Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Genius is two percent inspiration, ninety-eight percent perspiration.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Technique

Technique Quotes (41 quotes)

Among the studies to which the [Rockefeller] Foundation is giving support is a series in a relatively new field, which may be called molecular biology, in which delicate modern techniques are being used to investigate ever more minute details of certain life processes.
In 'Molecular Biology', Annual Report of the Rockefeller Foundation (1938), 203-4. Reprinted in a letter to Science (6 Nov 1970), 170, 582.
Science quotes on:  |  Delicate (11)  |  Detail (65)  |  Field (119)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Life (917)  |  Minute (25)  |  Modern (104)  |  Molecular Biology (23)  |  New (340)  |  Process (201)  |  Series (38)  |  Study (331)  |  Support (63)

Anthropology is the study of human beings as creatures of society. It fastens its attention upon those physical characteristics and industrial techniques, those conventions and values, which distinguish one community from all others that belong to a different tradition.
In 'The Science of Custom', Patterns of Culture (1934, 2005), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Anthropology (51)  |  Attention (76)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Community (65)  |  Convention (13)  |  Creature (127)  |  Different (110)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Human Being (54)  |  Industrial (11)  |  Physical (94)  |  Society (188)  |  Study (331)  |  Tradition (43)  |  Value (180)

As never before, the work of the engineer is basic to the kind of society to which our best efforts are committed. Whether it be city planning, improved health care in modern facilities, safer and more efficient transportation, new techniques of communication, or better ways to control pollution and dispose of wastes, the role of the engineer—his initiative, creative ability, and hard work—is at the root of social progress.
Remarks for National Engineers Week (1971). As quoted in Consulting Engineer (1971), 36, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (75)  |  Communication (58)  |  Control (93)  |  Creativity (66)  |  Dispose (7)  |  Efficient (20)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Health Care (7)  |  Improve (39)  |  New (340)  |  Pollution (37)  |  Progress (317)  |  Root (48)  |  Safety (39)  |  Social (93)  |  Society (188)  |  Transportation (10)  |  Waste (57)  |  Work (457)

At the present time it is of course quite customary for physicists to trespass on chemical ground, for mathematicians to do excellent work in physics, and for physicists to develop new mathematical procedures. … Trespassing is one of the most successful techniques in science.
In Dynamics in Psychology (1940, 1973), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Custom (24)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Physics (301)  |  Success (202)  |  Trespassing (2)

Each new machine or technique, in a sense, changes all existing machines and techniques, by permitting us to put them together into new combinations. The number of possible combinations rises exponentially as the number of new machines or techniques rises
Future Shock (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  Change (291)  |  Combination (69)  |  Exist (89)  |  Exponentially (2)  |  Machine (133)  |  New (340)  |  Number (179)  |  Permit (20)  |  Possible (100)  |  Rise (51)  |  Sense (240)  |  Together (48)

Fish farming, even with conventional techniques, changes fish within a few generations from an animal like a wild buffalo or a wildebeest to the equivalent of a domestic cow.
In The End of the Line: How Overfishing is Changing the World and what We Eat (2004), 312.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Aquaculture (5)  |  Buffalo (2)  |  Change (291)  |  Conventional (16)  |  Cow (27)  |  Domestic (12)  |  Equivalent (14)  |  Fish Farming (2)  |  Generation (111)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Salmon (4)  |  Wild (39)  |  Wildebeest (2)

FORTRAN —’the infantile disorder’—, by now nearly 20 years old, is hopelessly inadequate for whatever computer application you have in mind today: it is now too clumsy, too risky, and too expensive to use. PL/I —’the fatal disease’— belongs more to the problem set than to the solution set. It is practically impossible to teach good programming to students that have had a prior exposure to BASIC: as potential programmers they are mentally mutilated beyond hope of regeneration. The use of COBOL cripples the mind; its teaching should, therefore, be regarded as a criminal offence. APL is a mistake, carried through to perfection. It is the language of the future for the programming techniques of the past: it creates a new generation of coding bums.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Basic (52)  |  Belong (33)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Bum (3)  |  Carry (35)  |  Clumsy (4)  |  Code (12)  |  Computer (84)  |  Create (98)  |  Criminal (14)  |  Cripple (2)  |  Disease (257)  |  Disorder (19)  |  Expensive (5)  |  Exposure (5)  |  Fatal (10)  |  Fortran (3)  |  Future (229)  |  Generation (111)  |  Good (228)  |  Hope (129)  |  Hopelessly (3)  |  Impossible (68)  |  Inadequate (13)  |  Infantile (4)  |  Language (155)  |  Mentally (3)  |  Mind (544)  |  Mistake (107)  |  Mutilated (2)  |  Nearly (19)  |  New (340)  |  Offence (4)  |  Old (104)  |  Past (109)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Potential (34)  |  Practically (9)  |  Prior (5)  |  Problem (362)  |  Program (32)  |  Programmer (3)  |  Regard (58)  |  Regeneration (4)  |  Risky (4)  |  Set (56)  |  Solution (168)  |  Student (131)  |  Teach (102)  |  Today (86)  |  Year (214)

