |  English (34)  |  Example (92)  |  Exclusive (16)  |  Exist (147)  |  Fact (725)  |  Find (405)  |  Foreign (26)  |  Gain (67)  |  Knowledge (1293)  |  Large (130)  |  Main (27)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Modern (159)  |  Peculiarity (19)  |  Perpetual (20)  |  Problem (490)  |  Say (228)  |  Scarcely (13)  |  Show (90)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Supply (46)  |  Think (341)  |  Treatise (32)  |  Trouble (72)  |  Understand (326)  |  Work (626)

The science of the Mediterranean is the epitome of the science of the world. The very name of that inland sea is the text from which the sermon on all other seas must be preached”
From Literary Papers (1855), 106. As quoted in On Early Explorations in the Mediterranean.In George Wilson and Archibald Geikie, Memoir of Edward Forbes F.R.S. (1861), 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Epitome (3)  |  Inland (3)  |  Mediterranean Sea (5)  |  Preach (11)  |  Science (2043)  |  Sea (187)  |  Sermon (6)

The student should read his author with the most sustained attention, in order to discover the meaning of every sentence. If the book is well written, it will endure and repay his close attention: the text ought to be fairly intelligible, even without illustrative examples. Often, far too often, a reader hurries over the text without any sincere and vigorous effort to understand it; and rushes to some example to clear up what ought not to have been obscure, if it had been adequately considered. The habit of scrupulously investigating the text seems to me important on several grounds. The close scrutiny of language is a very valuable exercise both for studious and practical life. In the higher departments of mathematics the habit is indispensable: in the long investigations which occur there it would be impossible to interpose illustrative examples at every stage, the student must therefore encounter and master, sentence by sentence, an extensive and complicated argument.
In 'Private Study of Mathematics', Conflict of Studies and other Essays (1873), 67.
Science quotes on:  |  Adequately (3)  |  Argument (81)  |  Attention (115)  |  Author (61)  |  Book (257)  |  Both (81)  |  Clear (97)  |  Close (66)  |  Complicated (61)  |  Consider (80)  |  Department (47)  |  Discover (196)  |  Effort (143)  |  Encounter (22)  |  Endure (20)  |  Example (92)  |  Exercise (64)  |  Extensive (18)  |  Fairly (4)  |  Far (154)  |  Ground (90)  |  Habit (107)  |  High (152)  |  Hurry (9)  |  Important (202)  |  Impossible (108)  |  Indispensable (27)  |  Intelligible (18)  |  Investigate (65)  |  Investigation (175)  |  Language (217)  |  Life (1124)  |  Long (172)  |  Master (93)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Mean (101)  |  Obscure (31)  |  Occur (43)  |  Often (106)  |  Order (239)  |  Practical (129)  |  Read (144)  |  Reader (38)  |  Repay (3)  |  Rush (18)  |  Scrupulous (5)  |  Scrutiny (14)  |  Seem (143)  |  Sentence (28)  |  Several (31)  |  Sincere (4)  |  Stage (54)  |  Student (201)  |  Studious (2)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (59)  |  Sustain (23)  |  Understand (326)  |  Value (240)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  Write (153)

There is a noble vision of the great Castle of Mathematics, towering somewhere in the Platonic World of Ideas, which we humbly and devotedly discover (rather than invent). The greatest mathematicians manage to grasp outlines of the Grand Design, but even those to whom only a pattern on a small kitchen tile is revealed, can be blissfully happy. … Mathematics is a proto-text whose existence is only postulated but which nevertheless underlies all corrupted and fragmentary copies we are bound to deal with. The identity of the writer of this proto-text (or of the builder of the Castle) is anybody’s guess. …
In 'Mathematical Knowledge: Internal, Social, and Cultural Aspects', Mathematics As Metaphor: Selected Essays (2007), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Builder (12)  |  Castle (5)  |  Copy (19)  |  Design (113)  |  Devoted (8)  |  Discover (196)  |  Existence (296)  |  Fragmentary (4)  |  Grand (27)  |  Grasp (59)  |  Great (524)  |  Guess (48)  |  Happy (46)  |  Humble (31)  |  Idea (577)  |  Identity (11)  |  Invent (50)  |  Kitchen (8)  |  Mathematician (364)  |  Mathematics (1149)  |  Noble (51)  |  Outline (11)  |  Pattern (79)  |  Platonic (3)  |  Postulate (31)  |  Tile (2)  |  Towering (4)  |  Vision (94)  |  World (892)  |  Writer (45)

There is no part of the country where in the summer you cannot get a sufficient supply of the best specimens. Teach your children to bring them in for themselves. Take your text from the brooks, not from the booksellers.
Lecture at a teaching laboratory on Penikese Island, Buzzard's Bay. Quoted from the lecture notes by David Starr Jordan, Science Sketches (1911), 146-147.
Science quotes on:  |  Bring (90)  |  Brook (6)  |  Child (245)  |  Country (144)  |  Specimen (17)  |  Summer (33)  |  Supply (46)  |  Teaching (107)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.