Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “We are here to celebrate the completion of the first survey of the entire human genome. Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by human kind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Successful

Successful Quotes (123 quotes)


Question: If chimps are so much like us, why are they endangered while humans dominate the globe?
Goodall: Well, in some ways we're not successful at all. We're destroying our home. That's not a bit successful.
In Virginia Morell, 'The Discover Interview: Jane Goodall', Discover (Mar 2007), 28, No. 3, 52.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Destroying (3)  |  Environment (216)  |  Home (170)  |  Human (1468)  |  Question (621)  |  Success (302)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)

A lot of people ask, “Do you think humans are parasites?” It’s an interesting idea and one worth thinking about. People casually refer to humanity as a virus spreading across the earth. In fact, we do look like some strange kind of bio-film spreading across the landscape. A good metaphor? If the biosphere is our host, we do use it up for our own benefit. We do manipulate it. We alter the flows and fluxes of elements like carbon and nitrogen to benefit ourselves—often at the expense of the biosphere as a whole. If you look at how coral reefs or tropical forests are faring these days, you’ll notice that our host is not doing that well right now. Parasites are very sophisticated; parasites are highly evolved; parasites are very successful, as reflected in their diversity. Humans are not very good parasites. Successful parasites do a very good job of balancing—using up their hosts and keeping them alive. It’s all a question of tuning the adaptation to your particular host. In our case, we have only one host, so we have to be particularly careful.
Talk at Columbia University, 'The Power of Parasites'.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Alter (62)  |  Ask (411)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Biosphere (13)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon Cycle (5)  |  Coral Reef (12)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Environment (216)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flow (83)  |  Forest (150)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Job (82)  |  Kind (557)  |  Landscape (39)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  Manipulate (10)  |  Metaphor (33)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Nitrogen Cycle (2)  |  Notice (77)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Parasite (33)  |  People (1005)  |  Question (621)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Right (452)  |  Strange (157)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Use (766)  |  Virus (27)  |  Whole (738)  |  Worth (169)

A man who is convinced of the truth of his religion is indeed never tolerant. At the least, he is to feel pity for the adherent of another religion but usually it does not stop there. The faithful adherent of a religion will try first of all to convince those that believe in another religion and usually he goes on to hatred if he is not successful. However, hatred then leads to persecution when the might of the majority is behind it.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Adherent (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Belief (578)  |  Convince (41)  |  Convinced (23)  |  Faithful (10)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Lead (384)  |  Least (75)  |  Majority (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  Persecution (13)  |  Pity (14)  |  Religion (361)  |  Stop (80)  |  Tolerant (3)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Try (283)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

A mathematical problem should be difficult in order to entice us, yet not completely inaccessible, lest it mock at our efforts. It should be to us a guide post on the mazy paths to hidden truths, and ultimately a reminder of our pleasure in the successful solution.
In Mathematical Problems', Bulletin American Mathematical Society, 8, 438.
Science quotes on:  |  Completely (135)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Effort (227)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hide (69)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Lest (3)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mock (7)  |  Order (632)  |  Path (144)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Post (6)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Solution (267)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ultimately (55)

A scientist can be productive in various ways. One is having the ability to plan and carry out experiments, but the other is having the ability to formulate new ideas, which can be about what experiments can be carried out … by making [the] proper calculations. Individual scientists who are successful in their work are successful for different reasons.
Interview with George B. Kauffman and Laurie M. Kauffman, in 'Linus Pauling: Reflections', American Scientist (Nov-Dec 1994), 82, No. 6, 522.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Carry (127)  |  Different (577)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Making (300)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Productive (32)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reason (744)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Success (302)  |  Various (200)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

A system such as classical mechanics may be ‘scientific’ to any degree you like; but those who uphold it dogmatically — believing, perhaps, that it is their business to defend such a successful system against criticism as long as it is not conclusively disproved — are adopting the very reverse of that critical attitude which in my view is the proper one for the scientist.
In The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1959, reprint 2002), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Business (149)  |  Classical (45)  |  Critical (66)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Degree (276)  |  Long (790)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Proof (287)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  System (537)  |  View (488)

Add to this the pride of achievement; the desire to rank among the successful souls on earth, and we have the factors which have brought some of the ablest of human beings into the limelight that revealed them to an admiring world, as leaders and examples.
Quoted, without citation, in front matter to T. A. Edison Foundation, Lewis Howard Latimer: A Black Inventor: a Biography and Related Experiments You Can Do (1973). If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Being (1278)  |  Desire (204)  |  Earth (996)  |  Example (94)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Leader (43)  |  Limelight (2)  |  Pride (78)  |  Rank (67)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Soul (226)  |  Success (302)  |  World (1774)

All important unit operations have much in common, and if the underlying principles upon which the rational design and operation of basic types of engineering equipment depend are understood, their successful adaptation to manufacturing processes becomes a matter of good management rather than of good fortune.
In William H. Walker, Warren K. Lewis and William H. MacAdams, The Principles of Chemical Engineering (1923), Preface to 1st. edition, v.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Basic (138)  |  Become (815)  |  Common (436)  |  Depend (228)  |  Design (195)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Good (889)  |  Important (209)  |  Management (21)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Matter (798)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Rational (90)  |  Type (167)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Understood (156)

All successful men have agreed to one thing,—they were causationists. They believed that things went not by luck, but by law; that there was not a weak or a cracked link in the chain that joins the first and last of things.
From 'Power', The Conduct of Life (1860), collected in The Prose Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1870), 343.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  First (1283)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Luck (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Weak (71)

All successful people are big dreamers. They imagine what their future could be, ideal in every respect, and then they work every day toward their distant vision, that goal or purpose.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Big (48)  |  Distant (33)  |  Dreamer (13)  |  Future (429)  |  Goal (145)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagine (164)  |  People (1005)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Respect (207)  |  Toward (45)  |  Vision (123)  |  Work (1351)

An undertaking of great magnitude and importance, the successful accomplishment of which, in so comparatively short a period, notwithstanding the unheard of unestimable difficulties and impediments which had to be encountered and surmounted, in an almost unexplored and uninhabited wilderness … evinced on your part a moral courage and an undaunted spirit and combination of science and management equally exciting our admiration and deserving our praise.
(In recognition of his achievement building the Rideau Canal.)
John By
Address by the Montreal Committee of Trade. Quoted in 'John By', University of Toronto Press, Dictionary of Canadian Biography (1966), vol.7, 130.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Building (156)  |  Canal (17)  |  Combination (144)  |  Courage (69)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Equally (130)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impediment (11)  |  Importance (286)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Management (21)  |  Moral (195)  |  Period (198)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Science (3879)  |  Short (197)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Wilderness (45)

Any successful international negotiation for reducing emissions must be based on four principles: the precautionary principle, the principle of sustainable development, the polluter-pays principle and the principle of equity. The strength of 'contraction and convergence' is that it satisfies all these principles.
In The Independent (10 Aug 2003).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Contraction (15)  |  Convergence (4)  |  Development (422)  |  Equity (4)  |  Global Warming (27)  |  International (37)  |  Must (1526)  |  Negotiation (2)  |  Principle (507)  |  Strength (126)  |  Sustainable (12)

Applied research generates improvements, not breakthroughs. Great scientific advances spring from pure research. Even scientists renowned for their “useful” applied discoveries often achieved success only when they abandoned their ostensible applied-science goal and allowed their minds to soar—as when Alexander Fleming, “just playing about,” refrained from throwing away green molds that had ruined his experiment, studied them, and discovered penicillin. Or when C. A. Clarke, a physician affiliated with the University of Liverpool, became intrigued in the 1950s by genetically created color patterns that emerged when he cross-bred butterflies as a hobby. His fascination led him—“by the pleasant route of pursuing idle curiosity”—to the successful idea for preventing the sometimes fatal anemia that threatened babies born of a positive-Rhesus-factor father and a negative-Rhesus-factor mother.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 214-215.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Advance (280)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Research (2)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Breakthrough (15)  |  Butterfly (22)  |  Color (137)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Father (110)  |  Sir Alexander Fleming (19)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Goal (145)  |  Great (1574)  |  Green (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Idle (33)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Intrigued (4)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mold (33)  |  Mother (114)  |  Negative (63)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Penicillin (17)  |  Physician (273)  |  Playing (42)  |  Positive (94)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Refrain (9)  |  Research (664)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Soar (23)  |  Spring (133)  |  Success (302)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Throwing (17)  |  University (121)  |  Useful (250)

As a career, the business of an orthodox preacher is about as successful as that of a celluloid dog chasing an asbestos cat through hell.
A Thousand & One Epigrams: Selected from the Writings of Elbert Hubbard (1911), 110. Celluloid, an early plastic, known by that name since 1872 and used for early film stock, is noted for its flammability.
Science quotes on:  |  Asbestos (3)  |  Business (149)  |  Career (75)  |  Cat (47)  |  Chase (14)  |  Clergyman (5)  |  Dog (70)  |  Hell (32)  |  Orthodox (4)  |  Preacher (13)  |  Success (302)  |  Through (849)

As a general rule, the most successful man in life is the man who has the best information.
Endymion (1880), 156.
Science quotes on:  |  Best (459)  |  General (511)  |  Information (166)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Rule (294)  |  Success (302)

Asian Homo erectus died without issue and does not enter our immediate ancestry (for we evolved from African populations); Neanderthal people were collateral cousins, perhaps already living in Europe while we emerged in Africa... In other words, we are an improbable and fragile entity, fortunately successful after precarious beginnings as a small population in Africa, not the predictable end result of a global tendency. We are a thing, an item of history, not an embodiment of general principles.
Wonderful Life (1989), 319.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  African (10)  |  Already (222)  |  Ancestry (12)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Cousin (12)  |  Embodiment (9)  |  End (590)  |  Enter (141)  |  Entity (35)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fragile (21)  |  General (511)  |  Global (35)  |  History (673)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Living (491)  |  Neanderthal (7)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Population (110)  |  Principle (507)  |  Result (677)  |  Small (477)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Word (619)

At the present time it is of course quite customary for physicists to trespass on chemical ground, for mathematicians to do excellent work in physics, and for physicists to develop new mathematical procedures. … Trespassing is one of the most successful techniques in science.
In Dynamics in Psychology (1940, 1973), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Course (409)  |  Custom (42)  |  Customary (18)  |  Develop (268)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ground (217)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Present (619)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Science (3879)  |  Success (302)  |  Technique (80)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trespass (5)  |  Trespassing (2)  |  Work (1351)

Basic research is not the same as development. A crash program for the latter may be successful; but for the former it is like trying to make nine women pregnant at once in the hope of getting a baby in a month’s time.
In New Scientist, November 18, 1976.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Baby (28)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Development (422)  |  Former (137)  |  Hope (299)  |  Month (88)  |  Research (664)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trying (144)

Biologically the species is the accumulation of the experiments of all its successful individuals since the beginning.
repr. In The Works of H.G. Wells, vol. 9 (1925). A Modern Utopia, ch. 3, sect. 4 (1905).
Science quotes on:  |  Accumulation (50)  |  All (4108)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Biologically (4)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Individual (404)  |  Species (401)

Elbert (Green) Hubbard quote: Business, to be successful, must be based on science, for demand and supply are matters
Business, to be successful, must be based on science, for demand and supply are matters of mathematics, not guesswork.
The Book of Business (1913), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Business (149)  |  Demand (123)  |  Guesswork (4)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Must (1526)  |  Science (3879)  |  Success (302)  |  Supply (93)  |  Supply And Demand (3)

But indeed, the English generally have been very stationary in latter times, and the French, on the contrary, so active and successful, particularly in preparing elementary books, in the mathematical and natural sciences, that those who wish for instruction, without caring from what nation they get it, resort universally to the latter language.
Letter (29 Jan 1824) to Patrick K. Rodgers. Collected in Andrew A. Lipscomb (ed.), The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1904), Vol. 16, 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Book (392)  |  Caring (6)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Elementary (96)  |  English (35)  |  French (20)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Language (293)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Nation (193)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stationary (10)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wish (212)