Gradually, … the aspect of science as knowledge is being thrust into the background by the aspect of science as the power of manipulating nature. It is because science gives us the power of manipulating nature that it has more social importance than art. Science as the pursuit of truth is the equal, but not the superior, of art. Science as a technique, though it may have little intrinsic value, has a practical importance to which art cannot aspire.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Aspect (37)  |  Aspire (4)  |  Background (24)  |  Equal (53)  |  Importance (183)  |  Intrinsic (10)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Manipulate (4)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Power (273)  |  Practical (93)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Science (1699)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Social (93)  |  Superior (30)  |  Technology (199)  |  Truth (750)  |  Value (180)

Hardly a year passes that fails to find a new, oft-times exotic, research method or technique added to the armamentarium of political inquiry. Anyone who cannot negotiate Chi squares, assess randomization, statistical significance, and standard deviations
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Armamentarium (2)  |  Assess (2)  |  Exotic (4)  |  Fail (34)  |  Find (248)  |  Hardly (12)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Method (154)  |  Negotiate (2)  |  New (340)  |  Pass (60)  |  Political (31)  |  Research (517)  |  Significance (60)  |  Square (10)  |  Statistical (4)  |  Year (214)

In 1945 J.A. Ratcliffe … suggested that I [join his group at Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge] to start an investigation of the radio emission from the Sun, which had recently been discovered accidentally with radar equipment. … [B]oth Ratcliffe and Sir Lawrence Bragg, then Cavendish Professor, gave enormous support and encouragement to me. Bragg’s own work on X-ray crystallography involved techniques very similar to those we were developing for “aperture synthesis,” and he always showed a delighted interest in the way our work progressed.
From Autobiography in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1974/Nobel Lectures (1975)
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (54)  |  Aperture (4)  |  Sir Lawrence Bragg (12)  |  Cambridge (11)  |  Delight (51)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Emission (16)  |  Encouragement (17)  |  Equipment (26)  |  Interest (170)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Progress (317)  |  Radar (6)  |  Radio (27)  |  Radio Telescope (5)  |  Ratcliffe_Jack (2)  |  Sun (211)  |  Support (63)  |  Synthesis (38)  |  Work (457)  |  X-ray Crystallography (11)

In science, as in love, a concentration on technique is likely to lead to impotence.
Invitation to Sociology (1936), 13. In Ken G. Smith and Michael A. Hitt, Great Minds in Management: the Theory of Process Development (2005), 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Concentration (14)  |  Impotence (6)  |  Love (164)  |  Science (1699)

Littlewood, on Hardy's own estimate, is the finest mathematician he has ever known. He was the man most likely to storm and smash a really deep and formidable problem; there was no one else who could command such a combination of insight, technique and power. (1943)
In Béla Bollobás, Littlewood's Miscellany (1986), Foreward, 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Biography (227)  |  Deep (81)  |  G. H. Hardy (69)  |  Insight (57)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Power (273)  |  Problem (362)  |  Proof (192)  |  Smash (3)

Melvin [Calvin]’s marvellous technique for delivering a scientific lecture was unique. His mind must have roamed constantly, especially in planning lectures. His remarkable memory enabled him to formulate a lecture or manuscript with no breaks in the sequence of his thoughts. His lectures usually began hesitatingly, as if he had little idea of how to begin or what to say. This completely disarmed his audiences, who would try to guess what he might have to say. Soon enough, however, his ideas would coalesce, to be delivered like an approaching freight train, reaching a crescendo of information at breakneck speed and leaving his rapt audience nearly overwhelmed.
Co-author with Andrew A. Benson, 'Melvin Calvin', Biographical Memoirs of the US National Academy of Science.
Science quotes on:  |  Audience (13)  |  Biography (227)  |  Melvin Calvin (11)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Formulate (10)  |  Hesitation (8)  |  Information (102)  |  Lecture (54)  |  Manuscript (7)  |  Memory (81)  |  Mind (544)  |  Overwhelmed (2)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Roam (3)  |  Speed (27)  |  Thought (374)  |  Train (25)  |  Unique (24)

