Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Boy

Boy Quotes (94 quotes)

La science, mon garçon, est faite d’erreurs, mais d’erreurs qu’il est bon de commettre, car elles mènent peu à peu à la vérité.
Science, my boy, is composed of errors, but errors that it is right to make, for they lead step by step to the truth.
Journey to the Centre of the Earth, translated by William Butcher (1992, 2008), 146.
Science quotes on:  |  Car (71)  |  Error (321)  |  Lead (384)  |  Research (664)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Truth (1057)

A boy is better unborn than untaught.
In Hialmer Day Gould, New Practical Spelling (1905), 27
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Education (378)  |  Unborn (5)

A fossil hunter needs sharp eyes and a keen search image, a mental template that subconsciously evaluates everything he sees in his search for telltale clues. A kind of mental radar works even if he isn’t concentrating hard. A fossil mollusk expert has a mollusk search image. A fossil antelope expert has an antelope search image. … Yet even when one has a good internal radar, the search is incredibly more difficult than it sounds. Not only are fossils often the same color as the rocks among which they are found, so they blend in with the background; they are also usually broken into odd-shaped fragments. … In our business, we don’t expect to find a whole skull lying on the surface staring up at us. The typical find is a small piece of petrified bone. The fossil hunter’s search therefore has to have an infinite number of dimensions, matching every conceivable angle of every shape of fragment of every bone on the human body.
Describing the skill of his co-worker, Kamoya Kimeu, who discovered the Turkana Boy, the most complete specimen of Homo erectus, on a slope covered with black lava pebbles.
Richard Leakey and Roger Lewin, Origins Reconsidered: In Search of What Makes Us Human (1992), 26.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Background (43)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Broken (56)  |  Business (149)  |  Color (137)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceivable (28)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Discover (553)  |  Everything (476)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expert (65)  |  Eye (419)  |  Find (998)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Good (889)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hunter (24)  |  Image (96)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Internal (66)  |  Kind (557)  |  Lava (9)  |  Lying (55)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mollusk (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Paleontology (31)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Radar (8)  |  Rock (161)  |  Search (162)  |  See (1081)  |  Skill (109)  |  Slope (9)  |  Small (477)  |  Sound (183)  |  Specimen (28)  |  Surface (209)  |  Usually (176)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

A New Arithmetic: “I am not much of a mathematician,” said the cigarette, “but I can add nervous troubles to a boy, I can subtract from his physical energy, I can multiply his aches and pains, I can divide his mental powers, I can take interest from his work and discount his chances for success.”
Anonymous
In Henry Ford, The Case Against the Little White Slaver (1914), Vol. 3, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Ache (7)  |  Addition (66)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Divide (75)  |  Energy (344)  |  Interest (386)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Nerve (79)  |  New (1216)  |  Pain (136)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Subtraction (4)  |  Success (302)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Work (1351)

A scientist is in a sense a learned small boy. There is something of the scientist in every small boy. Others must outgrow it. Scientists can stay that way all their lives.
Nobel banquet speech (10 Dec 1967). In Ragnar Granit (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1967 (1968).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outgrow (4)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Stay (25)  |  Way (1217)

A weird happening has occurred in the case of a lansquenet named Daniel Burghammer, of the squadron of Captain Burkhard Laymann Zu Liebenau, of the honorable Madrucci Regiment in Piadena, in Italy. When the same was on the point of going to bed one night he complained to his wife, to whom he had been married by the Church seven years ago, that he had great pains in his belly and felt something stirring therein. An hour thereafter he gave birth to a child, a girl. When his wife was made aware of this, she notified the occurrence at once. Thereupon he was examined and questioned. … He confessed on the spot that he was half man and half woman and that for more than seven years he had served as a soldier in Hungary and the Netherlands… . When he was born he was christened as a boy and given in baptism the name of Daniel… . He also stated that while in the Netherlands he only slept once with a Spaniard, and he became pregnant therefrom. This, however, he kept a secret unto himself and also from his wife, with whom he had for seven years lived in wedlock, but he had never been able to get her with child… . The aforesaid soldier is able to suckle the child with his right breast only and not at all on the left side, where he is a man. He has also the natural organs of a man for passing water. Both are well, the child is beautiful, and many towns have already wished to adopt it, which, however, has not as yet been arranged. All this has been set down and described by notaries. It is considered in Italy to be a great miracle, and is to be recorded in the chronicles. The couple, however, are to be divorced by the clergy.
Anonymous
'From Piadena in Italy, the 26th day of May 1601'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) The Fugger Newsletter (1970), 247-248. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg. This was footnoted in The Story of the Secret Service (1937), 698. https://books.google.com/books?id=YfssAAAAMAAJ Richard Wilmer Rowan - 1937
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Birth (147)  |  Both (493)  |  Captain (14)  |  Child (307)  |  Church (56)  |  Confess (42)  |  Consider (416)  |  Divorce (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happening (58)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hungary (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Organ (115)  |  Pain (136)  |  Passing (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Record (154)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Right (452)  |  Secret (194)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Something (719)  |  Water (481)  |  Wife (41)  |  Wish (212)  |  Woman (151)  |  Year (933)

About the year 1772, being then an apprentice to a wheel-wright, or wagon maker, I laboured to discover some means of propelling land carriages without animal power. … one of my brothers [told me of] blacksmith’s boys, who, for amusement, had stopped up the touch hole of a gun barrel, then put in about a gill of water, and rammed down a tight wad; after which they put the breech in the smith’s fire, when it discharged itself with as loud a crack as if it had been loaded with powder. It immediately occurred to me, that here was the power to propel any wagon, if I could only apply it.
From 'On the Origin of Steam Boats and Steam Wagons', Thomas Cooper (ed.), The Emporium of Arts and Sciences (Feb 1814), 2, No. 2, 205.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Animal (617)  |  Apply (160)  |  Apprentice (4)  |  Barrel (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biography (240)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Brother (43)  |  Carriage (10)  |  Crack (15)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Down (456)  |  Fire (189)  |  Gill (3)  |  Gun (9)  |  Gunpowder (16)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Labour (98)  |  Loud (9)  |  Maker (34)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Powder (9)  |  Power (746)  |  Propulsion (10)  |  Ram (3)  |  Steam Power (8)  |  Touch (141)  |  Wad (2)  |  Wagon (8)  |  Water (481)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Year (933)

Although as a boy I had dreamed about going into space, I had completely forgotten about that until one day I received a call from an astronaut, who suggested that I should join the program.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Astronaut (32)  |  Call (769)  |  Completely (135)  |  Dream (208)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Join (26)  |  Program (52)  |  Receive (114)  |  Space (500)  |  Suggest (34)

An incidental remark from a German colleague illustrates the difference between Prussian ways and our own. He had apparently been studying the progress of our various crews on the river, and had been struck with the fact that though the masters in charge of the boats seemed to say and do very little, yet the boats went continually faster and faster, and when I mentioned Dr. Young’s book to him, he made the unexpected but suggestive reply: “Mathematics in Prussia! Ah, sir, they teach mathematics in Prussia as you teach your boys rowing in England: they are trained by men who have been trained by men who have themselves been trained for generations back.”
In John Perry (ed.), Discussion on the Teaching of Mathematics (1901), 43. The discussion took place on 14 Sep 1901 at the British Association at Glasgow, during a joint meeting of the mathematics and physics sections with the education section. The proceedings began with an address by John Perry. Langley related this anecdote during the Discussion which followed.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Back (390)  |  Book (392)  |  Charge (59)  |  Colleague (50)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  England (40)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faster (50)  |  Generation (242)  |  German (36)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Little (707)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mention (82)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reply (56)  |  River (119)  |  Row (9)  |  Say (984)  |  Studying (70)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Train (114)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Young (227)

As a boy I had liked both drawing and physics, and I always abhorred the role of being a spectator. In 1908, when I was 15, I designed, built and flew a toy model airplane which won the then-famous James Gordon Bennett Cup. By 16 I had discovered that design could be fun and profitable, and this lesson has never been lost on me.
On the official Raymond Loewry website.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhorrence (9)  |  Airplane (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Career (75)  |  Design (195)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Fun (38)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Like (22)  |  Model (102)  |  Never (1087)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Profit (52)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Role (86)  |  Spectator (10)  |  Toy (19)  |  Win (52)

As a little boy, I showed an abnormal aptitude for mathematics this gift played a horrible part in tussles with quinsy or scarlet fever, when I felt enormous spheres and huge numbers swell relentlessly in my aching brain.
In Speak, Memory: An Autobiography Revisited (1999), 2
Science quotes on:  |  Abnormal (5)  |  Ache (7)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Brain (270)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Feel (367)  |  Fever (29)  |  Gift (104)  |  Horrible (10)  |  Huge (25)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Number (699)  |  Relentless (8)  |  Scarlet Fever (2)  |  Show (346)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Swell (4)

As Littlewood said to me once [of the ancient Greeks], they are not clever school boys or “scholarship candidates,” but “Fellows of another college.”
Quoted in G. H. Hardy, A Mathematician's Apology (1940, 1992), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Candidate (8)  |  Clever (38)  |  College (66)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Greek (107)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  School (219)

As to how far in advance of the first flight the man should know he’s going. I’m not in agreement with the argument that says word should be delayed until the last possible moment to save the pilot from developing a bad case of the jitters. If we don’t have the confidence to keep from getting clutched at that time, we have no business going at all. If I’m the guy going, I’ll be glad to get the dope as soon as possible. As for keeping this a big secret from us and having us all suited up and then saying to one man “you go” and stuffing him in and putting the lid on that thing and away he goes, well, we’re all big boys now.
As he wrote in an article for Life (14 Sep 1959), 38. In fact, he was the first to fly in Earth orbit on 20 Feb 1962, though Alan Shepard was picked for the earlier first suborbital flight.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Bad (180)  |  Big (48)  |  Business (149)  |  Case (99)  |  Clutch (2)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Delay (20)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dope (3)  |  First (1283)  |  Flight (98)  |  Glad (7)  |  Go (6)  |  Going (6)  |  Keep (101)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Possible (552)  |  Save (118)  |  Say (984)  |  Secret (194)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stuff (21)  |  Suit (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Word (619)