By the 18th century science had been so successful in laying bare the laws of nature that many thought there was nothing left to discover. Immutable laws prescribed the motion of every particle in the universe, exactly and forever: the task of the scientist was to elucidate the implications of those laws for any particular phenomenon of interest. Chaos gave way to a clockwork world. But the world moved on ...Today even our clocks are not made of clockwork. ... With the advent of quantum mechanics, the clockwork world has become a lottery. Fundamental events, such as the decay of a radioactive atom, are held to be determined by chance, not law.
Does God Play Dice?: The New Mathematics of Chaos (2002). xi.
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (21)  |  Atom (355)  |  Bare (33)  |  Become (815)  |  Century (310)  |  Chance (239)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Clock (47)  |  Decay (53)  |  Discover (553)  |  Event (216)  |  Forever (103)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Immutable (22)  |  Interest (386)  |  Law (894)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Particle (194)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Predictability (7)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Task (147)  |  Thought (953)  |  Today (314)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Chemistry is the study of material transformations. Yet a knowledge of the rate, or time dependence, of chemical change is of critical importance for the successful synthesis of new materials and for the utilization of the energy generated by a reaction. During the past century it has become clear that all macroscopic chemical processes consist of many elementary chemical reactions that are themselves simply a series of encounters between atomic or molecular species. In order to understand the time dependence of chemical reactions, chemical kineticists have traditionally focused on sorting out all of the elementary chemical reactions involved in a macroscopic chemical process and determining their respective rates.
'Molecular Beam Studies of Elementary Chemical Processes', Nobel Lecture, 8 Dec 1986. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1981-1990 (1992), 320.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consist (223)  |  Critical (66)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Energy (344)  |  Focus (35)  |  Importance (286)  |  Involved (90)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Past (337)  |  Process (423)  |  Rate (29)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Series (149)  |  Species (401)  |  Study (653)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Understand (606)  |  Utilization (15)

Common sense … has the very curious property of being more correct retrospectively than prospectively. It seems to me that one of the principal criteria to be applied to successful science is that its results are almost always obvious retrospectively; unfortunately, they seldom are prospectively. Common sense provides a kind of ultimate validation after science has completed its work; it seldom anticipates what science is going to discover.
Quoted in A. De Reuck, M. Goldsmith and J. Knight (eds.), Decision Making in National Science Policy (1968), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  Anticipate (18)  |  Applied (177)  |  Being (1278)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Completed (30)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discover (553)  |  Kind (557)  |  More (2559)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Principal (63)  |  Property (168)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Sense (770)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unfortunately (38)  |  Validation (2)  |  Work (1351)

Edison was by far the most successful and, probably, the last exponent of the purely empirical method of investigation. Everything he achieved was the result of persistent trials and experiments often performed at random but always attesting extraordinary vigor and resource. Starting from a few known elements, he would make their combinations and permutations, tabulate them and run through the whole list, completing test after test with incredible rapidity until he obtained a clue. His mind was dominated by one idea, to leave no stone unturned, to exhaust every possibility.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Clue (17)  |  Combination (144)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Element (310)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exhaust (22)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Exponent (6)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Perform (121)  |  Permutation (5)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Purely (109)  |  Random (41)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Resource (63)  |  Result (677)  |  Run (174)  |  Stone (162)  |  Success (302)  |  Tabulate (2)  |  Test (211)  |  Through (849)  |  Trial (57)  |  Vigor (9)  |  Whole (738)

Every discoverer of a new truth, or inventor of the method which evolves it, makes a dozen, perhaps fifty, useless combinations, experiments, or trials for one successful one. In the realm of electricity or of mechanics there is no objection to this. But when such rejected failures involve a torture of animals, sometimes fearful in its character, there is a distinct objection to it.
From 'Vivisection', an original paper in Surgical Anaesthesia: Addresses, and Other Papers (1894, 1900), 369-370.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Character (243)  |  Combination (144)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fearful (7)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Involve (90)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Method (505)  |  New (1216)  |  Objection (32)  |  Realm (85)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rejected (26)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Success (302)  |  Torture (29)  |  Trial (57)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vivisection (7)

Facts are a heap of bricks and timber. It is only a successful theory that can convert the heap into a stately mansion
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 324.
Science quotes on:  |  Brick (18)  |  Convert (22)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Heap (14)  |  Mansion (4)  |  Stately (12)  |  Success (302)  |  Theory (970)  |  Timber (7)

Failure is so much more interesting because you learn from it. That’s what we should be teaching children at school, that being successful the first time, there’s nothing in it. There’s no interest, you learn nothing actually.
Interview with Carole Cadwalladr, The Observer (9 May 2014).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Failure (161)  |  First (1283)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  School (219)  |  Success (302)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Time (1877)

Fifty years ago the successful doctor was said to need three things; a top hat to give him Authority, a paunch to give him Dignity, and piles to give him an Anxious Expression.
Anonymous
Lancet (1951), 1, 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Authority (95)  |  Dignity (42)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Expression (175)  |  Physician (273)  |  Piles (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Top (96)  |  Year (933)

For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled.
Upon identifying the reason for the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger with his demonstration showing that O-rings grow brittle when cold by immersing a sample in iced water. Concluding remark in Feynman's Appendix to the Rogers Commission Report on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident. In (Jan 1987). In James B. Simpson, Simpson’s Contemporary Quotations (1988).
Science quotes on:  |  Disaster (51)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fool (116)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Public Relations (5)  |  Reality (261)  |  Space Shuttle (12)  |  Technology (257)

He will also find that the high and independent spirit, which usually dwells in the breast of those who are deeply versed in scientific pursuits, is ill adapted for administrative appointments; and that even if successful, he must hear many things he disapproves, and raise no voice against them.
Reflections on the Decline of Science in England and on Some of its Causes, (1830), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Against (332)  |  Appointment (12)  |  Find (998)  |  Hear (139)  |  High (362)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Must (1526)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Usually (176)  |  Will (2355)

He, who for an ordinary cause, resigns the fate of his patient to mercury, is a vile enemy to the sick; and, if he is tolerably popular, will, in one successful season, have paved the way for the business of life, for he has enough to do, ever afterward, to stop the mercurial breach of the constitutions of his dilapidated patients. He has thrown himself in fearful proximity to death, and has now to fight him at arm's length as long as the patient maintains a miserable existence.
Quoted by William M. Scribner, 'Treatment of Pneumonia and Croup, Once More, Etc,' in The Medical World (1885), 3, 187.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arm (81)  |  Business (149)  |  Cause (541)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Enough (340)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fate (72)  |  Himself (461)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Patient (199)  |  Poison (40)  |  Season (47)  |  Sick (81)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

However far the calculating reason of the mathematician may seem separated from the bold flight of the artist’s phantasy, it must be remembered that these expressions are but momentary images snatched arbitrarily from among the activities of both. In the projection of new theories the mathematician needs as bold and creative a phantasy as the productive artist, and in the execution of the details of a composition the artist too must calculate dispassionately the means which are necessary for the successful consummation of the parts. Common to both is the creation, the generation, of forms out of mind.
From Die Entwickelung der Mathematik im Zusammenhange mit der Ausbreitung der Kultur (1893), 4. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 185. From the original German, “Wie weit auch der rechnende Verstand des Mathematikers von dem kühnen Fluge der Phantasie des Künstlers getrennt zu sein scheint, so bezeichnen diese Ausdrücke doch blosse Augenblicksbilder, die willkürlich aus der Thätigkeit Beider herausgerissen sind. Bei dem Entwurfe neuer Theorieen bedarf der Mathematiker einer ebenso kühnen und schöpferischen Phantasie wie der schaffende Künstler, und bei der Ausführung der Einzelheiten eines Werkes muss auch der Künstler kühl alle Mittel berechnen, welche zum Gelingen der Theile erforderlich sind. Gemeinsam ist Beiden die Hervorbringung, die Erzeugung der Gebilde aus dem Geiste.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Artist (90)  |  Bold (22)  |  Both (493)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Common (436)  |  Composition (84)  |  Consummation (7)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creative (137)  |  Detail (146)  |  Dispassionate (8)  |  Execution (25)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fantasy (14)  |  Flight (98)  |  Form (959)  |  Generation (242)  |  Image (96)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Momentary (4)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Productive (32)  |  Projection (5)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remember (179)  |  Separate (143)  |  Snatch (13)  |  Theory (970)

I am sure that one secret of a successful teacher is that he has formulated quite clearly in his mind what the pupil has got to know in precise fashion. He will then cease from half-hearted attempts to worry his pupils with memorising a lot of irrelevant stuff of inferior importance.
In 'The Rhythmic Claims of Freedom and Discipline', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Cease (79)  |  Education (378)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Heart (229)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lot (151)  |  Memorization (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Secret (194)  |  Success (302)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Will (2355)

I called it ignose, not knowing which carbohydrate it was. This name was turned down by my editor. 'God-nose' was not more successful, so in the end 'hexuronic acid' was agreed upon. To-day the substance is called 'ascorbic acid' and I will use this name.
Studies on Biological Oxidation and Some of its Catalysts (C4 Dicarboxylic Acids, Vitamin C and P Etc.) (1937), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Agreement (53)  |  Call (769)  |  Carbohydrate (3)  |  Down (456)  |  Editor (9)  |  End (590)  |  God (757)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Substance (248)  |  Success (302)  |  Turn (447)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

I confess that Fermat’s Theorem as an isolated proposition has very little interest for me, for a multitude of such theorems can easily be set up, which one could neither prove nor disprove. But I have been stimulated by it to bring our again several old ideas for a great extension of the theory of numbers. Of course, this theory belongs to the things where one cannot predict to what extent one will succeed in reaching obscurely hovering distant goals. A happy star must also rule, and my situation and so manifold distracting affairs of course do not permit me to pursue such meditations as in the happy years 1796-1798 when I created the principal topics of my Disquisitiones arithmeticae. But I am convinced that if good fortune should do more than I expect, and make me successful in some advances in that theory, even the Fermat theorem will appear in it only as one of the least interesting corollaries.
In reply to Olbers' attempt in 1816 to entice him to work on Fermat's Theorem. The hope Gauss expressed for his success was never realised.
Letter to Heinrich Olbers (21 Mar 1816). Quoted in G. Waldo Dunnington, Carl Friedrich Gauss: Titan of Science (2004), 413.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Belong (162)  |  Confess (42)  |  Course (409)  |  Disprove (23)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Express (186)  |  Extension (59)  |  Extent (139)  |  Pierre de Fermat (15)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Goal (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hovering (5)  |  Idea (843)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Little (707)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Meditation (19)  |  More (2559)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Old (481)  |  Permit (58)  |  Predict (79)  |  Principal (63)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Prove (250)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Reply (56)  |  Rule (294)  |  Set (394)  |  Situation (113)  |  Star (427)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Numbers (7)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Topic (21)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

