Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index T > Category: Technique

Technique Quotes (80 quotes)

Remarking about Frederick Sanger who used the new technique of paper chromotography:
They are not chemists there, just a lot of paper hangers.

Quoted in 'Alexander Robertus Todd, O.M., Baron Todd of Trumpington', obituary by Damiel M. Brown and Hans Kornberg in Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, 2000, 46, 527. At Cambridge, Todd and his colleagues began using paper chromotography in the early 1950s to separate a mixture of vitamin B12 reaction products as a method to identify them.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemist (156)  |  Lot (151)  |  New (1216)  |  Paper (182)

Among the multitude of animals which scamper, fly, burrow and swim around us, man is the only one who is not locked into his environment. His imagination, his reason, his emotional subtlety and toughness, make it possible for him not to accept the environment, but to change it. And that series of inventions, by which man from age to age has remade his environment, is a different kind of evolution—not biological, but cultural evolution. I call that brilliant sequence of cultural peaks The Ascent of Man. I use the word ascent with a precise meaning. Man is distinguished from other animals by his imaginative gifts. He makes plans, inventions, new discoveries, by putting different talents together; and his discoveries become more subtle and penetrating, as he learns to combine his talents in more complex and intimate ways. So the great discoveries of different ages and different cultures, in technique, in science, in the arts, express in their progression a richer and more intricate conjunction of human faculties, an ascending trellis of his gifts.
The Ascent of Man (1973), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Age (499)  |  Animal (617)  |  Art (657)  |  Ascent Of Man (6)  |  Become (815)  |  Biological (137)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Combine (57)  |  Complex (188)  |  Conjunction (10)  |  Culture (143)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Express (186)  |  Fly (146)  |  Gift (104)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Intricate (29)  |  Invention (369)  |  Kind (557)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  More (2559)  |  Multitude (47)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plan (117)  |  Possible (552)  |  Precise (68)  |  Progression (23)  |  Reason (744)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Series (149)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Swim (30)  |  Talent (94)  |  Together (387)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)

Among the studies to which the [Rockefeller] Foundation is giving support is a series in a relatively new field, which may be called molecular biology, in which delicate modern techniques are being used to investigate ever more minute details of certain life processes.
In 'Molecular Biology', Annual Report of the Rockefeller Foundation (1938), 203-4. Reprinted in a letter to Science (6 Nov 1970), 170, 582.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Detail (146)  |  Field (364)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Life (1795)  |  Minute (125)  |  Modern (385)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Process (423)  |  Series (149)  |  Study (653)  |  Support (147)

Anthropology is the study of human beings as creatures of society. It fastens its attention upon those physical characteristics and industrial techniques, those conventions and values, which distinguish one community from all others that belong to a different tradition.
In 'The Science of Custom', Patterns of Culture (1934, 2005), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belong (162)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Community (104)  |  Convention (14)  |  Creature (233)  |  Different (577)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Industrial (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Society (326)  |  Study (653)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Value (365)

As never before, the work of the engineer is basic to the kind of society to which our best efforts are committed. Whether it be city planning, improved health care in modern facilities, safer and more efficient transportation, new techniques of communication, or better ways to control pollution and dispose of wastes, the role of the engineer—his initiative, creative ability, and hard work—is at the root of social progress.
Remarks for National Engineers Week (1971). As quoted in Consulting Engineer (1971), 36, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Basic (138)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Care (186)  |  City (78)  |  Communication (94)  |  Control (167)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Dispose (10)  |  Efficient (26)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Health (193)  |  Health Care (9)  |  Improve (58)  |  Initiative (17)  |  Kind (557)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Planning (20)  |  Pollution (48)  |  Progress (465)  |  Role (86)  |  Root (120)  |  Safety (54)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Progress (3)  |  Society (326)  |  Transportation (14)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

As soon as we got rid of the backroom attitude and brought our apparatus fully into the Department with an inexhaustible supply of living patients with fascinating clinical problems, we were able to get ahead really fast. Any new technique becomes more attractive if its clinical usefulness can be demonstrated without harm, indignity or discomfort to the patient... Anyone who is satisfied with his diagnostic ability and with his surgical results is unlikely to contribute much to the launching of a new medical science. He should first be consumed with a divine discontent with things as they are. It greatly helps, of course, to have the right idea at the right time, and quite good ideas may come, Archimedes fashion, in one's bath..
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Attractive (23)  |  Become (815)  |  Clinical (15)  |  Course (409)  |  Department (92)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Divine (112)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inexhaustible (24)  |  Living (491)  |  Medical Science (18)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Patient (199)  |  Problem (676)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Soon (186)  |  Supply (93)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usefulness (86)

At the present time it is of course quite customary for physicists to trespass on chemical ground, for mathematicians to do excellent work in physics, and for physicists to develop new mathematical procedures. … Trespassing is one of the most successful techniques in science.
In Dynamics in Psychology (1940, 1973), 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Course (409)  |  Custom (42)  |  Customary (18)  |  Develop (268)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ground (217)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Present (619)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Science (3879)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trespass (5)  |  Trespassing (2)  |  Work (1351)

Biological disciplines tend to guide research into certain channels. One consequence is that disciplines are apt to become parochial, or at least to develop blind spots, for example, to treat some questions as “interesting” and to dismiss others as “uninteresting.” As a consequence, readily accessible but unworked areas of genuine biological interest often lie in plain sight but untouched within one discipline while being heavily worked in another. For example, historically insect physiologists have paid relatively little attention to the behavioral and physiological control of body temperature and its energetic and ecological consequences, whereas many students of the comparative physiology of terrestrial vertebrates have been virtually fixated on that topic. For the past 10 years, several of my students and I have exploited this situation by taking the standard questions and techniques from comparative vertebrate physiology and applying them to insects. It is surprising that this pattern of innovation is not more deliberately employed.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 233.
Science quotes on:  |  Accessible (25)  |  Apply (160)  |  Apt (9)  |  Area (31)  |  Attention (190)  |  Become (815)  |  Behavioral (6)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Blind (95)  |  Blind Spot (2)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Channel (21)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Control (167)  |  Deliberately (6)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Dismiss (10)  |  Ecological (7)  |  Employ (113)  |  Energetic (6)  |  Example (94)  |  Exploit (19)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Guide (97)  |  Heavily (14)  |  Historically (3)  |  Innovation (42)  |  Insect (77)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Least (75)  |  Lie (364)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Past (337)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Pay (43)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiologist (29)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Plain (33)  |  Question (621)  |  Readily (10)  |  Relatively (7)  |  Research (664)  |  Several (32)  |  Sight (132)  |  Situation (113)  |  Standard (57)  |  Student (300)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Tend (124)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Topic (21)  |  Treat (35)  |  Uninteresting (9)  |  Untouched (4)  |  Unworked (2)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  Virtually (6)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Biology as a discipline would benefit enormously if we could bring together the scientists working at the opposite ends of the biological spectrum. Students of organisms who know natural history have abundant questions to offer the students of molecules and cells. And molecular and cellular biologists with their armory of techniques and special insights have much to offer students of organisms and ecology.
In 'The role of natural history in contemporary biology', BioScience (1986), 36, 328-329.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Armory (3)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Bring (90)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cellular (2)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Ecology (74)  |  End (590)  |  Enormously (4)  |  History (673)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Molecular (7)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Organism (220)  |  Question (621)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Special (184)  |  Spectrum (31)  |  Student (300)  |  Together (387)  |  Work (1351)

