Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index B > Category: Bold

Bold Quotes (22 quotes)

From thus meditating on the great similarity of the structure of the warm-blooded animals, and at the same time of the great changes they undergo both before and after their nativity; and by considering in how minute a portion of time many of the changes of animals above described have been produced; would it be too bold to imagine that, in the great length of time since the earth began to exist, perhaps millions of ages before the commencement of the history of mankind would it be too bold to imagine that all warm-blooded animals have arisen from one living filament, which THE GREAT FIRST CAUSE endued with animality, with the power of acquiring new parts, attended with new propensities, directed by irritations, sensations, volitions and associations, and thus possessing the faculty of continuing to improve by its own inherent activity, and of delivering down these improvements by generation to its posterity, world without end!
Zoonomia, Or, The Laws of Organic Life, in three parts (1803), Vol. 1, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Association (46)  |  Attend (65)  |  Blood (134)  |  Both (493)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Commencement (14)  |  Direct (225)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Filament (4)  |  First (1283)  |  Generation (242)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mankind (13)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Living (491)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Minute (125)  |  New (1216)  |  Portion (84)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Power (746)  |  Produced (187)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Small (477)  |  Structure (344)  |  Time (1877)  |  Volition (3)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warm-Blooded (3)  |  World (1774)

Prospero: Hast thou, spirit,
Performed, to point, the tempest that I bade thee?
Ariel: To every article.
I boarded the king’s ship. Now on the beak,
Now in the waist, the deck, in every cabin,
I flamed amazement.
Sometime I’d divide
And burn in many places; on the topmast,
The yards, and bowsprit would I flame distinctly,
Then meet and join. Jove’s lightnings, the precursors
O’ th’ dreadful thunderclaps, more momentary
And sight-outrunning were not. The fire and cracks
Of sulphurous roaring the most mighty Neptune
Seem to besiege, and make his bold waves tremble;
Yea, his dread trident shake.
In The Tempest (1611), Act 1, Scene 2, line 193-206.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Amazement (15)  |  Burn (87)  |  Divide (75)  |  Dreadful (14)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flame (40)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neptune (13)  |  Perform (121)  |  Point (580)  |  Precursor (5)  |  Shake (41)  |  Ship (62)  |  Sight (132)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Sulphur (18)  |  Tempest (6)  |  Thunder (20)  |  Wave (107)

A Dr van’t Hoff of the veterinary college at Utrecht, appears to have no taste for exact chemical investigation. He finds it a less arduous task to mount Pegasus (evidently borrowed from the veterinary school) and to proclaim in his La Chemie dans l’espace how, during his bold fight to the top of the chemical Parnassus, the atoms appeared to him to have grouped themselves together throughout universal space. … I should have taken no notice of this matter had not Wislicenus oddly enough written a preface to the pamphlet, and not by way of a joke but in all seriousness recommended it a worthwhile performance.
'Signs of the Times', Journal fur Praktische Chemie, 15, 473. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Biography (240)  |  Borrow (30)  |  Chemical (292)  |  College (66)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Joke (83)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mount (42)  |  Notice (77)  |  Performance (48)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Recommend (24)  |  School (219)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Space (500)  |  Task (147)  |  Taste (90)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Together (387)  |  Top (96)  |  Universal (189)  |  Way (1217)  |  Johannes Wislicenus (4)  |  Worthwhile (18)

But when we face the great questions about gravitation Does it require time? Is it polar to the 'outside of the universe' or to anything? Has it any reference to electricity? or does it stand on the very foundation of matter–mass or inertia? then we feel the need of tests, whether they be comets or nebulae or laboratory experiments or bold questions as to the truth of received opinions.
Letter to Michael Faraday, 9 Nov 1857. In P. M. Harman (ed.), The Scientific Letters and Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1990), Vol. 1, 1846-1862, 551-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Comet (54)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Face (212)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inertia (14)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Mass (157)  |  Matter (798)  |  Nebula (16)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Outside (141)  |  Polar (12)  |  Question (621)  |  Require (219)  |  Stand (274)  |  Test (211)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)