Before I was born, my father told my mother, “If it’s a boy, he’s going to be a scientist.”
In 'The Making of a Scientist', What Do You Care What Other People Think?": Further Adventures of a Curious Character (2001), 12. The editor of the the book, Ralph Leighton, footnoted that Feynman’s younger sister, Joan, has a Ph.D. in physics, in spite of this preconception that only boys are destined to be scientists.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Biography (240)  |  Birth (147)  |  Father (110)  |  Mother (114)  |  Scientist (820)

During the school period the student has been mentally bending over his desk; at the University he should stand up and look around. For this reason it is fatal if the first year at the University be frittered away in going over the old work in the old spirit. At school the boy painfully rises from the particular towards glimpses at general ideas; at the University he should start from general ideas and study their applications to concrete cases.
In 'The Rhythm of Education', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Concreteness (5)  |  Education (378)  |  First (1283)  |  Frittering (2)  |  General (511)  |  Generality (45)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Idea (843)  |  Look (582)  |  Old (481)  |  Particular (76)  |  Period (198)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rise (166)  |  School (219)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Stand (274)  |  Start (221)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  University (121)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Early in my school days a boy had a copy of the “Wonders of the World,” which I often read, and disputed with other boys about the veracity of some of the statements; and I believe that this book first gave me a wish to travel in remote countries, which was ultimately fulfilled by the voyage of the Beagle.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), 'Autobiography', The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin (1887, 1896), Vol. 1, 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Beagle (13)  |  Belief (578)  |  Book (392)  |  Copy (33)  |  Country (251)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Early (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Other (2236)  |  Read (287)  |  Remote (83)  |  School (219)  |  Statement (142)  |  Travel (114)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Veracity (2)  |  Voyage (11)  |  Wish (212)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

Ever since I was a boy, I’ve been fascinated by crazy science and such things as perpetual motion machines and logical paradoxes. I’ve always enjoyed keeping up with those ideas. I suppose I didn’t get into it seriously until I wrote my first book, Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science. I was influenced by the Dianetics movement, now called Scientology, which was then promoted by John Campbell in Astounding Science Fiction. I was astonished at how rapidly the thing had become a cult.
In Scot Morris, 'Interview: Martin Gardner', Omni, 4, No. 4 (Jan 1982), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Astonish (37)  |  Astonished (9)  |  Astounding (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Book (392)  |  Call (769)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Cult (4)  |  Enjoy (40)  |  Fad (10)  |  Fallacy (30)  |  Fascinate (12)  |  First (1283)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Logical (55)  |  Machine (257)  |  Motion (310)  |  Movement (155)  |  Name (333)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Perpetual Motion (14)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Write (230)

Faraday, who had no narrow views in regard to education, deplored the future of our youth in the competition of the world, because, as he said with sadness, “our school-boys, when they come out of school, are ignorant of their ignorance at the end of all that education.”
In Inaugural Presidential Address (9 Sep 1885) to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, Aberdeen, Scotland, 'Relations of Science to the Public Weal', Report to the Fifty-Fifth Meeting of the British Association (1886), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Competition (39)  |  Education (378)  |  End (590)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Future (429)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Regard (305)  |  Sadness (35)  |  School (219)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  View (488)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

Firefly meteorites blazed against a dark background, and sometimes the lightning was frighteningly brilliant. Like a boy, I gazed open-mouthed at the fireworks, and suddenly, before my eyes, something magical occurred. A greenish radiance poured from Earth directly up to the station, a radiance resembling gigantic phosphorescent organ pipes, whose ends were glowing crimson, and overlapped by waves of swirling green mist.
“Consider yourself very lucky, Vladimir,” I said to myself, “to have watched the northern lights.”
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Background (43)  |  Blaze (14)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crimson (4)  |  Dark (140)  |  Directly (22)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Firefly (7)  |  Firework (2)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Glow (14)  |  Green (63)  |  Light (607)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Lucky (13)  |  Magic (86)  |  Meteorite (9)  |  Mist (14)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Myself (212)  |  Northern Lights (2)  |  Occur (150)  |  Open (274)  |  Organ (115)  |  Overlap (8)  |  Phosphorescent (3)  |  Pipe (7)  |  Pour (10)  |  Radiance (7)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Say (984)  |  Something (719)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Station (29)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Swirl (10)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wave (107)

For me too, the periodic table was a passion. ... As a boy, I stood in front of the display for hours, thinking how wonderful it was that each of those metal foils and jars of gas had its own distinct personality.
[Referring to the periodic table display in the Science Museum, London, with element samples in bottles]
Letter to Oliver Sacks. Quoted in Oliver Sacks, Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood (2001), footnote, 203.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Display (56)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Element (310)  |  Foil (3)  |  Gas (83)  |  Hour (186)  |  Jar (9)  |  Metal (84)  |  Museum (31)  |  Passion (114)  |  Periodic Table (17)  |  Personality (62)  |  Sample (19)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stand (274)  |  Table (104)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Wonderful (149)

For my confirmation, I didn't get a watch and my first pair of long pants, like most Lutheran boys. I got a telescope. My mother thought it would make the best gift.
Quoted in 'Reach For The Stars', Time (17 Feb 1958), 71, 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  First (1283)  |  Gift (104)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mother (114)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trousers (5)  |  Watch (109)

How twins are born my discourse will explain thus. The cause is chiefly the nature of the womb in woman. For if it has grown equally on either side of its mouth, and if it opens equally, and also dries equally after menstruation, it can give nourishment, if it conceive the secretion of the man so that it immediately divides into both parts of the womb equally. Now if the seed secreted from both parents be abundant and strong, it can grow in both places, as it masters the nourishment that reaches it. In all other cases twins are not formed. Now when the secretion from both parents is male, of necessity boys are begotten in both places; but when from both it is female, girls are begotten. But when one secretion is female and the other male, whichever masters the other gives the embryo its sex. Twins are like one another for the following reasons. First, the places are alike in which they grow; then they were secreted together; then they grow by the same nourishment, and at birth they reach together the light of day.
Regimen, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Birth (147)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Divide (75)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Equally (130)  |  Explain (322)  |  Female (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Girl (37)  |  Grow (238)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Menstruation (3)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Secret (194)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sex (69)  |  Side (233)  |  Strong (174)  |  Together (387)  |  Twin (15)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)  |  Womb (24)

I believe that the useful methods of mathematics are easily to be learned by quite young persons, just as languages are easily learned in youth. What a wondrous philosophy and history underlie the use of almost every word in every language—yet the child learns to use the word unconsciously. No doubt when such a word was first invented it was studied over and lectured upon, just as one might lecture now upon the idea of a rate, or the use of Cartesian co-ordinates, and we may depend upon it that children of the future will use the idea of the calculus, and use squared paper as readily as they now cipher. … When Egyptian and Chaldean philosophers spent years in difficult calculations, which would now be thought easy by young children, doubtless they had the same notions of the depth of their knowledge that Sir William Thomson might now have of his. How is it, then, that Thomson gained his immense knowledge in the time taken by a Chaldean philosopher to acquire a simple knowledge of arithmetic? The reason is plain. Thomson, when a child, was taught in a few years more than all that was known three thousand years ago of the properties of numbers. When it is found essential to a boy’s future that machinery should be given to his brain, it is given to him; he is taught to use it, and his bright memory makes the use of it a second nature to him; but it is not till after-life that he makes a close investigation of what there actually is in his brain which has enabled him to do so much. It is taken because the child has much faith. In after years he will accept nothing without careful consideration. The machinery given to the brain of children is getting more and more complicated as time goes on; but there is really no reason why it should not be taken in as early, and used as readily, as were the axioms of childish education in ancient Chaldea.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Acquire (39)  |  Actually (27)  |  Afterlife (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Belief (578)  |  Brain (270)  |  Bright (79)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Careful (24)  |  Cartesian (3)  |  Chaldea (3)  |  Child (307)  |  Childish (20)  |  Children (200)  |  Cipher (2)  |  Close (69)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Coordinate (5)  |  Depend (228)  |  Depth (94)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Early (185)  |  Easily (35)  |  Easy (204)  |  Education (378)  |  Egyptian (5)  |  Enable (119)  |  Essential (199)  |  Faith (203)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Give (202)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immense (86)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Machinery (56)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Memory (134)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Notion (113)  |  Number (699)  |  Paper (182)  |  Person (363)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plain (33)  |  Property (168)  |  Rate (29)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reason (744)  |  Same (157)  |  Second Nature (3)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Square (70)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconsciously (7)  |  Underlie (18)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wondrous (21)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

I belonged to a small minority of boys who were lacking in physical strength and athletic prowess. ... We found our refuge in science. ... We learned that science is a revenge of victims against oppressors, that science is a territory of freedom and friendship in the midst of tyranny and hatred.
[Referring to the science club he founded to escape bullying at his preparatory school.]
Essay 'To Teach or Not to Teach'. In From Eros to Gaia (1992), Vol. 5, 191. Partial quote in Oliver Sacks, Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood (2001), 26. Different part of quote in Bill Swainson, Encarta Book of Quotations (2000), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Athletic (4)  |  Belong (162)  |  Escape (80)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Minority (21)  |  Physical (508)  |  Refuge (15)  |  Revenge (10)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Strength (126)  |  Territory (24)  |  Tyranny (14)  |  Victim (35)

