Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Witness

Witness Quotes (54 quotes)

Dilbert: You joined the “Flat Earth Society?”
Dogbert: I believe the earth must be flat. There is no good evidence to support the so-called “round earth theory.”
Dilbert: I think Christopher Columbus would disagree.
Dogbert: How convenient that your best witness is dead.
Dilbert comic strip (9 Oct 1989).
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Best (459)  |  Call (769)  |  Christopher Columbus (15)  |  Convenience (50)  |  Death (388)  |  Disagreement (14)  |  Earth (996)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Flat (33)  |  Flat Earth (3)  |  Good (889)  |  Join (26)  |  Must (1526)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Society (326)  |  Support (147)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)

Active experimentation must force the apparent facts of nature into forms different to those in which they familiarly present themselves; and thus make them tell the truth about themselves, as torture may compel an unwilling witness to reveal what he has been concealing.
In Reconstruction in Philosophy (1920), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Compel (30)  |  Conceal (18)  |  Different (577)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Present (619)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Tell (340)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Torture (29)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unwilling (9)

By these pleasures it is permitted to relax the mind with play, in turmoils of the mind, or when our labors are light, or in great tension, or as a method of passing the time. A reliable witness is Cicero, when he says (De Oratore, 2): 'men who are accustomed to hard daily toil, when by reason of the weather they are kept from their work, betake themselves to playing with a ball, or with knucklebones or with dice, or they may also contrive for themselves some new game at their leisure.'
The Book of Games of Chance (1663), final sentences, trans. Sydney Henry Gould. In Oysten Ore, The Gambling Scholar (1953), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Ball (62)  |  Chance (239)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Daily (87)  |  Dice (21)  |  Game (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Labor (107)  |  Leisure (24)  |  Light (607)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  New (1216)  |  Passing (76)  |  Playing (42)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Reason (744)  |  Say (984)  |  Tension (24)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Toil (25)  |  Turmoil (8)  |  Weather (44)  |  Work (1351)

Christianity possesses the source of its justification within itself and does not expect science to constitute its primary apologetic. Science must bear witness to its own worth.
In Letter (1 Jun 1988) to Father George V. Coyne, Director of the Vatican Observatory. On vatican.va website.
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Christianity (11)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Expect (200)  |  Justification (48)  |  Must (1526)  |  Primary (80)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Worth (169)

During my eighty-seven years I have witnessed a whole succession of technological revolutions. But none of them has done away with the need for character in the individual or the ability to think.
From My Own Story (1957), 320.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Character (243)  |  Ethics (50)  |  Individual (404)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Succession (77)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Whole (738)  |  Year (933)

For nothing is fixed, forever and forever and forever, it is not fixed; the earth is always shifting, the light is always changing, the sea does not cease to grind down rock. Generations do not cease to be born, and we are responsible to them because we are the only witnesses they have. The sea rises, the light fails, lovers cling to each other, and children cling to us. The moment we cease to hold each other, the sea engulfs us and the light goes out.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (159)  |  Cease (79)  |  Change (593)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Cling (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fail (185)  |  Fix (25)  |  Forever (103)  |  Generation (242)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hold (95)  |  Light (607)  |  Lover (11)  |  Moment (253)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rock (161)  |  Sea (308)  |  Shift (44)

Here man is no longer the center of the world, only a witness, but a witness who is also a partner in the silent life of nature, bound by secret affinities to the trees.
From Presidential Address (20 Dec 1957), to the Annual Meeting of the Swedish Academy, 'The Linnaeus Tradition and Our Time', collected in Servant of Peace: A Selection of the Speeches and Statements of Dag Hammarskjöld, Secretary-General of the United Nations, 1953-1961 (1962), 153. Also in Public Papers of the Secretaries-General of the United Nations (1973), Vol. 3, 703.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (27)  |  Bound (119)  |  Center (33)  |  Forest (150)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Partner (5)  |  Secret (194)  |  Silent (29)  |  Tree (246)  |  World (1774)

Here the most sublime scene ever witnessed in the operating room was presented when the patient placed himself voluntarily upon the table, which was to become the altar of future fame. … The heroic bravery of the man who voluntarily placed himself upon the table, a subject for the surgeon’s knife, should be recorded and his name enrolled upon parchment, which should be hung upon the walls of the surgical amphitheatre in which the operation was performed. His name was Gilbert Abbott.
Description of the first public demonstration of ether at the Massachussetts General Hospital (16 Oct 1846).
From the Semi-Centennial of Anesthesia, Massachusetts General Hospital (1897). In Logan Clendening, Source Book of Medical History (1960), 373.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Altar (10)  |  Amphitheatre (2)  |  Anesthesia (5)  |  Become (815)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Ether (35)  |  Fame (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Knife (23)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Name (333)  |  Operation (213)  |  Patient (199)  |  Perform (121)  |  Present (619)  |  Record (154)  |  Scene (36)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Surgery (51)  |  Table (104)  |  Wall (67)

His [Thomas Edison] method was inefficient in the extreme, for an immense ground had to be covered to get anything at all unless blind chance intervened and, at first, I was almost a sorry witness of his doings, knowing that just a little theory and calculation would have saved him 90 per cent of the labor. But he had a veritable contempt for book learning and mathematical knowledge, trusting himself entirely to his inventor's instinct and practical American sense. In view of this, the truly prodigious amount of his actual accomplishments is little short of a miracle.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25. In 1884, Tesla had moved to America to assist Edison in the designing of motors and generators.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  American (46)  |  Amount (151)  |  Blind (95)  |  Book (392)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Chance (239)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Doing (280)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Extreme (75)  |  First (1283)  |  Ground (217)  |  Himself (461)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inefficient (3)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labor (107)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prodigious (20)  |  Saving (20)  |  Sense (770)  |  Short (197)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truly (116)  |  Trust (66)  |  View (488)