I have always liked horticulturists, people who make their living from orchards and gardens, whose hands are familiar with the feel of the bark, whose eyes are trained to distinguish the different varieties, who have a form memory. Their brains are not forever dealing with vague abstractions; they are satisfied with the romance which the seasons bring with them, and have the patience and fortitude to gamble their lives and fortunes in an industry which requires infinite patience, which raise hopes each spring and too often dashes them to pieces in fall. They are always conscious of sun and wind and rain; must always be alert lest they lose the chance of ploughing at the right moment, pruning at the right time, circumventing the attacks of insects and fungus diseases by quick decision and prompt action. They are manufacturers of a high order, whose business requires not only intelligence of a practical character, but necessitates an instinct for industry which is different from that required by the city dweller always within sight of other people and the sound of their voices. The successful horticulturist spends much time alone among his trees, away from the constant chatter of human beings.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstraction (47)  |  Action (327)  |  Alert (13)  |  Alone (311)  |  Attack (84)  |  Bark (18)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Business (149)  |  Chance (239)  |  Character (243)  |  City (78)  |  Constant (144)  |  Decision (91)  |  Different (577)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fall (230)  |  Feel (367)  |  Forever (103)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Fungus (5)  |  Garden (60)  |  High (362)  |  Hope (299)  |  Horticulture (9)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Industry (137)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Insect (77)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Live (628)  |  Living (491)  |  Lose (159)  |  Memory (134)  |  Moment (253)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patience (56)  |  People (1005)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prompt (14)  |  Pruning (7)  |  Rain (62)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Right (452)  |  Romance (15)  |  Season (47)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sound (183)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spring (133)  |  Sun (385)  |  Time (1877)  |  Train (114)  |  Tree (246)  |  Vague (47)  |  Wind (128)

I have no doubt that we will be successful in harnessing the sun's energy. … If sunbeams were weapons of war, we would have had solar energy centuries ago.
'Sayings of the Week.' The Observer, London (26 Aug 1973). Quoted in Barbara K. Rodes and Rice Odell, A Dictionary of Environmental Quotations (1992), 265.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Energy (344)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Solar Power (9)  |  Sun (385)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  Weapons (58)  |  Will (2355)

I know Teddy Kennedy had fun at the Democratic convention when he said that I said that trees and vegetation caused 80 percent of the air pollution in this country. ... Well, now he was a little wrong about what I said. I didn't say 80 percent. I said 92 percent—93 percent, pardon me. And I didn’t say air pollution, I said oxides of nitrogen. Growing and decaying vegetation in this land are responsible for 93 percent of the oxides of nitrogen. ... If we are totally successful and can eliminate all the manmade oxides of nitrogen, we’ll still have 93 percent as much as we have in the air today.
[Reagan reconfirming his own pathetic lack of understanding of air pollutants.]
Address to senior citizens at Sea World, Orlando, Florida (9 Oct 1980). As quoted later in Douglas E. Kneeland, 'Teamsters Back Republican', New York Times (10 Oct 1980), D14.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Air Pollution (9)  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Country (251)  |  Decay (53)  |  Democratic (12)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lack (119)  |  Little (707)  |  Nitrogen (26)  |  Pardon (7)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Say (984)  |  Still (613)  |  Today (314)  |  Tree (246)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Vegetation (23)  |  Wrong (234)

I ought to say that one of our first joint researches, so far as publication was concerned, had the peculiar effect of freeing me forever from the wiles of college football, and if that is a defect, make the most of it! Dr. Noyes and I conceived an idea on sodium aluminate solutions on the morning of the day of a Princeton-Harvard game (as I recall it) that we had planned to attend. It looked as though a few days' work on freezing-point determinations and electrical conductivities would answer the question. We could not wait, so we gave up the game and stayed in the laboratory. Our experiments were successful. I think that this was the last game I have ever cared about seeing. I mention this as a warning, because this immunity might attack anyone. I find that I still complainingly wonder at the present position of football in American education.
Address upon receiving the Perkin Medal Award, 'The Big Things in Chemistry', The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (Feb 1921), 13, No. 2, 162-163.
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Answer (366)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attend (65)  |  Car (71)  |  Care (186)  |  College (66)  |  Complaint (11)  |  Concern (228)  |  Conductivity (4)  |  Defect (31)  |  Determination (78)  |  Education (378)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Football (10)  |  Forever (103)  |  Freeing (6)  |  Freezing (16)  |  Freezing Point (3)  |  Game (101)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immunity (8)  |  Joint (31)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Last (426)  |  Look (582)  |  Mention (82)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Present (619)  |  Publication (101)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Say (984)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sodium (14)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Still (613)  |  Success (302)  |  Think (1086)  |  Wait (58)  |  Warning (17)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)

If my theory of relativity is proven successful, Germany will claim me as a German and France will declare I am a citizen of the world. Should my theory prove untrue, France will say I am a German and Germany will declare I am a Jew.
In Speech (6 Apr 1922) to the French Philosophical Society, Sorbonne. Quoted in Alice Calaprice, The Quotable Einstein (1996), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Citizen (51)  |  Claim (146)  |  Declare (45)  |  German (36)  |  Jew (9)  |  Nationalism (6)  |  Prove (250)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Say (984)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Untrue (12)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

In England, more than in any other country, science is felt rather than thought. … A defect of the English is their almost complete lack of systematic thinking. Science to them consists of a number of successful raids into the unknown.
The Social Function of Science (1939), 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Complete (204)  |  Consist (223)  |  Country (251)  |  Defect (31)  |  England (40)  |  Lack (119)  |  More (2559)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unknown (182)

In its earliest development knowledge is self-sown. Impressions force themselves upon men’s senses whether they will or not, and often against their will. The amount of interest in which these impressions awaken is determined by the coarser pains and pleasures which they carry in their train or by mere curiosity; and reason deals with the materials supplied to it as far as that interest carries it, and no further. Such common knowledge is rather brought than sought; and such ratiocination is little more than the working of a blind intellectual instinct. It is only when the mind passes beyond this condition that it begins to evolve science. When simple curiosity passes into the love of knowledge as such, and the gratification of the æsthetic sense of the beauty of completeness and accuracy seems more desirable that the easy indolence of ignorance; when the finding out of the causes of things becomes a source of joy, and he is accounted happy who is successful in the search, common knowledge passes into what our forefathers called natural history, whence there is but a step to that which used to be termed natural philosophy, and now passes by the name of physical science.
In this final state of knowledge the phenomena of nature are regarded as one continuous series of causes and effects; and the ultimate object of science is to trace out that series, from the term which is nearest to us, to that which is at the farthest limit accessible to our means of investigation.
The course of nature as it is, as it has been, and as it will be, is the object of scientific inquiry; whatever lies beyond, above, or below this is outside science. But the philosopher need not despair at the limitation on his field of labor; in relation to the human mind Nature is boundless; and, though nowhere inaccessible, she is everywhere unfathomable.
The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoölogy (1880), 2-3. Excerpted in Popular Science (Apr 1880), 16, 789-790.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accessible (25)  |  Account (192)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Against (332)  |  Amount (151)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blind (95)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cause And Effect (20)  |  Common (436)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deal (188)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Despair (40)  |  Determination (78)  |  Development (422)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Field (364)  |  Final (118)  |  Finding (30)  |  Force (487)  |  Forefather (4)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Impression (114)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Indolence (8)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Material (353)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Pain (136)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Ratiocination (4)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Step (231)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trace (103)  |  Tracing (3)  |  Train (114)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unfathomable (10)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)

In Melvin Calvin’s office there were four photographs: Michael Polanyi, Joel Hildebrand, Gilbert N. Lewis, and Ernest O. Lawrence. These scientists were his mentors: Polanyi for introducing him to the chemistry of phthalocyanine; Hildebrand for bringing him to Berkeley; Lewis, perhaps his most influential teacher; and Lawrence, who provided him the opportunity to work with the new scientific tool of radioactive carbon, which enabled the search for the path of carbon in photosynthesis to be successful.
Co-author with Marilyn Taylor and Robert E. Connick, obituary, 'Melvin Calvin', Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (Dec 2000), 144, No. 4, 454.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Berkeley (3)  |  Biography (240)  |  Melvin Calvin (11)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Carbon-14 (2)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Enable (119)  |  Joel H. Hildebrand (17)  |  Influential (4)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Introduced (3)  |  Ernest Orlando Lawrence (5)  |  Gilbert Newton Lewis (9)  |  Mentor (3)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Office (71)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Path (144)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Michael Polanyi (4)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Search (162)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Tool (117)  |  Work (1351)

In order to drive the individuals towards reproduction, sexuality had therefore to be associated with some other devices. Among these was pleasure. … Thus pleasure appears as a mere expedient to push individuals to indulge in sex and therefore to reproduce. A rather successful expedient indeed as judged by the state of the world population.
In 'Evolution and Tinkering,' Science, June 10, 1977.
Science quotes on:  |  Device (70)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Individual (404)  |  Indulge (14)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Population (110)  |  Push (62)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Sex (69)  |  State (491)  |  World (1774)

In these strenuous times, we are likely to become morbid and look constantly on the dark side of life, and spend entirely too much time considering and brooding over what we can't do, rather than what we can do, and instead of growing morose and despondent over opportunities either real or imaginary that are shut from us, let us rejoice at the many unexplored fields in which there is unlimited fame and fortune to the successful explorer and upon which there is no color line; simply the survival of the fittest.
In article urging African-Americans to engage in plant breeding to develop improved species.'A New Industry for Colored Men and Women', Colored American (Jan 1908, 14, 33. Cited in Linda O. McMurry, George Washington Carver, Scientist and Symbol (1982), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Become (815)  |  Color (137)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Dark (140)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Fame (50)  |  Field (364)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Growing (98)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Morbid (3)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Research (664)  |  Shut (41)  |  Side (233)  |  Spend (95)  |  Strenuous (5)  |  Success (302)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survival Of The Fittest (40)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unlimited (22)

It is imperative in the design process to have a full and complete understanding of how failure is being obviated in order to achieve success. Without fully appreciating how close to failing a new design is, its own designer may not fully understand how and why a design works. A new design may prove to be successful because it has a sufficiently large factor of safety (which, of course, has often rightly been called a “factor of ignorance”), but a design's true factor of safety can never be known if the ultimate failure mode is unknown. Thus the design that succeeds (ie, does not fail) can actually provide less reliable information about how or how not to extrapolate from that design than one that fails. It is this observation that has long motivated reflective designers to study failures even more assiduously than successes.
In Design Paradigms: Case Histories of Error and Judgment in Engineering (1994), 31. books.google.comHenry Petroski - 1994
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Complete (204)  |  Course (409)  |  Design (195)  |  Extrapolation (6)  |  Factor (46)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Imperative (15)  |  Information (166)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Long (790)  |  Mode (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Motivated (14)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Process (423)  |  Prove (250)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Reliability (17)  |  Safety (54)  |  Study (653)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Sufficiency (16)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Why (491)  |  Work (1351)

It is often held that scientific hypotheses are constructed, and are to be constructed, only after a detailed weighing of all possible evidence bearing on the matter, and that then and only then may one consider, and still only tentatively, any hypotheses. This traditional view however, is largely incorrect, for not only is it absurdly impossible of application, but it is contradicted by the history of the development of any scientific theory. What happens in practice is that by intuitive insight, or other inexplicable inspiration, the theorist decides that certain features seem to him more important than others and capable of explanation by certain hypotheses. Then basing his study on these hypotheses the attempt is made to deduce their consequences. The successful pioneer of theoretical science is he whose intuitions yield hypotheses on which satisfactory theories can be built, and conversely for the unsuccessful (as judged from a purely scientific standpoint).
Co-author with Raymond Arthur Lyttleton, in 'The Internal Constitution of the Stars', Occasional Notes of the Royal Astronomical Society 1948, 12, 90.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Capable (168)  |  Certain (550)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Construct (124)  |  Contradict (40)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Detail (146)  |  Development (422)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Happen (274)  |  History (673)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inexplicable (8)  |  Insight (102)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Possible (552)  |  Practice (204)  |  Purely (109)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientific Theory (24)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Theorist (44)  |  Theory (970)  |  View (488)  |  Yield (81)