Biology has become as unthinkable without gene-splicing techniques as sending an explorer into the jungle without a compass.
Magazine interview (1981); one year after becoming the first scientist to make bacteria produce a facsimile of human interferon.
'Shaping Life in the Lab'. In Time (9 Mar 1981).
Science quotes on:  |  Bacteria (48)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Biology (216)  |  Compass (34)  |  Explorer (28)  |  First (1283)  |  Gene (98)  |  Human (1468)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Unthinkable (8)  |  Year (933)

Can a society in which thought and technique are scientific persist for a long period, as, for example, ancient Egypt persisted, or does it necessarily contain within itself forces which must bring either decay or explosion?
The Impact of Science on Society (1951, 1985), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Ancient Egypt (4)  |  Decay (53)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Explosion (44)  |  Force (487)  |  Long (790)  |  Must (1526)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Period (198)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Society (326)  |  Thought (953)

Can the cultural evolution of higher ethical values gain a direction and momentum of its own and completely replace genetic evolution? I think not. The genes hold culture an a leash. The leash is very long, but inevitably values will be constrained in accordance with their effects in the human gene pool. The brain is a product of evolution. Human behaviour—like the deepest capacities for emotional response which drive and guide it—is the circuitous technique by which human genetic material has been and will be kept intact. Morality has no other demonstrable ultimate function.
In On Human Nature (1978), 167. In William Andrew Rottschaefer, The Biology and Psychology of Moral Agency (1998), 58.
Science quotes on:  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Brain (270)  |  Completely (135)  |  Culture (143)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effect (393)  |  Ethical (34)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Function (228)  |  Gain (145)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Guide (97)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intact (8)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Momentum (9)  |  Morality (52)  |  Other (2236)  |  Product (160)  |  Response (53)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

Each new machine or technique, in a sense, changes all existing machines and techniques, by permitting us to put them together into new combinations. The number of possible combinations rises exponentially as the number of new machines or techniques rises
Future Shock (1970).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Change (593)  |  Combination (144)  |  Exist (443)  |  Exponentially (2)  |  Machine (257)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Permit (58)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rise (166)  |  Sense (770)  |  Together (387)

Fish farming, even with conventional techniques, changes fish within a few generations from an animal like a wild buffalo or a wildebeest to the equivalent of a domestic cow.
In The End of the Line: How Overfishing is Changing the World and what We Eat (2004), 312.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Aquaculture (5)  |  Buffalo (7)  |  Change (593)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Cow (39)  |  Domestic (26)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fish Farming (2)  |  Generation (242)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Wild (87)  |  Wildebeest (2)

FORTRAN —’the infantile disorder’—, by now nearly 20 years old, is hopelessly inadequate for whatever computer application you have in mind today: it is now too clumsy, too risky, and too expensive to use. PL/I —’the fatal disease’— belongs more to the problem set than to the solution set. It is practically impossible to teach good programming to students that have had a prior exposure to BASIC: as potential programmers they are mentally mutilated beyond hope of regeneration. The use of COBOL cripples the mind; its teaching should, therefore, be regarded as a criminal offence. APL is a mistake, carried through to perfection. It is the language of the future for the programming techniques of the past: it creates a new generation of coding bums.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Basic (138)  |  Belong (162)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Bum (3)  |  Carry (127)  |  Clumsy (6)  |  Code (31)  |  Computer (127)  |  Create (235)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Cripple (3)  |  Disease (328)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Expensive (10)  |  Exposure (7)  |  Fatal (12)  |  Fortran (3)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Good (889)  |  Hope (299)  |  Hopelessly (3)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inadequate (19)  |  Infantile (4)  |  Language (293)  |  Mentally (3)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Mutilated (2)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Offence (4)  |  Old (481)  |  Past (337)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Potential (69)  |  Practically (10)  |  Prior (5)  |  Problem (676)  |  Program (52)  |  Programmer (4)  |  Regard (305)  |  Regeneration (5)  |  Risky (4)  |  Set (394)  |  Solution (267)  |  Student (300)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Use (766)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Year (933)

Gradually, … the aspect of science as knowledge is being thrust into the background by the aspect of science as the power of manipulating nature. It is because science gives us the power of manipulating nature that it has more social importance than art. Science as the pursuit of truth is the equal, but not the superior, of art. Science as a technique, though it may have little intrinsic value, has a practical importance to which art cannot aspire.
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), xxiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Aspire (13)  |  Background (43)  |  Being (1278)  |  Equal (83)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Manipulate (10)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Power (746)  |  Practical (200)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Social (252)  |  Superior (81)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value (365)

Hardly a year passes that fails to find a new, oft-times exotic, research method or technique added to the armamentarium of political inquiry. Anyone who cannot negotiate Chi squares, assess randomization, statistical significance, and standard deviations
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Armamentarium (3)  |  Assess (4)  |  Chi (2)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Exotic (6)  |  Fail (185)  |  Find (998)  |  Hardly (19)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Method (505)  |  Negotiate (2)  |  New (1216)  |  Pass (238)  |  Political (121)  |  Research (664)  |  Significance (113)  |  Square (70)  |  Standard Deviation (3)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Time (1877)  |  Year (933)

Hypothesis is the most important mental technique of the investigator, and its main function is to suggest new experiments or new observations. Indeed, most experiments and many observations are carried out with the deliberate object of testing an hypothesis. Another function is to help one see the significance of an object or event that otherwise would mean nothing. For instance, a mind prepared by the hypothesis of evolution would make many more significant observations on a field excursion than one not so prepared. Hypotheses should be used as tools to uncover new facts rather than as ends in themselves.
The Art of Scientific Investigation (1953), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Deliberate (18)  |  End (590)  |  Event (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Excursion (11)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Field (364)  |  Function (228)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  See (1081)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Tool (117)  |  Uncover (20)

I compare arithmetic with a tree that unfolds upwards in a multitude of techniques and theorems while the root drives into the depths.
Grundgesetze der Arithmetik (1893), xiii, trans. Ivor Grattan-Guinness.
Science quotes on:  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Compare (69)  |  Depth (94)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Root (120)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Tree (246)  |  Upward (43)

I will ask you to mark again that rather typical feature of the development of our subject; how so much progress depends on the interplay of techniques, discoveries and new ideas, probably in that order of decreasing importance.
This is the original quote, which gave rise to the commonly seen misstated shortened quote as: “Progress in science depends on new techniques, new discoveries and new ideas, probably in that order”—with the qualifying words “interplay” and “decreasing importance” omitted. From Brenner’s own handwritten notes of a Speech (20 Mar 1980), 'Biology in the 1980s', at the Friedrich Miescher Institute in Basel, Switzerland. Reproduced in his article 'Life sentences: Detective Rummage investigates', The Scientist (19 Aug 2002), 16, No. 16, 15. He reflects on the original wording of the quote, from his notes that he “came across”, while rummaging through “the piles of papers that I have accumulated,” (hence “Detective Rummage” in the title). See more on the commonly seen misstated shortened quote also on the Sydney Brenner Quotes web page of this site, beginning, “Progress in science…”.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Decrease (15)  |  Depend (228)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Feature (44)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Interplay (7)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Probably (49)  |  Progress (465)  |  Subject (521)  |  Typical (13)  |  Will (2355)