I can hear the sizzle of newborn stars, and know anything of meaning, of the fierce magic emerging here. I am witness to flexible eternity, the evolving past, and I know we will live forever, as dust or breathe in the face of stars, in the shifting pattern of winds.
Joy Harjo
In Secrets from the Center of the World (1989), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Breathe (45)  |  Dust (64)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Face (212)  |  Fierce (7)  |  Flexible (6)  |  Forever (103)  |  Hear (139)  |  Know (1518)  |  Live (628)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Newborn (5)  |  Past (337)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Shift (44)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wind (128)

I have witnessed a most remarkable drama here, one which to me as a German was very unexpected, and quite shocking. I saw the famous M. Lavoisier hold a ceremonial auto-da-fe of phlogiston in the Arsenal. His wife... served as the sacrificial priestess, and Stahl appeared as the advocatus diaboli to defend phlogiston. In the end, poor phlogiston was burned on the accusation of oxygen. Do you not think I have made a droll discovery? Everything is literally true. I will not say whether the cause of phlogiston is now irretrievably lost, or what I think about the issue. But I am glad that this spectacle was not presented in my fatherland.
Letter to Chemische Annalen, 1789, 1, 519. Quoted (in English translation) in K. Hufbauer, The Formation of the German Chemical Community (1982), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  Advocate (18)  |  Burn (87)  |  Cause (541)  |  Devil (31)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drama (21)  |  End (590)  |  Everything (476)  |  German (36)  |  Germany (13)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Literally (30)  |  Most (1731)  |  Oxygen (66)  |  Phlogiston (9)  |  Poor (136)  |  Present (619)  |  Saw (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Georg Ernst Stahl (8)  |  Think (1086)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Wife (41)  |  Will (2355)

I, Galileo Galilei, son of the late Vincenzo Galilei, of Florence, aged seventy years, being brought personally to judgment, and kneeling before your Most Eminent and Most Reverend Lords Cardinals, General Inquisitors of the universal Christian republic against heretical depravity, having before my eyes the Holy Gospels, which I touch with my own hands, swear that I have always believed, and now believe, and with the help of God will in future believe, every article which the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of Rome holds, teaches, and preaches. But because I have been enjoined by this Holy Office altogether to abandon the false opinion which maintains that the sun is the centre and immovable, and forbidden to hold, defend, or teach the said false doctrine in any manner, and after it hath been signified to me that the said doctrine is repugnant with the Holy Scripture, I have written and printed a book, in which I treat of the same doctrine now condemned, and adduce reasons with great force in support of the same, without giving any solution, and therefore have been judged grievously suspected of heresy; that is to say, that I held and believed that the sun is the centre of the universe and is immovable, and that the earth is not the centre and is movable; willing, therefore, to remove from the minds of your Eminences, and of every Catholic Christian, this vehement suspicion rightfully entertained toward me, with a sincere heart and unfeigned faith, I abjure, curse, and detest the said errors and heresies, and generally every other error and sect contrary to Holy Church; and I swear that I will never more in future say or assert anything verbally, or in writing, which may give rise to a similar suspicion of me; but if I shall know any heretic, or anyone suspected of heresy, that I will denounce him to this Holy Office, or to the Inquisitor or Ordinary of the place where I may be; I swear, moreover, and promise, that I will fulfil and observe fully, all the penances which have been or shall be laid on me by this Holy Office. But if it shall happen that I violate any of my said promises, oaths, and protestations (which God avert!), I subject myself to all the pains and punishments which have been decreed and promulgated by the sacred canons, and other general and particular constitutions, against delinquents of this description. So may God help me, and his Holy Gospels which I touch with my own hands. I, the above-named Galileo Galilei, have abjured, sworn, promised, and bound myself as above, and in witness thereof with my own hand have subscribed this present writing of my abjuration, which I have recited word for word. At Rome, in the Convent of Minerva, June 22, 1633. I, Galileo Galilei, have abjured as above with my own hand.
Abjuration, 22 Jun 1633. In J.J. Fahie, Galileo, His Life and Work (1903), 319-321.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abjuration (2)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Bound (119)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Christian (43)  |  Church (56)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Constitution (76)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Curse (17)  |  Denounce (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Error (321)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Force (487)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heliocentric Model (7)  |  Heretic (8)  |  Holy (34)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Lord (93)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oath (10)  |  Observe (168)  |  Office (71)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remove (45)  |  Republic (15)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rome (19)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Say (984)  |  Solution (267)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Swear (6)  |  Teach (277)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

If we are still here to witness the destruction of our planet some five billion years or more hence ..., then we will have achieved something so unprecedented in the history of life that we should be willing to sing our swan song with joy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Achieve (66)  |  Billion (95)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Five (16)  |  History (673)  |  Joy (107)  |  Life (1795)  |  More (2559)  |  Planet (356)  |  Sing (26)  |  Something (719)  |  Song (37)  |  Still (613)  |  Swan (3)  |  Unprecedented (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Year (933)

If we factor in high-powered women in Europe as well, such as [German Chancellor] Angela Merkel, it seems we are witnessing a seismic shift for women to accede to high-level positions in politics and society. But there may still be a gap between those women achieving high public status and those in the private sector. I welcome these signs of women’s liberation.
From TV show interview with Piers Morgan, on ITV, 'Good Morning Britain'. Transcribed from online video, 'Stephen Hawking on Donald Trump's US: "I Fear I May Not Be Welcome" | Good Morning Britain' on youtube.com website. Also quoted online at huffingtonpost.com in Hayley Miller, 'Stephen Hawking Teaches Piers Morgan A Valuable Lesson In Gender Equality', Huffington Post (20 Mar 2017), but given there with the last sentence moved to follow the first.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Achieve (66)  |  Chancellor (8)  |  Europe (43)  |  Factor (46)  |  Gap (33)  |  German (36)  |  High (362)  |  Liberation (12)  |  Politics (112)  |  Position (77)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Public (96)  |  Sector (6)  |  Seismic (2)  |  Shift (44)  |  Sign (58)  |  Society (326)  |  Status (35)  |  Still (613)  |  Welcome (16)  |  Woman (151)