Freedom lies in being bold.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Lie (364)

However far the calculating reason of the mathematician may seem separated from the bold flight of the artist’s phantasy, it must be remembered that these expressions are but momentary images snatched arbitrarily from among the activities of both. In the projection of new theories the mathematician needs as bold and creative a phantasy as the productive artist, and in the execution of the details of a composition the artist too must calculate dispassionately the means which are necessary for the successful consummation of the parts. Common to both is the creation, the generation, of forms out of mind.
From Die Entwickelung der Mathematik im Zusammenhange mit der Ausbreitung der Kultur (1893), 4. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 185. From the original German, “Wie weit auch der rechnende Verstand des Mathematikers von dem kühnen Fluge der Phantasie des Künstlers getrennt zu sein scheint, so bezeichnen diese Ausdrücke doch blosse Augenblicksbilder, die willkürlich aus der Thätigkeit Beider herausgerissen sind. Bei dem Entwurfe neuer Theorieen bedarf der Mathematiker einer ebenso kühnen und schöpferischen Phantasie wie der schaffende Künstler, und bei der Ausführung der Einzelheiten eines Werkes muss auch der Künstler kühl alle Mittel berechnen, welche zum Gelingen der Theile erforderlich sind. Gemeinsam ist Beiden die Hervorbringung, die Erzeugung der Gebilde aus dem Geiste.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Artist (90)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Common (436)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Detail (146)  |  Dispassionate (8)  |  Execution (25)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fantasy (14)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Image (96)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Momentary (4)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Productive (32)  |  Projection (5)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remember (179)  |  Separate (143)  |  Snatch (13)  |  Successful (123)  |  Theory (970)

However far the mathematician’s calculating senses seem to be separated from the audacious flight of the artist’s imagination, these manifestations refer to mere instantaneous images, which have been arbitrarily torn from the operation of both. In designing new theories, the mathematician needs an equally bold and inspired imagination as creative as the artist, and in carrying out the details of a work the artist must unemotionally reckon all the resources necessary for the success of the parts. Common to both is the fabrication, the creation of the structure from the intellect.
From Die Entwickelung der Mathematik im Zusammenhange mit der Ausbreitung der Kultur (1893), 4. Translated by Webmaster using online resources. From the original German, “Wie weit auch der rechnende Verstand des Mathematikers von dem kühnen Fluge der Phantasie des Künstlers getrennt zu sein scheint, so bezeichnen diese Ausdrücke doch blosse Augenblicksbilder, die willkürlich aus der Thätigkeit Beider herausgerissen sind. Bei dem Entwurfe neuer Theorieen bedarf der Mathematiker einer ebenso kühnen und schöpferischen Phantasie wie der schaffende Künstler, und bei der Ausführung der Einzelheiten eines Werkes muss auch der Künstler kühl alle Mittel berechnen, welche zum Gelingen der Theile erforderlich sind. Gemeinsam ist Beiden die Hervorbringung, die Erzeugung der Gebilde aus dem Geiste.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Artist (90)  |  Audacious (4)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Carrying Out (13)  |  Common (436)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Design (195)  |  Detail (146)  |  Equally (130)  |  Fabrication (2)  |  Flight (98)  |  Image (96)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Instantaneous (3)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mere (84)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Operation (213)  |  Part (222)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Refer (14)  |  Resource (63)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Structure (344)  |  Success (302)  |  Tear (42)  |  Theory (970)  |  Torn (17)  |  Work (1351)

Invention is an Heroic thing, and plac'd above the reach of a low, and vulgar Genius. It requires an active, a bold, a nimble, a restless mind: a thousand difficulties must be contemn'd with which a mean heart would be broken: many attempts must be made to no purpose: much Treasure must sometimes be scatter'd without any return: much violence, and vigour of thoughts must attend it: some irregularities, and excesses must be granted it, that would hardly be pardon'd by the severe Rules of Prudence.
The History of the Royal Society (1667), 392.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Activity (210)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attention (190)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Broken (56)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Excess (22)  |  Genius (284)  |  Grant (73)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Invention (369)  |  Irregularity (11)  |  Low (80)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pardon (7)  |  Prudence (4)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reach (281)  |  Require (219)  |  Restlessness (7)  |  Return (124)  |  Rule (294)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Vigour (18)  |  Violence (34)  |  Vulgar (33)