I came into the room, which was half dark, and presently spotted Lord Kelvin in the audience and realised that I was in for trouble at the last part of my speech dealing with the age of the earth, where my views conflicted with his. To my relief, Kelvin fell fast asleep, but as I came to the important point, I saw the old bird sit up, open an eye and cock a baleful glance at me! Then a sudden inspiration came, and I said Lord Kelvin had limited the age of the earth, provided no new source (of energy) was discovered. That prophetic utterance refers to what we are now considering tonight, radium! Behold! the old boy beamed upon me.
Speech at the Royal Institution (1904). Quoted in Arthur S. Eve, Rutherford (1939), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Age Of The Earth (12)  |  Audience (26)  |  Beam (24)  |  Bird (149)  |  Cock (6)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Dark (140)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  Energy (344)  |  Eye (419)  |  Glance (34)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Last (426)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Lord (93)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Open (274)  |  Point (580)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Radium (25)  |  Relief (30)  |  Saw (160)  |  Speech (61)  |  Sudden (67)  |  Tonight (9)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Utterance (10)  |  View (488)

I couldn’t help picturing [the Steady State universe] as a sort of 1950s advertisement, with a pipe-smoking father sitting comfortably in his living room, next to the radiogram, with a wife knitting submissively in the background, and a small boy playing with Meccano on the carpet. The father would remove his pipe and twinkle knowledgeably as he said “Of course, I’m with Steady State Insurance,” and a caption underneath would say “You Know Where You Are With a STEADY STATE Policy.”
In short essay, 'The Origin of the Universe,' 1-2. Written after hearing Stephen Hawking’s lecture (2006) at Oxford, about the origin of the universe.
Science quotes on:  |  Advertisement (13)  |  Background (43)  |  Course (409)  |  Father (110)  |  Insurance (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Living (491)  |  Meccano (5)  |  Next (236)  |  Playing (42)  |  Policy (24)  |  Remove (45)  |  Say (984)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Small (477)  |  Smoking (27)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Steady State (6)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wife (41)

Isaac Newton Quote: like a boy playing on the seashore [pebbles]…whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me
Click image for larger 800 x 500px version
I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
First reported in Joseph Spence, Anecdotes, Observations and Characters, of Books and Men (1820), Vol. 1 of 1966 edn, sect. 1259, p. 462. Purported to have been addressed by Newton in the final year of his life (1727) to Chevalier Andrew Michael Ramsey (which conflicts with the Dictionary of National Biography article giving that he was in France at the time). Quoted in David Brewster, Memoirs of the Life, Writings, and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton (1855), Vol. 2, 407.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Do (1908)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Myself (212)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Pebble (25)  |  Play (112)  |  Playing (42)  |  Seashore (6)  |  Shell (63)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  World (1774)

I do not like to see all the fine boys turning to the study of law, instead of to the study of science or technology. … Japan wants no more lawyers now; and I think the professions of literature and of teaching give small promise. What Japan needs are scientific men; and she will need more and more of them every year.
In letter to Masanobu Ōtani (1894), collected in Elizabeth Bisland The Writings of Lafcadio Hearn (1922), Vol. 14, 273.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Japan (8)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Literature (103)  |  More (2559)  |  Profession (99)  |  Promise (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Technology (257)  |  Think (1086)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

I do not remember having felt, as a boy, any passion for mathematics, and such notions as I may have had of the career of a mathematician were far from noble. I thought of mathematics in terms of examinations and scholarships: I wanted to beat other boys, and this seemed to be the way in which I could do so most decisively.
In A Mathematician's Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Beat (41)  |  Career (75)  |  Do (1908)  |  Examination (98)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Noble (90)  |  Notion (113)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  Remember (179)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thought (953)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)

I don't know what your Company is feeling as of today about the work of Dr. Alice Hamilton on benzol [benzene] poisoning. I know that back in the old days some of your boys used to think that she was a plain nuisance and just picking on you for luck. But I have a hunch that as you have learned more about the subject, men like your good self have grown to realize the debt that society owes her for her crusade. I am pretty sure that she has saved the lives of a great many girls in can-making plants and I would hate to think that you didn't agree with me.
Letter to S. P. Miller, technical director of a company that sold solvents, 9 Feb 1933. Alice Hamilton papers, no. 40, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College. Quoted in Barbara Sicherman, Alice Hamilton: A Life in Letters (1984).
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Benzene (7)  |  Company (59)  |  Debt (13)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Girl (37)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hate (64)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Live (628)  |  Luck (42)  |  Making (300)  |  More (2559)  |  Nuisance (9)  |  Old (481)  |  Owe (71)  |  Plant (294)  |  Realize (147)  |  Self (267)  |  Society (326)  |  Subject (521)  |  Think (1086)  |  Today (314)  |  Work (1351)

I often get letters … from people who say … I never give credit to the almighty power that created nature. … I reply … “Well, it’s funny that the people, when they say that this is evidence of the Almighty, always quote beautiful things … orchids and hummingbirds and butterflies and roses.” But I always have to think too of a little boy sitting on the banks of a river in west Africa who has a worm boring through his eyeball, turning him blind before he’s five years old. And I … say, “Well, presumably the God you speak about created the worm as well,” and now, I find that baffling to credit a merciful God with that action. And therefore it seems to me safer to show things that I know to be truth, truthful and factual, and allow people to make up their own minds about the moralities of this thing, or indeed the theology of this thing.
From BBC TV, Life on Air (2002).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Africa (35)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Bank (31)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boring (7)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Hummingbird (4)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Know (1518)  |  Letter (109)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Orchid (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Power (746)  |  Quote (42)  |  Reply (56)  |  River (119)  |  Rose (34)  |  Say (984)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Show (346)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Speak (232)  |  Theology (52)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Worm (42)  |  Year (933)

I shall take as a starting point for our flight into space two contrasted statements about geography. The first is that of a boy who said that the earth is a ball filled inside with dirt and worms and covered all over on the outside with
'Genetic Geography: The Development of the Geographic Sense and Concept', Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 1920, 10, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Dirt (15)  |  Earth (996)  |  First (1283)  |  Flight (98)  |  Geography (36)  |  Outside (141)  |  Point (580)  |  Space (500)  |  Statement (142)  |  Two (937)  |  Worm (42)

I should object to any experimentation which can justly be called painful, for the purpose of elementary instruction ... [but I regret] a condition of the law which permits a boy to troll for pike, or set lines with live frog bait, for idle amusement; and, at the same time, lays the teacher of that boy open to the penalty of fine and imprisonment, if he uses the same animal for the purpose of exhibiting one of the most beautiful and instructive of physiological spectacles, the circulation in the web of the foot. ... [Maybe the frog is] inconvenienced by being wrapped up in a wet rag, and having his toes tied out ... But you must not inflict the least pain on a vertebrated animal for scientific purposes (though you may do a good deal in that way for gain or for sport) without due licence of the Secretary of State for the Home Department, granted under the authority of the Vivisection Act.
... [Yet, in] 1877, two persons may be charged with cruelty to animals. One has impaled a frog, and suffered the creature to writhe about in that condition for hours; the other has pained the animal no more than one of us would be pained by tying strings round his fingers, and keeping him in the position of a hydropathic patient. The first offender says, 'I did it because I find fishing very amusing,' and the magistrate bids him depart in peace; nay, probably wishes him good sport. The second pleads, 'I wanted to impress a scientific truth, with a distinctness attainable in no other way, on the minds of my scholars,' and the magistrate fines him five pounds.
I cannot but think that this is an anomalous and not wholly creditable state of things.
'On Elementary Instruction in Physiology'. Science and Culture (1882), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Animal (617)  |  Authority (95)  |  Bait (2)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Circulation (24)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creature (233)  |  Creditable (3)  |  Cruelty (23)  |  Deal (188)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Department (92)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Find (998)  |  Fine (33)  |  First (1283)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Frog (38)  |  Gain (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Grant (73)  |  Home (170)  |  Hour (186)  |  Idle (33)  |  Impress (64)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Law (894)  |  Live (628)  |  Magistrate (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Object (422)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peace (108)  |  Permit (58)  |  Person (363)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Regret (30)  |  Say (984)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Truth (23)  |  Set (394)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)  |  Sport (22)  |  State (491)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Vivisection (7)  |  Want (497)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wholly (88)

I think all museums should be directed toward 12-year-old boys. They’re the brightest group you can find and this is the age when you can arouse their curiosity and interest.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Arouse (12)  |  Brightest (12)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Direct (225)  |  Find (998)  |  Group (78)  |  Interest (386)  |  Museum (31)  |  Old (481)  |  Think (1086)  |  Year (933)

I was fascinated by fractional distillation as a method while still a school-boy, and built in the cellar of my home, which was my combined workshop and laboratory, distillation columns, packed with coke of graded size, some five feet in height. They were made from coffee tins (obtained from the kitchen), with the bottoms removed and soldered together! Experience with them served me in good stead and by the time I graduated I had a good understanding of the problems of fractional distillation.
Nobel Lectures in Chemistry (1999), Vol. 3, 359-360.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Coffee (19)  |  Coke (3)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Experience (467)  |  Good (889)  |  Home (170)  |  Kitchen (13)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Method (505)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Problem (676)  |  School (219)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tin (18)  |  Together (387)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Workshop (14)

I was thrown out of NYU in my freshman year … for cheating on my metaphysics final. You know, I looked within the soul of the boy sitting next to me.
As character Alvy Singer doing a stand-up comedy act to a college audience, in movie Annie Hall (1977). Screenplay by Woody Allen with Marshall Brickman, transcript printed in Four films of Woody Allen (1982), 53.
Science quotes on:  |  Cheating (2)  |  Examination (98)  |  Final (118)  |  Freshman (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Next (236)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Soul (226)  |  Thrown Out (2)  |  Year (933)