In 1768, some peasants, near Luce in France, heard a thunderclap and saw a large stone fall from the sky. Reports of this strange phenomenon reached the French Academy of Sciences. The Academy asked Lavoisier, the premier chemist, to investigate. Lavoisier knew that stones do not fall out of the sky; so, in his knowledgeable arrogance, he reported that the witnesses were either lying or mistaken. The academy did not accept the fact of meteorites until the following century.
In 'Forum: A Case of Spontaneous Human Combustion', New Scientist (15 May 1986), 70.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Accept (191)  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Ask (411)  |  Century (310)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fall (230)  |  France (27)  |  French Academy Of Sciences (2)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Large (394)  |  Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (40)  |  Lie (364)  |  Lying (55)  |  Meteorite (9)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Peasant (8)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Reach (281)  |  Report (38)  |  Saw (160)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sky (161)  |  Stone (162)  |  Strange (157)  |  Thunder (20)

In both social and natural sciences, the body of positive knowledge grows by the failure of a tentative hypothesis to predict phenomena the hypothesis professes to explain; by the patching up of that hypothesis until someone suggests a new hypothesis that more elegantly or simply embodies the troublesome phenomena, and so on ad infinitum. In both, experiment is sometimes possible, sometimes not (witness meteorology). In both, no experiment is ever completely controlled, and experience often offers evidence that is the equivalent of controlled experiment. In both, there is no way to have a self-contained closed system or to avoid interaction between the observer and the observed. The Gödel theorem in mathematics, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in physics, the self-fulfilling or self-defeating prophecy in the social sciences all exemplify these limitations.
Inflation and Unemployment (1976), 348.
Science quotes on:  |  Ad Infinitum (5)  |  All (4108)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Closed (38)  |  Completely (135)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Explain (322)  |  Failure (161)  |  Kurt Gödel (8)  |  Grow (238)  |  Werner Heisenberg (42)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Limitation (47)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  More (2559)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  New (1216)  |  Observed (149)  |  Offer (141)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Positive (94)  |  Possible (552)  |  Predict (79)  |  Principle (507)  |  Prophecy (13)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Self (267)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  System (537)  |  Tentative (16)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Uncertainty Principle (8)  |  Way (1217)

In the last fifteen years we have witnessed an event that, I believe, is unique in the history of the natural sciences: their subjugation to and incorporation into the whirls and frenzies of disgusting publicity and propaganda. This is no doubt symptomatic of the precarious position assigned by present-day society to any form of intellectual activity. Such intellectual pursuits have at all times been both absurd and fragile; but they become ever more ludicrous when, as is now true of science, they become mass professions and must, as homeless pretentious parasites, justify their right to exist in a period devoted to nothing but the rapid consumption of goods and amusements. These sciences were always a divertissement in the sense in which Pascal used the word; but what is their function in a society living under the motto lunam et circenses? Are they only a band of court jesters in search of courts which, if they ever existed, have long lost their desire to be amused?
Voices in the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science (1979), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurd (59)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Amusement (33)  |  Become (815)  |  Both (493)  |  Consumption (14)  |  Court (33)  |  Desire (204)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Event (216)  |  Exist (443)  |  Form (959)  |  Fragile (21)  |  Function (228)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  Incorporation (4)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Last (426)  |  Living (491)  |  Long (790)  |  Ludicrous (7)  |  Mass (157)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Period (198)  |  Present (619)  |  Pretentious (4)  |  Profession (99)  |  Propaganda (13)  |  Publicity (5)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Sense (770)  |  Society (326)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unique (67)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Word (619)  |  Year (933)

It was my good fortune to be linked with Mme. Curie through twenty years of sublime and unclouded friendship. I came to admire her human grandeur to an ever growing degree. Her strength, her purity of will, her austerity toward herself, her objectivity, her incorruptible judgement— all these were of a kind seldom found joined in a single individual... The greatest scientific deed of her life—proving the existence of radioactive elements and isolating them—owes its accomplishment not merely to bold intuition but to a devotion and tenacity in execution under the most extreme hardships imaginable, such as the history of experimental science has not often witnessed.
Out of My Later Years (1950), 227-8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Austerity (3)  |  Bold (22)  |  Marie Curie (32)  |  Deed (34)  |  Degree (276)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Element (310)  |  Execution (25)  |  Existence (456)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fortune (49)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Good (889)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Growing (98)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Kind (557)  |  Life (1795)  |  Merely (316)  |  Most (1731)  |  Objectivity (16)  |  Owe (71)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Single (353)  |  Strength (126)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Tenacity (10)  |  Through (849)  |  Will (2355)  |  Year (933)

Its [mathematical analysis] chief attribute is clearness; it has no means for expressing confused ideas. It compares the most diverse phenomena and discovers the secret analogies which unite them. If matter escapes us, as that of air and light because of its extreme tenuity, if bodies are placed far from us in the immensity of space, if man wishes to know the aspect of the heavens at successive periods separated by many centuries, if gravity and heat act in the interior of the solid earth at depths which will forever be inaccessible, mathematical analysis is still able to trace the laws of these phenomena. It renders them present and measurable, and appears to be the faculty of the human mind destined to supplement the brevity of life and the imperfection of the senses, and what is even more remarkable, it follows the same course in the study of all phenomena; it explains them in the same language, as if in witness to the unity and simplicity of the plan of the universe, and to make more manifest the unchangeable order which presides over all natural causes.
From Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), Discours Préliminaire, xiv, (Theory of Heat, Introduction), as translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appear (118)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Body (537)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Century (310)  |  Chief (97)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Compare (69)  |  Confused (12)  |  Course (409)  |  Depth (94)  |  Destined (42)  |  Discover (553)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forever (103)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Heat (174)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Interior (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurable (3)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Order (632)  |  Period (198)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Place (177)  |  Plan (117)  |  Present (619)  |  Preside (3)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Render (93)  |  Same (157)  |  Secret (194)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solid (116)  |  Space (500)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Successive (73)  |  Supplement (6)  |  Tenuity (2)  |  Trace (103)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Unite (42)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