It was my good fortune to be linked with Mme. Curie through twenty years of sublime and unclouded friendship. I came to admire her human grandeur to an ever growing degree. Her strength, her purity of will, her austerity toward herself, her objectivity, her incorruptible judgement— all these were of a kind seldom found joined in a single individual... The greatest scientific deed of her life—proving the existence of radioactive elements and isolating them—owes its accomplishment not merely to bold intuition but to a devotion and tenacity in execution under the most extreme hardships imaginable, such as the history of experimental science has not often witnessed.
Out of My Later Years (1950), 227-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Austerity (3)  |  Marie Curie (32)  |  Deed (34)  |  Degree (276)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Element (310)  |  Execution (25)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Good (889)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Growing (98)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Owe (71)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Single (353)  |  Strength (126)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Tenacity (10)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)  |  Witness (54)  |  Year (933)

I’d disband NASA for 10 years and take half its budget to avert natural disasters. We could do it, we’ve got the technology. I'd take the other half to deal with disease and suffering. The time has come to do something bold instead of buying wheelchairs.
Quoted in Jennifer Kay 'Neurosurgeon Barth Green: Football player's treatment available to all', Associated Press news report, USA Today website (posted 27 Sep 2007).
Science quotes on:  |  Deal (188)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  NASA (11)  |  Natural (796)  |  Neurosurgery (3)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Something (719)  |  Suffering (67)  |  Technology (257)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Has Come (8)  |  Year (933)

Mathematics is of two kinds, Rigorous and Physical. The former is Narrow: the latter Bold and Broad. To have to stop to formulate rigorous demonstrations would put a stop to most physico-mathematical inquiries. Am I to refuse to eat because I do not fully understand the mechanism of digestion?
As quoted by Charles Melbourne Focken in Dimensional Methods and Their Applications (1953), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (27)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Digestion (28)  |  Do (1908)  |  Eat (104)  |  Eating (45)  |  Former (137)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Kind (557)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Most (1731)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Physical (508)  |  Refusal (22)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Rigorous (48)  |  Stop (80)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)

Obviously we biologists should fit our methods to our materials. An interesting response to this challenge has been employed particularly by persons who have entered biology from the physical sciences or who are distressed by the variability in biology; they focus their research on inbred strains of genetically homogeneous laboratory animals from which, to the maximum extent possible, variability has been eliminated. These biologists have changed the nature of the biological system to fit their methods. Such a bold and forthright solution is admirable, but it is not for me. Before I became a professional biologist, I was a boy naturalist, and I prefer a contrasting approach; to change the method to fit the system. This approach requires that one employ procedures which allow direct scientific utilization of the successful long-term evolutionary experiments which are documented by the fascinating diversity and variability of the species of animals which occupy the earth. This is easy to say and hard to do.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Allow (45)  |  Animal (617)  |  Approach (108)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Boy (94)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Change (593)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distress (9)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Document (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Employ (113)  |  Enter (141)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fit (134)  |  Focus (35)  |  Genetically (2)  |  Hard (243)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Material (353)  |  Maximum (12)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Professional (70)  |  Require (219)  |  Research (664)  |  Response (53)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  Species (401)  |  Strain (11)  |  Successful (123)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Variability (5)

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“I’ll move the world,” quoth he;
“My England’s high, and rich, and great,
But greater she shall be !”
And he call’d for the pick, and he call’d for the spade,
And he call’d for his miners bold;
“ And it’s dig,” he said, “in the deep, deep earth;
You’ll find my treasures better worth
Than mines of Indian gold!”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul,
Yet not content was he;
And he said, “I’ve found what I’ve desired,
Though ’tis but one of three.”
And he call’d for water, he call’d for fire,
For smiths and workmen true:
“Come, build me engines great and strong ;
We’ll have,” quoth he, “a change ere long;
We’ll try what Steam can do.”