If all boys could be made to know that with every breath of cigarette smoke they inhale imbecility and exhale manhood … and that the cigarette is a maker of invalids, criminals and fools—not men—it ought to deter them some. The yellow finger stain is an emblem of deeper degradation and enslavement than the ball and chain.
Quoted in Henry Ford, The Case Against the Little White Slaver (1914), Vol. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ball (62)  |  Breath (59)  |  Chain (50)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Degradation (17)  |  Deterrent (2)  |  Emblem (4)  |  Enslavement (3)  |  Exhalation (2)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fool (116)  |  Imbecility (5)  |  Invalid (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Maker (34)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manhood (2)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Stain (9)  |  Yellow (30)

If at this moment I am not a worn-out, debauched, useless carcass of a man, if it has been or will be my fate to advance the cause of science, if I feel that I have a shadow of a claim on the love of those about me, if in the supreme moment when I looked down into my boy’s grave my sorrow was full of submission and without bitterness, it is because these agencies have worked upon me, and not because I have ever cared whether my poor personality shall remain distinct forever from the All from whence it came and whither it goes.
And thus, my dear Kingsley, you will understand what my position is. I may be quite wrong, and in that case I know I shall have to pay the penalty for being wrong. But I can only say with Luther, “Gott helfe mir, ich kann nichts anders [God help me, I cannot do otherwise].”
In Letter (23 Sep 1860) to Charles Kingsley, Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley (1901), 237.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Car (71)  |  Carcass (2)  |  Cause (541)  |  Claim (146)  |  Debauched (2)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Fate (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Forever (103)  |  God (757)  |  Grave (52)  |  Know (1518)  |  Look (582)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Personality (62)  |  Poor (136)  |  Remain (349)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Understand (606)  |  Whither (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

If I had my way every French boy would be required to take a trip to America as part of his education.
As quoted by H.M. Davidson, in System: The Magazine of Business (Apr 1922), 41, 446.
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Education (378)  |  French (20)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Trip (10)  |  Way (1217)

If we wish to imitate the physical sciences, we must not imitate them in their contemporary, most developed form; we must imitate them in their historical youth, when their state of development was comparable to our own at the present time. Otherwise we should behave like boys who try to copy the imposing manners of full-grown men without understanding their raison d’être, also without seeing that in development one cannot jump over intermediate and preliminary phases.
Gestalt Psychology (1929), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Copy (33)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Form (959)  |  Historical (70)  |  Imitate (17)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Jump (29)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Phase (36)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Present (619)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeing (142)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wish (212)  |  Youth (101)

Imagine a school-boy who has outgrown his clothes. Imagine the repairs made on the vestments where the enlarged frame had burst the narrow limits of the enclosure. Imagine the additions made where the projecting limbs had fairly and far emerged beyond the confines of the garment. Imagine the boy still growing, and the clothes, mended allover, now more than ever in want of mending—such is chemistry, and such is nomenclature.
Chemical Recreations (1834), 206, footnote.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Burst (39)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Enclosure (4)  |  Garment (13)  |  Growing (98)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Limit (280)  |  Mending (3)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  School (219)  |  Still (613)  |  Vestment (2)  |  Want (497)

In a class I was taking there was one boy who was much older than the rest. He clearly had no motive to work. I told him that, if he could produce for me, accurately to scale, drawings of the pieces of wood required to make a desk like the one he was sitting at, I would try to persuade the Headmaster to let him do woodwork during the mathematics hours—in the course of which, no doubt, he would learn something about measurement and numbers. Next day, he turned up with this task completed to perfection. This I have often found with pupils; it is not so much that they cannot do the work, as that they see no purpose in it.
In Mathematician's Delight (1943), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Class (164)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completed (30)  |  Course (409)  |  Desk (13)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Draw (137)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Hour (186)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Motive (59)  |  Next (236)  |  Number (699)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Persuade (11)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Required (108)  |  Rest (280)  |  Scale (121)  |  See (1081)  |  Sitting (44)  |  Something (719)  |  Task (147)  |  Try (283)  |  Turn (447)  |  Wood (92)  |  Woodwork (2)  |  Work (1351)

In the past, you wouldn’t have had any problem in getting a countryman to explain the difference between a blackbird and a song thrush, but you might have that difficulty with a kid now. Equally, if you asked a chap about gorillas in the 19th-century, he wouldn’t have heard of the creatures, but today an urban boy knows all about them.
Explaining how the success of nature documentaries may result in children who know more about gorillas than the wildlife in their own gardens. As reported by Adam Lusher in 'Sir David Attenborough', Daily Mail (28 Feb 2014).
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (33)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Blackbird (4)  |  Century (310)  |  Countryman (4)  |  Creature (233)  |  Difference (337)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Equally (130)  |  Explain (322)  |  Gorilla (18)  |  Kid (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Past (337)  |  Problem (676)  |  Song (37)  |  Thrush (2)  |  Today (314)  |  Urban (10)

It is certain that as a nation we are all smoking a great deal too much ... Smoking among boys—to whom it cannot possibly do any kind of good, while it may do a vast amount of active harm—is becoming prevalent to a most pernicious extent. ... It would be an excellent thing for the morality of the people could the use of “intoxicants and tobacco” be forbidden to all persons under twenty years of age. (1878)
In London Daily Telegraph (22 Jan 1878). Reprinted in English Anti-Tobacco Society and Anti-Narcotic League, Monthly letters of the Committee of the English Anti-Tobacco Society and Anti-Narcotic League 1878, 1879, 1880, (1 Feb 1878), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Certain (550)  |  Deal (188)  |  Do (1908)  |  Excellent (28)  |  Extent (139)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harm (39)  |  Kind (557)  |  Morality (52)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  People (1005)  |  Pernicious (7)  |  Person (363)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Prevalent (4)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  Twenty (4)  |  Use (766)  |  Vast (177)  |  Year (933)

It is curious to reflect on how history repeats itself the world over. Why, I remember the same thing was done when I was a boy on the Mississippi River. There was a proposition in a township there to discontinue public schools because they were too expensive. An old farmer spoke up and said if they stopped the schools they would not save anything, because every time a school was closed a jail had to be built.
It's like feeding a dog on his own tail. He'll never get fat. I believe it is better to support schools than jails.
Address at a meeting of the Berkeley Lyceum, New York (23 Nov 1900). Mark Twain's Speeches (2006), 69-70.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Better (486)  |  Build (204)  |  Close (69)  |  Closed (38)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discontinue (3)  |  Dog (70)  |  Education (378)  |  Expensive (10)  |  Farmer (32)  |  Fat (11)  |  Feed (27)  |  History (673)  |  Jail (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Public (96)  |  Remember (179)  |  River (119)  |  Save (118)  |  School (219)  |  Support (147)  |  Tail (18)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

It is supposed that the ancients were ignorant of the law in hydraulics, by which water, in a tube, will rise as high as the fountain-head; and hence they carried their stupendous aqueducts horizontally, from hill-top to hill-top, upon lofty arches, with an incredible expenditure of labor and money. The knowledge of a single law, now familiar to every well-instructed school-boy,— namely, that water seeks a level, and, if not obstructed, will find it,—enables the poorest man of the present day to do what once demanded the wealth of an empire. The beautiful fragments of the ancient Roman aqueducts, which have survived the ravage of centuries, are often cited to attest the grandeur and power of their builders. To me, they are monuments, not of their power, but of their weakness.
In Thoughts Selected From the Writings of Horace Mann (1872), 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Aqueduct (4)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Demand (123)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enable (119)  |  Expenditure (15)  |  Find (998)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  High (362)  |  Hydraulic (5)  |  Hydraulics (2)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Law (894)  |  Level (67)  |  Man (2251)  |  Money (170)  |  Monument (45)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Ravage (7)  |  Rise (166)  |  Roman (36)  |  School (219)  |  Seek (213)  |  Single (353)  |  Stupendous (13)  |  Top (96)  |  Water (481)  |  Weakness (48)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Will (2355)

Junior high school seemed like a fine idea when we invented it but it turned out to be an invention of the devil. We’re catching our boys in a net in which they’re socially unprepared. We put them in junior high school with girls who are two years ahead of them. There isn’t a thing they should have to do with girls at this age except growl at them.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Ahead (19)  |  Catch (31)  |  Devil (31)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fine (33)  |  Girl (37)  |  Growl (3)  |  High (362)  |  High School (11)  |  Idea (843)  |  Invent (51)  |  Invention (369)  |  Junior (6)  |  Net (11)  |  School (219)  |  Social (252)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Turn (447)  |  Turn Out (9)  |  Two (937)  |  Year (933)

Just think of the differences today. A young person gets interested in chemistry and is given a chemical set. But it doesn't contain potassium cyanide. It doesn't even contain copper sulfate or anything else interesting because all the interesting chemicals are considered dangerous substances. Therefore, these budding young chemists don't get a chance to do anything engrossing with their chemistry sets. As I look back, I think it is pretty remarkable that Mr. Ziegler, this friend of the family, would have so easily turned over one-third of an ounce of potassium cyanide to me, an eleven-year-old boy.
In Barbara Marinacci, Linus Pauling In His Own Words (1995), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Chemistry Set (3)  |  Consider (416)  |  Copper (25)  |  Danger (115)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Family (94)  |  Friend (168)  |  Gift (104)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Look (582)  |  Old (481)  |  Person (363)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Set (394)  |  Substance (248)  |  Think (1086)  |  Today (314)  |  Turn (447)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