It is tautological to say that an organism is adapted to its environment. It is even tautological to say that an organism is physiologically adapted to its environment. However, just as in the case of many morphological characters, it is unwarranted to conclude that all aspects of the physiology of an organism have evolved in reference to a specific milieu. It is equally gratuitous to assume that an organism will inevitably show physiological specializations in its adaptation to a particular set of conditions. All that can be concluded is that the functional capacities of an organism are sufficient to have allowed persistence within its environment. On one hand, the history of an evolutionary line may place serious constraints upon the types of further physiological changes that are readily feasible. Some changes might require excessive restructuring of the genome or might involve maladaptive changes in related functions. On the other hand, a taxon which is successful in occupying a variety of environments may be less impressive in individual physiological capacities than one with a far more limited distribution.
In W.R. Dawson, G.A. Bartholomew, and A.F. Bennett, 'A Reappraisal of the Aquatic Specializations of the Galapagos Marine Iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus)', Evolution (1977), 31, 891.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Assume (38)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Case (99)  |  Change (593)  |  Character (243)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constraint (13)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Far (154)  |  Feasible (3)  |  Function (228)  |  Functional (10)  |  Genome (15)  |  Gratuitous (2)  |  Hand (143)  |  History (673)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Less (103)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Line (91)  |  Milieu (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphological (3)  |  Occupy (26)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Persistence (24)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Place (177)  |  Readily (10)  |  Reference (33)  |  Relate (21)  |  Require (219)  |  Restructuring (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Serious (91)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Specific (95)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Tautological (2)  |  Type (167)  |  Unwarranted (2)  |  Variety (132)  |  Will (2355)

It would be interesting to inquire how many times essential advances in science have first been made possible by the fact that the boundaries of special disciplines were not respected… Trespassing is one of the most successful techniques in science.
Dynamics in Psychology (1940), 115-116
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Most (1731)  |  Possible (552)  |  Progress (465)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Special (184)  |  Technique (80)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trespassing (2)

Just as it will never be successfully challenged that the French language, progressively developing and growing more perfect day by day, has the better claim to serve as a developed court and world language, so no one will venture to estimate lightly the debt which the world owes to mathematicians, in that they treat in their own language matters of the utmost importance, and govern, determine and decide whatever is subject, using the word in the highest sense, to number and measurement.
In 'Sprüche in Prosa', Natur, III, 868.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Claim (146)  |  Court (33)  |  Debt (13)  |  Decide (41)  |  Determine (144)  |  Develop (268)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  French (20)  |  Govern (64)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growing (98)  |  High (362)  |  Importance (286)  |  Language (293)  |  Lightly (2)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Matter (798)  |  Measurement (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  Number (699)  |  Owe (71)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serve (59)  |  Subject (521)  |  Treat (35)  |  Utmost (12)  |  Venture (18)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Let us hope that the advent of a successful flying machine, now only dimly foreseen and nevertheless thought to be possible, will bring nothing but good into the world; that it shall abridge distance, make all parts of the globe accessible, bring men into closer relation with each other, advance civilization, and hasten the promised era in which there shall be nothing but peace and goodwill among all men.
Concluding paragraph, Progress in Flying Machines (1894), 269.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  Advance (280)  |  Airplane (41)  |  All (4108)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Closer (43)  |  Distance (161)  |  Era (51)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Good (889)  |  Goodwill (6)  |  Hasten (13)  |  Hope (299)  |  Machine (257)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peace (108)  |  Possible (552)  |  Thought (953)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Let us sum up the three possible explanations of the decision to drop the bomb and its timing. The first that it was a clever and highly successful move in the field of power politics, is almost certainly correct; the second, that the timing was coincidental, convicts the American government of a hardly credible tactlessness [towards the Soviet Union]; and the third, the Roman holiday theory [a spectacular event to justify the cost of the Manhattan Project], convicts them of an equally incredible irresponsibility.
In The Political and Military Consequences of Atomic Energy (1948), 126. As cited by Maurice W. Kirby and Jonathan Rosenhead, 'Patrick Blackett (1897)' in Arjang A. Assad (ed.) and Saul I. Gass (ed.),Profiles in Operations Research: Pioneers and Innovators (2011), 17. Blackett regarded the dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan as unnecessary because a Japanese surrender was inevitable.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Clever (38)  |  Cost (86)  |  Decision (91)  |  Drop (76)  |  Equally (130)  |  Event (216)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Government (110)  |  Hiroshima (18)  |  Holiday (9)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Irresponsibility (5)  |  Manhattan Project (12)  |  Move (216)  |  Politics (112)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Project (73)  |  Roman (36)  |  Soviet (9)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Sum (102)  |  Theory (970)  |  Union (51)

Many people regard mathematicians as a race apart, possessed of almost supernatural powers. While this is very flattering for successful mathematicians, it is very bad for those who, for one reason or another, are attempting to learn the subject.
Opening paragraph in Chap. 1 of Mathematician's Delight (1943, 2012), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Bad (180)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  People (1005)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Regard (305)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supernatural (25)

Necessity is not the mother of invention. Knowledge and experiment are its parents. It sometimes happens that successful search is made for unknown materials to fill well-recognized and predetermined requirements. It more often happens that the acquirement of knowledge of the previously unknown properties of a material suggests its trial for some new use. These facts strongly indicate the value of knowledge of properties of materials and indicate a way for research.
Quoted in Guy Suits, 'Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 357.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Happen (274)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Indication (33)  |  Invention (369)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Material (353)  |  More (2559)  |  Mother (114)  |  Mother Of Invention (6)  |  Necessity (191)  |  New (1216)  |  Parent (76)  |  Predetermine (2)  |  Property (168)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Research (664)  |  Search (162)  |  Success (302)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Trial (57)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)

Obviously everyone wants to be successful, but I want to be looked back on as being very innovative, very trusted and ethical and ultimately making a big difference in the world.
Concerning philanthropy and investment in alternative energy research. In Tim Walker, 'Sergey Brin: Engine Driver', Independent (15 Jan 2010).
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Being (1278)  |  Big (48)  |  Difference (337)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Look (582)  |  Look Back (5)  |  Make (25)  |  Making (300)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Trust (66)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Want (497)  |  World (1774)

Obviously we biologists should fit our methods to our materials. An interesting response to this challenge has been employed particularly by persons who have entered biology from the physical sciences or who are distressed by the variability in biology; they focus their research on inbred strains of genetically homogeneous laboratory animals from which, to the maximum extent possible, variability has been eliminated. These biologists have changed the nature of the biological system to fit their methods. Such a bold and forthright solution is admirable, but it is not for me. Before I became a professional biologist, I was a boy naturalist, and I prefer a contrasting approach; to change the method to fit the system. This approach requires that one employ procedures which allow direct scientific utilization of the successful long-term evolutionary experiments which are documented by the fascinating diversity and variability of the species of animals which occupy the earth. This is easy to say and hard to do.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 232.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  Allow (45)  |  Animal (617)  |  Approach (108)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Bold (22)  |  Boy (94)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Change (593)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Direct (225)  |  Distress (9)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Document (7)  |  Earth (996)  |  Easy (204)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Employ (113)  |  Enter (141)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fit (134)  |  Focus (35)  |  Genetically (2)  |  Hard (243)  |  Homogeneous (16)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Long (790)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Material (353)  |  Maximum (12)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Possible (552)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Professional (70)  |  Require (219)  |  Research (664)  |  Response (53)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Solution (267)  |  Species (401)  |  Strain (11)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Utilization (15)  |  Variability (5)

One could not be a successful scientist without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of scientists, a goodly number of scientists are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid.
The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA (1968, 1998), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Conception (154)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Dull (54)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mother (114)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Narrow-Minded (5)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Number (699)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Stupid (35)  |  Success (302)  |  Support (147)

One is hard pressed to think of universal customs that man has successfully established on earth. There is one, however, of which he can boast the universal adoption of the Hindu-Arabic numerals to record numbers. In this we perhaps have man’s unique worldwide victory of an idea.
In Mathematical Circles Squared (1972), 13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adoption (7)  |  Arabic (3)  |  Boast (22)  |  Custom (42)  |  Earth (996)  |  Establish (57)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hindu (3)  |  Idea (843)  |  Man (2251)  |  Number (699)  |  Record (154)  |  Think (1086)  |  Unique (67)  |  Universal (189)  |  Victory (39)  |  Worldwide (16)

One of the characteristics of successful scientists is having courage. Once you get your courage up and believe that you can do important problems, then you can. If you think you can't, almost surely you are not going to.
'You and Your Research', Bell Communications Research Colloquium Seminar, 7 Mar 1986.
Science quotes on:  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Courage (69)  |  Do (1908)  |  Problem (676)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Success (302)  |  Surely (101)  |  Think (1086)

One of the most successful physicians I have ever known, has assured me, that he used more bread pills, drops of colored water, and powders of hickory ashes, than of all other medicines put together. It was certainly a pious fraud.
In letter to Caspar Wistar (21 Jun 1807), collected in Thomas Jefferson Randolph (ed.), Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson (1829), Vol. 4, 93.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ash (20)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Bread (39)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Color (137)  |  Drop (76)  |  Fraud (15)  |  Known (454)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physician (273)  |  Pill (6)  |  Pious (4)  |  Powder (9)  |  Success (302)  |  Together (387)  |  Water (481)

One should guard against inculcating a young man with the idea that success is the aim of life, for a successful man normally receives from his peers an incomparably greater portion than the services he has been able to render them deserve. The value of a man resides in what he gives and not in what he is capable of receiving. The most important motive for study at school, at the university, and in life is the pleasure of working and thereby obtaining results which will serve the community. The most important task for our educators is to awaken and encourage these psychological forces in a young man {or woman}. Such a basis alone can lead to the joy of possessing one of the most precious assets in the world - knowledge or artistic skill.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Aim (165)  |  Alone (311)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Asset (6)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Basis (173)  |  Capable (168)  |  Community (104)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Educator (5)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Force (487)  |  Give (202)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greater (288)  |  Guard (18)  |  Idea (843)  |  Important (209)  |  Incomparable (12)  |  Inculcate (6)  |  Joy (107)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Normally (2)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Peer (12)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possess (156)  |  Precious (41)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Receive (114)  |  Render (93)  |  Reside (25)  |  Result (677)  |  School (219)  |  Serve (59)  |  Service (110)  |  Skill (109)  |  Study (653)  |  Success (302)  |  Task (147)  |  Thereby (5)  |  University (121)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Young (227)

Our most successful theories in physics are those that explicitly leave room for the unknown, while confining this room sufficiently to make the theory empirically disprovable. It does not matter whether this room is created by allowing for arbitrary forces as Newtonian dynamics does, or by allowing for arbitrary equations of state for matter, as General Relativity does, or for arbitrary motions of charges and dipoles, as Maxwell's electrodynamics does. To exclude the unknown wholly as a “unified field theory” or a “world equation” purports to do is pointless and of no scientific significance.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Charge (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electrodynamics (10)  |  Equation (132)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  General (511)  |  General Relativity (10)  |  Matter (798)  |  Maxwell (42)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pointless (6)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Significance (113)  |  State (491)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Wholly (88)  |  World (1774)

Parasites are not only incredibly diverse; they are also incredibly successful. There are parasitic stretches of DNA in your own genes, some of which are called retrotransposons. Many of the parasitic stretches were originally viruses that entered our DNA. Most of them don't do us any harm. They just copy and insert themselves in other parts of our DNA, basically replicating themselves. Sometimes they hop into other species and replicate themselves in a new host. According to one estimate, roughly one-third to one-half of all human DNA is basically parasitic.
Talk at Columbia University, 'The Power of Parasites.'
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Copy (33)  |  DNA (77)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enter (141)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Gene (98)  |  Human (1468)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Replicating (3)  |  Species (401)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Virus (27)