Know, oh Brother (May God assist thee and us by the Spirit from Him) that God, Exalted Be His Praise, when He created all creatures and brought all things into being, arranged them and brought them into existence by a process similar to the process of generation of numbers from one, so that the multiplicity [of numbers] should be a witness to his Oneness, and their classification and order an indication of the perfection of His wisdom in creation. And this would be a witness to the fact, too, that they [creatures] are related to Him who created them, in the same way as the numbers are related to the One which is prior to two, and which is the principle, origin and source of numbers, as we have shown in our treatise on arithmetic.
Rasa'il. In Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Science and Civilisation in Islam (1968), 155-6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brother (43)  |  Classification (97)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creature (233)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Generation (242)  |  God (757)  |  Indication (33)  |  Know (1518)  |  Multiplicity (14)  |  Number (699)  |  Oneness (6)  |  Order (632)  |  Origin (239)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Two (937)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wisdom (221)

Man has never been a particularly modest or self-deprecatory animal, and physical theory bears witness to this no less than many other important activities. The idea that thought is the measure of all things, that there is such a thing as utter logical rigor, that conclusions can be drawn endowed with an inescapable necessity, that mathematics has an absolute validity and controls experience—these are not the ideas of a modest animal. Not only do our theories betray these somewhat bumptious traits of self-appreciation, but especially obvious through them all is the thread of incorrigible optimism so characteristic of human beings.
In The Nature of Physical Theory (1936), 135-136.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Appreciation (34)  |  Bear (159)  |  Being (1278)  |  Betray (8)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Control (167)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Experience (467)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Idea (843)  |  Important (209)  |  Inescapable (7)  |  Logic (287)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Modest (15)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Never (1087)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Optimism (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physical (508)  |  Rigor (27)  |  Self (267)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thread (32)  |  Through (849)  |  Trait (22)  |  Utter (7)  |  Validity (47)

Man is a classifying animal: in one sense it may be said that the whole process of speaking is nothing but distributing phenomena, of which no two are alike in every respect, into different classes on the strength of perceived similarities and dissimilarities. In the name-giving process we witness the same ineradicable and very useful tendency to see likenesses and to express similarity in the phenomena through similarity in name.
Language: Its Nature, Development and Origin (1922), 388-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (60)  |  Animal (617)  |  Classification (97)  |  Different (577)  |  Express (186)  |  Man (2251)  |  Name (333)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Process (423)  |  Respect (207)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Speech (61)  |  Strength (126)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Useful (250)  |  Whole (738)

Mathematics accomplishes really nothing outside of the realm of magnitude; marvellous, however, is the skill with which it masters magnitude wherever it finds it. We recall at once the network of lines which it has spun about heavens and earth; the system of lines to which azimuth and altitude, declination and right ascension, longitude and latitude are referred; those abscissas and ordinates, tangents and normals, circles of curvature and evolutes; those trigonometric and logarithmic functions which have been prepared in advance and await application. A look at this apparatus is sufficient to show that mathematicians are not magicians, but that everything is accomplished by natural means; one is rather impressed by the multitude of skilful machines, numerous witnesses of a manifold and intensely active industry, admirably fitted for the acquisition of true and lasting treasures.
In Werke [Kehrbach] (1890), Bd. 5, 101. As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Active (76)  |  Admirably (3)  |  Advance (280)  |  Altitude (4)  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Application (242)  |  Ascension (4)  |  Await (5)  |  Circle (110)  |  Curvature (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evolute (2)  |  Find (998)  |  Fit (134)  |  Function (228)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  Industry (137)  |  Intense (20)  |  Latitude (4)  |  Line (91)  |  Logarithmic (5)  |  Longitude (6)  |  Look (582)  |  Machine (257)  |  Magician (14)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  Manifold (22)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Network (21)  |  Normal (28)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Outside (141)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Really (78)  |  Realm (85)  |  Recall (10)  |  Refer (14)  |  Right (452)  |  Show (346)  |  Skill (109)  |  Skillful (14)  |  Spin (26)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  System (537)  |  Tangent (6)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Trigonometry (6)  |  True (212)  |  Wherever (51)

Most people assume that meditation is all about stopping thoughts, getting rid of emotions, somehow controlling the mind. But actually it’s … about stepping back, seeing the thought clearly, witnessing it coming and going.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 184
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Actually (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Assume (38)  |  Back (390)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Coming (114)  |  Control (167)  |  Emotion (100)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Rid (13)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Somehow (48)  |  Step (231)  |  Stop (80)  |  Thought (953)

My life as a surgeon-scientist, combining humanity and science, has been fantastically rewarding. In our daily patients we witness human nature in the raw–fear, despair, courage, understanding, hope, resignation, heroism. If alert, we can detect new problems to solve, new paths to investigate.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 565.
Science quotes on:  |  Alert (13)  |  Courage (69)  |  Daily (87)  |  Despair (40)  |  Detect (44)  |  Fear (197)  |  Heroism (7)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Path (144)  |  Patient (199)  |  Problem (676)  |  Raw (28)  |  Resignation (3)  |  Rewarding (2)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Solve (130)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Understanding (513)

Nothing can so quickly blur and distort the facts as desire—the wish to use the facts for some purpose of your own—and nothing can so surely destroy the truth. As soon as the witness wants to prove something he is no longer impartial and his evidence is no longer to be trusted.
From 'Getting at the Truth', The Saturday Review (19 Sep 1953), 36, No. 38, 12. Excerpted in Meta Riley Emberger and Marian Ross Hall, Scientific Writing (1955), 400.
Science quotes on:  |  Blur (8)  |  Desire (204)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Distort (22)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Impartial (4)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Something (719)  |  Soon (186)  |  Surely (101)  |  Trust (66)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Use (766)  |  Want (497)  |  Wish (212)