Much of the work we do as scientists involves filling in the details about matters that are basically understood already, or applying standard techniques to new specific cases. But occasionally there is a question that offers an opportunity for a really major discovery.
In Tyrannosaurus Rex and the Crater of Doom (1997), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Basic (52)  |  Detail (65)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Major (24)  |  Occasionally (3)  |  Opportunity (43)  |  Question (315)  |  Research (517)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Standard (41)  |  Understanding (317)

Nobody is calling for an end to fishing on the high seas but some techniques, for example bottom trawling, must be banned.
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Ban (9)  |  Bottom (28)  |  Fish (85)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Trawling (6)

Of the nucleosides from deoxyribonucleic acids, all that was known with any certainty [in the 1940s] was that they were 2-deoxy-­D-ribosides of the bases adenine, guanine, thymine and cytosine and it was assumed that they were structurally analogous to the ribonucleosides. The chemistry of the nucleotides—the phosphates of the nucleosides—was in a correspondingly primitive state. It may well be asked why the chemistry of these groups of compounds was not further advanced, particularly since we recognize today that they occupy a central place in the history of the living cell. True, their full significance was for a long time unrecognized and emerged only slowly as biochemical research got into its stride but I think a more important reason is to be found in the physical properties of compounds of the nucleotide group. As water-soluble polar compounds with no proper melting points they were extremely difficult to handle by the classic techniques of organic chemistry, and were accordingly very discouraging substances to early workers. It is surely no accident that the major advances in the field have coincided with the appearance of new experimental techniques such as paper and ion-exchange chromatography, paper electrophoresis, and countercurrent distribution, peculiarly appropriate to the compounds of this group.
In 'Synthesis in the Study of Nucleotides', Nobel Lecture, 11 December 1957. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1942-1962 (1964), 524.
Science quotes on:  |  Adenine (4)  |  Analogous (2)  |  Base (43)  |  Biochemistry (46)  |  Cell (125)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Cytosine (4)  |  Electrophoresis (2)  |  Guanine (4)  |  Phosphate (3)  |  Polar (2)  |  Research (517)  |  Structure (191)  |  Thymine (4)

People still do not understand that a live fish is more valuable than a dead one, and that destructive fishing techniques are taking a wrecking ball to biodiversity.
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (20)  |  Biodiversity (8)  |  Dead (45)  |  Destructive (7)  |  Ecology (55)  |  Fish (85)  |  Live (186)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Understand (189)  |  Value (180)  |  Wreck (7)

Physicist Isador Isaac Rabi, who won a Nobel Prize for inventing a technique that permitted scientists to probe the structure of atoms and molecules in the 1930s, attributed his success to the way his mother used to greet him when he came home from school each day. “Did you ask any good questions today, Isaac?” she would say.
Thomas J. Peters, Liberation Management: Necessary Disorganization for the Nanosecond Nineties (1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (99)  |  Atom (251)  |  Greet (3)  |  Invention (283)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Mother (59)  |  Nobel Prize (26)  |  Probe (6)  |  Question (315)  |  School (87)  |  Structure (191)  |  Success (202)

Psychoanalysis has changed American psychiatry from a diagnostic to a therapeutic science, not because so many patients are cured by the psychoanalytic technique, but because of the new understanding of psychiatric patients it has given us and the new and different concepts of illness and health.
News summaries 29 Apr 56
Science quotes on:  |  American (34)  |  Change (291)  |  Concept (102)  |  Cure (88)  |  Diagnostic (2)  |  Different (110)  |  Give (117)  |  Health (136)  |  Illness (22)  |  New (340)  |  Patient (116)  |  Psychiatry (19)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Psychoanalytic (2)  |  Science (1699)  |  Therapeutic (2)  |  Understand (189)