Plant breeding to be successful must be conducted like architecture. Definite plans must be carefully laid for the proposed creation; suitable materials selected with judgment, and these must he securely placed in their proper order and position.
From Paper read at the Annual Meeting of the American Breeders’ Association, at Columbia, Mo. (5-8 January 1909). In 'Another Mode of Species Forming', Popular Science Monthly (Sep 1909), 75, 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Architecture (48)  |  Breed (24)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Creation (327)  |  Definite (110)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Material (353)  |  Must (1526)  |  Order (632)  |  Place (177)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plant (294)  |  Position (77)  |  Proper (144)  |  Select (44)  |  Success (302)  |  Suitable (8)

Samuel Pierpoint Langley, at that time regarded as one of the most distinguished scientists in the United States … evidently believed that a full sized airplane could be built and flown largely from theory alone. This resulted in two successive disastrous plunges into the Potomac River, the second of which almost drowned his pilot. This experience contrasts with that of two bicycle mechanics Orville and Wilbur Wright who designed, built and flew the first successful airplane. But they did this after hundreds of experiments extending over a number of years.
In article Total Quality: Its Origins and its Future (1995), published at the Center for Quality and Productivity Improvement.
Science quotes on:  |  Airplane (41)  |  Alone (311)  |  Bicycle (10)  |  Build (204)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Design (195)  |  Disastrous (3)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Drown (12)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Fly (146)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Samuel Pierpont Langley (3)  |  Largely (13)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Most (1731)  |  Number (699)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Plunge (11)  |  Regard (305)  |  Regarded (4)  |  Result (677)  |  River (119)  |  Scientist (820)  |  State (491)  |  Success (302)  |  Successive (73)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  United States (31)  |  Orville Wright (8)  |  Year (933)

Science is a collection of successful recipes.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Collection (64)  |  Recipe (7)  |  Science (3879)

Science is a speculative enterprise. The validity of a new idea and the significance of a new experimental finding are to be measured by the consequences—consequences in terms of other ideas and other experiments. Thus conceived, science is not a quest for certainty; it is rather a quest which is successful only to the degree that it is continuous.
In Science and Common Sense (1951), 25-26.
Science quotes on:  |  Certainty (174)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Continuous (82)  |  Degree (276)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Idea (843)  |  Measure (232)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Quest (39)  |  Science (3879)  |  Significance (113)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Validity (47)

Science is in a literal sense constructive of new facts. It has no fixed body of facts passively awaiting explanation, for successful theories allow the construction of new instruments—electron microscopes and deep space probes—and the exploration of phenomena that were beyond description—the behavior of transistors, recombinant DNA, and elementary particles, for example. This is a key point in the progressive nature of science—not only are there more elegant or accurate analyses of phenomena already known, but there is also extension of the range of phenomena that exist to be described and explained.
Co-author with Michael A. Arbib, English-born professor of computer science and biomedical engineering (1940-)
Michael A. Arbib and Mary B. Hesse, The Construction of Reality (1986), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Already (222)  |  Author (167)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Computer (127)  |  Computer Science (11)  |  Construction (112)  |  Constructive (14)  |  Deep (233)  |  DNA (77)  |  Electron (93)  |  Electron Microscope (2)  |  Elegant (36)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Exist (443)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Extension (59)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Known (454)  |  Literal (11)  |  Microscope (80)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Particle (194)  |  Point (580)  |  Probe (12)  |  Professor (128)  |  Range (99)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Space (500)  |  Theory (970)  |  Transistor (5)

Scientists and particularly the professional students of evolution are often accused of a bias toward mechanism or materialism, even though believers in vitalism and in finalism are not lacking among them. Such bias as may exist is inherent in the method of science. The most successful scientific investigation has generally involved treating phenomena as if they were purely materialistic, rejecting any metaphysical hypothesis as long as a physical hypothesis seems possible. The method works. The restriction is necessary because science is confined to physical means of investigation and so it would stultify its own efforts to postulate that its subject is not physical and so not susceptible to its methods.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Accusation (6)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Bias (20)  |  Confinement (4)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Involved (90)  |  Lacking (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Materialism (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Professional (70)  |  Purely (109)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Stultify (5)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vitalism (5)  |  Work (1351)

Scientists constantly get clobbered with the idea that we spent 27 billion dollars on the Apollo programs, and are asked “What more do you want?” We didn't spend it; it was done for political reasons. ... Apollo was a response to the Bay of Pigs fiasco and to the successful orbital flight of Yuri Gagarin. President Kennedy's objective was not to find out the origin of the moon by the end of the decade; rather it was to put a man on the moon and bring him back, and we did that.
Quoted by Dennis Meredith, in 'Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection and Extraterrestrial Life-Wish', Science Digest (Jun 1979), 85, 38 & 89. Reproduced in Carl Sagan and Tom Head, Conversations With Sagan (2006), 55-56.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Apollo Program (2)  |  Ask (411)  |  Back (390)  |  Bay Of Pigs (2)  |  Billion (95)  |  Decade (59)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dollar (22)  |  End (590)  |  Fiasco (2)  |  Find (998)  |  Flight (98)  |  Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (13)  |  Idea (843)  |  John F. Kennedy (46)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  Objective (91)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Orbital (4)  |  Origin (239)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  President (31)  |  Reason (744)  |  Response (53)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spending (24)  |  Spent (85)  |  Want (497)

Since the discovery of oxygen the civilised world has undergone a revolution in manners and customs. The knowledge of the composition of the atmosphere, of the solid crust of the earth, of water, and of their influence upon the life of plants and animals, was linked to that discovery. The successful pursuit of innumerable trades and manufactures, the profitable separation of metals from their ores, also stand in the closest connection therewith.
Familiar Letters on Chemistry (1851), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Composition (84)  |  Connection (162)  |  Crust (38)  |  Custom (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Influence (222)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Metal (84)  |  Ore (12)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Plant (294)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Separation (57)  |  Solid (116)  |  Stand (274)  |  Water (481)  |  World (1774)

Since the examination of consistency is a task that cannot be avoided, it appears necessary to axiomatize logic itself and to prove that number theory and set theory are only parts of logic. This method was prepared long ago (not least by Frege’s profound investigations); it has been most successfully explained by the acute mathematician and logician Russell. One could regard the completion of this magnificent Russellian enterprise of the axiomatization of logic as the crowning achievement of the work of axiomatization as a whole.
Address (11 Sep 1917), 'Axiomatisches Denken' delivered before the Swiss Mathematical Society in Zürich. Translated by Ewald as 'Axiomatic Thought', (1918), in William Bragg Ewald, From Kant to Hilbert (1996), Vol. 2, 1113.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Acute (7)  |  Appear (118)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Completion (22)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Crown (38)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Examination (98)  |  Explain (322)  |  Gottlob Frege (11)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Least (75)  |  Logic (287)  |  Logician (17)  |  Long (790)  |  Long Ago (10)  |  Magnificent (43)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Method (505)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Number (699)  |  Number Theory (6)  |  Prepared (5)  |  Profound (104)  |  Prove (250)  |  Regard (305)  |  Bertrand Russell (184)  |  Set (394)  |  Set Theory (6)  |  Task (147)  |  Theory (970)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

Success is achievable without public recognition, and the world has many unsung heroes. The teacher who inspires you to pursue your education to your ultimate ability is a success. The parents who taught you the noblest human principles are a success. The coach who shows you the importance of teamwork is a success. The spiritual leader who instills in you spiritual values and faith is a success. The relatives, friends, and neighbors with whom you develop a reciprocal relationship of respect and support - they, too, are successes. The most menial workers can properly consider themselves successful if they perform their best and if the product of their work is of service to humanity.
From 'Getting to the Heart of Success', in Jim Stovall, Success Secrets of Super Achievers: Winning Insights from Those Who Are at the Top (1999), 42-43.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Best (459)  |  Coach (5)  |  Consider (416)  |  Develop (268)  |  Education (378)  |  Faith (203)  |  Friend (168)  |  Hero (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Leader (43)  |  Most (1731)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Parent (76)  |  Perform (121)  |  Principle (507)  |  Product (160)  |  Public (96)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Reciprocal (7)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Relative (39)  |  Respect (207)  |  Service (110)  |  Show (346)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Success (302)  |  Support (147)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Teamwork (5)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unsung (4)  |  Value (365)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)  |  World (1774)

Successful—four flights on Thursday morning—took off with motors from level ground—average speed thirty miles an hour—longest flight 59 seconds—inform press—home for Christmas—Orville.
Telegram (17 Dec 1903) to his father, Bishop Wright, about the first flight in an airplane, at Kitty Hawk, N.C. As quoted in Heinz Gartmann, Rings Around the World: Man’s Progress From Steam Engine to Satellite (1959), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Average (82)  |  Christmas (11)  |  Flight (98)  |  Ground (217)  |  Home (170)  |  Hour (186)  |  Inform (47)  |  Level (67)  |  Morning (94)  |  Motor (23)  |  Press (21)  |  Speed (65)  |  Telegram (3)

Success…seems to be connected with action. Successful men keep moving. They make mistakes, but they don’t quit.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Connect (125)  |  Keep (101)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Move (216)  |  Quit (10)  |  Seem (145)  |  Success (302)

The “British Association for the Promotion of Science,” … is almost necessary for the purposes of science. The periodical assemblage of persons, pursuing the same or différent branches of knowledge, always produces an excitement which is favourable to the development of new ideas; whilst the long period of repose which succeeds, is advantageous for the prosecution of the reasonings or the experiments then suggested; and the récurrence of the meeting in the succeeding year, will stimulate the activity of the inquirer, by the hope of being then enabled to produce the successful result of his labours.
In 'Future Prospects', On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures (1st ed., 1832), chap. 32, 274. Note: The British Association for the Advancement of Science held its first meeting at York in 1831, the year before the first publication of this book in 1832.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Advantageous (10)  |  Assemblage (17)  |  Assembly (13)  |  Association (46)  |  Being (1278)  |  Branch (150)  |  British (41)  |  Conference (17)  |  Development (422)  |  Different (577)  |  Enable (119)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Excitement (50)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Favourable (3)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Information (166)  |  Inquirer (9)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Long (790)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Necessary (363)  |  New (1216)  |  New Ideas (16)  |  Period (198)  |  Periodic (3)  |  Person (363)  |  Produce (104)  |  Promotion (7)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reasonings (2)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Society (326)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Succeeding (14)  |  Success (302)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

The advantage is that mathematics is a field in which one’s blunders tend to show very clearly and can be corrected or erased with a stroke of the pencil. It is a field which has often been compared with chess, but differs from the latter in that it is only one’s best moments that count and not one’s worst. A single inattention may lose a chess game, whereas a single successful approach to a problem, among many which have been relegated to the wastebasket, will make a mathematician’s reputation.
In Ex-Prodigy: My Childhood and Youth (1953), 21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Approach (108)  |  Bad (180)  |  Best (459)  |  Blunder (21)  |  Chess (25)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Compare (69)  |  Correct (86)  |  Count (105)  |  Differ (85)  |  Erase (6)  |  Field (364)  |  Game (101)  |  Inattention (5)  |  Lose (159)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Moment (253)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Problem (676)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Tend (124)  |  Wastebasket (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  Worst (57)

The classical example of a successful research programme is Newton’s gravitational theory: possibly the most successful research programme ever.
In Radio Lecture (30 Jun 1973) broadcast by the Open University, collected in Imre Lakatos, John Worrall (ed.) and Gregory Currie (ed.), 'Introduction: Science and Pseudoscience', The Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes (1978, 1980), Vol. 1, 48.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Classical (45)  |  Example (94)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Program (52)  |  Research (664)  |  Theory (970)

