Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Care

Care Quotes (95 quotes)

[About gorillas] You take these fine, regal animals. How many (human) fathers have the same sense of paternity? How many human mothers are more caring? The family structure is unbelievably strong.
As quoted in article from Times Wire Services, 'Naturalist Dian Fossey Slain at Camp in Rwanda: American Was Expert on Mountain Gorillas; Assailants Hunted', Los Angeles Times (29 Dec 1985).
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (359)  |  Family (47)  |  Father (60)  |  Gorilla (17)  |  Human (550)  |  Mother (71)  |  Paternity (2)  |  Structure (225)

A careful analysis of the process of observation in atomic physics has shown that the subatomic particles have no meaning as isolated entities, but can only be understood as interconnections between the preparation of an experiment and the subsequent measurement.
The Tao of Physics: An Exploration of the Parallels Between Modern Physics (1975), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (166)  |  Atomic Physics (7)  |  Entity (31)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Interconnection (7)  |  Isolation (26)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Measurement (161)  |  Observation (450)  |  Particle (99)  |  Preparation (43)  |  Process (267)  |  Subatomic (7)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Understanding (325)

A doctor’s reputation is made by the number of eminent men who die under his care.
Statement (14 Sep 1950) at age 94 to his doctor. As quoted in Michael Holroyd, Bernard Shaw: The Lure of Fantasy: Vol. 3: 1918-1951 (1991).
Science quotes on:  |  Die (82)  |  Doctor (102)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Number (282)  |  Reputation (28)

A life that stood out as a gospel of self-forgetting service.
He could have added fortune to fame but caring for neither he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world.
The centre of his world was the south where he was born in slavery some 79 years ago and where he did his work as a creative scientist.
Epitaph on tombstone at Tuskegee University Campus Cemetery, Alabama.
Science quotes on:  |  Birth (93)  |  Creativity (70)  |  Epitaph (19)  |  Fame (37)  |  Fortune (27)  |  Gospel (8)  |  Happiness (94)  |  Help (103)  |  Research (590)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Service (64)  |  Slavery (9)  |  South (10)

Almost every major systematic error which has deluded men for thousands of years relied on practical experience. Horoscopes, incantations, oracles, magic, witchcraft, the cures of witch doctors and of medical practitioners before the advent of modern medicine, were all firmly established through the centuries in the eyes of the public by their supposed practical successes. The scientific method was devised precisely for the purpose of elucidating the nature of things under more carefully controlled conditions and by more rigorous criteria than are present in the situations created by practical problems.
Personal Knowledge (1958), 183.
Science quotes on:  |  Advent (6)  |  Century (131)  |  Circumstance (66)  |  Control (114)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Cure (96)  |  Delusion (22)  |  Devising (7)  |  Elucidation (6)  |  Error (277)  |  Establishment (35)  |  Experience (342)  |  Eye (222)  |  Horoscope (4)  |  Incantation (4)  |  Magic (78)  |  Major (32)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Modern (162)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Oracle (4)  |  Practicality (6)  |  Practitioner (13)  |  Precisely (23)  |  Problem (497)  |  Public (94)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Reliance (10)  |  Rigor (23)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Situation (52)  |  Success (250)  |  Supposition (37)  |  System (191)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Witch Doctor (2)  |  Witchcraft (5)  |  Year (299)

Although [Charles Darwin] would patiently go on repeating experiments where there was any good to be gained, he could not endure having to repeat an experiment which ought, if complete care had been taken, to have told its story at first—and this gave him a continual anxiety that the experiment should not be wasted; he felt the experiment to be sacred, however slight a one it was. He wished to learn as much as possible from an experiment, so that he did not confine himself to observing the single point to which the experiment was directed, and his power of seeing a number of other things was wonderful. ... Any experiment done was to be of some use, and ... strongly he urged the necessity of keeping the notes of experiments which failed, and to this rule he always adhered.
In Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of his Published Letters (1908), 92.
Science quotes on:  |  Charles Darwin (301)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Failure (138)  |  Learning (177)  |  Note (34)  |  Observation (450)  |  Repetition (22)  |  Story (73)  |  Waste (65)

Alvarez seemed to care less about the way the picture in the puzzle would look, when everything fit together, than about the fun of looking for pieces that fit. He loved nothing more than doing something that everybody else thought impossible. His designs were clever, and usually exploited some little-known principle that everyone else had forgotten.
As quoted in Walter Sullivan, 'Luis W. Alvarez, Nobel Physicist Who Explored Atom, Dies at 77: Obituary', New York Times (2 Sep 1988).
Science quotes on:  |  Luis W. Alvarez (24)  |  Clever (19)  |  Design (115)  |  Exploit (12)  |  Fit (48)  |  Forget (63)  |  Fun (34)  |  Impossible (113)  |  Picture (77)  |  Piece (38)  |  Principle (292)  |  Puzzle (35)

Archaeology is the peeping Tom of the sciences. It is the sandbox of men who care not where they are going; they merely want to know where everyone else has been.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Archaeology (48)  |  Everyone (34)  |  Know (556)  |  Merely (82)  |  Peep (3)  |  Science (2067)  |  Tom (2)  |  Want (176)

Are God and Nature then at strife,
That Nature lends such evil dreams?
So careful of the type she seems,
So careless of the single life; ...
'So careful of the type', but no.
From scarped cliff and quarried stone
She cries, 'A thousand types are gone:
I care for nothing, all shall go' ...
Man, her last work, who seemed so fair,
Such splendid purpose in his eyes,
Who rolled the psalm to wintry skies,
Who built him fanes of fruitless prayer,
Who trusted God was love indeed
And love Creation's final law—
Tho’ Nature red in tooth and claw
With ravine, shrieked against his creed...
In Memoriam A. H. H. (1850), Cantos 56-57. Collected in Alfred Tennyson and William James Rolfe (ed.) The Poetic and Dramatic works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1898), 176.
Science quotes on:  |  Claw (8)  |  Cliff (11)  |  Creation (242)  |  Creed (11)  |  Cry (18)  |  Dream (167)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Eye (222)  |  Fairness (2)  |  Fruitless (6)  |  God (535)  |  Law (515)  |  Love (224)  |  Man (373)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Prayer (23)  |  Psalm (3)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Quarry (11)  |  Ravine (5)  |  Red (35)  |  Rolling (3)  |  Scarp (2)  |  Shriek (3)  |  Sky (124)  |  Splendid (12)  |  Stone (76)  |  Strife (9)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Tooth (26)  |  Trust (49)  |  Type (52)  |  Winter (30)  |  Work (635)

Are God and Nature then at strife,
That Nature lends such evil dreams?
So careful of the type she seems,
So careless of the single life…
So careful of the type, but no.
From scarped cliff and quarried stone
She cries, “A thousand types are gone;
I care for nothing, all shall go.”
From poem, 'In Memoriam A.H.H.' written between 1833-50, and first published anonymously in 1850. Collected in Poetical Works of Alfred Tennyson (1860), Vol.2, 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Careful (24)  |  Careless (5)  |  Cliff (11)  |  Cry (18)  |  Dream (167)  |  Evil (79)  |  Extinction (66)  |  Fossil (113)  |  God (535)  |  Life (1131)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Paleontology (30)  |  Quarry (11)  |  Scarp (2)  |  Seem (143)  |  Single (120)  |  Stone (76)  |  Strife (9)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Type (52)

As regards railways, it is certain that nothing is so profitable, because nothing is so cheaply transported, as passenger traffic. Goods traffic, of whatsoever description, must be more or less costly. Every article conveyed by railway requires handling and conveyance beyond the limit of the railway stations; but passengers take care of themselves, and find their own way.
From 'Railway System and its Results' (Jan 1856) read to the Institution of Civil Engineers, reprinted in Samuel Smiles, Life of George Stephenson (1857), 520.
Science quotes on:  |  Cheap (11)  |  Convey (16)  |  Conveyance (2)  |  Find (408)  |  Goods (8)  |  Handling (7)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Profit (39)  |  Railroad (27)  |  Station (12)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Traffic (6)  |  Transport (15)

Because intelligence is our own most distinctive feature, we may incline to ascribe superior intelligence to the basic primate plan, or to the basic plan of the mammals in general, but this point requires some careful consideration. There is no question at all that most mammals of today are more intelligent than most reptiles of today. I am not going to try to define intelligence or to argue with those who deny thought or consciousness to any animal except man. It seems both common and scientific sense to admit that ability to learn, modification of action according to the situation, and other observable elements of behavior in animals reflect their degrees of intelligence and permit us, if only roughly, to compare these degrees. In spite of all difficulties and all the qualifications with which the expert (quite properly) hedges his conclusions, it also seems sensible to conclude that by and large an animal is likely to be more intelligent if it has a larger brain at a given body size and especially if its brain shows greater development of those areas and structures best developed in our own brains. After all, we know we are intelligent, even though we wish we were more so.
In The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (108)  |  Action (185)  |  Animal (359)  |  Area (29)  |  Argument (82)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Basic (66)  |  Body (247)  |  Brain (213)  |  Common (122)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Deny (42)  |  Development (289)  |  Distinction (46)  |  Feature (44)  |  Intelligence (168)  |  Larger (13)  |  Learning (177)  |  Mammal (30)  |  Man (373)  |  Modification (35)  |  Permit (31)  |  Primate (8)  |  Question (404)  |  Reptile (26)  |  Sense (321)  |  Size (60)  |  Structure (225)  |  Superior (41)  |  Thought (546)