Like almost every subject of human interest, this one [mathematics] is just as easy or as difficult as we choose to make it. A lifetime may be spent by a philosopher in discussing the truth of the simplest axiom. The simplest fact as to our existence may fill us with such wonder that our minds will remain overwhelmed with wonder all the time. A Scotch ploughman makes a working religion out of a system which appalls a mental philosopher. Some boys of ten years of age study the methods of the differential calculus; other much cleverer boys working at mathematics to the age of nineteen have a difficulty in comprehending the fundamental ideas of the calculus.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1902), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  All The Time (4)  |  Appall (2)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Choose (112)  |  Clever (38)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Differential Calculus (10)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Easy (204)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fill (61)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Ploughman (3)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remain (349)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Like thousands of other boys, I had a little chemical laboratory in our cellar and think that some of our friends thought me a bit crazy.
Quoted in 'Langmuir Winner Stumped Einstein”, New York Times (23 Aug 1931), N2.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Cellar (4)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Crazy (26)  |  Friend (168)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Little (707)  |  Other (2236)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)

Man … begins life as an ambiguous speck of matter which can in no way be distinguished from the original form of the lowest animal or plant. He next becomes a cell; his life is precisely that of the animalcule. Cells cluster round this primordial cell, and the man is so far advanced that he might be mistaken for an undeveloped oyster; he grows still more, and it is clear that he might even be a fish; he then passes into a stage which is common to all quadrupeds, and next assumes a form which can only belong to quadrupeds of the higher type. At last the hour of birth approaches; coiled within the dark womb he sits, the image of an ape; a caricature of the man that is to be. He is born, and for some time he walks only on all fours; he utters only inarticulate sounds; and even in his boyhood his fondness for climbing trees would seem to be a relic of the old arboreal life.
In The Martyrdom of Man (1876), 393.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ambiguous (13)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animalcule (12)  |  Ape (53)  |  Arboreal (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Belong (162)  |  Birth (147)  |  Caricature (6)  |  Cell (138)  |  Climbing (4)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Common (436)  |  Dark (140)  |  Development (422)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Form (959)  |  Grow (238)  |  Hour (186)  |  Image (96)  |  Inarticulate (2)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Next (236)  |  Old (481)  |  Oyster (11)  |  Plant (294)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Primordial (10)  |  Quadruped (4)  |  Relic (6)  |  Sit (48)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speck (23)  |  Stage (143)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tree (246)  |  Type (167)  |  Undeveloped (6)  |  Walk (124)  |  Way (1217)  |  Womb (24)

Mathematics—a wonderful science, but it hasn't yet come up with a way to divide one tricycle between three small boys.
In Bob Phillips, Phillips' Treasury of Humorous Quotations (2004), 171.
Science quotes on:  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Science (3879)  |  Small (477)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Wonderful (149)

May the Gods confound that man who first disclosed the hours, and who first, in fact, erected a sun-dial here; who, for wretched me, minced the day up into pieces. For when I was a boy, this stomach was the sun-dial, one much better and truer than all of these; when that used to warn me to eat. Except when there was nothing to eat. Now, even when there is something to eat, it’s not eaten, unless the sun chooses; and to such a degree now, in fact, is the city filled with sun-dials, that the greater part of the people are creeping along the streets shrunk up with famine.
Plautus
A fragment, preserved in the works of Aulus Gellius, as translated by Henry Thomas Riley, in The Comedies of Plautus (1890), Vol. 2, 517.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Choose (112)  |  City (78)  |  Confound (21)  |  Day (42)  |  Degree (276)  |  Dial (9)  |  Eat (104)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Famine (15)  |  First (1283)  |  God (757)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hour (186)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Nothing (966)  |  People (1005)  |  Something (719)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sundial (6)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wretched (8)

Most of the scientists in their twenties and thirties who went in 1939 to work on wartime problems were profoundly affected by their experience. The belief that Rutherford's boys were the best boys, that we could do anything that was do-able and could master any subject in a few days was of enormous value.
'The Effect of World War II on the Development of Knowledge in the Physical Sciences', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 1975, Series A, 342, 531.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experience (467)  |  Master (178)  |  Most (1731)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Subject (521)  |  Value (365)  |  War (225)  |  Wartime (4)  |  Work (1351)

Mr. Darwin in the Zoological Gardens. Frank Darwin told me his father was once standing near the hippopotamus cage when a little boy and girl, aged four and five, came up. The hippopotamus shut his eyes for a minute. “That bird’s dead,” said the little girl; “come along.”
Samuel Butler, Henry Festing Jones (ed.), The Note-Books of Samuel Butler (1917), 243. Francis Darwin was a son of Charles Darwin.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Bird (149)  |  Cage (12)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Francis Darwin (6)  |  Dead (59)  |  Eye (419)  |  Father (110)  |  Garden (60)  |  Girl (37)  |  Hippopotamus (2)  |  Little (707)  |  Minute (125)  |  Shut (41)  |  Zoo (8)

Mr. [Granville T.] Woods says that he has been frequently refused work because of the previous condition of his race, but he has had great determination and will and never despaired because of disappointments. He always carried his point by persistent efforts. He says the day is past when colored boys will be refused work only because of race prejudice. There are other causes. First, the boy has not the nerve to apply for work after being refused at two or three places. Second, the boy should have some knowledge of mechanics. The latter could be gained at technical schools, which should be founded for the purpose. And these schools must sooner or later be established, and thereby, we should be enabled to put into the hands of our boys and girls the actual means of livelihood.
From William J. Simmons, Men of Mark: Eminent, Progressive and Rising (1887), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  African American (6)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Being (1278)  |  Cause (541)  |  Color (137)  |  Condition (356)  |  Despair (40)  |  Determination (78)  |  Disappointment (16)  |  Effort (227)  |  Establishment (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Gain (145)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Livelihood (12)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Point (580)  |  Prejudice (87)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Race (268)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wood (92)  |  Work (1351)

Not only is science fiction an idea of tremendous import, but it is to be an important factor in making the world a better place to live in, through educating the public to the possibilities of science and the influence of science on life which, even today, are not appreciated byu the man on the street. ... If every man, woman, boy and girl, could be induced to read science fiction right along, there would certainly be a great resulting benefit to the community, in that the educational standards of its people would be raised tremendously. Science fiction would make people happier, give them a broader understanding of the world, make tham more tolerant.
Editorial, Science Fiction Week (1930). In Gary Westfahl, Hugo Gernsback and the Century of Science Fiction (2007), 166.
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (114)  |  Better (486)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Community (104)  |  Education (378)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Influence (222)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  People (1005)  |  Read (287)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Fiction (31)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Tremendous (26)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Woman (151)  |  World (1774)

Nothing could have been worse for the development of my mind than Dr. Butler's school, as it was strictly classical, nothing else being taught, except a little ancient geography and history. The school as a means of education to me was simply a blank. During my whole life I have been singularly incapable of mastering any language. Especial attention was paid to versemaking, and this I could never do well. I had many friends, and got together a good collection of old verses, which by patching together, sometimes aided by other boys, I could work into any subject.
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 8.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aid (97)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blank (11)  |  Classical (45)  |  Collection (64)  |  Development (422)  |  Do (1908)  |  Education (378)  |  Friend (168)  |  Geography (36)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Language (293)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Mastering (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poetry (143)  |  School (219)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Together (387)  |  Verse (11)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Now, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else. And root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir! ... In this life, we want nothing but Facts, sir: nothing but Facts!
Spoken by fictional character Thomas Gringrind, first paragraph, chap. 1, Hard Times, published in Household Words (1 Apr 1854), Vol. 36, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Children (200)  |  Education (378)  |  Everything (476)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Form (959)  |  Girl (37)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Plant (294)  |  Principle (507)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Root (120)  |  Root Out (4)  |  Service (110)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thomas Gradgrind (2)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

Obviously we biologists should fit our methods to our materials. An interesting response to this challenge has been employed particularly by persons who have entered biology from the physical sciences or who are distressed by the variability in biology; they focus their research on inbred strains of genetically homogeneous laboratory animals from which, to the maximum extent possible, variability has been eliminated. These biologists have changed the nature of the biological system to fit their methods. Such a bold and forthright solution is admirable, but it is not for me. Before I became a professional biologist, I was a boy naturalist, and I prefer a contrasting approach; to change the method to fit the system. This approach requires that one employ procedures which allow direct scientific utilization of the successful long-term evolutionary experiments which are documented by the fascinating diversity and variability of the species of animals which occupy the earth. This is easy to say and hard to do.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Allow (45)  |  Animal (617)  |  Approach (108)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Bold (22)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Change (593)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distress (9)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Document (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Employ (113)  |  Enter (141)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fit (134)  |  Focus (35)  |  Genetically (2)  |  Hard (243)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Material (353)  |  Maximum (12)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Professional (70)  |  Require (219)  |  Research (664)  |  Response (53)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  Species (401)  |  Strain (11)  |  Successful (123)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Variability (5)

On the afternoon of October 19, 1899, I climbed a tall cherry tree and, armed with a saw which I still have, and a hatchet, started to trim the dead limbs from the cherry tree. It was one of the quiet, colorful afternoons of sheer beauty which we have in October in New England, and as I looked towards the fields at the east, I imagined how wonderful it would be to make some device which had even the possibility of ascending to Mars. I was a different boy when I descended the tree from when I ascended for existence at last seemed very purposive.
In The Papers of Robert H. Goddard: 1898-1924 (1970), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (5)  |  Arm (81)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Climb (35)  |  Colorful (2)  |  Dead (59)  |  Descend (47)  |  Device (70)  |  Different (577)  |  Existence (456)  |  Field (364)  |  Hatchet (2)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Last (426)  |  Limb (8)  |  Look (582)  |  Mars (44)  |  New (1216)  |  New England (2)  |  October (4)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quiet (36)  |  Saw (160)  |  Start (221)  |  Still (613)  |  Tall (11)  |  Tree (246)  |  Trim (3)  |  Wonderful (149)