The flights of the imagination which occur to the pure mathematician are in general so much better described in his formulas than in words, that it is not remarkable to find the subject treated by outsiders as something essentially cold and uninteresting— … the only successful attempt to invest mathematical reasoning with a halo of glory—that made in this section by Prof. Sylvester—is known to a comparative few, …
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science (1871), Nature Vol. 4, 271,
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Better (486)  |  Cold (112)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Describe (128)  |  Essentially (14)  |  Find (998)  |  Flight (98)  |  Formula (98)  |  General (511)  |  Glory (58)  |  Halo (7)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Invest (18)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Occur (150)  |  Outsider (6)  |  Prof (2)  |  Pure (291)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Section (11)  |  Something (719)  |  Subject (521)  |  James Joseph Sylvester (58)  |  Treat (35)  |  Uninteresting (9)  |  Word (619)

The full story of successful organ transplantation in man weaves together three separate pathways: the study of renal disease, skin grafting in twins, and surgical determination. A leitmotif permeates each of these pathways, i.e. a single event or report was critical for medical progress.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 558.
Science quotes on:  |  Critical (66)  |  Determination (78)  |  Disease (328)  |  Event (216)  |  Graft (4)  |  Man (2251)  |  Medical (26)  |  Organ (115)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Progress (465)  |  Renal (4)  |  Report (38)  |  Separate (143)  |  Single (353)  |  Skin (47)  |  Story (118)  |  Study (653)  |  Success (302)  |  Surgical (2)  |  Together (387)  |  Transplantation (4)  |  Twin (15)  |  Weave (19)

The labor of love aspect is important. The most successful scientists are not the most talented. But they are the ones who are impelled by curiosity. They’ve got to know what the answer is.
As quoted in Andrew Grant and Gaia Grant, Who Killed Creativity?: ...And How Do We Get It Back? (2012).
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Impel (5)  |  Important (209)  |  Know (1518)  |  Labor (107)  |  Love (309)  |  Most (1731)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Talent (94)

The mathematical framework of quantum theory has passed countless successful tests and is now universally accepted as a consistent and accurate description of all atomic phenomena. The verbal interpretation, on the other hand – i.e., the metaphysics of quantum theory – is on far less solid ground. In fact, in more than forty years physicists have not been able to provide a clear metaphysical model.
In The Tao of Physics (1975), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Countless (36)  |  Description (84)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Framework (31)  |  Ground (217)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  On The Other Hand (34)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Solid (116)  |  Success (302)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universal (189)  |  Year (933)

The mathematical framework of quantum theory has passed countless successful tests and is now universally accepted as a consistent and accurate description of all atomic phenomena. The verbal interpretation, on the other hand, i.e. the metaphysics of quantum physics, is on far less solid ground. In fact, in more than forty years physicists have not been able to provide a clear metaphysical model.
In The Tao of Physics: An Exploration of the Parallels Between Modern Physics (1975), 132.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Acceptance (52)  |  Accurate (86)  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic (5)  |  Clear (100)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Countless (36)  |  Description (84)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Forty (4)  |  Framework (31)  |  Ground (217)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Less (103)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Model (102)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Providing (5)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Solid (116)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Universal (189)  |  Verbal (10)  |  Year (933)

The most successful men in the end are those whose success is the result of steady accretion. That intellectuality is more vigorous that has attained its strength gradually. It is the man who carefully advances step by step, with his mind becoming wider and wider—and progressively better able to grasp any theme or situation—persevering in what he knows to be practical, and concentrating his thought upon it, who is bound to succeed in the greatest degree.
In Orison Swett Marden, 'Bell Telephone Talk: Hints on Success by Alexander G. Bell', How They Succeeded: Life Stories of Successful Men Told by Themselves (1901), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Accretion (5)  |  Advance (280)  |  Attain (125)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Better (486)  |  Bound (119)  |  Carefully (65)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Degree (276)  |  End (590)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Know (1518)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Practical (200)  |  Progressive (17)  |  Result (677)  |  Situation (113)  |  Steady (44)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Strength (126)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Success (302)  |  Theme (17)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vigorous (20)

The narrow slit through which the scientist, if he wants to be successful, must view nature constructs, if this goes on for a long time, his entire character; and, more often than not, he ends up becoming what the German language so appropriately calls a Fachidiot (professional idiot).
Heraclitean Fire: Sketches from a Life before Nature (1978), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Becoming (96)  |  Call (769)  |  Character (243)  |  Construct (124)  |  End (590)  |  German (36)  |  Idiot (22)  |  Language (293)  |  Long (790)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Professional (70)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  View (488)  |  Want (497)

The object of geometry in all its measuring and computing, is to ascertain with exactness the plan of the great Geometer, to penetrate the veil of material forms, and disclose the thoughts which lie beneath them? When our researches are successful, and when a generous and heaven-eyed inspiration has elevated us above humanity, and raised us triumphantly into the very presence, as it were, of the divine intellect, how instantly and entirely are human pride and vanity repressed, and, by a single glance at the glories of the infinite mind, are we humbled to the dust.
From 'Mathematical Investigation of the Fractions Which Occur in Phyllotaxis', Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1850), 2, 447, as quoted by R. C. Archibald in 'Benjamin Peirce: V. Biographical Sketch', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jan 1925), 32, No. 1, 12.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Compute (18)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Divine (112)  |  Dust (64)  |  Elevated (3)  |  Entirely (34)  |  Exactness (29)  |  Form (959)  |  Generous (17)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Glance (34)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Lie (364)  |  Material (353)  |  Measuring (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Object (422)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Plan (117)  |  Presence (63)  |  Pride (78)  |  Research (664)  |  Single (353)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vanity (19)  |  Veil (26)

The pace of science forces the pace of technique. Theoretical physics forces atomic energy on us; the successful production of the fission bomb forces upon us the manufacture of the hydrogen bomb. We do not choose our problems, we do not choose our products; we are pushed, we are forced—by what? By a system which has no purpose and goal transcending it, and which makes man its appendix.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appendix (5)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Bomb (18)  |  Choose (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fission (10)  |  Force (487)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Hydrogen Bomb (16)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Pace (14)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Product (160)  |  Production (183)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Push (62)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Technique (80)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Transcend (26)

The principal impetus for my entering a career in science … was the successful launching of Sputnik in 1957, and the then current belief that science and technology was going to be where the action was in the coming decades.
From 'Richard E. Smalley: Biographical', collected in Tore Frängsmyr (ed.), Les Prix Nobel: The Nobel Prizes 1996 (1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biography (240)  |  Career (75)  |  Coming (114)  |  Current (118)  |  Decade (59)  |  Impetus (5)  |  Launch (20)  |  Principal (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  Sputnik (4)  |  Technology (257)

The Principle of Uncertainty is a bad name. In science or outside of it we are not uncertain; our knowledge is merely confined, within a certain tolerance. We should call it the Principle of Tolerance. And I propose that name in two senses: First, in the engineering sense, science has progressed, step by step, the most successful enterprise in the ascent of man, because it has understood that the exchange of information between man and nature, and man and man, can only take place with a certain tolerance. But second, I also use the word, passionately, about the real world. All knowledge, all information between human beings, can only be exchanged within a play of tolerance. And that is true whether the exchange is in science, or in literature, or in religion, or in politics, or in any form of thought that aspires to dogma. It’s a major tragedy of my lifetime and yours that scientists were refining, to the most exquisite precision, the Principle of Tolerance, and turning their backs on the fact that all around them, tolerance was crashing to the ground beyond repair. The Principle of Uncertainty or, in my phrase, the Principle of Tolerance, fixed once for all the realization that all knowledge is limited. It is an irony of history that at the very time when this was being worked out there should rise, under Hitler in Germany and other tyrants elsewhere, a counter-conception: a principle of monstrous certainty. When the future looks back on the 1930s it will think of them as a crucial confrontation of culture as I have been expounding it, the ascent of man, against the throwback to the despots’ belief that they have absolute certainty. It is said that science will dehumanize people and turn them into numbers. That is false: tragically false. Look for yourself. This is the concentration camp and crematorium at Auschwitz. This is where people were turned into numbers. Into this pond were flushed the ashes of four million people. And that was not done by gas. It was done by arrogance. It was done by dogma. It was done by ignorance. When people believe that they have absolute knowledge, with no test in reality this is how they behave. This is what men do when they aspire to the knowledge of gods. Science is a very human form of knowledge. We are always at the brink of the known; we always feel forward for what is to be hoped. Every judgment in science stands on the edge of error, and is personal. Science is a tribute to what we can know although we are fallible. In the end, the words were said by Oliver Cromwell: “I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ: Think it possible you may be mistaken.” We have to cure ourselves of the itch for absolute knowledge and power. We have to close the distance between the push-button order and the human act. We have to touch people. [Referring to Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle.]
'Knowledge or Certainty,' episode 11, The Ascent of Man (1972), BBC TV series.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolute (145)  |  Act (272)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Ascent Of Man (6)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Auschwitz (5)  |  Back (390)  |  Bad (180)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beseech (3)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bowel (16)  |  Call (769)  |  Camp (10)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Christ (17)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Conception (154)  |  Confrontation (8)  |  Culture (143)  |  Cure (122)  |  Distance (161)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Edge (47)  |  End (590)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Error (321)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Exquisite (25)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fallible (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Forward (102)  |  Future (429)  |  Gas (83)  |  God (757)  |  Ground (217)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Information (166)  |  Itch (10)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Literature (103)  |  Look (582)  |  Major (84)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Outside (141)  |  People (1005)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Politics (112)  |  Pond (15)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Precision (68)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Push (62)  |  Reality (261)  |  Realization (43)  |  Refining (4)  |  Religion (361)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Stand (274)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  Test (211)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tolerance (10)  |  Touch (141)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Tribute (10)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Uncertainty Principle (8)  |  Understood (156)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The process of discovery is very simple. An unwearied and systematic application of known laws to nature, causes the unknown to reveal themselves. Almost any mode of observation will be successful at last, for what is most wanted is method.
In A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1862), 382.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Cause (541)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Last (426)  |  Law (894)  |  Method (505)  |  Mode (41)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Process (423)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Success (302)  |  System (537)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Want (497)  |  Weariness (6)  |  Will (2355)

The successful launching of the Sputnik was a demonstration of one of the highest scientific and technological achievements of man—a tantalizing invitation both to the militarist in search of ever more devastating means of destruction and to the astronomer searching for new means of carrying his instruments away from their earthbound environment.
In BBC Reith Lecture (9 Nov 1958), 'Astronomy Breaks Free', published as The Individual and the Universe (1959, 1961), 72.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Both (493)  |  Carry (127)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Devastating (5)  |  Earthbound (4)  |  Environment (216)  |  Highest (18)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invitation (11)  |  Launch (20)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Military (40)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Search (162)  |  Searching (5)  |  Sputnik (4)  |  Success (302)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)

The term Science should not be given to anything but the aggregate of the recipes that are always successful. All the rest is literature.
Moralités (1932). In Bill Swainson and Anne H. Soukhanov. Encarta Book of Quotations (2000), 951.
Science quotes on:  |  Aggregate (23)  |  All (4108)  |  Literature (103)  |  Rest (280)  |  Science (3879)  |  Term (349)

The three of us have worked on the development of the small and totally harmless fruit fly, Drosophila. This animal has been extremely cooperative in our hands - and has revealed to us some of its innermost secrets and tricks for developing from a single celled egg to a complex living being of great beauty and harmony. ... None of us expected that our work would be so successful or that our findings would ever have relevance to medicine.
Nobel Banquet Speech, 10 Dec 1995
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Complex (188)  |  Development (422)  |  Drosophila (7)  |  Egg (69)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fly (146)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Fruit Fly (6)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Living (491)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Relevance (16)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Secret (194)  |  Single (353)  |  Small (477)  |  Trick (35)  |  Work (1351)

The ultimate function of prophecy is not to tell the future, but to make it. Your successful past will block your visions of the future.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Block (12)  |  Function (228)  |  Future (429)  |  Past (337)  |  Prophecy (13)  |  Tell (340)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Vision (123)  |  Will (2355)