Being perpetually charmed by his familiar siren, that is, by his geometry, he [Archimedes] neglected to eat and drink and took no care of his person; that he was often carried by force to the baths, and when there he would trace geometrical figures in the ashes of the fire, and with his finger draws lines upon his body when it was anointed with oil, being in a state of great ecstasy and divinely possessed by his science.
Plutarch
As translated in George Finlay Simmons, Calculus Gems: Brief Lives and Memorable Mathematics, (1992), 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Ash (19)  |  Bath (10)  |  Body (247)  |  Carry (59)  |  Charm (28)  |  Divine (61)  |  Draw (55)  |  Drink (36)  |  Eat (52)  |  Ecstasy (8)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Figure (69)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (133)  |  Force (249)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Great (534)  |  Line (90)  |  Neglect (33)  |  Often (106)  |  Oil (39)  |  Perpetual (21)  |  Person (154)  |  Possess (56)  |  Science (2067)  |  Siren (4)  |  State (137)  |  Trace (53)

Between men of different studies and professions, may be observed a constant reciprocation of reproaches. The collector of shells and stones derides the folly of him who pastes leaves and flowers upon paper, pleases himself with colours that are perceptibly fading, and amasses with care what cannot be preserved. The hunter of insects stands amazed that any man can waste his short time upon lifeless matter, while many tribes of animals yet want their history. Every one is inclined not only to promote his own study, but to exclude all others from regard, and having heated his imagination with some favourite pursuit, wonders that the rest of mankind are not seized with the same passion.
From 'Numb. 83, Tuesday, January 1, 1750', The Rambler (1756), Vol. 2, 150.
Science quotes on:  |  Amass (2)  |  Amazed (4)  |  Animal (359)  |  Collector (9)  |  Color (99)  |  Constant (58)  |  Deride (2)  |  Different (186)  |  Exclude (7)  |  Fading (3)  |  Favourite (6)  |  Flower (77)  |  Folly (32)  |  History (369)  |  Hunter (13)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Inclined (12)  |  Insect (64)  |  Leaf (49)  |  Lifeless (11)  |  Mankind (241)  |  Matter (343)  |  Observed (6)  |  Paper (83)  |  Passion (71)  |  Paste (2)  |  Perceptibly (2)  |  Please (24)  |  Preserved (3)  |  Profession (60)  |  Promote (17)  |  Pursuit (79)  |  Regard (95)  |  Reproach (3)  |  Rest (93)  |  Seized (2)  |  Shell (41)  |  Short (51)  |  Stand (108)  |  Stone (76)  |  Study (476)  |  Time (595)  |  Tribe (12)  |  Want (176)  |  Waste (65)  |  Wonder (169)

But now that I was finally here, standing on the summit of Mount Everest, I just couldn’t summon the energy to care.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Energy (214)  |  Finally (26)  |  Mount Everest (5)  |  Stand (108)  |  Summit (15)  |  Summon (6)

But when great and ingenious artists behold their so inept performances, not undeservedly do they ridicule the blindness of such men; since sane judgment abhors nothing so much as a picture perpetrated with no technical knowledge, although with plenty of care and diligence. Now the sole reason why painters of this sort are not aware of their own error is that they have not learnt Geometry, without which no one can either be or become an absolute artist; but the blame for this should be laid upon their masters, who are themselves ignorant of this art.
In The Art of Measurement (1525). As quoted in Albrecht Dürer and R.T. Nichol (trans.), 'Preface', Of the Just Shaping of Letters (1965), Book 3, 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Abhor (5)  |  Art (294)  |  Artist (69)  |  Aware (31)  |  Blame (24)  |  Blindness (10)  |  Diligence (16)  |  Error (277)  |  Geometry (232)  |  Ignorant (40)  |  Inept (4)  |  Ingenious (26)  |  Judgment (101)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Learn (288)  |  Master (98)  |  Painter (23)  |  Performance (33)  |  Perpetrate (3)  |  Picture (77)  |  Reason (471)  |  Ridicule (17)  |  Sole (21)  |  Technical (42)  |  Undeserved (3)

Careful and correct use of language is a powerful aid to straight thinking, for putting into words precisely what we mean necessitates getting our own minds quite clear on what we mean.
In The Art of Scientific Investigation (1950,1957), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (42)  |  Clear (98)  |  Correct (85)  |  Language (228)  |  Mean (101)  |  Mind (760)  |  Necessity (143)  |  Powerful (68)  |  Precise (34)  |  Straight (19)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Word (302)

Chemistry works with an enormous number of substances, but cares only for some few of their properties; it is an extensive science. Physics on the other hand works with rather few substances, such as mercury, water, alcohol, glass, air, but analyses the experimental results very thoroughly; it is an intensive science. Physical chemistry is the child of these two sciences; it has inherited the extensive character from chemistry. Upon this depends its all-embracing feature, which has attracted so great admiration. But on the other hand it has its profound quantitative character from the science of physics.
In Theories of Solutions (1912), xix.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (44)  |  Air (190)  |  Alcohol (18)  |  Analysis (166)  |  Character (118)  |  Chemistry (252)  |  Child (252)  |  Enormous (41)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Extensive (18)  |  Feature (44)  |  Few (13)  |  Glass (44)  |  Inheritance (19)  |  Intensive (8)  |  Mercury (44)  |  Number (282)  |  Physical Chemistry (5)  |  Physics (348)  |  Property (126)  |  Quantitative (19)  |  Result (389)  |  Substance (87)  |  Through (3)  |  Water (293)

Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves.
John Muir
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Autumn (7)  |  Blow (22)  |  Climb (34)  |  Drop (40)  |  Energy (214)  |  Flow (42)  |  Freshness (7)  |  Good (345)  |  Leave (128)  |  Mountain (145)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Peace (84)  |  Storm (30)  |  Sunshine (9)  |  Tiding (2)  |  Tree (171)  |  Wind (80)

Come, see the north-wind’s masonry, Out of an unseen quarry evermore Furnished with tile, the fierce artificer Curves his white bastions with projected roof Round every windward stake, or tree, or door. Speeding, the myriad-handed, his wild work So fanciful, so savage, naught cares he For number or proportion.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Artificer (3)  |  Bastion (3)  |  Curve (33)  |  Door (39)  |  Evermore (2)  |  Fanciful (6)  |  Fierce (7)  |  Furnish (42)  |  Masonry (3)  |  Myriad (22)  |  Naught (5)  |  North Wind (2)  |  Number (282)  |  Project (31)  |  Proportion (72)  |  Quarry (11)  |  Roof (13)  |  Round (26)  |  Savage (28)  |  See (369)  |  Speed (35)  |  Stake (19)  |  Tile (2)  |  Tree (171)  |  Unseen (10)  |  White (56)  |  Wild (49)  |  Windward (2)  |  Work (635)

Forty years as an astronomer have not quelled my enthusiasm for lying outside after dark, staring up at the stars. It isn’t only the beauty of the night sky that thrills me. It’s the sense I have that some of those points of light are the home stars of beings not so different from us, daily cares and all, who look across space and wonder, just as we do.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Across (32)  |  Astronomer (68)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Daily (29)  |  Dark (77)  |  Different (186)  |  Enthusiasm (43)  |  Forty (4)  |  Home (84)  |  Lie (115)  |  Light (347)  |  Night (118)  |  Outside (48)  |  Point (123)  |  Sense (321)  |  Sky (124)  |  Space (257)  |  Star (336)  |  Stare (9)  |  Thrill (19)  |  Wonder (169)  |  Year (299)

Hunting, fishing, drawing, and music occupied my every moment. ... Cares I knew not, and cared naught about them.
[Recalling his time spent at his father's property, Mill Grove, during his first visit to America.]
In John James Audubon and Lucy Audubon (editor), The Life of John James Audubon: the Naturalist (1869), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Drawing (21)  |  Fishing (13)  |  Hunting (8)  |  Moment (107)  |  Music (106)  |  Naught (5)  |  Occupation (41)