Notwithstanding, therefore, that we have not witnessed of a large continent, yet, as we may predict the future occurrence of such catastrophes, we are authorized to regard them as part of the present order of Nature.
Principles of Geology (1837), Vol. 1, 94.
Science quotes on:  |  Catastrophe (31)  |  Continent (76)  |  Deluge (14)  |  Devastation (6)  |  Future (429)  |  Geology (220)  |  Large (394)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Order (632)  |  Predict (79)  |  Present (619)  |  Regard (305)  |  Science (3879)

Numbers are intellectual witnesses that belong only to mankind.
From the French original, “Le nombre est un témoin intellectuel qui n’appartient qu’à l’homme”, in Oeuvres illustrées de Balzac (1852), Vol. 3, Louis Lambert, 28. As translated in Robert Collison (ed.), Dictionary of Foreign Quotations (1980), 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Belong (162)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Number (699)  |  Understand (606)

Over the last century, physicists have used light quanta, electrons, alpha particles, X-rays, gamma-rays, protons, neutrons and exotic sub-nuclear particles for this purpose [scattering experiments]. Much important information about the target atoms or nuclei or their assemblage has been obtained in this way. In witness of this importance one can point to the unusual concentration of scattering enthusiasts among earlier Nobel Laureate physicists. One could say that physicists just love to perform or interpret scattering experiments.
Nobel Banquet Speech (10 Dec 1994), in Tore Frängsmyr (ed.), Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1994 (1995).
Science quotes on:  |  Alpha Particle (5)  |  Assemblage (17)  |  Atom (355)  |  Century (310)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Electron (93)  |  Enthusiast (7)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Gamma Ray (3)  |  Gamma-Ray (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Information (166)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Last (426)  |  Light (607)  |  Love (309)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Nobel Laureate (3)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perform (121)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Proton (21)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Ray (114)  |  Say (984)  |  Scattering (4)  |  Target (9)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Way (1217)  |  X-ray (37)

Placed as the fossils are in their several tiers of burial-places the one over the other; we have in them true witnesses of successive existences, whilst the historian of man is constantly at fault as to dates and even the sequence of events, to say nothing of the contradicting statements which he is forced to reconcile.
Siluria (1872), 476.
Science quotes on:  |  Burial (7)  |  Contradiction (68)  |  Event (216)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fault (54)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Historian (54)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Other (2236)  |  Reconcile (18)  |  Reconciliation (10)  |  Say (984)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Statement (142)  |  Strata (35)  |  Succession (77)  |  Successive (73)

Reason must approach nature with the view, indeed, of receiving information from it, not, however, in the character of a pupil, who listens to all that his master chooses to tell him, but in that of a judge, who compels the witnesses to reply to those questions which he himself thinks fit to propose. To this single idea must the revolution be ascribed, by which, after groping in the dark for so many centuries, natural science was at length conducted into the path of certain progress.
Critique of Pure Reason, translated by J.M.D. Meiklejohn (1855), Preface to the Second Edition, xxvii.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Century (310)  |  Certain (550)  |  Character (243)  |  Choose (112)  |  Compel (30)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Dark (140)  |  Fit (134)  |  Grope (3)  |  Himself (461)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Information (166)  |  Judge (108)  |  Listen (73)  |  Master (178)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Path (144)  |  Progress (465)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Question (621)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reply (56)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Tell (340)  |  Think (1086)  |  View (488)

Science appears to us with a very different aspect after we have found out that it is not in lecture rooms only, and by means of the electric light projected on a screen, that we may witness physical phenomena, but that we may find illustrations of the highest doctrines of science in games and gymnastics, in travelling by land and by water, in storms of the air and of the sea, and wherever there is matter in motion.
'Introductory Lecture on Experimental Physics' (1871). In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 243.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Different (577)  |  Electric (76)  |  Find (998)  |  Game (101)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Light (607)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Motion (310)  |  Physical (508)  |  Project (73)  |  Projector (3)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  Storm (51)  |  Storms (18)  |  Travel (114)  |  Travelling (17)  |  Water (481)  |  Wherever (51)

Scripture and Nature agree in this, that all things were covered with water; how and when this aspect began, and how long it lasted, Nature says not, Scripture relates. That there was a watery fluid, however, at a time when animals and plants were not yet to be found, and that the fluid covered all things, is proved by the strata of the higher mountains, free from all heterogeneous material. And the form of these strata bears witness to the presence of a fluid, while the substance bears witness to the absence of heterogeneous bodies. But the similarity of matter and form in the strata of mountains which are different and distant from each other, proves that the fluid was universal.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 263-4.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Bear (159)  |  Covering (14)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Form (959)  |  Free (232)  |  Heterogeneous (3)  |  Last (426)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plant (294)  |  Presence (63)  |  Prove (250)  |  Say (984)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Strata (35)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universality (22)  |  Water (481)

So-called extraordinary events always split into two extremes naturalists who have not witnessed them: those who believe blindly and those who do not believe at all. The latter have always in mind the story of the golden goose; if the facts lie slightly beyond the limits of their knowledge, they relegate them immediately to fables. The former have a secret taste for marvels because they seem to expand Nature; they use their imagination with pleasure to find explanations. To remain doubtful is given to naturalists who keep a middle path between the two extremes. They calmly examine facts; they refer to logic for help; they discuss probabilities; they do not scoff at anything, not even errors, because they serve at least the history of the human mind; finally, they report rather than judge; they rarely decide unless they have good evidence.
Quoted in Albert V. Carozzi, Histoire des sciences de la terre entre 1790 et 1815 vue à travers les documents inédités de la Societé de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi. (1990), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Call (769)  |  Decision (91)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Error (321)  |  Event (216)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fable (12)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Former (137)  |  Gold (97)  |  Golden (45)  |  Good (889)  |  Goose (12)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Judge (108)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Logic (287)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Path (144)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Probability (130)  |  Rare (89)  |  Relegation (3)  |  Remain (349)  |  Report (38)  |  Scoff (7)  |  Secret (194)  |  Service (110)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Split (13)  |  Story (118)  |  Taste (90)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)

