Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Celebrate

Celebrate Quotes (14 quotes)

A world that did not lift a finger when Hitler was wiping out six million Jewish men, women, and children is now saying that the Jewish state of Israel will not survive if it does not come to terms with the Arabs. My feeling is that no one in this universe has the right and the competence to tell Israel what it has to do in order to survive. On the contrary, it is Israel that can tell us what to do. It can tell us that we shall not survive if we do not cultivate and celebrate courage, if we coddle traitors and deserters, bargain with terrorists, court enemies, and scorn friends.
In Before the Sabbath (1979), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Arab (3)  |  Bargain (4)  |  Child (252)  |  Competence (7)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Courage (55)  |  Court (20)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Enemy (65)  |  Feel (167)  |  Finger (44)  |  Friend (86)  |  Adolf Hitler (19)  |  Israel (5)  |  Jewish (10)  |  Lift (25)  |  Million (111)  |  Order (242)  |  Right (197)  |  Say (228)  |  Scorn (7)  |  State (137)  |  Survive (46)  |  Tell (110)  |  Term (122)  |  Terrorist (2)  |  Traitor (3)  |  Universe (686)  |  Wipe (6)  |  Woman (111)  |  World (898)

Archimedes, who combined a genius for mathematics with a physical insight, must rank with Newton, who lived nearly two thousand years later, as one of the founders of mathematical physics. … The day (when having discovered his famous principle of hydrostatics he ran through the streets shouting Eureka! Eureka!) ought to be celebrated as the birthday of mathematical physics; the science came of age when Newton sat in his orchard.
In An Introduction to Mathematics (1911), 37.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Birthday (5)  |  Discover (199)  |  Eureka (7)  |  Famous (9)  |  Founder (16)  |  Genius (249)  |  Insight (73)  |  Later (17)  |  Lived (3)  |  Mathematical Physics (9)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Orchard (4)  |  Physical (134)  |  Principle (292)  |  Rank (32)  |  Run (57)  |  Science (2067)  |  Shout (12)  |  Sit (47)  |  Street (23)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Year (299)

Daniel Bernoulli used to tell two little adventures, which he said had given him more pleasure than all the other honours he had received. Travelling with a learned stranger, who, being pleased with his conversation, asked his name; “I am Daniel Bernoulli,” answered he with great modesty; “and I,” said the stranger (who thought he meant to laugh at him) “am Isaac Newton.” Another time, having to dine with the celebrated Koenig, the mathematician, who boasted, with some degree of self-complacency, of a difficult problem he had solved with much trouble, Bernoulli went on doing the honours of his table, and when they went to drink coffee he presented Koenig with a solution of the problem more elegant than his own.
In A Philosophical and Mathematical Dictionary (1815), 1, 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Adventure (47)  |  Answer (249)  |  Ask (160)  |  Daniel Bernoulli (5)  |  Boast (21)  |  Coffee (12)  |  Complacent (6)  |  Conversation (26)  |  Degree (82)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Dine (5)  |  Drink (36)  |  Elegant (16)  |  Great (534)  |  Honour (25)  |  Laugh (28)  |  Learned (24)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Modesty (12)  |  Name (170)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Pleased (3)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Present (176)  |  Problem (497)  |  Solution (216)  |  Solve (78)  |  Stranger (15)  |  Table (36)  |  Travel (61)  |  Trouble (72)

Humans ... would not exist but for the wreckage of spent stars. So you're made of detritus [from exploded stars]. Get over it. Or better yet, celebrate it. After all, what nobler thought can one cherish than that the universe lives within us all?
In Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries (2007), 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (192)  |  Cherish (11)  |  Exist (148)  |  Exploded (3)  |  Human (550)  |  Live (272)  |  Made (14)  |  Nobler (3)  |  Spent (4)  |  Stars (2)  |  Thought (546)  |  Universe (686)

I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
Opening lines from poem, 'Song of Myself', Leaves of Grass (1881), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Assume (38)  |  Atom (280)  |  Belong (53)  |  Myself (36)  |  Sing (25)