I am not insensible to natural beauty, but my emotional joys center on the improbable yet sometimes wondrous works of that tiny and accidental evolutionary twig called Homo sapiens. And I find, among these works, nothing more noble than the history of our struggle to understand nature—a majestic entity of such vast spatial and temporal scope that she cannot care much for a little mammalian afterthought with a curious evolutionary invention, even if that invention has, for the first time in so me four billion years of life on earth, produced recursion as a creature reflects back upon its own production and evolution. Thus, I love nature primarily for the puzzles and intellectual delights that she offers to the first organ capable of such curious contemplation.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accidental (4)  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Back (104)  |  Billion (62)  |  Call (128)  |  Capable (51)  |  Center (34)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Creature (155)  |  Curious (43)  |  Delight (66)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Entity (31)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Find (408)  |  First (314)  |  First Time (10)  |  History (369)  |  Homo Sapiens (20)  |  Improbable (12)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Invention (324)  |  Joy (88)  |  Life On Earth (9)  |  Little (188)  |  Love (224)  |  Majestic (16)  |  Mammalian (3)  |  Natural Beauty (2)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Noble (52)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Offer (43)  |  Organ (64)  |  Primarily (12)  |  Produce (102)  |  Production (117)  |  Puzzle (35)  |  Reflect (31)  |  Scope (23)  |  Sometimes (43)  |  Spatial (8)  |  Struggle (78)  |  Temporal (4)  |  Tiny (36)  |  Twig (8)  |  Understand (340)  |  Vast (89)  |  Wondrous (9)  |  Work (635)  |  Year (299)

I am not pleading with you to make changes, I am telling you you have got to make them—not because I say so, but because old Father Time will take care of you if you don’t change. Consequently, you need a procurement department for new ideas.
As quoted in book review, T.A. Boyd, 'Charles F. Kettering: Prophet of Progress', Science (30 Jan 1959), 256.
Science quotes on:  |  Change (364)  |  Department (47)  |  Idea (580)  |  Need (287)  |  New (496)  |  Plead (3)

I am willing to believe that my unobtainable sixty seconds within a sponge or a flatworm might not reveal any mental acuity that I would care to ca ll consciousness. But I am also confident ... that vultures and sloths, as close evolutionary relatives with the same basic set of organs, lie on our side of any meaningful (and necessarily fuzzy) border–and that we are therefore not mistaken when we look them in the eye and see a glimmer of emotional and conceptual affinity.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acuity (2)  |  Affinity (14)  |  Basic (66)  |  Belief (504)  |  Border (9)  |  Close (67)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Confident (9)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Eye (222)  |  Fuzzy (3)  |  Glimmer (5)  |  Lie (115)  |  Meaningful (16)  |  Mental (78)  |  Mistake (132)  |  Necessarily (30)  |  Organ (64)  |  Relative (39)  |  Reveal (52)  |  Same (156)  |  Second (59)  |  See (369)  |  Set (99)  |  Side (51)  |  Sixty (6)  |  Sloth (3)  |  Sponge (9)  |  Vulture (5)

I came from Paris in the Spring of 1884, and was brought in intimate contact with him [Thomas Edison]. We experimented day and night, holidays not excepted. His existence was made up of alternate periods of work and sleep in the laboratory. He had no hobby, cared for no sport or amusement of any kind and lived in utter disregard of the most elementary rules of hygiene. There can be no doubt that, if he had not married later a woman of exceptional intelligence, who made it the one object of her life to preserve him, he would have died many years ago from consequences of sheer neglect. So great and uncontrollable was his passion for work.
As quoted in 'Tesla Says Edison Was an Empiricist', The New York Times (19 Oct 1931), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Amusement (23)  |  Death (302)  |  Disregard (8)  |  Thomas Edison (83)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Hobby (5)  |  Holiday (4)  |  Hygiene (10)  |  Intelligence (168)  |  Laboratory (132)  |  Marriage (35)  |  Neglect (33)  |  Night (118)  |  Passion (71)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Sleep (58)  |  Sport (11)  |  Uncontrollable (4)  |  Woman (111)  |  Work (635)

I don't care two hoots about civilization. I want to wander in the wild.
Repeating a remark made in the past to Dr. Leakey, as quoted by Nan Robertson in 'Three Who Have Chosen a Life in the Wild', New York Times (1 May 1981), B36. The article featured three primatologists (Dian Fossey, Biruté Galdikas and Goodall) at a symposium, 'What We Can Learn About Humankind From the Apes' at Sweet Briar College campus.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (175)  |  Hoot (2)  |  Wander (20)  |  Want (176)  |  Wild (49)

I don't really care how time is reckoned so long as there is some agreement about it, but I object to being told that I am saving daylight when my reason tells me that I am doing nothing of the kind. I even object to the implication that I am wasting something valuable if I stay in bed after the sun has risen. As an admirer of moonlight I resent the bossy insistence of those who want to reduce my time for enjoying it. At the back of the Daylight Saving scheme I detect the bony, blue-fingered hand of Puritanism, eager to push people into bed earlier, and get them up earlier, to make them healthy, wealthy and wise in spite of themselves.
In The Diary of Samuel Marchbanks (1947), 75.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirer (7)  |  Agreement (39)  |  Bed (22)  |  Blue (56)  |  Daylight Saving Time (10)  |  Detection (12)  |  Eager (15)  |  Earlier (9)  |  Enjoyment (29)  |  Finger (44)  |  Hand (142)  |  Healthy (25)  |  Insistence (10)  |  Moonlight (5)  |  Object (175)  |  Reason (471)  |  Reckoning (4)  |  Reduction (41)  |  Resent (4)  |  Scheme (25)  |  Sunrise (12)  |  Value (242)  |  Waste (65)  |  Wealthy (5)  |  Wise (61)

I have said that the investigation for which the teeth of the shark had furnished an opportunity, was very near an end... But thereafter, while I was examining more carefully these details of both places and bodies [sedimentary deposits and shells], these day by day presented points of doubt to me as they followed one another in indissoluble connection, so that I saw myself again and again brought back to the starting-place, as it were, when I thought I was nearest the goal. I might compare those doubts to the heads of the Lernean Hydra, since when one of them had been got rid of, numberless others were born; at any rate, I saw that I was wandering about in a sort of labyrinth, where the nearer one approaches the exit, the wider circuits does one tread.
The Prodromus of Nicolaus Steno's Dissertation Concerning a Solid Body enclosed by Process of Nature within a Solid (1669), trans. J. G. Winter (1916), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (247)  |  Circuit (15)  |  Detail (87)  |  Doubt (160)  |  End (195)  |  Examination (65)  |  Exit (4)  |  Hydra (2)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Labyrinth (9)  |  Opportunity (63)  |  Place (175)  |  Sediment (7)  |  Shark (7)  |  Shell (41)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Tooth (26)  |  Tread (11)  |  Wandering (5)

I just had a romance that I really care about, a lot—I mean, a lot—go up in smoke. Because of the stress, and the sort of other woman that Macintosh is.
Jobs blamed his obsession with work at Apple on the soon-to-be-released Macintosh for a breakup. Interview with Rolling Stone writer, Steven Levy (late Nov 1983). As quoted in Nick Bilton, 'The 30-Year-Old Macintosh and a Lost Conversation With Steve Jobs' (24 Jan 2014), on New York Times blog web page. Levy appended a transcript of the interview to an updated Kindle version of his book, Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer that Changed Everything.
Science quotes on:  |  Macintosh (3)  |  Romance (9)  |  Smoke (16)  |  Stress (12)  |  Woman (111)

I like to summarize what I regard as the pedestal-smashing messages of Darwin’s revolution in the following statement, which might be chanted several times a day, like a Hare Krishna mantra, to encourage penetration into the soul: Humans are not the end result of predictable evolutionary progress, but rather a fortuitous cosmic afterthought, a tiny little twig on the enormously arborescent bush of life, which, if replanted from seed, would almost surely not grow this twig again, or perhaps any twig with any property that we would care to call consciousness.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Bush (9)  |  Call (128)  |  Consciousness (82)  |  Cosmic (47)  |  Darwins (5)  |  Encourage (24)  |  End (195)  |  Enormously (4)  |  Evolutionary (23)  |  Follow (124)  |  Fortuitous (8)  |  Grow (99)  |  Hare (3)  |  Human (550)  |  Life (1131)  |  Little (188)  |  Message (35)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Predictable (10)  |  Progress (368)  |  Property (126)  |  Regard (95)  |  Result (389)  |  Revolution (69)  |  Seed (63)  |  Several (31)  |  Soul (166)  |  Statement (76)  |  Summarize (10)  |  Surely (13)  |  Time (595)  |  Tiny (36)  |  Twig (8)

I ought to say that one of our first joint researches, so far as publication was concerned, had the peculiar effect of freeing me forever from the wiles of college football, and if that is a defect, make the most of it! Dr. Noyes and I conceived an idea on sodium aluminate solutions on the morning of the day of a Princeton-Harvard game (as I recall it) that we had planned to attend. It looked as though a few days' work on freezing-point determinations and electrical conductivities would answer the question. We could not wait, so we gave up the game and stayed in the laboratory. Our experiments were successful. I think that this was the last game I have ever cared about seeing. I mention this as a warning, because this immunity might attack anyone. I find that I still complainingly wonder at the present position of football in American education.
Address upon receiving the Perkin Medal Award, 'The Big Things in Chemistry', The Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (Feb 1921), 13, No. 2, 162-163.
Science quotes on:  |  America (87)  |  Answer (249)  |  Attack (41)  |  College (35)  |  Complaint (10)  |  Conductivity (3)  |  Defect (16)  |  Education (347)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Football (7)  |  Freezing Point (2)  |  Game (61)  |  Immunity (4)  |  Laboratory (132)  |  Position (76)  |  Publication (91)  |  Question (404)  |  Research (590)  |  Success (250)  |  Wait (58)  |  Warning (10)