One of the first things a boy learns with a chemistry set is that he'll never get another one.
Anonymous
In Evan Esar, 20,000 Quips and Quotes, 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Chemistry Set (3)  |  First (1283)  |  Joke (83)  |  Learn (629)  |  Never (1087)  |  Set (394)  |  Thing (1915)

Praise up the humanities, my boy. That will make them think that you are broad-minded.
Said to R. V. Jones in 'Science, Technology and Civilisation', Bulletin of the Institute of Physics, 1962, 13, 101.
Science quotes on:  |  Humanities (20)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Think (1086)  |  Will (2355)

Science in England, in America, is jealous of theory, hates the name of love and moral purpose. There's revenge for this humanity. What manner of man does science make? The boy is not attracted. He says, I do not wish to be such a kind of man as my professor is.
In essay. 'Beauty', collected in The Conduct of Life (1860), 250.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  America (127)  |  Attract (23)  |  Do (1908)  |  England (40)  |  Hate (64)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Jealous (3)  |  Kind (557)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manner (58)  |  Moral (195)  |  Name (333)  |  Professor (128)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Revenge (10)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Theory (970)  |  Wish (212)

Several of my young acquaintances are in their graves who gave promise of making happy and useful citizens and there is no question whatever that cigarettes alone were the cause of their destruction. No boy living would commence the use of cigarettes if he knew what a useless, soulless, worthless thing they would make of him.
Quoted in Henry Ford, The Case Against the Little White Slaver (1914), Vol. 1, 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (37)  |  Alone (311)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Grave (52)  |  Happy (105)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Making (300)  |  Promise (67)  |  Question (621)  |  Soul (226)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Worthless (21)  |  Young (227)  |  Youth (101)

Since you are now studying geometry and trigonometry, I will give you a problem. A ship sails the ocean. It left Boston with a cargo of wool. It grosses 200 tons. It is bound for Le Havre. The mainmast is broken, the cabin boy is on deck, there are 12 passengers aboard, the wind is blowing East-North-East, the clock points to a quarter past three in the afternoon. It is the month of May. How old is the captain?
Letter (14 Aug 1853) to Louise Colet. As quote and cited in Robert A. Nowlan, Masters of Mathematics: The Problems They Solved, Why These Are Important, and What You Should Know about Them (2017), 271.
Science quotes on:  |  Afternoon (5)  |  Blow (44)  |  Blowing (22)  |  Boston (7)  |  Bound (119)  |  Break (99)  |  Broken (56)  |  Cabin (4)  |  Captain (14)  |  Cargo (5)  |  Clock (47)  |  Deck (3)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Gross (7)  |  Leave (130)  |  Month (88)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Old (481)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Past (337)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quarter (5)  |  Sail (36)  |  Ship (62)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Ton (21)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)  |  Wool (4)

Taking … the mathematical faculty, probably fewer than one in a hundred really possess it, the great bulk of the population having no natural ability for the study, or feeling the slightest interest in it*. And if we attempt to measure the amount of variation in the faculty itself between a first-class mathematician and the ordinary run of people who find any kind of calculation confusing and altogether devoid of interest, it is probable that the former could not be estimated at less than a hundred times the latter, and perhaps a thousand times would more nearly measure the difference between them.
[* This is the estimate furnished me by two mathematical masters in one of our great public schools of the proportion of boys who have any special taste or capacity for mathematical studies. Many more, of course, can be drilled into a fair knowledge of elementary mathematics, but only this small proportion possess the natural faculty which renders it possible for them ever to rank high as mathematicians, to take any pleasure in it, or to do any original mathematical work.]
In Darwinism, chap. 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Altogether (9)  |  Amount (151)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Class (164)  |  Confuse (19)  |  Course (409)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Difference (337)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drill (11)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fair (15)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fewer (8)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  First-Class (2)  |  Former (137)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Great (1574)  |  High (362)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Latter (21)  |  Less (103)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Original (58)  |  People (1005)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Population (110)  |  Possess (156)  |  Possible (552)  |  Probable (20)  |  Probably (49)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Rank (67)  |  Really (78)  |  Render (93)  |  Run (174)  |  School (219)  |  Slight (31)  |  Small (477)  |  Special (184)  |  Study (653)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Variation (90)  |  Work (1351)

The advanced course in physics began with Rutherford’s lectures. I was the only woman student who attended them and the regulations required that women should sit by themselves in the front row. There had been a time when a chaperone was necessary but mercifully that day was past. At every lecture Rutherford would gaze at me pointedly, as I sat by myself under his very nose, and would begin in his stentorian voice: “Ladies and Gentlemen”. All the boys regularly greeted this witticism with thunderous applause, stamping with their feet in the traditional manner, and at every lecture I wished I could sink into the earth. To this day I instinctively take my place as far back as possible in a lecture room.
In Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin: An Autobiography and Other Recollections (1996), 118.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Applause (9)  |  Attend (65)  |  Back (390)  |  Begin (260)  |  Course (409)  |  Earth (996)  |  Foot (60)  |  Front (16)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Lady (11)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Manner (58)  |  Myself (212)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Past (337)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Regulation (24)  |  Regulations (3)  |  Required (108)  |  Row (9)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Sink (37)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Student (300)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Traditional (15)  |  Voice (52)  |  Wish (212)  |  Witticism (2)  |  Woman (151)

The ancients devoted a lifetime to the study of arithmetic; it required days to extract a square root or to multiply two numbers together. Is there any harm in skipping all that, in letting the school boy learn multiplication sums, and in starting his more abstract reasoning at a more advanced point? Where would be the harm in letting the boy assume the truth of many propositions of the first four books of Euclid, letting him assume their truth partly by faith, partly by trial? Giving him the whole fifth book of Euclid by simple algebra? Letting him assume the sixth as axiomatic? Letting him, in fact, begin his severer studies where he is now in the habit of leaving off? We do much less orthodox things. Every here and there in one’s mathematical studies one makes exceedingly large assumptions, because the methodical study would be ridiculous even in the eyes of the most pedantic of teachers. I can imagine a whole year devoted to the philosophical study of many things that a student now takes in his stride without trouble. The present method of training the mind of a mathematical teacher causes it to strain at gnats and to swallow camels. Such gnats are most of the propositions of the sixth book of Euclid; propositions generally about incommensurables; the use of arithmetic in geometry; the parallelogram of forces, etc., decimals.
In Teaching of Mathematics (1904), 12.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Advance (280)  |  Algebra (113)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Assume (38)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Axiomatic (2)  |  Begin (260)  |  Book (392)  |  Camel (11)  |  Cause (541)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Extract (40)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Faith (203)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Generally (15)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Give (202)  |  Gnat (7)  |  Habit (168)  |  Harm (39)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Incommensurable (2)  |  Large (394)  |  Learn (629)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lifetime (31)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methodical (8)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiplication (43)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Number (699)  |  Orthodox (4)  |  Parallelogram (3)  |  Partly (5)  |  Pedantic (4)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Point (580)  |  Present (619)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Root (120)  |  School (219)  |  Schoolboy (9)  |  Severe (16)  |  Simple (406)  |  Skip (4)  |  Square (70)  |  Square Root (12)  |  Start (221)  |  Strain (11)  |  Stride (15)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Sum (102)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Teaching of Mathematics (39)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Together (387)  |  Training (80)  |  Trial (57)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

The belief that mathematics, because it is abstract, because it is static and cold and gray, is detached from life, is a mistaken belief. Mathematics, even in its purest and most abstract estate, is not detached from life. It is just the ideal handling of the problems of life, as sculpture may idealize a human figure or as poetry or painting may idealize a figure or a scene. Mathematics is precisely the ideal handling of the problems of life, and the central ideas of the science, the great concepts about which its stately doctrines have been built up, are precisely the chief ideas with which life must always deal and which, as it tumbles and rolls about them through time and space, give it its interests and problems, and its order and rationality. That such is the case a few indications will suffice to show. The mathematical concepts of constant and variable are represented familiarly in life by the notions of fixedness and change. The concept of equation or that of an equational system, imposing restriction upon variability, is matched in life by the concept of natural and spiritual law, giving order to what were else chaotic change and providing partial freedom in lieu of none at all. What is known in mathematics under the name of limit is everywhere present in life in the guise of some ideal, some excellence high-dwelling among the rocks, an “ever flying perfect” as Emerson calls it, unto which we may approximate nearer and nearer, but which we can never quite attain, save in aspiration. The supreme concept of functionality finds its correlate in life in the all-pervasive sense of interdependence and mutual determination among the elements of the world. What is known in mathematics as transformation—that is, lawful transfer of attention, serving to match in orderly fashion the things of one system with those of another—is conceived in life as a process of transmutation by which, in the flux of the world, the content of the present has come out of the past and in its turn, in ceasing to be, gives birth to its successor, as the boy is father to the man and as things, in general, become what they are not. The mathematical concept of invariance and that of infinitude, especially the imposing doctrines that explain their meanings and bear their names—What are they but mathematicizations of that which has ever been the chief of life’s hopes and dreams, of that which has ever been the object of its deepest passion and of its dominant enterprise, I mean the finding of the worth that abides, the finding of permanence in the midst of change, and the discovery of a presence, in what has seemed to be a finite world, of being that is infinite? It is needless further to multiply examples of a correlation that is so abounding and complete as indeed to suggest a doubt whether it be juster to view mathematics as the abstract idealization of life than to regard life as the concrete realization of mathematics.
In 'The Humanization of Teaching of Mathematics', Science, New Series, 35, 645-46.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abide (12)  |  Abound (17)  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attention (190)  |  Bear (159)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Birth (147)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Case (99)  |  Cease (79)  |  Central (80)  |  Change (593)  |  Chaotic (2)  |  Chief (97)  |  Cold (112)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Concept (221)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Constant (144)  |  Content (69)  |  Correlate (6)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deep (233)  |  Detach (5)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Dominant (26)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Dream (208)  |  Element (310)  |  Ralph Waldo Emerson (150)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Equation (132)  |  Especially (31)  |  Estate (5)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Example (94)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Explain (322)  |  Far (154)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Figure (160)  |  Find (998)  |  Finite (59)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Flux (21)  |  Fly (146)  |  Flying (72)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Functionality (2)  |  General (511)  |  Give (202)  |  Gray (8)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guise (5)  |  Handle (28)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Idealization (3)  |  Impose (22)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Indication (33)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinitude (3)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invariance (4)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Match (29)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Meanings (5)  |  Midst (7)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multiply (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Needless (4)  |  Never (1087)  |  Notion (113)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Painting (44)  |  Partial (10)  |  Passion (114)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Pervasive (5)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Presence (63)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Provide (69)  |  Pure (291)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Realization (43)  |  Regard (305)  |  Represent (155)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Rock (161)  |  Roll (40)  |  Save (118)  |  Scene (36)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sculpture (12)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Serving (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Space (500)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Stately (12)  |  Static (8)  |  Successor (14)  |  Suffice (7)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Supreme (71)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Tumble (2)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unto (8)  |  Variability (5)  |  Variable (34)  |  View (488)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