If you confine yourself to this Skinnerian technique, you study nothing but the learning apparatus and you leave out everything that is different in octopi, crustaceans, insects and vertebrates. In other words, you leave out everything that makes a pigeon a pigeon, a rat a rat, a man a man, and, above all, a healthy man healthy and a sick man sick.
'Some Psychological Concepts and Issues. A Discussion between Konrad Lorenz and Richard I Evans'. In Richard I. Evans, Konrad Lorenz: The Man and his Ideas (1975), 60.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Crustacean (3)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Everything (476)  |  Health (193)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Insect (77)  |  Learning (274)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Octopus (2)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pidgeon (2)  |  Pigeon (8)  |  Rat (37)  |  Sick (81)  |  Sickness (26)  |  Study (653)  |  Vertebrate (20)  |  Word (619)

In 1945 J.A. Ratcliffe … suggested that I [join his group at Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge] to start an investigation of the radio emission from the Sun, which had recently been discovered accidentally with radar equipment. … [B]oth Ratcliffe and Sir Lawrence Bragg, then Cavendish Professor, gave enormous support and encouragement to me. Bragg’s own work on X-ray crystallography involved techniques very similar to those we were developing for “aperture synthesis,” and he always showed a delighted interest in the way our work progressed.
From Autobiography in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1974/Nobel Lectures (1975)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Aperture (5)  |  Sir Lawrence Bragg (13)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Crystallography (9)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Emission (17)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Involved (90)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Professor (128)  |  Progress (465)  |  Radar (8)  |  Radio (50)  |  Radio Telescope (5)  |  Ratcliffe_Jack (2)  |  Ray (114)  |  Show (346)  |  Start (221)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

In describing a protein it is now common to distinguish the primary, secondary and tertiary structures. The primary structure is simply the order, or sequence, of the amino-acid residues along the polypeptide chains. This was first determined by Sanger using chemical techniques for the protein insulin, and has since been elucidated for a number of peptides and, in part, for one or two other small proteins. The secondary structure is the type of folding, coiling or puckering adopted by the polypeptide chain: the a-helix structure and the pleated sheet are examples. Secondary structure has been assigned in broad outline to a number of librous proteins such as silk, keratin and collagen; but we are ignorant of the nature of the secondary structure of any globular protein. True, there is suggestive evidence, though as yet no proof, that a-helices occur in globular proteins, to an extent which is difficult to gauge quantitatively in any particular case. The tertiary structure is the way in which the folded or coiled polypeptide chains are disposed to form the protein molecule as a three-dimensional object, in space. The chemical and physical properties of a protein cannot be fully interpreted until all three levels of structure are understood, for these properties depend on the spatial relationships between the amino-acids, and these in turn depend on the tertiary and secondary structures as much as on the primary. Only X-ray diffraction methods seem capable, even in principle, of unravelling the tertiary and secondary structures.
Co-author with G. Bodo, H. M. Dintzis, R. G. Parrish, H. Wyckoff, and D. C. Phillips
'A Three-Dimensional Model of the Myoglobin Molecule Obtained by X-ray Analysis', Nature (1958) 181, 662.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  All (4108)  |  Amino Acid (11)  |  Author (167)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Common (436)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Diffraction (5)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Extent (139)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Helix (10)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Insulin (9)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Occur (150)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Polypeptide (2)  |  Primary (80)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proof (287)  |  Protein (54)  |  Ray (114)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Residue (9)  |  Frederick Sanger (6)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Silk (13)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Structure (344)  |  Three-Dimensional (11)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Understood (156)  |  Way (1217)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Diffraction (3)

In science, as in love, a concentration on technique is likely to lead to impotence.
Invitation to Sociology (1936), 13. In Ken G. Smith and Michael A. Hitt, Great Minds in Management: the Theory of Process Development (2005), 361.
Science quotes on:  |  Concentration (29)  |  Impotence (8)  |  Lead (384)  |  Love (309)  |  Science (3879)

In the context of biological research one can reasonably identify creativity with the capacity 1 to ask new and incisive questions, 2 to form new hypotheses, 3 to examine old questions in new ways or with new techniques, and 4 to perceive previously unnoticed relationships.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Biological (137)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Context (29)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Examine (78)  |  Form (959)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Identify (13)  |  Incisive (3)  |  New (1216)  |  Old (481)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Previously (11)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasonably (3)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Research (664)  |  Unnoticed (5)  |  Way (1217)

It is both a sad and a happy fact of engineering history that disasters have been powerful instruments of change. Designers learn from failure. Industrial society did not invent grand works of engineering, and it was not the first to know design failure. What it did do was develop powerful techniques for learning from the experience of past disasters. It is extremely rare today for an apartment house in North America, Europe, or Japan to fall down. Ancient Rome had large apartment buildings too, but while its public baths, bridges and aqueducts have lasted for two thousand years, its big residential blocks collapsed with appalling regularity. Not one is left in modern Rome, even as ruin.
In Why Things Bite Back: Technology and the Revenge of Unintended Consequences (1997), 23.
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Apartment (4)  |  Appalling (10)  |  Aqueduct (4)  |  Bath (10)  |  Both (493)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Bridge Engineering (8)  |  Building (156)  |  Change (593)  |  Collapse (17)  |  Design (195)  |  Designer (6)  |  Develop (268)  |  Disaster (51)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Experience (467)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fall (230)  |  First (1283)  |  Grand (27)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  History (673)  |  House (140)  |  Industry (137)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invention (369)  |  Know (1518)  |  Large (394)  |  Last (426)  |  Lasting (7)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Modern (385)  |  Past (337)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Rare (89)  |  Rarity (11)  |  Regularity (40)  |  Residence (2)  |  Rome (19)  |  Ruin (42)  |  Sadness (35)  |  Society (326)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Today (314)  |  Two (937)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

It is characteristic of our age to endeavour to replace virtues by technology. That is to say, wherever possible we strive to use methods of physical or social engineering to achieve goals which our ancestors thought attainable only by the training of character. Thus, we try so far as possible to make contraception take the place of chastity, and anaesthetics to take the place of fortitude; we replace resignation by insurance policies and munificence by the Welfare State. It would be idle romanticism to deny that such techniques and institutions are often less painful and more efficient methods of achieving the goods and preventing the evils which unaided virtue once sought to achieve and avoid. But it would be an equal and opposite folly to hope that the take-over of virtue by technology may one day be complete, so that the necessity for the laborious acquisition of the capacity for rational choice by individuals can be replaced by the painless application of the fruits of scientific discovery over the whole field of human intercourse and enterprise.
'Mental Health in Plato's Republic', in The Anatomy of the Soul: Historical Essays in the Philosophy of Mind (1973), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Age (499)  |  Anaesthetic (2)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Application (242)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chastity (5)  |  Choice (110)  |  Complete (204)  |  Contraception (2)  |  Deny (66)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Evil (116)  |  Field (364)  |  Folly (43)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Goal (145)  |  Good (889)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Idle (33)  |  Individual (404)  |  Institution (69)  |  Insurance (9)  |  Laborious (14)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Munificence (2)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rational (90)  |  Romanticism (5)  |  Say (984)  |  Science And Society (23)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Engineering (2)  |  State (491)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thought (953)  |  Training (80)  |  Try (283)  |  Use (766)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Welfare (25)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Whole (738)