I want us to save the creation—not just care about it, but to save it.
From transcript of PBS TV program 'Religion and Ethics' (17 Nov 2006).
Science quotes on:  |  Creation (242)  |  Save (56)  |  Want (176)

I watched Baeyer activating magnesium with iodine for a difficult Grignard reaction; it was done in a test tube, which he watched carefully as he moved it gently by hand over a flame for three quarters of an hour. The test tube was the apparatus to Baeyer.
In Richard Willstätter, Arthur Stoll (ed. of the original German) and Lilli S. Hornig (trans.), From My Life: The Memoirs of Richard Willstätter (1958), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Activation (5)  |  Apparatus (37)  |  Adolf von Baeyer (3)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Flame (26)  |  Gentle (7)  |  Hand (142)  |  Iodine (7)  |  Magnesium (4)  |  Move (94)  |  Reaction (62)  |  Test Tube (9)  |  Watching (10)

If a hundred or a thousand people, all of the same age, of the same constitution and habits, were suddenly seized by the same illness, and one half of them were to place themselves under the care of doctors, such as they are in our time, whilst the other half entrusted themselves to Nature and to their own discretion, I have not the slightest doubt that there would be more cases of death amongst the former, and more cases of recovery among the latter.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (178)  |  Among (3)  |  Case (99)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Death (302)  |  Discretion (3)  |  Doctor (102)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Entrust (2)  |  Former (25)  |  Habit (112)  |  Half (56)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Illness (24)  |  Latter (21)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Nature (1223)  |  People (390)  |  Place (175)  |  Recovery (18)  |  Same (156)  |  Seize (15)  |  Slight (31)  |  Suddenly (17)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Time (595)  |  Whilst (3)

In the same sense that our judicial system presumes us to be innocent until proven guilty, a medical care system may work best if it starts with the presumption that most people are healthy. Left to themselves, computers may try to do it in the opposite way, taking it as given that some sort of direct, continual, professional intervention is required all the time, in order to maintain the health of each citizen, and we will end up spending all our money on nothing but this.
In 'Aspects of Biomedical Science Policy', The New England Journal of Medicine (12 Oct 1972), 4. Also published as Occasional Paper of the Institute of Medicine.
Science quotes on:  |  All The Time (3)  |  Computer (105)  |  Continual (19)  |  Effective (30)  |  Guilty (9)  |  Health (156)  |  Innocent (12)  |  Intervention (12)  |  Judicial (3)  |  Maintain (33)  |  Medical (24)  |  Money (142)  |  Presume (9)  |  Presumption (13)  |  Professional (37)  |  Prove (109)  |  Required (6)  |  Spending (8)  |  Start (97)  |  System (191)

It is not therefore the business of philosophy, in our present situation in the universe, to attempt to take in at once, in one view, the whole scheme of nature; but to extend, with great care and circumspection, our knowledge, by just steps, from sensible things, as far as our observations or reasonings from them will carry us, in our enquiries concerning either the greater motions and operations of nature, or her more subtile and hidden works. In this way Sir Isaac Newton proceeded in his discoveries.
An Account of Sir Isaac Newton's Philosophical Discoveries, in Four Books (1748), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (126)  |  Business (84)  |  Circumspection (3)  |  Concern (110)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Enquiry (76)  |  Extend (44)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Motion (160)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Observation (450)  |  Operation (121)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Scheme (25)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Situation (52)  |  Step (110)  |  Subtle (34)  |  Universe (686)  |  View (171)

It is now necessary to indicate more definitely the reason why mathematics not only carries conviction in itself, but also transmits conviction to the objects to which it is applied. The reason is found, first of all, in the perfect precision with which the elementary mathematical concepts are determined; in this respect each science must look to its own salvation .... But this is not all. As soon as human thought attempts long chains of conclusions, or difficult matters generally, there arises not only the danger of error but also the suspicion of error, because since all details cannot be surveyed with clearness at the same instant one must in the end be satisfied with a belief that nothing has been overlooked from the beginning. Every one knows how much this is the case even in arithmetic, the most elementary use of mathematics. No one would imagine that the higher parts of mathematics fare better in this respect; on the contrary, in more complicated conclusions the uncertainty and suspicion of hidden errors increases in rapid progression. How does mathematics manage to rid itself of this inconvenience which attaches to it in the highest degree? By making proofs more rigorous? By giving new rules according to which the old rules shall be applied? Not in the least. A very great uncertainty continues to attach to the result of each single computation. But there are checks. In the realm of mathematics each point may be reached by a hundred different ways; and if each of a hundred ways leads to the same point, one may be sure that the right point has been reached. A calculation without a check is as good as none. Just so it is with every isolated proof in any speculative science whatever; the proof may be ever so ingenious, and ever so perfectly true and correct, it will still fail to convince permanently. He will therefore be much deceived, who, in metaphysics, or in psychology which depends on metaphysics, hopes to see his greatest care in the precise determination of the concepts and in the logical conclusions rewarded by conviction, much less by success in transmitting conviction to others. Not only must the conclusions support each other, without coercion or suspicion of subreption, but in all matters originating in experience, or judging concerning experience, the results of speculation must be verified by experience, not only superficially, but in countless special cases.
In Werke [Kehrbach] (1890), Bd. 5, 105. As quoted, cited and translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 19.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Apply (77)  |  Arise (49)  |  Arithmetic (121)  |  Attach (14)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Begin (108)  |  Belief (504)  |  Better (192)  |  Calculation (100)  |  Carry (59)  |  Case (99)  |  Chain (50)  |  Check (24)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Coercion (3)  |  Complicated (62)  |  Computation (18)  |  Concept (146)  |  Concern (110)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Continue (65)  |  Contrary (34)  |  Conviction (71)  |  Convince (23)  |  Correct (85)  |  Countless (22)  |  Danger (78)  |  Deceive (16)  |  Definitely (5)  |  Degree (82)  |  Depend (90)  |  Detail (87)  |  Determination (57)  |  Determine (76)  |  Different (186)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Elementary (45)  |  End (195)  |  Error (277)  |  Experience (342)  |  Fail (58)  |  Fare (5)  |  Find (408)  |  First (314)  |  Generally (15)  |  Give (201)  |  Good (345)  |  Great (534)  |  Hide (53)  |  High (153)  |  Hope (174)  |  Human Thought (7)  |  Hundred (64)  |  Imagine (76)  |  Inconvenience (3)  |  Increase (146)  |  Indicate (18)  |  Ingenious (26)  |  Instant (17)  |  Isolate (22)  |  Judge (63)  |  Know (556)  |  Lead (160)  |  Least (74)  |  Less (102)  |  Logical (55)  |  Long (174)  |  Manage (15)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Matter (343)  |  Metaphysic (6)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (154)  |  New (496)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Object (175)  |  Old (147)  |  Originate (21)  |  Overlook (12)  |  Part (222)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Perfectly (10)  |  Permanent (29)  |  Point (123)  |  Precise (34)  |  Precision (52)  |  Progression (12)  |  Proof (245)  |  Psychology (143)  |  Rapid (32)  |  Reach (121)  |  Realm (55)  |  Reason (471)  |  Respect (86)  |  Result (389)  |  Reward (49)  |  Rid (13)  |  Right (197)  |  Rigorous (23)  |  Rule (177)  |  Salvation (8)  |  Same (156)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Science (2067)  |  See (369)  |  Single (120)  |  Special Case (6)  |  Speculation (104)  |  Speculative (9)  |  Success (250)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Support (78)  |  Survey (20)  |  Suspicion (28)  |  Transmit (11)  |  True (208)  |  Uncertainty (42)  |  Verify (17)

It is the care we bestow on apparently trifling, unattractive detail and very troublesome minutiae which determines the result.
As quoted in William Bulloch, Obituary, 'Theobald Smith', Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology (May 1935), 40, No. 3, 621-625.
Science quotes on:  |  Detail (87)  |  Determine (76)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Minutiae (6)  |  Observation (450)  |  Research (590)  |  Result (389)  |  Trifle (15)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  Unattractive (3)

It took more than three thousand years to make some of the trees in these western woods ... Through all the wonderful, eventful centuries since Christ's time—and long before that—God has cared for these trees, saved them from drought, disease, avalanches, and a thousand straining, leveling tempests and floods; but he cannot save them from fools.
John Muir
In 'The American Forests', Atlantic Monthly (Aug 1897), Vol. 80, 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Avalanche (4)  |  Century (131)  |  Disease (275)  |  Drought (11)  |  Flood (36)  |  Save (56)  |  Tempest (6)  |  Thousand (152)  |  Tree (171)  |  Western (19)  |  Wonderful (60)  |  Wood (49)  |  Year (299)