Pure mathematics is much more than an armoury of tools and techniques for the applied mathematician. On the other hand, the pure mathematician has ever been grateful to applied mathematics for stimulus and inspiration. From the vibrations of the violin string they have drawn enchanting harmonies of Fourier Series, and to study the triode valve they have invented a whole theory of non-linear oscillations.
In 100 Years of Mathematics: a Personal Viewpoint (1981), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied Mathematics (10)  |  Grateful (3)  |  Hand (103)  |  Harmony (55)  |  Inspiration (50)  |  Invent (30)  |  Oscillation (6)  |  Pure Mathematics (27)  |  Stimulus (18)  |  String (17)  |  Study (331)  |  Theory (582)  |  Tool (70)  |  Valve (2)  |  Vibration (13)  |  Violin (2)

Scientific principles and laws do not lie on the surface of nature. They are hidden, and must be wrested from nature by an active and elaborate technique of inquiry.
Reconstruction in Philosophy, 1920
Science quotes on:  |  Active (17)  |  Elaborate (13)  |  Hide (36)  |  Inquiry (33)  |  Law (418)  |  Lie (80)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Principle (228)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Surface (74)  |  Wrest (3)

That only Galileo’s physical finger is preserved but the descendants of his techniques thrive is also symbolic of the transitoriness of personal existence in contrast to the immortality of knowledge.
In Galileo's Finger: The Ten Great Ideas of Science (2003), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Contrast (16)  |  Descendant (12)  |  Existence (254)  |  Finger (38)  |  Galileo Galilei (101)  |  Immortality (9)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Personal (49)  |  Preserve (38)  |  Symbol (35)  |  Thrive (6)  |  Transitory (3)

The distributed architecture and its technique of packet switching were built around the problem of getting messages delivered despite blockages, holes and malfunctions. Imagine the poor censor faced with such a system. There is no central exchange to seize and hold; messages actively “seek out” alternative routes so that even if one path is blocked another may open up. Here is the civil libertarian’s dream.
As quoted in Richard Rogers, 'The Internet Treats Censorship as a Malfunction and Routes Around It? : A New Media Approach to the Study of State Internet Censorship', collected in Jussi Parikka and Tony D. Sampson (eds.), The Spam Book: On Viruses, Porn, and Other Anomalies from the Dark Side of Digital Culture (2009), 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Alternative (22)  |  Architecture (35)  |  Block (8)  |  Censor (2)  |  Central (23)  |  Civil (2)  |  Delivery (4)  |  Distribute (5)  |  Dream (92)  |  Exchange (11)  |  Hold (56)  |  Malfunction (3)  |  Message (30)  |  Open (38)  |  Path (59)  |  Problem (362)  |  Route (11)  |  Seek (57)  |  Seize (10)

The engineer is concerned to travel from the abstract to the concrete. He begins with an idea and ends with an object. He journeys from theory to practice. The scientist’s job is the precise opposite. He explores nature with his telescopes or microscopes, or much more sophisticated techniques, and feeds into a computer what he finds or sees in an attempt to define mathematically its significance and relationships. He travels from the real to the symbolic, from the concrete to the abstract. The scientist and the engineer are the mirror image of each other.
In The Development of Design (1981), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (43)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Beginning (114)  |  Computer (84)  |  Concrete (21)  |  Definition (152)  |  End (141)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Exploration (93)  |  Idea (440)  |  Image (38)  |  Job (33)  |  Journey (19)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Microscope (68)  |  Mirror (21)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Object (110)  |  Opposite (39)  |  Practice (67)  |  Real (95)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Science And Engineering (11)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Significance (60)  |  Sophistication (8)  |  Symbolic (6)  |  Telescope (74)  |  Theory (582)  |  Travelling (3)

The frontiers of science are separated now by long years of study, by specialized vocabularies, arts, techniques, and knowledge from the common heritage even of a most civilized society; and anyone working at the frontier of such science is in that sense a very long way from home, a long way too from the practical arts that were its matrix and origin, as indeed they were of what we today call art.
Address at the close of the year-long Bicentennial Celebration of Columbia University (26 Dec 54). Printed in 'Prospects in the Arts and Sciences', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1955), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (155)  |  Frontier (16)  |  Heritage (10)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Matrix (5)  |  Origin (77)  |  Practical (93)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Separation (32)  |  Specialization (12)  |  Study (331)  |  Vocabulary (3)

The idea of achieving security through national armament is, at the present state of military technique, a disastrous illusion.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (36)  |  Armament (6)  |  Disastrous (3)  |  Idea (440)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Military (24)  |  National (20)  |  Present (103)  |  Security (27)  |  State (96)