The following story is true. There was a little boy, and his father said, “Do try to be like other people. Don’t frown.” And he tried and tried, but could not. So his father beat him with a strap; and then he was eaten up by lions. Reader, if young, take warning by his sad life and death. For though it may be an honour to be different from other people, if Carlyle’s dictum about the 30 million be still true, yet other people do not like it. So, if you are different, you had better hide it, and pretend to be solemn and wooden-headed. Until you make your fortune. For most wooden-headed people worship money; and, really, I do not see what else they can do. In particular, if you are going to write a book, remember the wooden-headed. So be rigorous; that will cover a multitude of sins. And do not frown.
From 'Electromagnetic Theory, CXII', The Electrician (23 Feb 1900), Vol. 44, 615.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Beat (41)  |  Better (486)  |  Book (392)  |  Thomas Carlyle (38)  |  Cover (37)  |  Death (388)  |  Dictum (9)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Father (110)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Frown (5)  |  Hide (69)  |  Hiding (12)  |  Honour (56)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lion (22)  |  Little (707)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Person (363)  |  Reader (40)  |  Remember (179)  |  Remembering (7)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Sadness (35)  |  See (1081)  |  Sin (42)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Still (613)  |  Story (118)  |  Strap (3)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Warning (17)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worship (32)  |  Write (230)  |  Writing (189)  |  Young (227)

The gentleman [Mr. Taber] from New York says [agricultural research] is all foolish. Yes; it was foolish when Burbank was experimenting with wild cactus. It was foolish when the Wright boys went down to Kitty Hawk and had a contraption there that they were going to fly like birds. It was foolish when Robert Fulton tried to put a boiler into a sail boat and steam it up the Hudson. It was foolish when one of my ancestors thought the world was round and discovered this country so that the gentleman from New York could become a Congressman. (Laughter.) ... Do not seek to stop progress; do not seek to put the hand of politics on these scientific men who are doing a great work. As the gentleman from Texas points out, it is not the discharge of these particular employees that is at stake, it is all the work of investigation, of research, of experimentation that has been going on for years that will be stopped and lost.
Speaking (28 Dec 1932) as a member of the 72nd Congress, early in the Great Depression, in opposition to an attempt to eliminate a small amount from the agricultural appropriation bill. As quoted in 'Mayor-Elect La Guardia on Research', Science (1933), New Series, 78, No. 2031, 511.
Science quotes on:  |  Agriculture (68)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Become (815)  |  Bird (149)  |  Boat (16)  |  Boiler (7)  |  Cactus (3)  |  Christopher Columbus (15)  |  Contraption (2)  |  Country (251)  |  Discharge (19)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Down (456)  |  Employee (3)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Flight (98)  |  Fly (146)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Foolishness (10)  |  Robert Fulton (7)  |  Gentleman (26)  |  Government (110)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hand (143)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Kitty Hawk (4)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Loss (110)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  New (1216)  |  New York (15)  |  Point (580)  |  Politics (112)  |  Progress (465)  |  Research (664)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Sail (36)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Progress (14)  |  Seek (213)  |  Steam (80)  |  Stop (80)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Orville Wright (8)  |  Wilbur Wright (11)  |  Year (933)

The Good Spirit never cared for the colleges, and though all men and boys were now drilled in Greek, Latin, and Mathematics, it had quite left these shells high on the beach, and was creating and feeding other matters [science] at other ends of the world.
The Prose Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1870), 553.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beach (21)  |  Car (71)  |  College (66)  |  Education (378)  |  End (590)  |  Europe (43)  |  Good (889)  |  Greek (107)  |  High (362)  |  Latin (38)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Never (1087)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Shell (63)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Student (300)  |  World (1774)

The idiot, the Indian, the child and unschooled farmer’s boy stand nearer to the light by which nature is to be read, than the dissector or the antiquary.
Concluding sentence in 'History', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1903), 41.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Antiquary (4)  |  Child (307)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Farmer (32)  |  Idiot (22)  |  Indian (27)  |  Light (607)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Read (287)  |  Stand (274)

The important thing is not so much that every child should be taught, as that every child should have the opportunity of teaching itself. What does it matter if the pupil know a little more or a little less? A boy who leaves school knowing much, but hating his lessons, will soon have forgotten all he ever learned; while another who had acquired a thirst for knowledge, even if he had learned little, would soon teach himself more than the first ever knew.
[Elementary Education, Revised New Code (1871), Resolution.] Hansard's Parliamentary Debates (19 Jul 1872), vol. 207, 1463. Also in The Pleasures of Life (2007), 71.(Appleton, 1887), 183-184, or (2007), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Child (307)  |  Education (378)  |  First (1283)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Himself (461)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lesson (57)  |  Little (707)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Pupil (61)  |  School (219)  |  Soon (186)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

The injurious agent in cigarettes comes principally from the burning paper wrapper. The substance thereby formed is called “acrolein.” It has a violent action on the nerve centers, producing degeneration of the cells of the brain, which is quite rapid among boys. Unlike most narcotics, this degeneration is permanent and uncontrollable. I employ no person who smokes cigarettes.
[From the Laboratory of Thomas A. Edison, Orange, N.J., April 26, 1914.]
Quoted in Henry Ford, The Case Against the Little White Slaver (1914), Vol. 1, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Agent (70)  |  April (9)  |  Brain (270)  |  Burning (48)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Degeneration (10)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employment (32)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Injurious (14)  |  Injury (36)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nerve (79)  |  Orange (14)  |  Paper (182)  |  Permanent (64)  |  Person (363)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Smoker (3)  |  Substance (248)  |  Uncontrollable (4)  |  Violence (34)

They were very different men. Or boys. Someone said they were both like curious children—Einstein the merry boy, Rutherford the boisterous one. They were looking and working in different directions—Einstein looking outward, rather dreamily trying to discover where we came from, and Rutherford drilling deep to discover what we were.
A Force of Nature: The Frontier Genius of Ernest Rutherford (2007), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Children (200)  |  Curious (91)  |  Deep (233)  |  Different (577)  |  Direction (175)  |  Discover (553)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Looking (189)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Trying (144)

This tomb holds Diophantus Ah, what a marvel! And the tomb tells scientifically the measure of his life. God vouchsafed that he should be a boy for the sixth part of his life; when a twelfth was added, his cheeks acquired a beard; He kindled for him the light of marriage after a seventh, and in the fifth year after his marriage He granted him a son. Alas! late-begotten and miserable child, when he had reached the measure of half his father’s life, the chill grave took him. After consoling his grief by this science of numbers for four years, he reached the end of his life.
Epigram-problem for age at his death (84). Original Greek with English translation in The Greek Anthology (1918), Vol. 5, 92-93.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Acquired (78)  |  Beard (7)  |  Child (307)  |  Consoling (4)  |  Death (388)  |  End (590)  |  Father (110)  |  God (757)  |  Grant (73)  |  Grave (52)  |  Grief (18)  |  Late (118)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Marriage (39)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Measure (232)  |  Number (699)  |  Reach (281)  |  Science (3879)  |  Son (24)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tomb (15)  |  Year (933)

This was what the universities were turning out nowadays. The science-is-a-sacred-cow boys. People who believe you could pour mankind into a test-tube and titrate it, and come up with all the answers to the problems of the human race.
The Day the World Ended (1953). Quoted in Gary Westfahl, Science Fiction Quotations (2005), 320-321.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Cow (39)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Mankind (339)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  Race (268)  |  Research (664)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Science (3879)  |  Test (211)  |  University (121)

This will end the mythology of the dumb little Dutch boy with his stupid finger in the dike to save his country.
On completion of new, technologically advanced sea barrier in the Netherlands
NY Times 5 Oct 86
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Barrier (32)  |  Completion (22)  |  Country (251)  |  Dike (2)  |  Dumb (11)  |  Dutch (3)  |  End (590)  |  Finger (44)  |  Little (707)  |  Mythology (18)  |  New (1216)  |  Save (118)  |  Sea (308)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Technologically (2)  |  Will (2355)

Thus will the fondest dream of Phallic science be realized: a pristine new planet populated entirely by little boy clones of great scientific entrepreneurs free to smash atoms, accelerate particles, or, if they are so moved, build pyramids—without any social relevance or human responsibility at all.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accelerate (11)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Build (204)  |  Clone (8)  |  Dream (208)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Entrepreneur (5)  |  Fond (12)  |  Free (232)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Little (707)  |  Move (216)  |  New (1216)  |  Particle (194)  |  Planet (356)  |  Populate (4)  |  Pristine (4)  |  Pyramid (9)  |  Realize (147)  |  Relevance (16)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Smash (4)  |  Social (252)  |  Will (2355)