Mathematics, like dialectics, is an organ of the inner higher sense; in its execution it is an art like eloquence. Both alike care nothing for the content, to both nothing is of value but the form. It is immaterial to mathematics whether it computes pennies or guineas, to rhetoric whether it defends truth or error.
From Wilhelm Meislers Wanderjahre (1829), Zweites Buch. Collected in Goethe’s Werke (1830), Vol. 22, 252. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-Book (1914), 36-37. The same book has another translation on p.202: “Mathematics, like dialectics, is an organ of the higher sense, in its execution it is an art like eloquence. To both nothing but the form is of value; neither cares anything for content. Whether mathematics considers pennies or guineas, whether rhetoric defends truth or error, is perfectly immaterial to either.” From the original German, “Die Mathematik ist, wie die Dialektik, ein Organ des inneren höheren Sinnes, in der Ausübung ist sie eine Kunst wie die Beredsamkeit. Für beide hat nichts Wert als die Form; der Gehalt ist ihnen gleichgültig. Ob die Mathematik Pfennige oder oder Guineen berechne, die Rhetorik Wahres oder Falsches verteidige, ist beiden vollkommen gleich.”
Science quotes on:  |  Alike (22)  |  Art (294)  |  Both (81)  |  Compute (18)  |  Content (69)  |  Defend (29)  |  Dialectic (5)  |  Eloquence (7)  |  Error (277)  |  Execution (19)  |  Form (314)  |  Guinea (2)  |  High (153)  |  Immaterial (4)  |  Inner (39)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Organ (64)  |  Penny (5)  |  Rhetoric (8)  |  Sense (321)  |  Truth (928)  |  Value (242)

Men who have excessive faith in their theories … make poor observations, because they choose among the results of their experiments only what suits their object, neglecting whatever is unrelated to it and carefully setting aside everything which might tend toward the idea they wish to combat
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Choose (60)  |  Combat (13)  |  Excessive (10)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Faith (157)  |  Idea (580)  |  Ignoring (5)  |  Neglect (33)  |  Object (175)  |  Observation (450)  |  Poor (58)  |  Result (389)  |  Suit (11)  |  Tendency (56)  |  Theory (696)  |  Unrelated (6)  |  Wish (92)

My belief (is) that one should take a minimum of care and preparation over first experiments. If they are unsuccessful one is not then discouraged since many possible reasons for failure can be thought of, and improvements can be made. Much can often be learned by the repetition under different conditions, even if the desired result is not obtained. If every conceivable precaution is taken at first, one is often too discouraged to proceed at all.
Nobel Lectures in Chemistry (1999), Vol. 3, 364.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (504)  |  Condition (163)  |  Desire (142)  |  Different (186)  |  Discourage (9)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Failure (138)  |  First (314)  |  Improvement (74)  |  Learning (177)  |  Minimum (12)  |  Obtain (45)  |  Possible (158)  |  Precaution (5)  |  Preparation (43)  |  Proceed (42)  |  Reason (471)  |  Repetition (22)  |  Result (389)  |  Thinking (231)  |  Unsuccessful (2)

Nature! … The one thing she seems to aim at is Individuality; yet she cares nothing for individuals.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (89)  |  Individual (221)  |  Individuality (13)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Seem (143)

No engineer can go upon a new work and not find something peculiar, that will demand his careful reflection, and the deliberate consideration of any advice that he may receive; and nothing so fully reveals his incapacity as a pretentious assumption of knowledge, claiming to understand everything.
In Railway Property: A Treatise on the Construction and Management of Railways (1866), 247.
Science quotes on:  |  Advice (40)  |  Assumption (58)  |  Claim (71)  |  Consideration (85)  |  Deliberate (12)  |  Demand (76)  |  Engineer (97)  |  Everything (181)  |  Incapacity (3)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  New (496)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Peculiar (45)  |  Receive (60)  |  Reflection (60)  |  Revelation (34)  |  Understanding (325)  |  Work (635)

Nothing is more humbling than to look with a strong magnifying glass at an insect so tiny that the naked eye sees only the barest speck and to discover that nevertheless it is sculpted and articulated and striped with the same care and imagination as a zebra. Apparently it does not occur to nature whether or not a creature is within our range of vision, and the suspicion arises that even the zebra was not designed for our benefit.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Apparently (19)  |  Arise (49)  |  Articulate (7)  |  Bare (11)  |  Benefit (73)  |  Creature (155)  |  Design (115)  |  Discover (199)  |  Humble (31)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Insect (64)  |  Magnifying Glass (2)  |  Naked Eye (8)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Occur (43)  |  Range (57)  |  Same (156)  |  See (369)  |  Speck (17)  |  Stripe (4)  |  Strong (72)  |  Suspicion (28)  |  Tiny (36)  |  Vision (94)

Observation is like a piece of glass, which, as a mirror, must be very smooth, and must be very carefully polished, in order that it may reflect the image pure and undistorted.
'The Study of the Natural Sciences: An Introductory Lecture to the Course of Experimental Chemistry in the University of Munich, for the Winter Session of 1852-53,' as translated and republished in The Medical Times and Gazette (22 Jan 1853), N.S. Vol. 6, 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Glass (44)  |  Image (59)  |  Mirror (29)  |  Observation (450)  |  Polish (9)  |  Pure (103)  |  Reflect (31)  |  Smooth (17)  |  Undistorted (2)

One must care about a world one will not see.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  See (369)  |  World (898)

One of the gladdest moments of human life, methinks, is the departure upon a distant journey into unknown lands. Shaking off with one mighty effort the fetters of habit, the leaden weight of routine, the cloak of many cares and the slavery of home, man feel once more happy.
In Zanzibar: City, Island, and Coast (1872), Vol. 1, 16.
Science quotes on:  |  Cloak (4)  |  Departure (9)  |  Distant (32)  |  Effort (144)  |  Exploration (123)  |  Feel (167)  |  Fetter (4)  |  Habit (112)  |  Happy (46)  |  Home (84)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Journey (28)  |  Land (115)  |  Leaden (2)  |  Mighty (13)  |  Moment (107)  |  Routine (19)  |  Shake (29)  |  Slavery (9)  |  Unknown (107)  |  Weight (77)

People are not going to care about animal conservation unless they think that animals are worthwhile.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (359)  |  Conservation (143)  |  People (390)  |  Think (347)  |  Worthwhile (11)

Remember that children, marriages, and flower gardens reflect the kind of care they get.
In Life’s Instructions for Wisdom, Success, and Happiness (2000),
Science quotes on:  |  Child (252)  |  Flower (77)  |  Garden (34)  |  Marriage (35)  |  Reflect (31)  |  Remember (82)

Science repudiates philosophy. In other words, it has never cared to justify its truth or explain its meaning.
Lowell Lecture (Feb 1925), 'The Origins of Modern Science', collected in Science and the Modern World (1925), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Explanation (177)  |  Justification (40)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Philosophy (259)  |  Repudiate (3)  |  Science (2067)  |  Truth (928)

So why fret and care that the actual version of the destined deed was done by an upper class English gentleman who had circumnavigated the globe as a vigorous youth, lost his dearest daughter and his waning faith at the same time, wrote the greatest treatise ever composed on the taxonomy of barnacles, and eventually grew a white beard, lived as a country squire just south of London, and never again traveled far enough even to cross the English Channel? We care for the same reason that we love okapis, delight in the fossil evidence of trilobites, and mourn the passage of the dodo. We care because the broad events that had to happen, happened to happen in a certain particular way. And something unspeakably holy –I don’t know how else to say this–underlies our discovery and confirmation of the actual details that made our world and also, in realms of contingency, assured the minutiae of its construction in the manner we know, and not in any one of a trillion other ways, nearly all of which would not have included the evolution of a scribe to record the beauty, the cruelty, the fascination, and the mystery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (48)  |  Assure (15)  |  Beard (7)  |  Beauty (248)  |  Broad (27)  |  Certain (126)  |  Channel (21)  |  Class (84)  |  Compose (17)  |  Confirmation (19)  |  Construction (83)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Country (147)  |  Cross (15)  |  Cruelty (16)  |  Daughter (16)  |  Deed (21)  |  Delight (66)  |  Destined (11)  |  Detail (87)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Dodo (5)  |  English (35)  |  Event (116)  |  Eventually (15)  |  Evidence (183)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Faith (157)  |  Far (154)  |  Fascination (28)  |  Fossil (113)  |  Fret (2)  |  Gentleman (18)  |  Globe (47)  |  Great (534)  |  Grow (99)  |  Happen (82)  |  Holy (17)  |  Include (40)  |  Know (556)  |  Live (272)  |  London (12)  |  Lose (94)  |  Love (224)  |  Manner (57)  |  Minutiae (6)  |  Mourn (2)  |  Mystery (153)  |  Nearly (26)  |  Particular (76)  |  Passage (20)  |  Realm (55)  |  Reason (471)  |  Record (68)  |  Same (156)  |  Say (228)  |  Scribe (3)  |  South (10)  |  Taxonomy (17)  |  Time (595)  |  Travel (61)  |  Treatise (34)  |  Trillion (2)  |  Trilobite (4)  |  Underly (2)  |  Unspeakably (3)  |  Upper (4)  |  Version (7)  |  Vigorous (20)  |  White (56)  |  World (898)  |  Write (154)  |  Youth (77)

Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.
Jim Rohn
Found quoted in various books, but without a citation. Webmaster has found no primary source yet. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Body (247)  |  Live (272)  |  Place (175)

Take care of your health. ... Imagine Hercules as oarsman in a rotten boat; what can he do there but by the very force of his stroke expedite the ruin of his craft. Take care of the timbers of your boat. ... The formation of right habits is essential to your permanent security. They diminish your chance of falling when assaulted, and they augment your chance of recovery when overthrown.
Concluding remark from 'An Address to Students of University College, London' (1869), in Fragments of Science for Unscientific People (1871), 105.
Science quotes on:  |  Assault (11)  |  Augmentation (4)  |  Boat (15)  |  Chance (160)  |  Diminish (17)  |  Essential (117)  |  Fall (120)  |  Habit (112)  |  Health (156)  |  Hercules (5)  |  Overthrown (5)  |  Permanence (17)  |  Recovery (18)  |  Right (197)  |  Rot (5)  |  Ruin (25)  |  Security (33)  |  Stroke (8)  |  Timber (7)

Take the rose—most people think it very beautiful: I don’t care for It at all. I prefer the cactus, for the simple reason that it has a more interesting personality. It has wonderfully adapted itself to its surroundings! It is the best illustration of the theory of evolution in plant life.
From George MacAdam, 'Steinmetz, Electricity's Mastermind, Enters Politics', New York Times (2 Nov 1913), SM3.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (28)  |  Beautiful (144)  |  Best (173)  |  Cactus (3)  |  Evolution (535)  |  Illustration (29)  |  Interesting (48)  |  Life (1131)  |  Personality (47)  |  Plant (200)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Reason (471)  |  Rose (9)  |  Simple (178)  |  Surrounding (13)  |  Theory (696)  |  Wonderfully (2)

The basis of the discovery is imagination, careful reasoning and experimentation where the use of knowledge created by those who came before is an important component.
Nobel Banquet speech (10 Dec 1982). In Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1982 (1983)
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (91)  |  Component (16)  |  Create (153)  |  Discovery (680)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Importance (218)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Reasoning (100)  |  Use (76)

The best way to look out for Number One is to care for Numbers Two, Three and Four first.
Quoted in 'Obituaries: Archibald Malloch, M.D., 1887-1953', Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (Jan 1954), 42(1), 153.

The facts, gentlemen, and nothing but the facts, for careful eyes are narrowly watching.
In Fact and Fancy (1962), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Eye (222)  |  Fact (733)  |  Gentleman (18)  |  Narrowly (4)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Watch (65)

The great difference between science and technology is a difference of initial attitude. The scientific man follows his method whithersoever it may take him. He seeks acquaintance with his subject­matter, and he does not at all care about what he shall find, what shall be the content of his knowledge when acquaintance-with is transformed into knowledge-about. The technologist moves in another universe; he seeks the attainment of some determinate end, which is his sole and obsessing care; and he therefore takes no heed of anything that he cannot put to use as means toward that end.
Systematic Psychology: Prolegomena (1929), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquaintance (23)  |  Attainment (40)  |  Attitude (59)  |  Content (69)  |  Determinate (6)  |  Difference (246)  |  End (195)  |  Find (408)  |  Follow (124)  |  Heed (8)  |  Initial (17)  |  Knowledge (1306)  |  Means (176)  |  Method (239)  |  Obsession (12)  |  Science (2067)  |  Subject (240)  |  Technologist (5)  |  Technology (222)  |  Transforming (4)  |  Universe (686)

The inventor and the research man are confused because they both examine results of physical or chemical operations. But they are exact opposites, mirror images of one another. The research man does something and does not care [exactly] what it is that happens, he measures whatever it is. The inventor wants something to happen, but does not care how it happens or what it is that happens if it is not what he wants.
Aphorism listed Frederick Seitz, The Cosmic Inventor: Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) (1999), 54, being Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Held at Philadelphia For Promoting Useful Knowledge, Vol. 86, Pt. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Chemical (79)  |  Exactness (21)  |  Examination (65)  |  Happening (32)  |  Image (59)  |  Inventor (56)  |  Measurement (161)  |  Mirror (29)  |  Operation (121)  |  Opposite (50)  |  Physical (134)  |  Researcher (17)  |  Result (389)  |  Want (176)

The mathematician requires tact and good taste at every step of his work, and he has to learn to trust to his own instinct to distinguish between what is really worthy of his efforts and what is not; he must take care not to be the slave of his symbols, but always to have before his mind the realities which they merely serve to express. For these and other reasons it seems to me of the highest importance that a mathematician should be trained in no narrow school; a wide course of reading in the first few years of his mathematical study cannot fail to influence for good the character of the whole of his subsequent work.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A, (1890), Nature, 42, 467.
Science quotes on:  |  Character (118)  |  Course (84)  |  Distinguish (64)  |  Effort (144)  |  Express (65)  |  Fail (58)  |  First (314)  |  Good (345)  |  High (153)  |  Importance (218)  |  Influence (140)  |  Instinct (66)  |  Learn (288)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Merely (82)  |  Mind (760)  |  Narrow (48)  |  Read (145)  |  Reality (190)  |  Really (78)  |  Reason (471)  |  Require (85)  |  School (119)  |  Seem (143)  |  Serve (58)  |  Slave (28)  |  Step (110)  |  Study (476)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subsequent (19)  |  Symbol (73)  |  Tact (6)  |  Taste (48)  |  Train (45)  |  Trust (49)  |  Whole (192)  |  Wide (28)  |  Work (635)  |  Worthy (34)  |  Year (299)

The more we study Art, the less we care for Nature. What Art really reveals to us is Nature’s lack of design, her curious crudities, her extraordinary monotony, her absolutely unfinished condition. … It is fortunate for us, however, that Nature is so imperfect, as otherwise we should have had no art at all. Art is our spirited protest, our gallant attempt to teach Nature her proper place. As for the infinite variety of Nature, that is a pure myth. It is not to be found in Nature herself. It resides in the imagination, or fancy, or cultivated blindness of the man who looks at her.
In 'Decay of Lying', The Writings of Oscar Wilde: Epigrams, Phrases and Philosophies For the Use of the Young (1907), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolutely (39)  |  Art (294)  |  Attempt (126)  |  Blindness (10)  |  Condition (163)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Curious (43)  |  Design (115)  |  Extraordinary (43)  |  Fancy (24)  |  Find (408)  |  Fortunate (11)  |  Gallant (2)  |  Imagination (275)  |  Imperfect (20)  |  Infinite (130)  |  Lack (77)  |  Less (102)  |  Monotony (3)  |  Myth (48)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Place (175)  |  Proper (38)  |  Protest (5)  |  Pure (103)  |  Reside (11)  |  Reveal (52)  |  Spirit (154)  |  Study (476)  |  Teach (188)  |  Unfinished (4)  |  Variety (71)

The ocean is not just blank blue space but rather the habitat for amazing wildlife, and we have to take care how we use it. If we want to keep having the goods and services it provides, we have to treat it more carefully in terms of fishing and dumping.
As quoted by Ain Stewart in '2 Long Islanders Get MacArthurs', New York Times (18 Jun 2000), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (21)  |  Blank (11)  |  Blue (56)  |  Fishing (13)  |  Goods (8)  |  Habitat (14)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Provide (69)  |  Service (64)  |  Space (257)  |  Treat (34)  |  Wildlife (11)

The operating management, providing as it does for the care of near thirty thousand miles of railway, is far more important than that for construction in which there is comparatively little doing.
In Railway Property: A Treatise on the Construction and Management of Railways (1866), iii.
Science quotes on:  |  Comparatively (8)  |  Construction (83)  |  Doing (36)  |  Importance (218)  |  Little (188)  |  Management (12)  |  Operation (121)  |  Railroad (27)

The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it. We cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries, we must claim its promise. That’s how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure—our forests and waterways, our crop lands and snow-capped peaks. That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.
In Second Inaugural Address (21 Jan 2013) at the United States Capitol.
Science quotes on:  |  America (87)  |  Cede (2)  |  Claim (71)  |  Command (28)  |  Creed (11)  |  Declare (27)  |  Difficult (121)  |  Economic (26)  |  Father (60)  |  Forest (107)  |  God (535)  |  Industry (109)  |  Job (43)  |  Lead (160)  |  Maintain (33)  |  Meaning (113)  |  Nation (134)  |  National (25)  |  Path (84)  |  Peak (20)  |  Planet (263)  |  Power (366)  |  Preserve (52)  |  Promise (38)  |  Resist (15)  |  Source (91)  |  Sustainable Energy (2)  |  Technology (222)  |  Transition (18)  |  Treasure (45)  |  Vitality (15)  |  Wind (80)  |  Wind Power (9)