The ideal engineer is a composite ... He is not a scientist, he is not a mathematician, he is not a sociologist or a writer; but he may use the knowledge and techniques of any or all of these disciplines in solving engineering problems.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Composite (3)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Problem (362)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Sociologist (2)  |  Solve (41)  |  Writer (35)

The pace of science forces the pace of technique. Theoretical physics forces atomic energy on us; the successful production of the fission bomb forces upon us the manufacture of the hydrogen bomb. We do not choose our problems, we do not choose our products; we are pushed, we are forced—by what? By a system which has no purpose and goal transcending it, and which makes man its appendix.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appendix (4)  |  Atomic Energy (21)  |  Bomb (17)  |  Choose (35)  |  Fission (7)  |  Force (194)  |  Goal (81)  |  Hydrogen Bomb (7)  |  Manufacture (12)  |  Pace (4)  |  Problem (362)  |  Product (72)  |  Production (105)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Push (22)  |  Science (1699)  |  Successful (20)  |  System (141)  |  Theoretical Physics (15)  |  Transcend (9)

The present rate of progress [in X-ray crystallography] is determined, not so much by the lack of problems to investigate or the limited power of X-ray analysis, as by the restricted number of investigators who have had a training in the technique of the new science, and by the time it naturally takes for its scientific and technical importance to become widely appreciated.
Concluding remark in Lecture (1936) on 'Forty Years of Crystal Physics', collected in Needham and Pagel (eds.) in Background to Modern Science: Ten Lectures at Cambridge Arranged by the History of Science Committee, (1938), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Appreciate (17)  |  Become (100)  |  Determine (45)  |  Importance (183)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Investigator (28)  |  Lack (52)  |  Limited (13)  |  Naturally (7)  |  New (340)  |  Number (179)  |  Power (273)  |  Present (103)  |  Problem (362)  |  Progress (317)  |  Rate (22)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)  |  Take (8)  |  Technical (26)  |  Time (439)  |  Training (39)  |  Widely (5)  |  X-ray Crystallography (11)

The recent ruling by the Supreme Court restricting obscenity in books, magazines and movies, requires that we re-examine our own journals for lewd contents. The recent chemical literature provides many examples of words and concepts whose double meaning and thinly veiled overtones are an affront to all clean chemists. What must a layman think of ‘coupling constants’, ‘tickling techniques’, or indeed ‘increased overlap’? The bounds of propriety are surely exceeded when heterocyclic chemists discuss homoenolization.
In Chemical Engineering News (8 Oct 1973), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (181)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Clean (20)  |  Concept (102)  |  Journal (13)  |  Layman (13)  |  Lewd (2)  |  Literature (64)  |  Magazine (19)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Movie (8)  |  Overlap (4)  |  Propriety (3)  |  Tickling (2)  |  Word (221)

The required techniques of effective reasoning are pretty formal, but as long as programming is done by people that don’t master them, the software crisis will remain with us and will be considered an incurable disease. And you know what incurable diseases do: they invite the quacks and charlatans in, who in this case take the form of Software Engineering gurus.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Case (64)  |  Charlatan (6)  |  Consider (45)  |  Crisis (13)  |  Disease (257)  |  Effective (20)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Form (210)  |  Formal (11)  |  Incurable (4)  |  Invite (8)  |  Know (321)  |  Long (95)  |  Master (55)  |  People (269)  |  Pretty (10)  |  Program (32)  |  Quack (12)  |  Reason (330)  |  Remain (77)  |  Require (33)  |  Software (11)

The science and technology which have advanced man safely into space have brought about startling medical advances for man on earth. Out of space research have come new knowledge, techniques and instruments which have enabled some bedridden invalids to walk, the totally deaf to hear, the voiceless to talk, and, in the foreseeable future, may even make it possible for the blind to “see.”
'From Outer Space—Advances For Medicine on Earth', contributed in Lillian Levy, Space, Its Impact on Man and Society (1965, reprinted 1973), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (123)  |  Blind (35)  |  Deaf (3)  |  Foreseeable (2)  |  Future (229)  |  Hearing (27)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Invalid (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Research (517)  |  Science (1699)  |  See (197)  |  Space (154)  |  Talk (61)  |  Technology (199)  |  Voice (41)  |  Walk (56)