The actions of bad men produce only temporary evil, the actions of good men only temporary good ; and eventually the good and the evil altogether subside, are neutralized by subsequent generations, absorbed by the incessant movements of future ages. But the discoveries of great men never leave us; they are immortal; they contain those eternal truths which survive the shock of empires, outlive the struggles of rival creeds, and witness the decay of successive religions.
In History of Civilization in England (1858), Vol. 1, 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Action (327)  |  Age (499)  |  Bad (180)  |  Creed (27)  |  Decay (53)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Empire (14)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Eventual (9)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Evil (116)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Incessant (8)  |  Leave (130)  |  Movement (155)  |  Never (1087)  |  Outlive (3)  |  Religion (361)  |  Rival (19)  |  Shock (37)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  Subside (5)  |  Successive (73)  |  Survival (94)  |  Survive (79)  |  Temporary (23)  |  Truth (1057)

The breaking up of the terrestrial globe, this it is we witness. It doubtless began a long time ago, and the brevity of human life enables us to contemplate it without dismay. It is not only in the great mountain ranges that the traces of this process are found. Great segments of the earth's crust have sunk hundreds, in some cases, even thousands, of feet deep, and not the slightest inequality of the surface remains to indicate the fracture; the different nature of the rocks and the discoveries made in mining alone reveal its presence. Time has levelled all.
The Face of the Earth (1904), Vol. 1, 604.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Break (99)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Crust (38)  |  Deep (233)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dismay (5)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enable (119)  |  Enabling (7)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Fracture (6)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Indication (33)  |  Inequality (9)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Mining (18)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Presence (63)  |  Process (423)  |  Range (99)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Rock (161)  |  Segment (6)  |  Sinking (6)  |  Surface (209)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)

The faith of scientists in the power and truth of mathematics is so implicit that their work has gradually become less and less observation, and more and more calculation. The promiscuous collection and tabulation of data have given way to a process of assigning possible meanings, merely supposed real entities, to mathematical terms, working out the logical results, and then staging certain crucial experiments to check the hypothesis against the actual empirical results. But the facts which are accepted by virtue of these tests are not actually observed at all. With the advance of mathematical technique in physics, the tangible results of experiment have become less and less spectacular; on the other hand, their significance has grown in inverse proportion. The men in the laboratory have departed so far from the old forms of experimentation—typified by Galileo's weights and Franklin's kite—that they cannot be said to observe the actual objects of their curiosity at all; instead, they are watching index needles, revolving drums, and sensitive plates. No psychology of 'association' of sense-experiences can relate these data to the objects they signify, for in most cases the objects have never been experienced. Observation has become almost entirely indirect; and readings take the place of genuine witness.
Philosophy in a New Key; A Study in Inverse the Symbolism of Reason, Rite, and Art (1942), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advance (280)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Association (46)  |  Become (815)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Certain (550)  |  Collection (64)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Data (156)  |  Deduction (82)  |  Drum (8)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Faith (203)  |  Form (959)  |  Benjamin Franklin (91)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Implicit (12)  |  Indirect (18)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Merely (316)  |  Meter (9)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possible (552)  |  Power (746)  |  Process (423)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reading (133)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sense (770)  |  Significance (113)  |  Signify (17)  |  Spectacular (18)  |  Tabulation (2)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Technique (80)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Test (211)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weight (134)  |  Work (1351)

The history of aëronautic adventure affords a curious illustration of the same [dip of the horizon] principle. The late Mr. Sadler, the celebrated aeronaut, ascended on one occasion in a balloon from Dublin, and was wafted across the Irish Channel, when, on his approach to the Welsh coast, the balloon descended nearly to the surface of the sea. By this time the sun was set, and the shades of evening began to close in. He threw out nearly all his ballast, and suddenly sprang upwards to a great height, and by so doing brought his horizon to dip below the sun, producing the whole phenomenon of a western sunrise. Subsequently descending in Wales, he of course witnessed a second sunset on the same evening.
This describes how a rapidly ascending balloonist can see more of a setting sun, from the top down, as the viewer gradually rises more and thus sees further, beyond the curvature of the earth. The sun gradually appears as if at sunrise. It is the reverse of the view of a ship sailing toward the horizon which disappears from its hull up to the tip of the mast. In Outlines of Astronomy (1849), 20. A similar description appeared earlier, in Astronomy (1833), 36, which also footnoted Herschel's comment that he had this anecdote from Dr. Lardner, who was present at the ascent
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (56)  |  All (4108)  |  Approach (108)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Ascent (7)  |  Ballast (2)  |  Balloon (15)  |  Course (409)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Curious (91)  |  Descend (47)  |  Descent (27)  |  Dip (3)  |  Doing (280)  |  Dublin (3)  |  Evening (12)  |  Great (1574)  |  Height (32)  |  History (673)  |  Horizon (45)  |  Illustration (48)  |  Ireland (8)  |  Late (118)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Principle (507)  |  Sea (308)  |  Set (394)  |  Shade (31)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Sun (385)  |  Sunrise (13)  |  Sunset (26)  |  Surface (209)  |  Time (1877)  |  Upward (43)  |  Western (45)  |  Whole (738)

The ideas that are basic to [my work] often bear witness to my amazement and wonder at the laws of nature which operate in the world around us.
In M.C. Escher: The Graphic Work (1978), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazement (15)  |  Basic (138)  |  Bear (159)  |  Idea (843)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Operate (17)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

The seventeenth century witnessed the birth of modern science as we know it today. This science was something new, based on a direct confrontation of nature by experiment and observation. But there was another feature of the new science—a dependence on numbers, on real numbers of actual experience.
From The Triumph of Numbers: How Counting Shaped Modern Life (2005), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  17th Century (16)  |  Actual (117)  |  Birth (147)  |  Century (310)  |  Confrontation (8)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Direct (225)  |  Experience (467)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Feature (44)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measurement (174)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Real (149)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Today (314)

The study of the reactivity of metal ion complexes—the birth of which I have witnessed and which I have helped to nurture … is still in its infancy; it too is flourishing.
Speech at the Nobel Banquet (10 Dec 1983) for his Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel: The Nobel Prizes (1984), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (147)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Flourishing (6)  |  Infancy (12)  |  Ion (21)  |  Metal (84)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)