It is really just as bad technique to make a measurement more accurately than is necessary as it is to make it not accurately enough.
Scientific Method: An Inquiry into the Character and Validy of Natural Law (1923), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Enough (340)  |  Measurement (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessary (363)

It is rigid dogma that destroys truth; and, please notice, my emphasis is not on the dogma, but on the rigidity. When men say of any question, “This is all there is to be known or said of the subject; investigation ends here,” that is death. It may be that the mischief comes not from the thinker but for the use made of his thinking by late-comers. Aristotle, for example, gave us our scientific technique … yet his logical propositions, his instruction in sound reasoning which was bequeathed to Europe, are valid only within the limited framework of formal logic, and, as used in Europe, they stultified the minds of whole generations of mediaeval Schoolmen. Aristotle invented science, but destroyed philosophy.
Dialogues of Alfred North Whitehead, as recorded by Lucien Price (1954, 2001), 165.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Death (388)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Dogma (48)  |  End (590)  |  Framework (31)  |  Generation (242)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Known (454)  |  Late (118)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mischief (13)  |  Notice (77)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Please (65)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Question (621)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Rigid (24)  |  Rigidity (5)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Sound (183)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)

It was on the 25th November 1740 that I cut the first polyp. I put the two parts in a flat glass, which only contained water to the height of four to five lignes. It was thus easy for me to observe these portions of the polyp with a fairly powerful lens.
I shall indicate farther on the precautions I took in making my experiments on these cut polyps and the technique I adopted to cut them. It will suffice to say here that I cut the polyp concerned transversely, a little nearer the anterior than the posterior end. The first part was thus a little shorter than the second.
The instant that I cut the polyp, the two parts contracted so that at first they only appeared like two little grains of green matter at the bottom of the glass in which I put them—for green, as I have already said, is the colour of the first polyps that I possessed. The two parts expanded on the same day on which I separated them. They were very easy to distinguish from one another. The first had its anterior end adorned with the fine threads that serve the polyp as legs and arms, which the second had none.
The extensions of the first part was not the only sign of life that it gave on the same day that it was separated from the other. I saw it move its arms; and the next day, the first time I came to observe it, I found that it had changed its position; and shortly afterwards I saw it take a step. The second part was extended as on the previous day and in the same place. I shook the glass a little to see if it were still alive. This movement made it contract, from which I judged that it was alive. Shortly afterwards it extended again. On the following days I .’ saw the same thing.
Mémoires, pour servir à l'histoire d'un genre de polyps d'eau douce à bras en forme de cornes (1744), 7-16. Trans. John R. Baker, in Abraham Trembley of Geneva: Scientist and Philosopher 1710-1784 (1952), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  Already (222)  |  Anterior (4)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Concern (228)  |  Cut (114)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Easy (204)  |  End (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extend (128)  |  Extension (59)  |  Farther (51)  |  First (1283)  |  Flat (33)  |  Glass (92)  |  Grain (50)  |  Green (63)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Instant (45)  |  Leg (34)  |  Lens (14)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Making (300)  |  Matter (798)  |  Move (216)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nearer (45)  |  Next (236)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Other (2236)  |  Polyp (4)  |  Portion (84)  |  Possess (156)  |  Posterior (7)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Precaution (5)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Step (231)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thread (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Water (481)  |  Will (2355)

It would be interesting to inquire how many times essential advances in science have first been made possible by the fact that the boundaries of special disciplines were not respected… Trespassing is one of the most successful techniques in science.
Dynamics in Psychology (1940), 115-116
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fact (1210)  |  First (1283)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Most (1731)  |  Possible (552)  |  Progress (465)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Special (184)  |  Successful (123)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trespassing (2)

It's hard to imagine anything more difficult to study than human sexuality, on every level from the technical to the political. One has only to picture monitoring orgasm in the lab to begin to grasp the challenge of developing testing techniques that are thorough and precise, yet respectful.
If you know an original print source for this quote, please contact webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Begin (260)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  More (2559)  |  Orgasm (2)  |  Picture (143)  |  Political (121)  |  Precise (68)  |  Sexuality (11)  |  Study (653)  |  Thorough (40)

Littlewood, on Hardy’s own estimate, is the finest mathematician he has ever known. He was the man most likely to storm and smash a really deep and formidable problem; there was no one else who could command such a combination of insight, technique and power.
(1943). In Béla Bollobás, Littlewood's Miscellany (1986), Foreward, 22.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Biography (240)  |  Combination (144)  |  Command (58)  |  Deep (233)  |  Estimate (57)  |  G. H. Hardy (71)  |  Insight (102)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Most (1731)  |  Power (746)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proof (287)  |  Smash (4)  |  Storm (51)

Many scientists have tried to make determinism and complementarity the basis of conclusions that seem to me weak and dangerous; for instance, they have used Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle to bolster up human free will, though his principle, which applies exclusively to the behavior of electrons and is the direct result of microphysical measurement techniques, has nothing to do with human freedom of choice. It is far safer and wiser that the physicist remain on the solid ground of theoretical physics itself and eschew the shifting sands of philosophic extrapolations.
In New Perspectives in Physics (1962), viii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Basis (173)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Choice (110)  |  Complementarity (5)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Determinism (12)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Electron (93)  |  Extrapolation (6)  |  Free (232)  |  Free Will (15)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Ground (217)  |  Werner Heisenberg (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Principle (507)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Remain (349)  |  Result (677)  |  Sand (62)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solid (116)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Uncertainty Principle (8)  |  Weak (71)  |  Will (2355)

Melvin [Calvin]’s marvellous technique for delivering a scientific lecture was unique. His mind must have roamed constantly, especially in planning lectures. His remarkable memory enabled him to formulate a lecture or manuscript with no breaks in the sequence of his thoughts. His lectures usually began hesitatingly, as if he had little idea of how to begin or what to say. This completely disarmed his audiences, who would try to guess what he might have to say. Soon enough, however, his ideas would coalesce, to be delivered like an approaching freight train, reaching a crescendo of information at breakneck speed and leaving his rapt audience nearly overwhelmed.
Co-author with Andrew A. Benson, 'Melvin Calvin', Biographical Memoirs of the US National Academy of Science.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Audience (26)  |  Begin (260)  |  Biography (240)  |  Break (99)  |  Melvin Calvin (11)  |  Coalesce (5)  |  Completely (135)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Enough (340)  |  Formulate (15)  |  Freight (3)  |  Guess (61)  |  Hesitation (19)  |  Idea (843)  |  Information (166)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Little (707)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Memory (134)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Overwhelmed (5)  |  Planning (20)  |  Rapt (5)  |  Roam (3)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Soon (186)  |  Speed (65)  |  Thought (953)  |  Train (114)  |  Try (283)  |  Unique (67)  |  Usually (176)

Much of the work we do as scientists involves filling in the details about matters that are basically understood already, or applying standard techniques to new specific cases. But occasionally there is a question that offers an opportunity for a really major discovery.
In Tyrannosaurus Rex and the Crater of Doom (1997), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Basic (138)  |  Detail (146)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Involve (90)  |  Major (84)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Occasionally (5)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Question (621)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Specific (95)  |  Standard (57)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Understood (156)  |  Work (1351)