The pursuit of mathematical science makes its votary appear singularly indifferent to the ordinary interests and cares of men. Seeking eternal truths, and finding his pleasures in the realities of form and number, he has little interest in the disputes and contentions of the passing hour. His views on social and political questions partake of the grandeur of his favorite contemplations, and, while careful to throw his mite of influence on the side of right and truth, he is content to abide the workings of those general laws by which he doubts not that the fluctuations of human history are as unerringly guided as are the perturbations of the planetary hosts.
In 'Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 227.
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (12)  |  Appear (118)  |  Careful (24)  |  Contemplation (52)  |  Content (69)  |  Contention (10)  |  Dispute (22)  |  Doubt (160)  |  Eternal (67)  |  Favorite (24)  |  Find (408)  |  Fluctuation (8)  |  Form (314)  |  General (160)  |  Grandeur (21)  |  Guide (65)  |  Host (16)  |  Hour (71)  |  Human History (5)  |  Indifferent (16)  |  Influence (140)  |  Interest (237)  |  Law (515)  |  Little (188)  |  Mathematician (384)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mite (3)  |  Number (282)  |  Ordinary (73)  |  Pass (93)  |  Perturbation (6)  |  Planetary (10)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Political (36)  |  Pursuit (79)  |  Question (404)  |  Reality (190)  |  Right (197)  |  Science (2067)  |  Seek (107)  |  Side (51)  |  Social (108)  |  Throw (43)  |  Truth (928)  |  View (171)  |  Votary (3)

The scientific method of examining facts is not peculiar to one class of phenomena and to one class of workers; it is applicable to social as well as to physical problems, and we must carefully guard ourselves against supposing that the scientific frame of mind is a peculiarity of the professional scientist.
From The Grammar of Science (1892), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Applicable (11)  |  Class (84)  |  Examination (65)  |  Fact (733)  |  Guard (18)  |  Peculiar (45)  |  Peculiarity (19)  |  Physical (134)  |  Problem (497)  |  Professional (37)  |  Scientific Method (166)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Social (108)  |  Supposition (37)  |  Worker (30)

The scientist is indistinguishable from the common man in his sense of evidence, except that the scientist is more careful.
In 'The Scope and Language of Science' (1954), reprinted in The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (1957), 8, 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Evidence (183)  |  Indistinguishable (2)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Sense (321)

The secular world is more spiritual than it thinks, just as the ecclesiastical world is more materialist than it cares to acknowledge.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 27
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (15)  |  Ecclesiastical (3)  |  Materialist (4)  |  Secular (9)  |  Spiritual (57)  |  Think (347)  |  World (898)

The symptoms or the sufferings generally considered to be inevitable and incident to the disease are very often not symptoms of the disease at all, but of something quite different—of the want of fresh air, or of light, or of warmth, or of quiet, or of cleanliness, or of punctuality and care in the administration of diet, of each or of all of these.
In Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (1859), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (190)  |  Diet (46)  |  Different (186)  |  Disease (275)  |  Fresh (30)  |  Inevitable (27)  |  Light (347)  |  Punctuality (2)  |  Quiet (16)  |  Suffering (27)  |  Symptom (18)  |  Want (176)  |  Warmth (11)

The traditional boundaries between various fields of science are rapidly disappearing and what is more important science does not know any national borders. The scientists of the world are forming an invisible network with a very free flow of scientific information - a freedom accepted by the countries of the world irrespective of political systems or religions. ... Great care must be taken that the scientific network is utilized only for scientific purposes - if it gets involved in political questions it loses its special status and utility as a nonpolitical force for development.
Banquet speech accepting Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (10 Dec 1982). In Wilhelm Odelberg (editor) Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1982 (1983)
Science quotes on:  |  Border (9)  |  Boundary (38)  |  Country (147)  |  Development (289)  |  Disappear (30)  |  Field (171)  |  Flow (42)  |  Information (122)  |  Invisible (38)  |  Nation (134)  |  Network (13)  |  Politics (96)  |  Purpose (194)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Status (20)  |  World (898)

The trees have not only been regarded by man as his lawful plunder, but he has even seemed to find a positive pleasure in their destruction. He … has been reckless of the future. The supply has seemed to be abundant, and the future has been left to take care of itself.
'What We Owe to the Trees', Harper's New Monthly Magazine (Apr 1882), 46, No. 383, 675.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (21)  |  Destruction (85)  |  Future (287)  |  Lawful (7)  |  Pleasure (133)  |  Plunder (5)  |  Reckless (4)  |  Regard (95)  |  Supply (47)  |  Tree (171)

The unscientific person takes things as they are, and cares not for their origin. To study things from a scientific standpoint means to take an inventory of them—to find the process in which they are being produced; to connect them with other things; to see things in their causal process.
From a series of lectures at Johns Hopkins University. Lecture 5 (4 Feb 1893), 'Herbert Spencer and What Knowledge is of Most Worth', The Philosophy of Education (1893), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Causal (7)  |  Connection (111)  |  Find (408)  |  Inventory (7)  |  Origin (88)  |  Process (267)  |  Produced (8)  |  Scientific (236)  |  See (369)  |  Standpoint (10)  |  Study (476)  |  Unscientific (7)

Their theories should be carefully examined and their arguments fairly weighed, but the scientist cannot compel acceptance of any argument he advances, except as, judged upon its merits, it is convincing.
In chapter, 'The Origin of Man', In His Image (1922), 93.
Science quotes on:  |  Acceptance (45)  |  Argument (82)  |  Compelling (8)  |  Convincing (9)  |  Examining (2)  |  Fair (15)  |  Judge (63)  |  Merit (32)  |  Scientist (522)  |  Theory (696)

There has not been any science so much esteemed and honored as this of mathematics, nor with so much industry and vigilance become the care of great men, and labored in by the potentates of the world, viz. emperors, kings, princes, etc.
In 'On the Usefulness of Mathematics', in Works (1840), Vol. 2, 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (172)  |  Emperor (6)  |  Esteem (15)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Great (534)  |  Honored (3)  |  Industry (109)  |  King (35)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Potentate (2)  |  Prince (13)  |  Science (2067)  |  Vigilance (5)  |  World (898)

There is a curious illusion today that nature is both wise and good. The awful truth is that nature is a bitch from the human point of view I care about the whooping crane a little. I would even give $10 to save the whooping crane. The whooping crane doesn’t give a damn about me.
From paper presented at Laramie College of Commerce and Industry, University of Wyoming, 'Energy and the Environment' (Jan 1976), 12, as quoted in Kenneth Ewart Boulding and Richard P. Beilock (ed.), Illustrating Economics: Beasts, Ballads and Aphorisms (1980, 2009), 153.
Science quotes on:  |  Awful (8)  |  Conservation (143)  |  Curious (43)  |  Damn (12)  |  Give (201)  |  Good (345)  |  Human (550)  |  Illusion (43)  |  Little (188)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Point Of View (41)  |  Save (56)  |  Truth (928)  |  Whooping Crane (2)  |  Wise (61)

There is no more potent antidote to the corroding influence of mammon than the presence in the community of a body of men devoted to science, living for investigation and caring nothing for the lust of the eyes and the pride of life.
In address at the University of Minnesota, "Teacher and Student" (1892) collected in Aequanimitas: With Other Addresses to Medical Students, Nurses and Practitioners of Medicine (1904), 29.
Science quotes on:  |  Antidote (6)  |  Community (82)  |  Corrosion (4)  |  Eye (222)  |  Influence (140)  |  Investigation (176)  |  Life (1131)  |  Lust (5)  |  Mammon (2)  |  Men Of Science (130)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Potency (7)  |  Presence (33)  |  Pride (64)

Unnecessary noise is the most cruel absence of care which can be inflicted either on sick or well.
In Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not (1860), 47.
Science quotes on:  |  Absence (18)  |  Cruel (12)  |  Inflict (4)  |  Medicine (344)  |  Noise (31)  |  Nursing (3)  |  Sick (27)  |  Unnecessary (15)

We are the only species that can destroy the Earth or take care of it and nurture all that live on this very special planet. I’m urging you to look on these things. For whatever reason, this planet was built specifically for us. Working on this planet is an absolute moral code. … Let’s go out and do what we were put on Earth to do.
Address at Tuskegee University, 79th Annual Scholarship Convocation/Parents Recognition Program. Published in News Release (3 Oct 2004). Previously on the university website.
Science quotes on:  |  Destroy (80)  |  Earth (638)  |  Live (272)  |  Nurture (16)  |  Planet (263)  |  Special (77)  |  Species (221)

We cannot cheat on DNA. We cannot get round photosynthesis. We cannot say I am not going to give a damn about phytoplankton. All these tiny mechanisms provide the preconditions of our planetary life. To say we do not care is to say in the most literal sense that “we choose death.”
In Maurice F. Strong (ed.), Who Speaks For Earth (1973), 31. In Robert Andrews, The Columbia Book of Quotations (1993), 261.
Science quotes on:  |  Cheat (7)  |  Choice (79)  |  Damn (12)  |  Death (302)  |  DNA (69)  |  Life (1131)  |  Literal (8)  |  Mechanism (52)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Phytoplankton (2)  |  Precondition (2)