The year 1896 ... marked the beginning of what has been aptly termed the heroic age of Physical Science. Never before in the history of physics has there been witnessed such a period of intense activity when discoveries of fundamental importance have followed one another with such bewildering rapidity.
'The Electrical Structure of Matter', Reports of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1924), C2.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Age (499)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Bewilderment (8)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Follow (378)  |  Following (16)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Hero (42)  |  History (673)  |  Importance (286)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Marked (55)  |  Never (1087)  |  Period (198)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Physics (533)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Science (3879)  |  Term (349)  |  Year (933)

There is an influence which is getting strong and stronger day by day, which shows itself more and more in all departments of human activity, and influence most fruitful and beneficial—the influence of the artist. It was a happy day for the mass of humanity when the artist felt the desire of becoming a physician, an electrician, an engineer or mechanician or—whatnot—a mathematician or a financier; for it was he who wrought all these wonders and grandeur we are witnessing. It was he who abolished that small, pedantic, narrow-grooved school teaching which made of an aspiring student a galley-slave, and he who allowed freedom in the choice of subject of study according to one's pleasure and inclination, and so facilitated development.
'Roentgen Rays or Streams', Electrical Review (12 Aug 1896). Reprinted in The Nikola Tesla Treasury (2007), 307. By Nikola Tesla
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  According (237)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Artist (90)  |  Aspiration (32)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Beneficial (13)  |  Choice (110)  |  Department (92)  |  Desire (204)  |  Development (422)  |  Electrician (6)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Grandeur (31)  |  Happy (105)  |  Human (1468)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Inclination (34)  |  Influence (222)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mechanician (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Pedantic (4)  |  Pedantry (5)  |  Physician (273)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  School (219)  |  Show (346)  |  Slave (37)  |  Small (477)  |  Strong (174)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Wonder (236)

These days at ten o’clock at night a most alarming wonder has manifested itself in the skies. The firmament was rent asunder and through this gap one could distinguish chariots and armies, riders with yellow, white, red and black standards, though to do battle against each other. This awesome and unusual vision continued from ten at night till about two of the morning, and was witnessed with alarm and dismay by many honest and trustworthy people. The significance thereof is known but to God Almighty, Who may graciously prevent the shedding of innocent blood.
Anonymous
'Frightful Apparition in the Sky at Vienna. From Vienna, the 11th day of August 1590'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) News and Rumor in Renaissance Europe: The Fugger Newsletters (1959), 188. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Alarm (18)  |  Alarming (4)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Army (33)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Awesome (14)  |  Battle (34)  |  Black (42)  |  Blood (134)  |  Chariot (9)  |  Clock (47)  |  Dismay (5)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Do (1908)  |  Firmament (18)  |  Gap (33)  |  God (757)  |  Graciously (2)  |  Honest (50)  |  Innocent (12)  |  Known (454)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Meteorology (33)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Night (120)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Red (35)  |  Rent (2)  |  Rider (3)  |  Shedding (3)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sky (161)  |  Standard (57)  |  Through (849)  |  Trustworthy (11)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Vision (123)  |  White (127)  |  Wonder (236)  |  Yellow (30)

Those who knew that the judgements of many centuries had reinforced the opinion that the Earth is placed motionless in the middle of heaven, as though at its centre, if I on the contrary asserted that the Earth moves, I hesitated for a long time whether to bring my treatise, written to demonstrate its motion, into the light of day, or whether it would not be better to follow the example of the Pythagoreans and certain others, who used to pass on the mysteries of their philosophy merely to their relatives and friends, not in writing but by personal contact, as the letter of Lysis to Hipparchus bears witness. And indeed they seem to me to have done so, not as some think from a certain jealousy of communicating their doctrines, but so that their greatest splendours, discovered by the devoted research of great men, should not be exposed to the contempt of those who either find it irksome to waste effort on anything learned, unless it is profitable, or if they are stirred by the exhortations and examples of others to a high-minded enthusiasm for philosophy, are nevertheless so dull-witted that among philosophers they are like drones among bees.
'To His Holiness Pope Paul III', in Copernicus: On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), trans. A. M. Duncan (1976), 24.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (66)  |  Bear (159)  |  Bee (40)  |  Better (486)  |  Certain (550)  |  Contact (65)  |  Contempt (20)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Demonstrate (76)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Discover (553)  |  Drone (4)  |  Dull (54)  |  Earth (996)  |  Effort (227)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Heaven (258)  |  High (362)  |  Hipparchus (3)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Jealousy (9)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Letter (109)  |  Light (607)  |  Long (790)  |  Lysis (4)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Profitable (28)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Research (664)  |  Splendour (8)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Time (1877)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Waste (101)  |  Writing (189)

Time is awake when all things sleep.
Time stands straight when all things fall.
Time shuts in all and will not be shut.
Is, was, and shall be are Time’s children.
O Reason! be witness! be stable!
Vyasa
In The Mahabarata (1968), Vol. 1, 31, v. 247-248
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Awake (19)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Fall (230)  |  Reason (744)  |  Shut (41)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Stable (30)  |  Stand (274)  |  Straight (73)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

Visible from Earth orbit … tropical rain forests of equatorial regions are huge expanses of monotonous, mottled dark green. During the day they are frequently covered with enormous thunderstorms that extend for hundreds of miles. The view has an air of fantasy about it, and you grope for words to describe what you see. My personal reaction was one of feeling humble, awed, and privileged to be witness to such a scene.
In How Do You Go To The Bathroom In Space?: All the Answers to All the Questions You Have About Living in Space (1999), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Awe (43)  |  Covered (5)  |  Dark (140)  |  Describe (128)  |  Earth (996)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Equatorial (2)  |  Expanse (6)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fantasy (14)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Forest (150)  |  Green (63)  |  Grope (3)  |  Humble (50)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Mile (39)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Privilege (39)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Scene (36)  |  See (1081)  |  Thunderstorm (5)  |  Tropical (8)  |  View (488)  |  Visible (84)  |  Word (619)