I read … that the celebrated Amontons, using a thermometer of his own invention, had discovered that water boils at a fixed degree of heat. I was at once inflamed with a great desire to make for myself a thermometer of the same sort, so that I might with my own eyes perceive this beautiful phenomenon of nature.
From 'Experimenta circa gradum caloris liquorum nonnullorum ebullientium instituta', Philosophical Transactions (1724), 33, 1, as translated in William Francis Magie, A Source Book in Physics (1935), 131.
Science quotes on:  |  Guillaume Amontons (3)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Boil (15)  |  Degree (82)  |  Desire (142)  |  Discover (199)  |  Eye (222)  |  Fixed (17)  |  Great (534)  |  Heat (100)  |  Inflame (2)  |  Invention (324)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Perceive (40)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Read (145)  |  Thermometer (9)  |  Water (293)

If a man dies of cancer in fear and despair, then cry for his pain and celebrate his life. The other man, who fought like hell and laughed in the end, but also died, may have had an easier time in his final months, but took his leave with no more humanity.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Cancer (49)  |  Cry (18)  |  Despair (27)  |  Die (82)  |  Easy (102)  |  End (195)  |  Fear (142)  |  Fight (44)  |  Final (50)  |  Hell (32)  |  Humanity (125)  |  Laugh (28)  |  Leave (128)  |  Life (1131)  |  Month (31)  |  Pain (101)  |  Time (595)

Its [science’s] effectiveness is almost inevitable because it narrows the possibility of refutation and failure. Science begins by saying it can only answer this type of question and ends by saying these are the only questions that can be asked. Once the implications and shallowness of this trick are fully realised, science will be humbled and we shall be free to celebrate ourselves once again.
From Understanding the Present: An Alternative History of Science (2004), 249.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (249)  |  Ask (160)  |  Begin (108)  |  Effectiveness (11)  |  End (195)  |  Failure (138)  |  Free (92)  |  Humble (31)  |  Implication (22)  |  Inevitable (27)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Ourselves (51)  |  Possibility (116)  |  Question (404)  |  Realize (90)  |  Refutation (12)  |  Say (228)  |  Science (2067)  |  Shallowness (2)  |  Trick (24)  |  Type (52)

Mathematics, from the earliest times to which the history of human reason can reach, has followed, among that wonderful people of the Greeks, the safe way of science. But it must not be supposed that it was as easy for mathematics as for logic, in which reason is concerned with itself alone, to find, or rather to make for itself that royal road. I believe, on the contrary, that there was a long period of tentative work (chiefly still among the Egyptians), and that the change is to be ascribed to a revolution, produced by the happy thought of a single man, whose experiments pointed unmistakably to the path that had to be followed, and opened and traced out for the most distant times the safe way of a science. The history of that intellectual revolution, which was far more important than the passage round the celebrated Cape of Good Hope, and the name of its fortunate author, have not been preserved to us. … A new light flashed on the first man who demonstrated the properties of the isosceles triangle (whether his name was Thales or any other name), for he found that he had not to investigate what he saw in the figure, or the mere concepts of that figure, and thus to learn its properties; but that he had to produce (by construction) what he had himself, according to concepts a priori, placed into that figure and represented in it, so that, in order to know anything with certainty a priori, he must not attribute to that figure anything beyond what necessarily follows from what he has himself placed into it, in accordance with the concept.
In Critique of Pure Reason, Preface to the Second Edition, (1900), 690.
Science quotes on:  |  A Priori (22)  |  Accord (36)  |  Accordance (10)  |  Alone (106)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Attribute (38)  |  Author (62)  |  Belief (504)  |  Beyond (105)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Change (364)  |  Chiefly (12)  |  Concept (146)  |  Concern (110)  |  Construction (83)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Demonstrate (53)  |  Distant (32)  |  Early (62)  |  Easy (102)  |  Egyptian (5)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Far (154)  |  Figure (69)  |  Find (408)  |  First (314)  |  Flash (34)  |  Follow (124)  |  Fortunate (11)  |  Greek (73)  |  Happy (46)  |  History (369)  |  Human (550)  |  Important (205)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Investigate (65)  |  Isosceles Triangle (3)  |  Know (556)  |  Learn (288)  |  Light (347)  |  Logic (260)  |  Long (174)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mere (82)  |  Name (170)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  New (496)  |  Open (66)  |  Order (242)  |  Passage (20)  |  Path (84)  |  People (390)  |  Period (66)  |  Place (175)  |  Point (123)  |  Preserve (52)  |  Produce (102)  |  Property (126)  |  Reach (121)  |  Reason (471)  |  Represent (43)  |  Revolution (69)  |  Round (26)  |  Royal Road (4)  |  Safe (28)  |  Science (2067)  |  See (369)  |  Single (120)  |  Suppose (49)  |  Tentative (8)  |  Thales (9)  |  Thought (546)  |  Time (595)  |  Trace (53)  |  Unmistakably (2)  |  Wonderful (60)  |  Work (635)