We must not put mistakes into programs because of sloppiness, we have to do it systematically and with care.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Mistake (132)  |  Program (52)  |  Systematically (7)

We need to respect the oceans and take care of them as if our lives depended on it. Because they do.
In 'Can We Stop Killing Our Oceans Now, Please?', Huffington Post (14 Aug 2013).
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (143)  |  Depend (90)  |  Life (1131)  |  Ocean (149)  |  Respect (86)

We should take care not to make the intellect our god; it has, of course, powerful muscles, but no personality.
From NBC radio broadcast for the United Jewish Appeal (11 Apr 1943), 'The Goal of Human Existence.' Einstein Archives 28-587. Transcript reprinted in full in David E. Rowe and Robert Schulmann (eds.), Einstein on Politics (2007), 322. Also in Albert Einstein, Out of My Later Years: The Scientist, Philosopher, and Man Portrayed Through His Own Words (1956), 260-261.
Science quotes on:  |  God (535)  |  Intellect (192)  |  Muscle (35)  |  Personality (47)  |  Powerful (68)

When you recover or discover something that nourishes your soul and brings joy, care enough about yourself to make room for it in your life.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 253
Science quotes on:  |  Bring (90)  |  Discover (199)  |  Joy (88)  |  Life (1131)  |  Nourish (16)  |  Recover (11)  |  Room (39)  |  Soul (166)

With a tone control at a single touch
I can make Caruso sound like Hutch,
I never did care for music much—
It’s the high fidelity!
A parody of the hi-fi addict. From lyrics of 'Song of Reproduction', in the Michael Flanders and Donald Swann revue, At the Drop of a Hat (1959). As quoted in Steven D. Lubar, InfoCulture: The Smithsonian Book of Information Age Inventions (1993), 186. “Hutch” was the popularly used name of Leslie Hutchinson (1900-1969), one of the biggest London cabaret entertainers of the 1920s-30s.
Science quotes on:  |  Control (114)  |  Music (106)  |  Sound (90)  |  Tone (11)  |  Touch (77)

[Alice asks the Cheshire Cat] Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to walk from here?
“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat.
“I don’t much care where———” said Alice.
“Then it doesn’t matter which way you walk,” said the Cat.
In Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1866), 36.
Science quotes on:  |  Alice (6)  |  Cheshire Cat (3)  |  Deal (49)  |  Depend (90)  |  Good (345)  |  Matter (343)  |  Tell (110)  |  Walk (67)  |  Want (176)

[American] Fathers are spending too much time taking care of babies. No other civilization ever let responsible and important men spend their time in this way. They should not be involved in household details. They should take the children on trips, explore with them and talk things over. Men today have lost something by turning towards the home instead of going out of it.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (20)  |  Child (252)  |  Civilization (175)  |  Detail (87)  |  Exploration (123)  |  Father (60)  |  Go (6)  |  Home (84)  |  Household (8)  |  Important (205)  |  Instead (19)  |  Involve (48)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Spend (43)  |  Talk (100)  |  Time (595)  |  Trip (9)  |  Turn (118)

[American] Motherhood is like being a crack tennis player or ballet dancer—it lasts just so long, then it’s over. We’ve made an abortive effort to turn women into people. We’ve sent them to school and put them in slacks. But we’ve focused on wifehood and reproductivity with no clue about what to do with mother after the children have left home. We’ve found no way of using the resources of women in the 25 years of post-menopausal zest. As a result many women seem to feel they should live on the recognition and care of society.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Abortive (2)  |  Child (252)  |  Clue (16)  |  Crack (15)  |  Dancer (4)  |  Effort (144)  |  Focus (27)  |  Home (84)  |  Last (19)  |  Leave (128)  |  Menopause (2)  |  Mother (71)  |  Motherhood (2)  |  Player (8)  |  Recognition (70)  |  Resource (62)  |  Result (389)  |  School (119)  |  Society (228)  |  Tennis (7)  |  Turn (118)  |  Use (76)  |  Woman (111)  |  Zest (4)

[In mathematics] we behold the conscious logical activity of the human mind in its purest and most perfect form. Here we learn to realize the laborious nature of the process, the great care with which it must proceed, the accuracy which is necessary to determine the exact extent of the general propositions arrived at, the difficulty of forming and comprehending abstract concepts; but here we learn also to place confidence in the certainty, scope and fruitfulness of such intellectual activity.
In Ueber das Verhältnis der Naturwissenschaften zur Gesammtheit der Wissenschaft, Vorträge und Reden (1896), Bd. 1, 176. Also seen translated as “In mathematics we see the conscious logical activity of our mind in its purest and most perfect form; here is made manifest to us all the labor and the great care with which it progresses, the precision which is necessary to determine exactly the source of the established general theorems, and the difficulty with which we form and comprehend abstract conceptions; but we also learn here to have confidence in the certainty, breadth, and fruitfulness of such intellectual labor”, in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 20. From the original German, “Hier sehen wir die bewusste logische Thätigkeit unseres Geistes in ihrer reinsten und vollendetsten Form; wir können hier die ganze Mühe derselben kennen lernen, die grosse Vorsicht, mit der sie vorschreiten muss, die Genauigkeit, welche nöthig ist, um den Umfang der gewonnenen allgemeinen Sätze genau zu bestimmen, die Schwierigkeit, abstracte Begriffe zu bilden und zu verstehen; aber ebenso auch Vertrauen fassen lernen in die Sicherheit, Tragweite und Fruchtbarkeit solcher Gedankenarbeit.”
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (86)  |  Accuracy (60)  |  Activity (135)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Behold (18)  |  Certainty (131)  |  Comprehend (39)  |  Concept (146)  |  Confidence (41)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Determine (76)  |  Difficulty (146)  |  Exact (68)  |  Extent (51)  |  Form (314)  |  Fruitfulness (2)  |  General (160)  |  Great (534)  |  Human Mind (82)  |  Intellectual (121)  |  Laborious (6)  |  Learn (288)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1205)  |  Mathematics And Logic (10)  |  Nature (1223)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Necessary (154)  |  Perfect (89)  |  Place (175)  |  Proceed (42)  |  Process (267)  |  Proposition (83)  |  Pure (103)  |  Realize (90)  |  Scope (23)

[Louis Rendu, Bishop of Annecy] collects observations, makes experiments, and tries to obtain numerical results; always taking care, however, so to state his premises and qualify his conclusions that nobody shall be led to ascribe to his numbers a greater accuracy than they merit. It is impossible to read his work, and not feel that he was a man of essentially truthful mind and that science missed an ornament when he was appropriated by the Church.
In The Glaciers of the Alps (1860), 299.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (60)  |  Appropriation (4)  |  Ascribe (17)  |  Church (34)  |  Collection (44)  |  Conclusion (160)  |  Essential (117)  |  Experiment (602)  |  Impossibility (53)  |  Measurement (161)  |  Merit (32)  |  Mind (760)  |  Miss (27)  |  Number (282)  |  Observation (450)  |  Ornament (15)  |  Premise (27)  |  Qualification (8)  |  Read (145)  |  Louis le Chanoine Rendu (2)  |  Result (389)  |  Science (2067)  |  Science And Religion (302)  |  Statement (76)  |  Truth (928)  |  Work (635)

[On the first moon landing:] It means nothing to me. I have no opinion about it, and I don’t care.
In 'Reactions to Man’s Landing on the Moon Show Broad Variations in Opinions', The New York Times (21 Jul 1969), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Means (176)  |  Moon Landing (8)  |  Nothing (395)  |  Opinion (176)

[Pure mathematics is] good to give chills in the spine to a certain number of people, me included. I don’t know what else it is good for, and I don’t care. But … like von Neumann said, one never knows whether someone is going to find another use for it.
In The Beauty of Doing Mathematics: Three Public Dialogues (1985), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Chill (9)  |  Find (408)  |  Good (345)  |  Know (556)  |  Pure Mathematics (65)  |  Spine (6)  |  Use (76)  |  John von Neumann (28)

[Someone] remarked to me once: Physicians should not say, I have cured this man, but, This man didn’t die in my care. In physics too one might say, For such and such a phenomenon I have determined causes whose absurdity cannot finally be proved, instead of saying, I have explained it.
As quoted in Joseph Peter Stern, Lichtenberg: A Doctrine of Scattered Occasions: Reconstructed From His Aphorisms and Reflections (1959), 297.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (22)  |  Cause (285)  |  Cure (96)  |  Determine (76)  |  Die (82)  |  Explain (107)  |  Final (50)  |  Phenomenon (278)  |  Physician (243)  |  Physics (348)  |  Prove (109)  |  Say (228)

“Once the rockets are up
Who cares where they come down
That's not my department,”
Says Wernher von Braun.
Stanza from song, 'Wernher von Braun' on record That Was the Year That Was (Jul 1965). As cited in Michael J. Hogan and Thomas G. Paterson, Explaining the History of American Foreign Relations (2004), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Wernher von Braun (29)  |  Down (86)  |  Rocket (34)  |  Satire (3)  |  Song (27)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.