Volcanic action is essentially paroxysmal; yet Mr. Lyell will admit no greater paroxysms than we ourselves have witnessed—no periods of feverish spasmodic energy, during which the very framework of nature has been convulsed and torn asunder. The utmost movements that he allows are a slight quivering of her muscular integuments.
'Address to the Geological Society, delivered on the Evening of the 18th of February 1831', Proceedings of the Geological Society (1834), 1, 307.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Asunder (3)  |  Convulsion (5)  |  Energy (344)  |  Fever (29)  |  Feverish (6)  |  Framework (31)  |  Greater (288)  |  Integument (3)  |  Movement (155)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Period (198)  |  Quiver (3)  |  Slight (31)  |  Torn (17)  |  Utmost (12)  |  Volcano (39)  |  Will (2355)

We may also draw a very important additional conclusion from the gradual dissolution of the milky way; for the state into which the incessant action of the clustering power [presumably, gravity] has brought it at present, is a kind of chronometer that may be used to measure the time of its past and future existence; and although we do not know the rate of going of this mysterious chronometer, it is nevertheless certain, that since the breaking up of the parts of the milky way affords a proof that it cannot last for ever, it equally bears witness that its past duration cannot be admitted to the infinite.
'Astronomical Observations... ' Philosophical Transactions (1814), 104, 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Bear (159)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chronometer (2)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Dissolution (11)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Equally (130)  |  Existence (456)  |  Future (429)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Measure (232)  |  Milky Way (26)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Past (337)  |  Power (746)  |  Present (619)  |  Proof (287)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

We modern chemists, the witnesses and workers of this “Age of Chemistry,” can learn something from the old alchemy, full as it was of errors and fantasies! … Let the Past furnish us a warning against too much phantasy in modern chemistry.
From 'What Can the Modern Chemist Learn From the Old Alchemy?', Introductory Lecture (1917), delivered at Cornell University, written in German, translated by L.F. Audrieth, and published in Salts, Acids, and Bases: Electrolytes Stereochemistry (1929), 1-2, as Vol. 4 of the George Fisher Baker Non-Resident Lectureship in Chemistry at Cornell University.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Age (499)  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Error (321)  |  Fantasy (14)  |  Full (66)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Learn (629)  |  Modern (385)  |  Old (481)  |  Past (337)  |  Something (719)  |  Warning (17)  |  Worker (31)

We reached the village of Watervliet, [New York] … and here we crossed the Hudson in a horse-tow-boat. Having never witnessed, except in America, this ingenious contrivance for crossing a river, I shall explain to you what it is … On each side of the boat, and standing on a revolving platform constructed a foot below the surface of the deck, is placed a horse, harnessed and attached to a splinter-bar which is fastened to the boat, so as to keep him in his proper position. When every thing is ready for departure, the animal is made to walk, and by the action of his feet puts the platform in motion, which, communicating with the paddle-wheels, gives them their rotatory evolution; and by this means the boat is propelled in any direction in which the helmsman wishes to go.
In Letter VIII, to a friend in England, from Lockport, New York (25 Jul 1831), collected in Narrative of a Tour in North America (1834), Vol. 1, 184-184.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  America (127)  |  Animal (617)  |  Attach (56)  |  Attached (36)  |  Boat (16)  |  Construct (124)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Direction (175)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explain (322)  |  Ferry (4)  |  Harness (23)  |  Horse (74)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Invention (369)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Motion (310)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Platform (3)  |  Proper (144)  |  Propulsion (10)  |  Reach (281)  |  Revolving (2)  |  River (119)  |  Side (233)  |  Surface (209)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Walk (124)  |  Wheel (50)

We reverence ancient Greece as the cradle of western science. Here for the first time the world witnessed the miracle of a logical system which proceeded from step to step with such precision that every single one of its propositions was absolutely indubitable—I refer to Euclid’s geometry. This admirable triumph of reasoning gave the human intellect the necessary confidence in itself for its subsequent achievements. If Euclid failed to kindle your youthful enthusiasm, then you were not born to be a scientific thinker.
From 'On the Method of Theoretical Physics', in Essays in Science (1934, 2004), 13.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Born (33)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Cradle (19)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Euclid (54)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failed (3)  |  First (1283)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Greece (8)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Intellect (31)  |  Indubitable (3)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Kindle (6)  |  Logic (287)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Precision (68)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Single (353)  |  Step (231)  |  Subsequent (33)  |  System (537)  |  Thinker (39)  |  Time (1877)  |  Triumph (73)  |  Western (45)  |  World (1774)  |  Youthful (2)

[In 1909,] Paris was the center of the aviation world. Aeronautics was neither an industry nor even a science; both were yet to come. It was an “art” and I might say a “passion”. Indeed, at that time it was a miracle. It meant the realization of legends and dreams that had existed for thousands of years and had been pronounced again and again as impossible by scientific authorities. Therefore, even the brief and unsteady flights of that period were deeply impressive. Many times I observed expressions of joy and tears in the eyes of witnesses who for the first time watched a flying machine carrying a man in the air.
In address (16 Nov 1964) presented to the Wings Club, New York City, Recollections and Thoughts of a Pioneer (1964), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Aeronautics (14)  |  Air (347)  |  Art (657)  |  Aviation (8)  |  Both (493)  |  Brief (36)  |  Carry (127)  |  Center (33)  |  Dream (208)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expression (175)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Flight (98)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Impressive (25)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Industry (137)  |  Joy (107)  |  Legend (17)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Paris (11)  |  Passion (114)  |  Period (198)  |  Realization (43)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Art (184)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Tear (42)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Watch (109)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

[The heart is] really a fascinating organ. It's about the only organ in the body that you can really witness its function. Doing things. And so on. Some of the other organs you can witness, like the intestines, will have this sort of peristaltic motion. But nothing that can compare with the activity of the human heart.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Body (537)  |  Compare (69)  |  Doing (280)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Function (228)  |  Heart (229)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.