Ode to Newton: Come celebrate with me in song the name Of Newton, to the Muses dear, for the Unlocked the hidden treasures of truth ... Nearer the gods no mortal may approach.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Approach (54)  |  God (535)  |  Hide (53)  |  Mortal (28)  |  Muse (6)  |  Name (170)  |  Newton (10)  |  Ode (2)  |  Song (27)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Truth (928)  |  Unlock (5)

Science and poetry are, in fact, inseparable. By providing a vision of life, of Earth, of the universe in all its splendor, science does not challenge human values; it can inspire human values. It does not negate faith; it celebrates faith.
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 201.
Science quotes on:  |  Challenge (61)  |  Earth (638)  |  Faith (157)  |  Human (550)  |  Inseparable (10)  |  Inspire (51)  |  Life (1131)  |  Science And Poetry (10)  |  Splendor (13)  |  Universe (686)  |  Value (242)  |  Vision (94)

The greatest scientists have always looked on scientific materialism as a kind of religion, as a mythology. They are impelled by a great desire to explore mystery, to celebrate mystery in the universe, to open it up, to read the stars, to find the deeper meaning.
In Pamela Weintraub (ed.), 'E. O. Wilson', The Omni Interviews (1984), 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Deep (124)  |  Desire (142)  |  Exploration (123)  |  Find (408)  |  Great (534)  |  Materialism (8)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Mystery (153)  |  Mythology (13)  |  Open (66)  |  Read (145)  |  Religion (239)  |  Scientific (236)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Star (336)  |  Universe (686)

What to-day is to be believed is to-morrow to be cast aside, certainly has been the law of advancement, and seemingly must continue to be so. With what a babel of discordant voices does it [medicine] celebrate its two thousand years of experience!
H.C. Wood
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (40)  |  Babel (3)  |  Belief (504)  |  Cast (25)  |  Certainly (31)  |  Continue (65)  |  Discord (10)  |  Experience (342)  |  Law (515)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Seemingly (7)  |  Thousand (152)  |  To-Day (5)  |  Voice (51)  |  Year (299)

When we seek a textbook case for the proper operation of science, the correction of certain error offers far more promise than the establishment of probable truth. Confirmed hunches, of course, are more upbeat than discredited hypotheses. Since the worst traditions of ‘popular’ writing falsely equate instruction with sweetness and light, our promotional literature abounds with insipid tales in the heroic mode, although tough stories of disappointment and loss give deeper insight into a methodology that the celebrated philosopher Karl Popper once labeled as ‘conjecture and refutation.’
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abound (5)  |  Bad (99)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (126)  |  Confirm (12)  |  Conjecture (32)  |  Correction (31)  |  Deep (124)  |  Disappointment (12)  |  Discredit (8)  |  Equate (3)  |  Error (277)  |  Establishment (35)  |  Falsely (2)  |  Far (154)  |  Give (201)  |  Heroic (4)  |  Hunch (4)  |  Hypothesis (252)  |  Insight (73)  |  Instruction (73)  |  Label (11)  |  Light (347)  |  Literature (79)  |  Loss (73)  |  Methodology (8)  |  Mode (40)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Offer (43)  |  Operation (121)  |  Philosopher (166)  |  Karl Raimund Popper (47)  |  Popular (29)  |  Probable (20)  |  Promise (38)  |  Proper (38)  |  Refutation (12)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seek (107)  |  Story (73)  |  Sweetness (8)  |  Tale (15)  |  Textbook (27)  |  Tough (10)  |  Tradition (49)  |  Truth (928)  |  Write (154)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.