Old King Coal was a merry old soul:
“’Tis fairly done,” quoth he,
When he saw the myriad wheels at work
O’er all the land and sea.
They spared the bones and strength of men,
They hammer’d, wove, and spun;
There was nought too great, too mean, or small,
The giant Steam had power for all;—
His task was never done.
From song, 'Old King Coal' (1846), collected in The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay: Now for the First Time Collected Complete in One Volume (1876), 565. To the melody of 'Old King Cole'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Better (486)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Bone (95)  |  Build (204)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Coal (57)  |  Deep (233)  |  Dig (21)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Engine (98)  |  Find (998)  |  Fire (189)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gold (97)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Hammer (25)  |  High (362)  |  Indian (27)  |  Industrial Revolution (10)  |  Long (790)  |  Loom (20)  |  Machine (257)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mine (76)  |  Miner (9)  |  Move (216)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Pick (16)  |  Power (746)  |  Railroad (32)  |  Saw (160)  |  Sea (308)  |  Small (477)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spade (3)  |  Steam (80)  |  Strength (126)  |  Strong (174)  |  Task (147)  |  Transport (30)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Try (283)  |  Water (481)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Work (1351)  |  Workman (13)  |  World (1774)  |  Worth (169)

The effort of the economist is to see, to picture the interplay of economic elements. The more clearly cut these elements appear in his vision, the better; the more elements he can grasp and hold in his mind at once, the better. The economic world is a misty region. The first explorers used unaided vision. Mathematics is the lantern by which what before was dimly visible now looms up in firm, bold outlines. The old phantasmagoria disappear. We see better. We also see further.
In Mathematical Investigations in the Theory of Value and Prices (1892), 119.
Science quotes on:  |  Appear (118)  |  Better (486)  |  Clear (100)  |  Cut (114)  |  Dim (8)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Economic (81)  |  Economist (17)  |  Effort (227)  |  Element (310)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Far (154)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hold (95)  |  Interplay (7)  |  Lantern (8)  |  Loom (20)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Misty (6)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Outline (11)  |  Phantasmagoria (3)  |  Picture (143)  |  Region (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Unaided (2)  |  Visible (84)  |  Vision (123)  |  World (1774)

The empirical basis of objective science has nothing “absolute” about it. Science does not rest upon solid bedrock. The bold structure of its theories rises, as it were, above a swamp. It is like a building erected on piles. The piles are driven down from above into the swamp, but not down to any natural or “given” base; and when we cease our attempts to drive our piles into a deeper layer, it is not because we have reached firm ground. We simply stop when we are satisfied that they are firm enough to carry the structure, at least for the time being.
The Logic of Scientific Discovery: Logik Der Forschung (1959, 2002), 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Base (117)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Building (156)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cease (79)  |  Down (456)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Enough (340)  |  Firm (47)  |  Ground (217)  |  Layer (40)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Objective (91)  |  Piles (7)  |  Reach (281)  |  Rest (280)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solid (116)  |  Structure (344)  |  Swamp (7)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)

The future does not belong to those who are content with today, apathetic toward common problems and their fellow man alike, timid and fearful in the face of bold projects and new ideas. Rather, it will belong to those who can blend passion, reason and courage in a personal commitment to the great enterprises and ideals of American society.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  American (46)  |  Apathetic (2)  |  Belong (162)  |  Blend (9)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Common (436)  |  Content (69)  |  Courage (69)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Face (212)  |  Fearful (7)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Future (429)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Man (2251)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Passion (114)  |  Personal (67)  |  Problem (676)  |  Project (73)  |  Reason (744)  |  Society (326)  |  Timid (5)  |  Today (314)  |  Toward (45)  |  Will (2355)