No species … possesses a purpose beyond the imperatives created by genetic history … The human mind is a device for survival and reproduction, and reason is just one of its various techniques.
'Dilemma'. On Human Nature (1978, 1979), 2.
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Device (70)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Imperative (15)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Species (401)  |  Survival (94)  |  Various (200)

Nobody is calling for an end to fishing on the high seas but some techniques, for example bottom trawling, must be banned.
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Ban (9)  |  Bottom (33)  |  End (590)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fishing (19)  |  High (362)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  Sea (308)  |  Trawling (6)

Of the nucleosides from deoxyribonucleic acids, all that was known with any certainty [in the 1940s] was that they were 2-deoxy-­D-ribosides of the bases adenine, guanine, thymine and cytosine and it was assumed that they were structurally analogous to the ribonucleosides. The chemistry of the nucleotides—the phosphates of the nucleosides—was in a correspondingly primitive state. It may well be asked why the chemistry of these groups of compounds was not further advanced, particularly since we recognize today that they occupy a central place in the history of the living cell. True, their full significance was for a long time unrecognized and emerged only slowly as biochemical research got into its stride but I think a more important reason is to be found in the physical properties of compounds of the nucleotide group. As water-soluble polar compounds with no proper melting points they were extremely difficult to handle by the classic techniques of organic chemistry, and were accordingly very discouraging substances to early workers. It is surely no accident that the major advances in the field have coincided with the appearance of new experimental techniques such as paper and ion-exchange chromatography, paper electrophoresis, and countercurrent distribution, peculiarly appropriate to the compounds of this group.
In 'Synthesis in the Study of Nucleotides', Nobel Lecture, 11 December 1957. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1942-1962 (1964), 524.
Science quotes on:  |  Accident (88)  |  Acid (83)  |  Adenine (5)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Ask (411)  |  Base (117)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Cell (138)  |  Central (80)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Compound (113)  |  Cytosine (5)  |  Deoxyribonucleic Acid (3)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Distribution (50)  |  Early (185)  |  Electrophoresis (2)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Field (364)  |  Guanine (4)  |  Handle (28)  |  History (673)  |  Ion (21)  |  Known (454)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Major (84)  |  Melting Point (3)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Nucleotide (6)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Paper (182)  |  Phosphate (5)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Polar (12)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Proper (144)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Research (664)  |  Significance (113)  |  Soluble (5)  |  State (491)  |  Stride (15)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Surely (101)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thymine (5)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Water (481)  |  Why (491)

People still do not understand that a live fish is more valuable than a dead one, and that destructive fishing techniques are taking a wrecking ball to biodiversity.
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Ball (62)  |  Biodiversity (11)  |  Dead (59)  |  Destructive (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Fish (120)  |  Fishing (19)  |  Live (628)  |  More (2559)  |  Overfishing (25)  |  People (1005)  |  Still (613)  |  Understand (606)  |  Value (365)  |  Wreck (7)

Physicist Isador Isaac Rabi, who won a Nobel Prize for inventing a technique that permitted scientists to probe the structure of atoms and molecules in the 1930s, attributed his success to the way his mother used to greet him when he came home from school each day. “Did you ask any good questions today, Isaac?” she would say.
Thomas J. Peters, Liberation Management: Necessary Disorganization for the Nanosecond Nineties (1992).
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Atom (355)  |  Good (889)  |  Greet (6)  |  Home (170)  |  Invention (369)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Mother (114)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Probe (12)  |  Question (621)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Structure (344)  |  Success (302)  |  Today (314)  |  Way (1217)

Progress in science depends on new techniques, new discoveries and new ideas, probably in that order.
As quoted in Miranda Robinson, 'Biology in the 1980s, Plus or Minus a Decade', Nature (5 Jun 1980), 285, 358-359. Note that Robinson gave her (slightly flawed) recollection of the quote from Brenner’s Speech (20 Mar 1980), 'Biology in the 1980s', Friedrich Miescher Institute Basel, Switzerland. Note that in other sources the journal date is stated incorrectly as 5 May 1980, for example, in Alan Mackay, A Dictionary of Scientific Quotations (1991), 39. See the original quote also on the Sydney Brenner Quotes web page of this site, beginning, “I will ask you…”
Science quotes on:  |  Depend (228)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Idea (843)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Progress (465)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)

Psychoanalysis has changed American psychiatry from a diagnostic to a therapeutic science, not because so many patients are cured by the psychoanalytic technique, but because of the new understanding of psychiatric patients it has given us and the new and different concepts of illness and health.
News summaries 29 Apr 56
Science quotes on:  |  American (46)  |  Change (593)  |  Concept (221)  |  Cure (122)  |  Diagnostic (2)  |  Different (577)  |  Give (202)  |  Health (193)  |  Illness (34)  |  New (1216)  |  Patient (199)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)  |  Psychoanalytic (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Therapeutic (2)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)

Pure mathematics is much more than an armoury of tools and techniques for the applied mathematician. On the other hand, the pure mathematician has ever been grateful to applied mathematics for stimulus and inspiration. From the vibrations of the violin string they have drawn enchanting harmonies of Fourier Series, and to study the triode valve they have invented a whole theory of non-linear oscillations.
In 100 Years of Mathematics: a Personal Viewpoint (1981), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Mathematics (15)  |  Armory (3)  |  Fourier Series (2)  |  Grateful (3)  |  Hand (143)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Invent (51)  |  Linear (13)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Series (149)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  String (21)  |  Study (653)  |  Theory (970)  |  Tool (117)  |  Valve (2)  |  Vibration (20)  |  Violin (6)  |  Whole (738)

Science through its physical technological consequences is now determining the relations which human beings, severally and in groups, sustain to one another. If it is incapable of developing moral techniques which will also determine those relations, the split in modern culture goes so deep that not only democracy but all civilized values are doomed.
In Freedom and Culture (1939).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Culture (143)  |  Deep (233)  |  Democracy (33)  |  Determine (144)  |  Doom (32)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Modern (385)  |  Moral (195)  |  Physical (508)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Technological (61)  |  Through (849)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

Scientific principles and laws do not lie on the surface of nature. They are hidden, and must be wrested from nature by an active and elaborate technique of inquiry.
In Reconstruction in Philosophy (1920), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Do (1908)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Hide (69)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Law (894)  |  Lie (364)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Principle (507)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Surface (209)  |  Wrest (3)

Sir Mortimer Wheeler is perhaps the most distinguished archaeologist in Europe. But he owes the greatest of his achievements to the rare combination of two qualities: namely a scientific expertise in the technique of excavation which has always been marked by a meticulous attention to minute detail, and a gift of imaginative vision.
Book review of two books by Mortimer Wheeler, 'Achaeology From the Earth' and 'Rome Beyond the Imperial Frontiers', in Blackfriars (Jan 1955), 36, No. 418, 597-598.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Archaeologist (17)  |  Attention (190)  |  Combination (144)  |  Detail (146)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Excavation (8)  |  Expertise (8)  |  Gift (104)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Marked (55)  |  Minute (125)  |  Most (1731)  |  Owe (71)  |  Quality (135)  |  Rare (89)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Two (937)  |  Vision (123)  |  Sir Mortimer Wheeler (4)