The value of mathematical instruction as a preparation for those more difficult investigations, consists in the applicability not of its doctrines but of its methods. Mathematics will ever remain the past perfect type of the deductive method in general; and the applications of mathematics to the simpler branches of physics furnish the only school in which philosophers can effectually learn the most difficult and important of their art, the employment of the laws of simpler phenomena for explaining and predicting those of the more complex. These grounds are quite sufficient for deeming mathematical training an indispensable basis of real scientific education, and regarding with Plato, one who is … as wanting in one of the most essential qualifications for the successful cultivation of the higher branches of philosophy
In System of Logic, Bk. 3, chap. 24, sect. 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicability (6)  |  Application (242)  |  Art (657)  |  Basis (173)  |  Branch (150)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consist (223)  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Deductive (11)  |  Deem (6)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Education (378)  |  Effectually (2)  |  Employment (32)  |  Essential (199)  |  Explain (322)  |  Furnish (96)  |  General (511)  |  Ground (217)  |  High (362)  |  Important (209)  |  Indispensable (28)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Plato (76)  |  Predict (79)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Qualification (14)  |  Real (149)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remain (349)  |  School (219)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Simple (406)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Training (80)  |  Type (167)  |  Value (365)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

The vitality of thought is in adventure. Idea's won't keep. Something must be done about them. When the idea is new, its custodians have fervour, live for it, and, if need be, die for it. Their inheritors receive the idea, perhaps now strong and successful, but without inheriting the fervour; so the idea settles down to a comfortable middle age, turns senile, and dies.
In Alfred North Whitehead and Lucien Price (ed.), Dialogues of Alfred North Whitehead (1954, 1977), 100.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Adventure (56)  |  Age (499)  |  Comfortable (10)  |  Custodian (3)  |  Die (86)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Fervor (7)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Keep (101)  |  Live (628)  |  Middle Age (18)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Receive (114)  |  Settle (19)  |  Something (719)  |  Strong (174)  |  Thought (953)  |  Turn (447)  |  Vitality (23)

The world little knows how many of the thoughts and theories which have passed through the mind of a scientific investigator, have been crushed in silence and secrecy by his own severe criticism and adverse examination; that in the most successful instances not a tenth of the suggestions, the hopes, the wishes, the preliminary conclusions have been realized.
In 'Observations On Mental Education', a lecture before the Prince Consort and the Royal Institution (6 May 1854). Experimental Researches in Chemistry and Physics (1859), 486.
Science quotes on:  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Crush (18)  |  Examination (98)  |  Hope (299)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Pass (238)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Silence (56)  |  Suggestion (46)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  World (1774)

The world’s first spaceship, Vostok (East), with a man on board was launched into orbit from the Soviet Union on April 12, 1961. The pilot space-navigator of the satellite-spaceship Vostok is a citizen of the U.S.S.R., Flight Major Yuri Gagarin.
The launching of the multistage space rocket was successful and, after attaining the first escape velocity and the separation of the last stage of the carrier rocket, the spaceship went in to free flight on around-the-earth orbit. According to preliminary data, the period of revolution of the satellite spaceship around the earth is 89.1 min. The minimum distance from the earth at perigee is 175 km (108.7 miles) and the maximum at apogee is 302 km (187.6 miles), and the angle of inclination of the orbit plane to the equator is 65º 4’. The spaceship with the navigator weighs 4725 kg (10,418.6 lb), excluding the weight of the final stage of the carrier rocket.
The first man in space was announced by the Soviet newsagency Tass on 12 April 1961, 9:59 a.m. Moscow time.
Tass
Quoted in John David Anderson, Jr., Hypersonic and High Temperature Gas Dynamics (2000), 2.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  April (9)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Data (156)  |  Distance (161)  |  Earth (996)  |  Equator (6)  |  Escape (80)  |  Final (118)  |  First (1283)  |  Flight (98)  |  Free (232)  |  Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (13)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Last (426)  |  Launch (20)  |  Major (84)  |  Man (2251)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Period (198)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Rocket (43)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Separation (57)  |  Soviet (9)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Flight (25)  |  Stage (143)  |  Time (1877)  |  Union (51)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Weight (134)  |  World (1774)

Theorems are not to mathematics what successful courses are to a meal.
In Rota's 'Introduction' written (1980) to preface Philip J. Davis and Reuben Hersh, The Mathematical Experience (1981, 2012), xxii-xxiii.
Science quotes on:  |  Course (409)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meal (18)  |  Theorem (112)

There are three chief requisites for a successful business man. The first is honesty—absolute honesty … the second … is industry … [and] perseverance is the third.
From address to the Brown University YMCA, as quoted in 'Young Rockefeller: Defending Trusts, Uses American Beauty Similitude,' Cincinnati Enquirer (9 Feb 1902), 4, citing the New York Journal.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Business (149)  |  Businessman (4)  |  Chief (97)  |  First (1283)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Industry (137)  |  Man (2251)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Requisite (11)

There is poetry in science and the cultivation of the imagination is an essential prerequisite to the successful investigation of nature.
Presidential address to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (22 Aug 1850),The Papers of Joseph Henry, Vol. 8, 89. (Original text had typos: “immagination” and “prerequsite”.)
Science quotes on:  |  Cultivation (35)  |  Essential (199)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Prerequisite (9)  |  Science (3879)

Thinking is merely the comparing of ideas, discerning relations of likeness and of difference between ideas, and drawing inferences. It is seizing general truths on the basis of clearly apprehended particulars. It is but generalizing and particularizing. Who will deny that a child can deal profitably with sequences of ideas like: How many marbles are 2 marbles and 3 marbles? 2 pencils and 3 pencils? 2 balls and 3 balls? 2 children and 3 children? 2 inches and 3 inches? 2 feet and 3 feet? 2 and 3? Who has not seen the countenance of some little learner light up at the end of such a series of questions with the exclamation, “Why it’s always that way. Isn’t it?” This is the glow of pleasure that the generalizing step always affords him who takes the step himself. This is the genuine life-giving joy which comes from feeling that one can successfully take this step. The reality of such a discovery is as great, and the lasting effect upon the mind of him that makes it is as sure as was that by which the great Newton hit upon the generalization of the law of gravitation. It is through these thrills of discovery that love to learn and intellectual pleasure are begotten and fostered. Good arithmetic teaching abounds in such opportunities.
In Arithmetic in Public Education (1909), 13. As quoted and cited in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 68.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abound (17)  |  Afford (17)  |  Apprehend (5)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Ball (62)  |  Basis (173)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Compare (69)  |  Countenance (8)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deny (66)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Drawing (56)  |  Effect (393)  |  End (590)  |  Exclamation (3)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Foster (12)  |  General (511)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Generalize (19)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Glow (14)  |  Good (889)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hit (20)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inference (45)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Joy (107)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravitation (22)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learner (10)  |  Life (1795)  |  Life-Giving (2)  |  Light (607)  |  Likeness (18)  |  Little (707)  |  Love (309)  |  Marble (20)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Particular (76)  |  Pencil (20)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Question (621)  |  Reality (261)  |  Relation (157)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Series (149)  |  Step (231)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thrill (22)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

Those who have taken upon them to lay down the law of nature as a thing already searched out and understood, whether they have spoken in simple assurance or professional affectation, have therein done philosophy and the sciences great injury. For as they have been successful in inducing belief, so they have been effective in quenching and stopping inquiry; and have done more harm by spoiling and putting an end to other men's efforts than good by their own. Those on the other hand who have taken a contrary course, and asserted that absolutely nothing can be known — whether it were from hatred of the ancient sophists, or from uncertainty and fluctuation of mind, or even from a kind of fullness of learning, that they fell upon this opinion — have certainly advanced reasons for it that are not to be despised; but yet they have neither started from true principles nor rested in the just conclusion, zeal and affectation having carried them much too far...
Now my method, though hard to practice, is easy to explain; and it is this. I propose to establish progressive stages of certainty. The evidence of the sense, helped and guarded by a certain process of correction, I retain. But the mental operation which follows the act of sense I for the most part reject; and instead of it I open and lay out a new and certain path for the mind to proceed in, starting directly from the simple sensuous perception.
Novum Organum (1620)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Already (222)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Assert (66)  |  Assurance (17)  |  Belief (578)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Correction (40)  |  Course (409)  |  Down (456)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effective (59)  |  Effort (227)  |  End (590)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fluctuation (14)  |  Follow (378)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Injury (36)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Kind (557)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Learning (274)  |  Mental (177)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Operation (213)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Path (144)  |  Perception (97)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Practice (204)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Process (423)  |  Professional (70)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reject (63)  |  Rest (280)  |  Retain (56)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Stage (143)  |  Start (221)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Understood (156)

Those who nod sagely and quote the tragedy of the commons in relation to environmental problems from pollution of the atmosphere to poaching of national parks tend to forget that Garrett Hardin revised his conclusions many times…. He recognized, most importantly, that anarchy did not prevail on the common pastures of medieval England in the way he had described…. “A managed commons, though it may have other defects, is not automatically subject to the tragic fate of the unmanaged commons,” wrote Hardin…. At sea, where a common exists in most waters… None of Hardin’s requirements for a successfully managed common is fulfilled by high-seas fishery regimes.
In The End of the Line: How Overfishing is Changing the World and what We Eat (2004), 153-155.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Air Pollution (9)  |  Anarchy (6)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Automatic (16)  |  Common (436)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Defect (31)  |  England (40)  |  Environment (216)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fate (72)  |  Fishery (2)  |  Forget (115)  |  Fulfilled (2)  |  Garrett Hardin (2)  |  High (362)  |  Medieval (10)  |  Most (1731)  |  National Park (4)  |  Ocean Pollution (10)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Problem (676)  |  Quote (42)  |  Recognized (3)  |  Regime (2)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Sea (308)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tend (124)  |  Time (1877)  |  Tragedy (29)  |  Tragic (17)  |  Water (481)  |  Water Pollution (11)  |  Way (1217)  |  Write (230)

Throughout his career, [Richard] Drew tried to create an environment where people were encouraged to follow their instincts. He was known at 3M as a consummate mentor, encouraging and helping to train many of the company’s young scientists, who went on to develop successful products of their own, paving the way for 3M’s culture of innovation.
Magazine
In Press Release (7 May 2007) on 3M Company website.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  3M Company (2)  |  Career (75)  |  Company (59)  |  Consummate (4)  |  Create (235)  |  Culture (143)  |  Develop (268)  |  Richard G. Drew (6)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Encouraging (12)  |  Environment (216)  |  Follow (378)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Known (454)  |  Mentor (3)  |  People (1005)  |  Product (160)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Throughout (98)  |  Train (114)  |  Way (1217)  |  Young (227)

Thus I learned the single essential to qualify a dive as successful: a return.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Dive (11)  |  Essential (199)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Qualify (4)  |  Return (124)  |  Single (353)

To be successful be ahead of your time, but only a little.
City Aphorisms, Tenth Selection (1991).
Science quotes on:  |  Ahead (19)  |  Little (707)  |  Time (1877)

To do successful research, you don’t need to know everything, you just need to know one thing that isn’t known.
As quoted in Steven Chu and Charles H. Townes, 'Arthur Schawlow', Biographical Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences (2003), Vol. 83, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Need (290)  |  Research (664)  |  Thing (1915)