This interpretation of the atomic number [as the number of orbital electrons] may be said to signify an important step toward the solution of the boldest dreams of natural science, namely to build up an understanding of the regularities of nature upon the consideration of pure number.
Atomic Theory and the Description of Nature (1934), 103-104Cited in Gerald James Holton, Thematic Origins of Scientific Thought: Kepler to Einstein (1985), 74.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Number (3)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Build (204)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Dream (208)  |  Electron (93)  |  Importance (286)  |  Important (209)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Namely (11)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Orbital (4)  |  Pure (291)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Significance (113)  |  Signify (17)  |  Solution (267)  |  Step (231)  |  Toward (45)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Unconscious, perhaps, of the remote tendency of his own labours, he [Joseph Black] undermined that doctrine of material heat, which he seemed to support. For, by his advocacy of latent heat, he taught that its movements constantly battle, not only some of our senses, but all of them; and that, while our feelings make us believe that heat is lost, our intellect makes us believe that it is not lost. Here, we have apparent destructability, and real indestructibility. To assert that a body received heat without its temperature rising, was to make the understanding correct the touch, and defy its dictates. It was a bold and beautiful paradox, which required courage as well as insight to broach, and the reception of which marks an epoch in the human mind, because it was an immense step towards idealizing matter into force.
History of Civilization in England (1861), Vol. 2, 494.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Assert (66)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Joseph Black (14)  |  Body (537)  |  Courage (69)  |  Defy (11)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Force (487)  |  Heat (174)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Immense (86)  |  Insight (102)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Labour (98)  |  Latent Heat (7)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Movement (155)  |  Paradox (50)  |  Reception (15)  |  Remote (83)  |  Required (108)  |  Rising (44)  |  Sense (770)  |  Step (231)  |  Support (147)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Touch (141)  |  Understanding (513)

What a weak, credulous, incredulous, unbelieving, superstitious, bold, frightened, what a ridiculous world ours is, as far as concerns the mind of man. How full of inconsistencies, contradictions and absurdities it is. I declare that taking the average of many minds that have recently come before me … I should prefer the obedience, affections and instinct of a dog before it.
Letter to C. Schoenbein (25 Jul 1853). In Georg W.A. Kahlbaum and Francis V. Darbishire (eds.), The Letters of Faraday and Schoenbein, 1836-1862 (1899), 215.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Average (82)  |  Concern (228)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Declare (45)  |  Dog (70)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Obedience (19)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Weak (71)  |  World (1774)

When we think how narrow and devious this path of nature is, how dimly we can trace it, for all our lamps of science, and how from the darkness which girds it round great and terrible possibilities loom ever shadowly upwards, it is a bold and a confident man who will put a limit to the strange by-oaths into which the human spirit may wander.
Lot No. 249 (1892)
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Confident (25)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Lamp (36)  |  Limit (280)  |  Loom (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Oath (10)  |  Path (144)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Strange (157)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Think (1086)  |  Trace (103)  |  Upward (43)  |  Wander (35)  |  Will (2355)

While there is still much to learn and discover through space exploration, we also need to pay attention to our unexplored world here on earth. Our next big leap into the unknown can be every bit as exciting and bold as our pioneering work in space. It possesses the same “wow” factor: alien worlds, dazzling technological feats and the mystery of the unknown.
In 'Why Exploring the Ocean is Mankind’s Next Giant Leap', contributed to CNN 'Lightyears Blog' (13 Mar 2012)
Science quotes on:  |  Alien (34)  |  Attention (190)  |  Dazzling (13)  |  Discover (553)  |  Earth (996)  |  Excite (15)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Factor (46)  |  Feat (10)  |  Leap (53)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Next (236)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Possess (156)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Exploration (13)  |  Still (613)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Through (849)  |  Unexplored (14)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

[Great scientists] are men of bold ideas, but highly critical of their own ideas: they try to find whether their ideas are right by trying first to find whether they are not perhaps wrong. They work with bold conjectures and severe attempts at refuting their own conjectures.
'The Problem of Demarcation' (1974). Collected in David Miller (ed.) Popper Selections (1985), 118-119.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Boldness (10)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Critical (66)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Idea (843)  |  Refutation (12)  |  Right (452)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Work (1351)  |  Wrong (234)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.