Technique and ability alone do not get you to the top; it is the willpower that is the most important. This willpower you cannot buy with money or be given by others...it rises from your heart.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Alone (311)  |  Buy (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Give (202)  |  Heart (229)  |  Important (209)  |  Money (170)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Rise (166)  |  Top (96)  |  Will Power (3)

That only Galileo’s physical finger is preserved but the descendants of his techniques thrive is also symbolic of the transitoriness of personal existence in contrast to the immortality of knowledge.
In Galileo's Finger: The Ten Great Ideas of Science (2003), 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Descendant (17)  |  Existence (456)  |  Finger (44)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Immortality (11)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Personal (67)  |  Physical (508)  |  Preserve (83)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Thrive (18)  |  Transitory (4)

The chances for favorable serendipity are increased if one studies an animal that is not one of the common laboratory species. Atypical animals, or preparations, force one to use non-standard approaches and non-standard techniques, and even to think nonstandard ideas. My own preference is to seek out species which show some extreme of adaptation. Such organisms often force one to abandon standard methods and standard points of view. Almost inevitably they lead one to ask new questions, and most importantly in trying to comprehend their special and often unusual adaptations one often serendipitously stumbles upon new insights.
In 'Scientific innovation and creativity: a zoologist’s point of view', American Zoologist (1982), 22, 234.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Animal (617)  |  Approach (108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Atypical (3)  |  Chance (239)  |  Common (436)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Force (487)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importantly (3)  |  Increase (210)  |  Inevitably (6)  |  Insight (102)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lead (384)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  New (1216)  |  Often (106)  |  Organism (220)  |  Point (580)  |  Preference (28)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Question (621)  |  Seek (213)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Show (346)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Standard (57)  |  Study (653)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Think (1086)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)

The distributed architecture and its technique of packet switching were built around the problem of getting messages delivered despite blockages, holes and malfunctions. Imagine the poor censor faced with such a system. There is no central exchange to seize and hold; messages actively “seek out” alternative routes so that even if one path is blocked another may open up. Here is the civil libertarian’s dream.
As quoted in Richard Rogers, 'The Internet Treats Censorship as a Malfunction and Routes Around It? : A New Media Approach to the Study of State Internet Censorship', collected in Jussi Parikka and Tony D. Sampson (eds.), The Spam Book: On Viruses, Porn, and Other Anomalies from the Dark Side of Digital Culture (2009), 243.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Actively (3)  |  Alternative (29)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Block (12)  |  Censor (2)  |  Central (80)  |  Civil (26)  |  Deliver (29)  |  Delivery (6)  |  Distribute (15)  |  Dream (208)  |  Exchange (37)  |  Hold (95)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Malfunction (4)  |  Message (49)  |  Open (274)  |  Path (144)  |  Poor (136)  |  Problem (676)  |  Route (15)  |  Seek (213)  |  Seize (15)  |  System (537)

The engineer is concerned to travel from the abstract to the concrete. He begins with an idea and ends with an object. He journeys from theory to practice. The scientist’s job is the precise opposite. He explores nature with his telescopes or microscopes, or much more sophisticated techniques, and feeds into a computer what he finds or sees in an attempt to define mathematically its significance and relationships. He travels from the real to the symbolic, from the concrete to the abstract. The scientist and the engineer are the mirror image of each other.
In The Development of Design (1981), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Begin (260)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Computer (127)  |  Concern (228)  |  Concrete (51)  |  Definition (221)  |  End (590)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Find (998)  |  Idea (843)  |  Image (96)  |  Job (82)  |  Journey (42)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mirror (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Object (422)  |  Opposite (104)  |  Other (2236)  |  Practice (204)  |  Precise (68)  |  Real (149)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Science And Engineering (16)  |  Scientist (820)  |  See (1081)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sophistication (9)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Telescope (98)  |  Theory (970)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)

The faith of scientists in the power and truth of mathematics is so implicit that their work has gradually become less and less observation, and more and more calculation. The promiscuous collection and tabulation of data have given way to a process of assigning possible meanings, merely supposed real entities, to mathematical terms, working out the logical results, and then staging certain crucial experiments to check the hypothesis against the actual empirical results. But the facts which are accepted by virtue of these tests are not actually observed at all. With the advance of mathematical technique in physics, the tangible results of experiment have become less and less spectacular; on the other hand, their significance has grown in inverse proportion. The men in the laboratory have departed so far from the old forms of experimentation—typified by Galileo's weights and Franklin's kite—that they cannot be said to observe the actual objects of their curiosity at all; instead, they are watching index needles, revolving drums, and sensitive plates. No psychology of 'association' of sense-experiences can relate these data to the objects they signify, for in most cases the objects have never been experienced. Observation has become almost entirely indirect; and readings take the place of genuine witness.
Philosophy in a New Key; A Study in Inverse the Symbolism of Reason, Rite, and Art (1942), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Association (46)  |  Become (815)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Collection (64)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Data (156)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Drum (8)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (203)  |  Form (959)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Merely (316)  |  Meter (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Process (423)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significance (113)  |  Signify (17)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Tabulation (2)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Test (211)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Witness (54)  |  Work (1351)

The first man who said “fire burns” was employing scientific method, at any rate if he had allowed himself to be burnt several times. This man had already passed through the two stages of observation and generalization. He had not, however, what scientific technique demands—a careful choice of significant facts on the one hand, and, on the other hand, various means of arriving at laws otherwise than my mere generalization. (1931)
In The Scientific Outlook (1931, 2009), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Already (222)  |  Burn (87)  |  Choice (110)  |  Demand (123)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Himself (461)  |  Inference (45)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Observation (555)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Significant (74)  |  Stage (143)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Various (200)

The frontiers of science are separated now by long years of study, by specialized vocabularies, arts, techniques, and knowledge from the common heritage even of a most civilized society; and anyone working at the frontier of such science is in that sense a very long way from home, a long way too from the practical arts that were its matrix and origin, as indeed they were of what we today call art.
Address at the close of the year-long Bicentennial Celebration of Columbia University (26 Dec 54). Printed in 'Prospects in the Arts and Sciences', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1955), 52.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Call (769)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Common (436)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Home (170)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Long (790)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Most (1731)  |  Origin (239)  |  Practical (200)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separation (57)  |  Society (326)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Study (653)  |  Today (314)  |  Vocabulary (8)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

The idea of achieving security through national armament is, at the present state of military technique, a disastrous illusion.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Armament (6)  |  Disastrous (3)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illusion (66)  |  Military (40)  |  National (26)  |  Present (619)  |  Security (47)  |  State (491)  |  Through (849)

The ideal engineer is a composite ... He is not a scientist, he is not a mathematician, he is not a sociologist or a writer; but he may use the knowledge and techniques of any or all of these disciplines in solving engineering problems.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Composite (4)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Problem (676)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sociologist (3)  |  Solve (130)  |  Use (766)  |  Writer (86)

The ideal engineer is a composite. … He is not a scientist, he is not a mathematician, he is not a sociologist or a writer. But he may use the knowledge and techniques of any or all of these disciplines in solving problems.
Student, Teacher, and Engineer: Selected Speeches and Articles of Nathan W Dougherty (1972), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Problem (676)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Use (766)  |  Writer (86)