To the east was our giant neighbor Makalu, unexplored and unclimbed, and even on top of Everest the mountaineering instinct was sufficient strong to cause me to spend some moments conjecturing as to whether a route up that mountain might not exist. Far away across the clouds the great bulk of Kangchenjunga loomed on the horizon. To the west, Cho Oyu, our old adversary from 1952, dominated the scene and we could see the great unexplored ranges of Nepal stretching off into the distance. The most important photograph, I felt, was a shot down the north ridge, showing the North Col and the old route that had been made famous by the struggles of those great climbers of the 1920s and 1930s. I had little hope of the results being particularly successful, as I had a lot of difficulty in holding the camera steady in my clumsy gloves, but I felt that they would at least serve as a record. After some ten minutes of this, I realized that I was becoming rather clumsy-fingered and slow-moving, so I quickly replaced my oxygen set and experience once more the stimulating effect of even a few liters of oxygen. Meanwhile, Tenzing had made a little hole in the snow and in it he placed small articles of food – a bar of chocolate, a packet of biscuits and a handful of lollies. Small offerings, indeed, but at least a token gifts to the gods that all devoted Buddhists believe have their home on this lofty summit. While we were together on the South Col two days before, Hunt had given me a small crucifix that he had asked me to take to the top. I, too, made a hole in the snow and placed the crucifix beside Tenzing’s gifts.
As quoted in Whit Burnett, The Spirit of Adventure: The Challenge (1955), 349.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Across (32)  |  Adversary (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Article (22)  |  Ask (411)  |  Bar (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Buddhist (5)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Camera (6)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chocolate (4)  |  Climb (35)  |  Climber (7)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Clumsy (6)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Devote (35)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Distance (161)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Down (456)  |  East (18)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everest (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Experience (467)  |  Famous (10)  |  Far (154)  |  Feel (367)  |  Food (199)  |  Giant (67)  |  Gift (104)  |  Give (202)  |  Glove (4)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Handful (13)  |  Hold (95)  |  Hole (16)  |  Home (170)  |  Hope (299)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Important (209)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Least (75)  |  Little (707)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Loom (20)  |  Lot (151)  |  Meanwhile (2)  |  Minute (125)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Mountaineering (2)  |  Neighbor (11)  |  Nepal (2)  |  North (11)  |  Offering (2)  |  Old (481)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Packet (3)  |  Particularly (21)  |  Photograph (19)  |  Place (177)  |  Quickly (18)  |  Range (99)  |  Realize (147)  |  Record (154)  |  Replace (31)  |  Result (677)  |  Ridge (7)  |  Route (15)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Serve (59)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Show (346)  |  Slow (101)  |  Small (477)  |  Snow (37)  |  South (38)  |  Spend (95)  |  Steady (44)  |  Stimulate (18)  |  Stretch (39)  |  Strong (174)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Summit (25)  |  Together (387)  |  Token (9)  |  Top (96)  |  Two (937)  |  Unexplored (14)  |  West (17)

To what part of electrical science are we not indebted to Faraday? He has increased our knowledge of the hidden and unknown to such an extent, that all subsequent writers are compelled so frequently to mention his name and quote his papers, that the very repetition becomes monotonous. [How] humiliating it may be to acknowledge so great a share of successful investigation to one man...
In the Second Edition ofElements of Electro-Metallurgy: or The Art of Working in Metals by the Galvanic Fluid (143), 128.
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  Acknowledgment (12)  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Extent (139)  |  Michael Faraday (85)  |  Frequency (22)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Humiliation (4)  |  Increase (210)  |  Indebtedness (4)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mention (82)  |  Monotonous (3)  |  Name (333)  |  Paper (182)  |  Quote (42)  |  Repetition (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Share (75)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Success (302)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Writer (86)

Try not to become a man of success, but rather try to become a man of value. He is considered successful in our day who gets more out of life than he puts in. But a man of value will give more than he receives."
In William Miller, 'Old Man's Advice to Youth: Never Lose a Holy Curiosity', Life (2 May 1955), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Consider (416)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Receive (114)  |  Success (302)  |  Try (283)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

We have not been seeing our Spaceship Earth as an integrally-designed machine which to be persistently successful must be comprehended and serviced in total.
In Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth (1969), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Design (195)  |  Earth (996)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Integral (26)  |  Machine (257)  |  Must (1526)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Service (110)  |  Success (302)  |  Total (94)

We must remember that all our [models of flying machine] inventions are but developments of crude ideas; that a commercially successful result in a practically unexplored field cannot possibly be got without an enormous amount of unremunerative work. It is the piled-up and recorded experience of many busy brains that has produced the luxurious travelling conveniences of to-day, which in no way astonish us, and there is no good reason for supposing that we shall always be content to keep on the agitated surface of the sea and air, when it is possible to travel in a superior plane, unimpeded by frictional disturbances.
Paper to the Royal Society of New South Wales (4 Jun 1890), as quoted in Octave Chanute, Progress in Flying Machines (1894), 2226.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Amount (151)  |  Astonish (37)  |  Brain (270)  |  Busy (28)  |  Commercially (3)  |  Content (69)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Crude (31)  |  Development (422)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Experience (467)  |  Field (364)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Invention (369)  |  Machine (257)  |  Model (102)  |  Must (1526)  |  Plane (20)  |  Possible (552)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Practically (10)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Reason (744)  |  Record (154)  |  Recorded (2)  |  Remember (179)  |  Result (677)  |  Sea (308)  |  Superior (81)  |  Supposing (3)  |  Surface (209)  |  Today (314)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Unexplored (14)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

What politicians do not understand is that [Ian] Wilmut discovered not so much a technical trick as a new law of nature. We now know that an adult mammalian cell can fire up all the dormant genetic instructions that shut down as it divides and specializes and ages, and thus can become a source of new life. You can outlaw technique; you cannot repeal biology.
Writing after Wilmut's successful cloning of the sheep, Dolly, that research on the cloning of human beings cannot be suppressed.
'A Special Report on Cloning'. Charles Krauthammer in Time (10 Mar 1997).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ban (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cell (138)  |  Clone (8)  |  Cloning (8)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dolly (2)  |  Down (456)  |  Fire (189)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Politician (38)  |  Research (664)  |  Shut (41)  |  Technique (80)  |  Trick (35)  |  Understand (606)  |  Ian Wilmut (5)  |  Writing (189)

When a physician is called to a patient, he should decide on the diagnosis, then the prognosis, and then the treatment. … Physicians must know the evolution of the disease, its duration and gravity in order to predict its course and outcome. Here statistics intervene to guide physicians, by teaching them the proportion of mortal cases, and if observation has also shown that the successful and unsuccessful cases can be recognized by certain signs, then the prognosis is more certain.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 213.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Course (409)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Guide (97)  |  Know (1518)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prognosis (5)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Rising (44)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universal (189)  |  Wholeness (9)

Whoever has undergone the intense experience of successful advances made in [science], is moved by profound reverence for the rationality made manifest in existence.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experience (467)  |  Intense (20)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Move (216)  |  Profound (104)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Undergo (14)  |  Whoever (42)

You cannot force ideas. Successful ideas are the result of slow growth. Ideas do not reach perfection in a day, no matter how much study is put upon them. It is perserverance in the pursuit of studies that is really wanted.
In Orison Swett Marden, 'Bell Telephone Talk: Hints on Success by Alexander G. Bell', How They Succeeded: Life Stories of Successful Men Told by Themselves (1901), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Force (487)  |  Growth (187)  |  Idea (843)  |  Matter (798)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Reach (281)  |  Result (677)  |  Slow (101)  |  Study (653)  |  Success (302)  |  Want (497)

Your Grace will no doubt have learnt from the weekly reports of one Marco Antonio Bragadini, called Mamugnano. … He is reported to be able to turn base metal into gold… . He literally throws gold about in shovelfuls. This is his recipe: he takes ten ounces of quicksilver, puts it into the fire, and mixes it with a drop of liquid, which he carries in an ampulla. Thus it promptly turns into good gold. He has no other wish but to be of good use to his country, the Republic. The day before yesterday he presented to the Secret Council of Ten two ampullas with this liquid, which have been tested in his absence. The first test was found to be successful and it is said to have resulted in six million ducats. I doubt not but that this will appear mighty strange to your Grace.
Anonymous
'The Famous Alchemist Bragadini. From Vienna on the 1st day of November 1589'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) News and Rumor in Renaissance Europe: The Fugger Newsletters (1959), 173. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Call (769)  |  Council (8)  |  Country (251)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Drop (76)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Gold (97)  |  Good (889)  |  Grace (31)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Literally (30)  |  Mamugnano (2)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Metal (84)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Quicksilver (7)  |  Recipe (7)  |  Republic (15)  |  Result (677)  |  Secret (194)  |  Strange (157)  |  Test (211)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Yesterday (36)

[Florence Nightingale] was a great administrator, and to reach excellence here is impossible without being an ardent student of statistics. Florence Nightingale has been rightly termed the “Passionate Statistician.” Her statistics were more than a study, they were indeed her religion. For her, Quetelet was the hero as scientist, and the presentation copy of his Physique Sociale is annotated by her on every page. Florence Nightingale believed—and in all the actions of her life acted upon that belief—that the administrator could only be successful if he were guided by statistical knowledge. The legislator—to say nothing of the politician—too often failed for want of this knowledge. Nay, she went further: she held that the universe—including human communities—was evolving in accordance with a divine plan; that it was man's business to endeavour to understand this plan and guide his actions in sympathy with it. But to understand God's thoughts, she held we must study statistics, for these are the measure of his purpose. Thus the study of statistics was for her a religious duty.
In Karl Pearson, The Life, Letters and Labours of Francis Galton (1924), Vol. 2, 414-5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Action (327)  |  Administrator (11)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Business (149)  |  Copy (33)  |  Divine (112)  |  Duty (68)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Excellence (39)  |  Fail (185)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hero (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Measure (232)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Florence Nightingale (34)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Plan (117)  |  Politician (38)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Lambert Adolphe Jacques Quételet (2)  |  Reach (281)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Statistician (27)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  Term (349)  |  Thought (953)  |  Understand (606)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)

[I] learnt, for the first time, the joys of substituting hard, disciplined study for the indulgence of day-dreaming.
[Comment on his successful undergraduate studies at the University of St. Andrews.]
As quoted in Obituary, The Times (24 Mar 2010)
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (240)  |  Day Dream (2)  |  Discipline (77)  |  First (1283)  |  Hard (243)  |  Indulgence (6)  |  Joy (107)  |  Study (653)  |  Time (1877)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  University (121)

[The Whig interpretation of history] ... is the tendency in many historians to write on the side of Protestants and Whigs, to praise revolutions provided they have been successful, to emphasise certain principles of progress in the past and to produce a story which is the ratification if not the glorification of the present.
The Whig Interpretation of History (1931), v.
Science quotes on:  |  Certain (550)  |  Glorification (2)  |  Historian (54)  |  History (673)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Past (337)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Side (233)  |  Story (118)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Write (230)

“Planning” is simply the result of experience read backward and projected into the future. To me the “purposive” action of a beehive is simply the summation and integration of its units, and Natural Selection has put higher and higher premiums on the most “purposeful” integration. It is the same way (to me) in the evolution of the middle ear, the steps in the Cynodonts (clearly shown by me in 1910 and by you later in Oudenodon) make it easier to see how such a wonderful device as the middle ear could arise without any predetermination or human-like planning, and in fact in the good old Darwinian way, if only we admit that as the “twig is bent the tree’s inclined” and that each stage conserves the advantages of its predecessors… The simple idea that planning is only experience read backward and combined by selection in suitable or successful combinations takes the mystery out of Nature and out of men’s minds.
Letter to Robert Broom [1933]. In Ronald Rainger, An Agenda for Antiquity (1991), 238.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Action (327)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Arise (158)  |  Beehive (2)  |  Combination (144)  |  Device (70)  |  Ear (68)  |  Easier (53)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Future (429)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Integration (19)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Old (481)  |  Planning (20)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Project (73)  |  Read (287)  |  Result (677)  |  See (1081)  |  Selection (128)  |  Simple (406)  |  Stage (143)  |  Step (231)  |  Summation (3)  |  Tree (246)  |  Twig (14)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonderful (149)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.