The techniques and criteria of religion and science are so extraordinarily different. Science seeks simplicity publicly and encourages the overthrow of authority; religion accepts complexity privately and encourages deference to authority.
In 'Religion - The Antithesis to Science', Chemistry & Industry (Feb 1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (37)  |  Authority (50)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Criterion (10)  |  Deference (2)  |  Different (110)  |  Encourage (16)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Publicly (3)  |  Religion (210)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Seek (57)  |  Simplicity (126)

The techniques have galloped ahead of the concepts. We have moved away from studying the complexity of the organism; from processes and organisation to composition.
[Commenting that growing use of new technologies and techniques, from molecular biology to genomics, has proved a mixed blessing.]
Quoted in Andrew Jack, "An Acute Talent for Innovation", Financial Times (1 Feb 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Complexity (80)  |  Composition (52)  |  Concept (102)  |  Drug (40)  |  Molecular Biology (23)  |  Organisation (5)  |  Organism (126)  |  Process (201)  |  Research (517)  |  Study (331)  |  Technology (199)

The work of a pioneer in science of technique often consists of finding a correct solution, or creating a working mechanism, based on laws that are not yet discovered.
In The Story of the Winged-S: The Autobiography of Igor I. Sikorsky (2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Based (4)  |  Correct (53)  |  Create (98)  |  Discover (115)  |  Find (248)  |  Law (418)  |  Mechanism (41)  |  Pioneer (23)  |  Science (1699)  |  Solution (168)

This is an age of science. ... All important fields of activity from the breeding of bees to the administration of an empire, call for an understanding of the spirit and the technique of modern science. The nations that do not cultivate the sciences cannot hold their own.
From Rose's private notebook (1924?), as quoted by Stanley Coben in 'The Scientific Establishment and the Transmission of Quantum Mechanics to the United States, 1919-32', The American Historical Review (Apr 1971), 76, No. 2, 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (97)  |  Administration (8)  |  Age Of Science (2)  |  Bee (21)  |  Breeding (11)  |  Cultivate (9)  |  Empire (10)  |  Field (119)  |  Hold (56)  |  Important (124)  |  Modern (104)  |  Nation (111)  |  Science (1699)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Understanding (317)

Unless his mind soars above his daily pursuits, it is different techniques. In the same spirit, the woodsman might claim that there are only trees but no forest.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (52)  |  Daily (19)  |  Different (110)  |  Forest (88)  |  Mind (544)  |  Pursuit (55)  |  Same (92)  |  Soar (8)  |  Spirit (113)  |  Tree (143)

Very few [doctors] are men of science in any very serious sense; they're men of technique.
Interview with Tom Harpur, 'You Should Face Up to Your Death, Says Author', Toronto Star (15 Nov 1975). Collected in Robertson Davies and J. Madison Davis (eds.) Conversations with Robertson Davies (1989), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (100)  |  Men Of Science (97)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sense (240)  |  Serious (37)

Watson and I had been often discussing the problem, the ways you could go wrong solving problems of this sort, the techniques you have to use, and in particular, such rather curious things as you mustn’t pay too much attention to the all the experimental evidence, some of it may be wrong, for example.
From Transcript of BBC TV program, The Prizewinners (1962).
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (76)  |  Curious (24)  |  Discuss (14)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Problem (362)  |  Solve (41)  |  James Watson (33)  |  Wrong (116)

What politicians do not understand is that [Ian] Wilmut discovered not so much a technical trick as a new law of nature. We now know that an adult mammalian cell can fire up all the dormant genetic instructions that shut down as it divides and specializes and ages, and thus can become a source of new life. You can outlaw technique; you cannot repeal biology.
Writing after Wilmut's successful cloning of the sheep, Dolly, that research on the cloning of human beings cannot be suppressed.
'A Special Report on Cloning'. Charles Krauthammer in Time (10 Mar 1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Ban (9)  |  Biology (150)  |  Cell (125)  |  Clone (7)  |  Dolly (2)  |  Genetics (98)  |  Instruction (51)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Life (917)  |  Mammal (28)  |  Politician (22)  |  Trick (19)  |  Ian Wilmut (5)

[The mathematician's] subject is the most curious of all—there is none in which truth plays such odd pranks. It has the most elaborate and the most fascinating technique, and gives unrivaled openings for the display of sheer professional skill.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 1967), 80.
Science quotes on:  |  Curious (24)  |  Display (22)  |  Elaborate (13)  |  Fascination (26)  |  Mathematician (177)  |  Odd (12)  |  Professional (27)  |  Sheer (6)  |  Skill (50)  |  Subject (129)  |  Truth (750)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.