The pace of science forces the pace of technique. Theoretical physics forces atomic energy on us; the successful production of the fission bomb forces upon us the manufacture of the hydrogen bomb. We do not choose our problems, we do not choose our products; we are pushed, we are forced—by what? By a system which has no purpose and goal transcending it, and which makes man its appendix.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appendix (5)  |  Atomic Energy (24)  |  Bomb (18)  |  Choose (112)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fission (10)  |  Force (487)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Hydrogen Bomb (16)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Pace (14)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Product (160)  |  Production (183)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Push (62)  |  Science (3879)  |  Successful (123)  |  System (537)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Transcend (26)

The patient has two sleeves, one containing a diagnostic and the other a therapeutic armamentarium; these sleeves should rarely be emptied in one move; keep some techniques in reserve; time your manoeuvres to best serve the status and special needs of your patient.
Chinese proverb.
Science quotes on:  |  Armamentarium (3)  |  Best (459)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Move (216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Patient (199)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Special (184)  |  Status (35)  |  Therapy (13)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Two (937)

The present rate of progress [in X-ray crystallography] is determined, not so much by the lack of problems to investigate or the limited power of X-ray analysis, as by the restricted number of investigators who have had a training in the technique of the new science, and by the time it naturally takes for its scientific and technical importance to become widely appreciated.
Concluding remark in Lecture (1936) on 'Forty Years of Crystal Physics', collected in Needham and Pagel (eds.) in Background to Modern Science: Ten Lectures at Cambridge Arranged by the History of Science Committee, (1938), 89.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Become (815)  |  Crystallography (9)  |  Determine (144)  |  Importance (286)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Lack (119)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Naturally (11)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rate (29)  |  Ray (114)  |  Restricted (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Take (10)  |  Technical (43)  |  Time (1877)  |  Training (80)  |  Widely (9)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

The progress of science depends less than is usually believed on the efforts and performance of the individual genius ... many important discoveries have been made by men of ordinary talents, simply because chance had made them, at the proper time and in the proper place and circumstances, recipients of a body of doctrines, facts and techniques that rendered almost inevitable the recognition of an important phenomenon. It is surprising that some historian has not taken malicious pleasure in writing an anthology of 'one discovery' scientists. Many exciting facts have been discovered as a result of loose thinking and unimaginative experimentation, and described in wrappings of empty words. One great discovery does not betoken a great scientist; science now and then selects insignificant standard bearers to display its banners.
Louis Pasteur, Free Lance of Science (1986), 368
Science quotes on:  |  Banner (7)  |  Body (537)  |  Chance (239)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Depend (228)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Display (56)  |  Effort (227)  |  Empty (80)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Genius (284)  |  Great (1574)  |  Historian (54)  |  Individual (404)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Malicious (8)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Performance (48)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Proper (144)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Render (93)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Select (44)  |  Serendipity (15)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Usually (176)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)

The recent ruling by the Supreme Court restricting obscenity in books, magazines and movies, requires that we re-examine our own journals for lewd contents. The recent chemical literature provides many examples of words and concepts whose double meaning and thinly veiled overtones are an affront to all clean chemists. What must a layman think of ‘coupling constants’, ‘tickling techniques’, or indeed ‘increased overlap’? The bounds of propriety are surely exceeded when heterocyclic chemists discuss homoenolization.
In Chemical Engineering News (8 Oct 1973), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Book (392)  |  Bound (119)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Clean (50)  |  Concept (221)  |  Constant (144)  |  Court (33)  |  Examine (78)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Journal (30)  |  Layman (21)  |  Lewd (2)  |  Literature (103)  |  Magazine (24)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Movie (16)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obscenity (3)  |  Overlap (8)  |  Overtone (3)  |  Propriety (6)  |  Recent (77)  |  Require (219)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Supreme Court (2)  |  Surely (101)  |  Think (1086)  |  Tickling (2)  |  Veil (26)  |  Word (619)

The required techniques of effective reasoning are pretty formal, but as long as programming is done by people that don’t master them, the software crisis will remain with us and will be considered an incurable disease. And you know what incurable diseases do: they invite the quacks and charlatans in, who in this case take the form of Software Engineering gurus.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Case (99)  |  Charlatan (8)  |  Consider (416)  |  Crisis (24)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effective (59)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Form (959)  |  Formal (33)  |  Incurable (10)  |  Invite (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Long (790)  |  Master (178)  |  People (1005)  |  Pretty (20)  |  Program (52)  |  Quack (18)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remain (349)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Software (13)  |  Will (2355)

The science and technology which have advanced man safely into space have brought about startling medical advances for man on earth. Out of space research have come new knowledge, techniques and instruments which have enabled some bedridden invalids to walk, the totally deaf to hear, the voiceless to talk, and, in the foreseeable future, may even make it possible for the blind to “see.”
'From Outer Space—Advances For Medicine on Earth', contributed in Lillian Levy, Space, Its Impact on Man and Society (1965, reprinted 1973), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Blind (95)  |  Deaf (4)  |  Earth (996)  |  Foreseeable (3)  |  Future (429)  |  Hear (139)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invalid (2)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Medicine (378)  |  New (1216)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Technology (45)  |  See (1081)  |  Space (500)  |  Startling (15)  |  Talk (100)  |  Technology (257)  |  Voice (52)  |  Walk (124)

The techniques and criteria of religion and science are so extraordinarily different. Science seeks simplicity publicly and encourages the overthrow of authority; religion accepts complexity privately and encourages deference to authority.
In 'Religion - The Antithesis to Science', Chemistry & Industry (Feb 1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Authority (95)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Criterion (27)  |  Deference (2)  |  Different (577)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Publicly (3)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Seek (213)  |  Simplicity (167)

The techniques have galloped ahead of the concepts. We have moved away from studying the complexity of the organism; from processes and organisation to composition.
[Commenting that growing use of new technologies and techniques, from molecular biology to genomics, has proved a mixed blessing.]
Quoted in Andrew Jack, "An Acute Talent for Innovation", Financial Times (1 Feb 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (216)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Composition (84)  |  Concept (221)  |  Drug (57)  |  Growing (98)  |  Molecular Biology (27)  |  New (1216)  |  Organisation (7)  |  Organism (220)  |  Process (423)  |  Research (664)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Technology (257)  |  Use (766)

The time is ripe for poetry therapy now because the psychiatric profession is more flexible in its willingness to use new techniques.Ten years ago we were laughed at. Now they’re starting to teach it in colleges.”
As quoted in Paul L. Montgomery, 'Psychopoetry: A New Way of Reaching the Disturbed', New York Times (17 Apr 1971), 31.
Science quotes on:  |  College (66)  |  Flexible (6)  |  Laugh (47)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Poetry Therapy (10)  |  Profession (99)  |  Psychiatry (26)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Therapy (13)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Willing (44)  |  Willingness (10)  |  Year (933)