Towards the end of his life, he [Ernest Rutherford] said, “I’ve just finished reading some of my early papers, and you know, when I’d finished I said to myself, ‘Rutherford, my boy, you used to be a damned clever fellow.’”
As quoted in 'The Rutherford Memorial Lecture' (29 Mar 1939), Memorial Lectures Delivered Before the Chemical Society (1951), Vol. 4, 183. Although quoted without source, note that Tizard and Rutherford were friends.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Clever (38)  |  Early (185)  |  End (590)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Finish (59)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Myself (212)  |  Paper (182)  |  Reading (133)

Train yourselves. Don’t wait to be fed knowledge out of a book. Get out and seek it. Make explorations. Do your own research work. Train your hands and your mind. Become curious. Invent your own problems and solve them. You can see things going on all about you. Inquire into them. Seek out answers to your own questions. There are many phenomena going on in nature the explanation of which cannot be found in books. Find out why these phenomena take place. Information a boy gets by himself is enormously more valuable than that which is taught to him in school.
In 'Dr. Irving Langmuir', Boys' Life (Jul 1941), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (55)  |  All (4108)  |  Answer (366)  |  Become (815)  |  Book (392)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Find (998)  |  Finding (30)  |  Hand (143)  |  Himself (461)  |  Information (166)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  School (219)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solve (130)  |  Student (300)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Train (114)  |  Value (365)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

We know less about the sexual life of little girls than of boys. But we need not feel ashamed of this distinction; after all, the sexual life of adult women is a 'dark continent' for psychology.
The Question of Lay Analysis (1926), in James Strachey (ed.), The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (1959), Vol. 20, 212.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Continent (76)  |  Dark (140)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Girl (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Sexuality (11)

When I was a boy, I could cycle out of town and be in fields in ten minutes. I knew where the birds’ nests and badger setts were. Now children’s mothers would tell them they need someone to go with them, to make sure they weren’t molested by a sexual deviant.
Commenting on today’s increased anxiety with health and safety culture. As reported by Adam Lusher in 'Sir David Attenborough', Daily Mail (28 Feb 2014).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Badger (2)  |  Bicycle (10)  |  Bird (149)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Field (364)  |  Know (1518)  |  Minute (125)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nest (23)  |  Safety (54)  |  Sexual (26)  |  Tell (340)  |  Town (27)

When I was a boy, I read with great interest but skepticism about as magic lamp which was used with success by a certain Aladdin. Today I have no skepticism whatsoever about the magic of the xenon flash lamp which we use so effectively for many purposes.
In Electronic Flash, Strobe (1970), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Effective (59)  |  Flash (49)  |  Great (1574)  |  Interest (386)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Magic (86)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Read (287)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Success (302)  |  Today (314)  |  Use (766)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Xenon (5)

When I was a small boy [my father] used to sit me on his lap and read to me from the [Encyclopaedia] Britannica … say, about … the Tyrannosaurus rex, and it would say something like, “This dinosaur is twenty-five feet high and its head is six feet across.” My father would stop reading and say, “Now, let’s see what that means. That would mean that if he stood in our front yard, he would be tall enough to put his head through our window up here.” (We were on the second floor.) “But his head would be too wide to fit in the window.” Everything he read to me he would translate as best he could into some reality. …
In 'The Making of a Scientist', What Do You Care What Other People Think?": Further Adventures of a Curious Character (2001), 12-13. I learned from my father to translate: everything I read I try to figure out what it really means, what it’s really saying.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Best (459)  |  Dinosaur (26)  |  Enough (340)  |  Everything (476)  |  Father (110)  |  Fit (134)  |  Head (81)  |  Height (32)  |  High (362)  |  Lap (9)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Means (579)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reality (261)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Small (477)  |  Something (719)  |  Through (849)  |  Translate (19)  |  Tyrannosaurus Rex (2)  |  Wide (96)  |  Width (5)  |  Window (58)

When the boy begins to understand that the visible point is preceded by an invisible point, that the shortest distance between two points is conceived as a straight line before it is ever drawn with the pencil on paper, he experiences a feeling of pride, of satisfaction. And justly so, for the fountain of all thought has been opened to him, the difference between the ideal and the real, potentia et actu, has become clear to him; henceforth the philosopher can reveal him nothing new, as a geometrician he has discovered the basis of all thought.
In Sprüche in Reimen. Sprüche in Prosa. Ethisches (1850), Vol. 3, 214. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 67. From the original German, “Wenn der knabe zu begreifen anfängt, daß einem sichtbaren Punkte ein unsichtbarer vorhergehen müsse, daß der nächste Weg zwischen zwei Punkten schon als Linie gedacht werde, ehe sie mit dem Bleistift aufs Papier gezogen wird, so fühlt er einen gewissen Stolz, ein Behagen. Und nicht mit Unrecht; denn ihm ist die Quelle alles Denkens aufgeschlossen, Idee und Verwirklichtes, potentia et actu, ist ihm klargeworden; der Philosoph entdeckt ihm nichts Neues; dem Geometer war von seiner Seite der Grund alles Denkens aufgegangen.” The Latin phrase, “potentia et actu” means “potentiality and actuality”.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Clear (100)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distance (161)  |  Draw (137)  |  Experience (467)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fountain (16)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Justly (6)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Point (580)  |  Potentia (3)  |  Precede (23)  |  Pride (78)  |  Real (149)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Shortest (16)  |  Shortest Distance (2)  |  Straight (73)  |  Straight Line (30)  |  Thought (953)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Visible (84)

You must not say that this cannot be, or that that is contrary to nature. You do not know what Nature is, or what she can do; and nobody knows; not even Sir Roderick Murchison, or Professor Huxley, or Mr. Darwin, or Professor Faraday, or Mr. Grove, or any other of the great men whom good boys are taught to respect. They are very wise men; and you must listen respectfully to all they say: but even if they should say, which I am sure they never would, “That cannot exist. That is contrary to nature,” you must wait a little, and see; for perhaps even they may be wrong.
The Water-babies (1886), 81.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Sir William Robert Grove (5)  |  Thomas Henry Huxley (126)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Know (1518)  |  Listen (73)  |  Little (707)  |  Sir Roderick Impey Murchison (9)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Sir Richard Owen (15)  |  Professor (128)  |  Proof (287)  |  Respect (207)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Wise (131)  |  Wrong (234)

You’re aware the boy failed my grade school math class, I take it? And not that many years later he’s teaching college. Now I ask you: Is that the sorriest indictment of the American educational system you ever heard? [pauses to light cigarette.] No aptitude at all for long division, but never mind. It’s him they ask to split the atom. How he talked his way into the Nobel prize is beyond me. But then, I suppose it’s like the man says, it’s not what you know...
Karl Arbeiter (former teacher of Albert Einstein)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  American (46)  |  Aptitude (19)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atom (355)  |  Aware (31)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Cigarette (24)  |  Class (164)  |  College (66)  |  Division (65)  |  Educational (7)  |  Fail (185)  |  Grade (11)  |  Hear (139)  |  Indictment (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Pause (6)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Split (13)  |  Suppose (156)  |  System (537)  |  Talk (100)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

[As a young teenager] Galois read [Legendre's] geometry from cover to cover as easily as other boys read a pirate yarn.
Men of Mathematics (1937, 1986), 364.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Book (392)  |  Évariste Galois (4)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Adrien-Marie Legendre (3)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pirate (2)  |  Read (287)  |  Young (227)

[I]magine you want to know the sex of your unborn child. There are several approaches. You could, for example, do what the late film star ... Cary Grant did before he was an actor: In a carnival or fair or consulting room, you suspend a watch or a plumb bob above the abdomen of the expectant mother; if it swings left-right it's a boy, and if it swings forward-back it's a girl. The method works one time in two. Of course he was out of there before the baby was born, so he never heard from customers who complained he got it wrong. ... But if you really want to know, then you go to amniocentesis, or to sonograms; and there your chance of being right is 99 out of 100. ... If you really want to know, you go to science.
In 'Wonder and Skepticism', Skeptical Enquirer (Jan-Feb 1995), 19, No. 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abdomen (5)  |  Actor (6)  |  Approach (108)  |  Baby (28)  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Birth (147)  |  Carnival (2)  |  Chance (239)  |  Child (307)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Course (409)  |  Customer (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fair (15)  |  Forward (102)  |  Girl (37)  |  Grant (73)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Late (118)  |  Method (505)  |  Mother (114)  |  Never (1087)  |  Pendulum (17)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sex (69)  |  Star (427)  |  Swing (11)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Unborn (5)  |  Want (497)  |  Watch (109)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)

[Reading a cartoon story,] the boy favored reading over reality. Adults might have characterized him in any number of negative ways—as uninquisitive, uninvolved, apathetic about the world around him and his place in it. I’ve often wondered: Are many adults much different when they read the scriptures of their respective faiths?
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Adult (19)  |  Apathetic (2)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Different (577)  |  Faith (203)  |  Favor (63)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Involved (90)  |  Negative (63)  |  Number (699)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reality (261)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Story (118)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

’Tis a short sight to limit our faith in laws to those of gravity, of chemistry, of botany, and so forth. Those laws do not stop where our eyes lose them, but push the same geometry and chemistry up into the invisible plane of social and rational life, so that, look where we will, in a boy's game, or in the strifes of races, a perfect reaction, a perpetual judgment keeps watch and ward.
From 'Worship', The Conduct of Life (1860) collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1866), Vol.2, 401.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Botany (57)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  Game (101)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Look (582)  |  Lose (159)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Plane (20)  |  Push (62)  |  Race (268)  |  Rational (90)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Short (197)  |  Sight (132)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Life (8)  |  Stop (80)  |  Strife (9)  |  Ward (7)  |  Watch (109)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.