The value of fundamental research does not lie only in the ideas it produces. There is more to it. It affects the whole intellectual life of a nation by determining its way of thinking and the standards by which actions and intellectual production are judged. If science is highly regarded and if the importance of being concerned with the most up-to-date problems of fundamental research is recognized, then a spiritual climate is created which influences the other activities. An atmosphere of creativity is established which penetrates every cultural frontier. Applied sciences and technology are forced to adjust themselves to the highest intellectual standards which are developed in the basic sciences. This influence works in many ways: some fundamental students go into industry; the techniques which are applied to meet the stringent requirements of fundamental research serve to create new technological methods. The style, the scale, and the level of scientific and technical work are determined in pure research; that is what attracts productive people and what brings scientists to those countries where science is at the highest level. Fundamental research sets the standards of modern scientific thought; it creates the intellectual climate in which our modern civilization flourishes. It pumps the lifeblood of idea and inventiveness not only into the technological laboratories and factories, but into every cultural activity of our time. The case for generous support for pure and fundamental science is as simple as that.
In 'Why Pure Science?' in Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 1965.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Activity (210)  |  Adjust (8)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Science (34)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Basic (138)  |  Being (1278)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Climate (97)  |  Concern (228)  |  Country (251)  |  Create (235)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Develop (268)  |  Establish (57)  |  Factory (20)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Generous (17)  |  Idea (843)  |  Importance (286)  |  Industry (137)  |  Influence (222)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Inventive (8)  |  Inventiveness (7)  |  Judge (108)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Lie (364)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifeblood (4)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Civilization (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nation (193)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  People (1005)  |  Problem (676)  |  Production (183)  |  Productive (32)  |  Pump (7)  |  Pure (291)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Regard (305)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Research (664)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Thought (17)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Serve (59)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Standard (57)  |  Stringent (2)  |  Student (300)  |  Support (147)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Work (1351)

The work of a pioneer in science of technique often consists of finding a correct solution, or creating a working mechanism, based on laws that are not yet discovered.
In The Story of the Winged-S: The Autobiography of Igor I. Sikorsky (2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Based (10)  |  Consist (223)  |  Correct (86)  |  Create (235)  |  Discover (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Law (894)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Pioneer (33)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solution (267)  |  Work (1351)

Theology, Mr. Fortune found, is a more accommodating subject than mathematics; its technique of exposition allows greater latitude. For instance when you are gravelled for matter there is always the moral to fall back upon. Comparisons too may be drawn, leading cases cited, types and antetypes analysed and anecdotes introduced. Except for Archimedes mathematics is singularly naked of anecdotes.
In Mr. Fortune’s Maggot (1927), 168.
Science quotes on:  |  Analyze (10)  |  Anecdote (21)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Back (390)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Exposition (15)  |  Fall (230)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Greater (288)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theology (52)  |  Type (167)

This is an age of science. ... All important fields of activity from the breeding of bees to the administration of an empire, call for an understanding of the spirit and the technique of modern science. The nations that do not cultivate the sciences cannot hold their own.
From Rose's private notebook (1924?), as quoted by Stanley Coben in 'The Scientific Establishment and the Transmission of Quantum Mechanics to the United States, 1919-32', The American Historical Review (Apr 1971), 76, No. 2, 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Administration (12)  |  Age (499)  |  Age Of Science (2)  |  All (4108)  |  Bee (40)  |  Breeding (21)  |  Call (769)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Do (1908)  |  Empire (14)  |  Field (364)  |  Hold (95)  |  Important (209)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Nation (193)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Understanding (513)

Thus science must begin with myths, and with the criticism of myths; neither with the collection of observations, nor with the invention of experiments, but with the critical discussion of myths, and of magical techniques and practices.
In Conjectures and Refutations: the Growth of Scientific Knowledge (1963, 2002), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Begin (260)  |  Collection (64)  |  Critical (66)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Invention (369)  |  Must (1526)  |  Myth (56)  |  Observation (555)  |  Practice (204)  |  Science (3879)

Unless his mind soars above his daily pursuits, it is different techniques. In the same spirit, the woodsman might claim that there are only trees but no forest.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Claim (146)  |  Daily (87)  |  Different (577)  |  Forest (150)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Same (157)  |  Soar (23)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Tree (246)

Very few [doctors] are men of science in any very serious sense; they're men of technique.
Interview with Tom Harpur, 'You Should Face Up to Your Death, Says Author', Toronto Star (15 Nov 1975). Collected in Robertson Davies and J. Madison Davis (eds.) Conversations with Robertson Davies (1989), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Doctor (187)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serious (91)

Watson and I had been often discussing the problem, the ways you could go wrong solving problems of this sort, the techniques you have to use, and in particular, such rather curious things as you mustn’t pay too much attention to the all the experimental evidence, some of it may be wrong, for example.
From Transcript of BBC TV program, The Prizewinners (1962).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solve (130)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  James Watson (33)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wrong (234)

We spend long hours discussing the curious situation that the two great bodies of biological knowledge, genetics and embryology, which were obviously intimately interrelated in development, had never been brought together in any revealing way. An obvious difficulty was that the most favorable organisms for genetics, Drosophila as a prime example, were not well suited for embryological study, and the classical objects of embryological study, sea urchins and frogs as examples, were not easily investigated genetically. What might we do about it? There were two obvious approaches: one to learn more about the genetics of an embryologically favourable organism, the other to better understand the development of Drosophila. We resolved to gamble up to a year of our lives on the latter approach, this in Ephrussi’s laboratory in Paris which was admirably equipped for tissue culture, tissue or organ transplantation, and related techniques.
In 'Recollections', Annual Review of Biochemistry, 1974, 43, 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Approach (108)  |  Better (486)  |  Biological (137)  |  Classical (45)  |  Culture (143)  |  Curious (91)  |  Development (422)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drosophila (7)  |  Embryology (17)  |  Boris Ephrussi (4)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Favorable (24)  |  Frog (38)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hour (186)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Learn (629)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Organ (115)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Research (664)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sea Urchin (3)  |  Situation (113)  |  Spend (95)  |  Study (653)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Together (387)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Way (1217)  |  Year (933)

What politicians do not understand is that [Ian] Wilmut discovered not so much a technical trick as a new law of nature. We now know that an adult mammalian cell can fire up all the dormant genetic instructions that shut down as it divides and specializes and ages, and thus can become a source of new life. You can outlaw technique; you cannot repeal biology.
Writing after Wilmut's successful cloning of the sheep, Dolly, that research on the cloning of human beings cannot be suppressed.
'A Special Report on Cloning'. Charles Krauthammer in Time (10 Mar 1997).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ban (9)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biology (216)  |  Cell (138)  |  Clone (8)  |  Cloning (8)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dolly (2)  |  Down (456)  |  Fire (189)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Politician (38)  |  Research (664)  |  Shut (41)  |  Successful (123)  |  Trick (35)  |  Understand (606)  |  Ian Wilmut (5)  |  Writing (189)

[P]ure mathematics is on the whole distinctly more useful than applied. For what is useful above all is technique, and mathematical technique is taught mainly through pure mathematics.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, reprint with Foreward by C.P. Snow 1992), 134.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Through (849)  |  Useful (250)  |  Whole (738)

[The mathematician's] subject is the most curious of all—there is none in which truth plays such odd pranks. It has the most elaborate and the most fascinating technique, and gives unrivaled openings for the display of sheer professional skill.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 1967), 80.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Curious (91)  |  Display (56)  |  Elaborate (28)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Most (1731)  |  Odd (13)  |  Professional (70)  |  Sheer (9)  |  Skill (109)  |  Subject (521)  |  Truth (1057)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.