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Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index D > Category: Daughter

Daughter Quotes (11 quotes)

La veritΰ fu sola figliola del tenpo.
Truth was the only daughter of Time.
From manuscript original “Moto, colpo,” 58b, editted and translated by Jean Paul Richter (ed.) compiled in 'Philosphical Maxims, Morals, Polemics and Speculations' The Literary Works of Leonardo da Vinci (1883), Vol. 2, 288, Maxim No. 1152.
Science quotes on:  |  Time (439)  |  Truth (750)

Botany, the eldest daughter of medicine.
As written in Outlines of the History of Medicine and the Medical Profession, translated by Henry Ebenezer Handerson (1889), 843. The expression 'daughter of medicine' has been applied by other authors to other disciplines. Baas may have simply recorded this example from common use.
Science quotes on:  |  Botany (47)  |  Medicine (322)

Curiosity that inborn property of man, daughter of ignorance and mother of knowledge when wonder wakens our minds, has the habit, wherever it sees some extraordinary phenomenon of nature, a comet for example, a sun-dog, or a midday star, of asking straightway what it means.
In The New Science (3rd ed., 1744), Book 1, Para. 189, as translated by Thomas Goddard Bergin and Max Harold Fisch, The New Science of Giambattista Vico (1948), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (23)  |  Comet (43)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Extraordinary (32)  |  Habit (78)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Meaning (87)  |  Midday (2)  |  Mother (59)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Star (251)  |  Straightway (2)  |  Wonder (134)

Dermatology ... this young daughter of medicine ...
Address (7 Sep 1887), 'Dermatology in its Relation to General Medicine', at Ninth Session, International Medical Congress, Washington, D.C. In The Medical News (17 Sep 1887), 51, No. 12, 325. Unna used the expression 'daughter of medicine' in this context, but this phrase had been used before him.
Science quotes on:  |  Medicine (322)

Godless science reads nature only as Milton's daughters did Hebrew, rightly syllabling the sentences, but utterly ignorant of the meaning.
Lecture, 'The Blessed Life', collected in Lectures Delivered Before the Young Men's Christian Association (1861), Vol. 16, 347.
Science quotes on:  |  Hebrew (3)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Meaning (87)  |  John Milton (18)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Syllable (3)

I am the daughter of earth and water, And the nursling of the sky;
I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores;
I change, but I cannot die.
For after the rain when with never a stain,
The pavilion of Heaven is bare,
And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams,
Build up the blue dome of air,
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph, And out of the caverns of rain,
Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb,
I arise and unbuild it again.
The Cloud (1820). In K. Raine (ed.), Shelley (1974), 289.
Science quotes on:  |  Bare (5)  |  Change (291)  |  Die (46)  |  Earth (487)  |  Heaven (118)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Pore (5)  |  Rain (28)  |  Shore (11)  |  Sky (68)  |  Stain (8)

Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art!
alterest all things with thy peering eyes.
preyest thou thus upon the poet’s heart,
Vulture, whose wings are dull realities?
How should he love thee? or how deem thee wise,
Who wouldst not leave him in his wandering .
To seek for treasure in the jewelled skies,
Albeit he soared with an undaunted wing?
Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car?
And driven the Hamadryad from the wood
To seek a shelter in some happier star?
Hast thou not torn the Naiad from her flood,
The Elfin from the green grass, and from me
The summer dread beneath the tamarind tree?
Sonnet, 'To Science' (1829), Saturday Evening Post (11 Sep 1830). In Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (1917), 33, and Notes, 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (19)  |  Eye (159)  |  Heart (110)  |  Poet (59)  |  Prey (9)  |  Science (1699)  |  Time (439)  |  Vulture (5)

So why fret and care that the actual version of the destined deed was done by an upper class English gentleman who had circumnavigated the globe as a vigorous youth, lost his dearest daughter and his waning faith at the same time, wrote the greatest treatise ever composed on the taxonomy of barnacles, and eventually grew a white beard, lived as a country squire just south of London, and never again traveled far enough even to cross the English Channel? We care for the same reason that we love okapis, delight in the fossil evidence of trilobites, and mourn the passage of the dodo. We care because the broad events that had to happen, happened to happen in a certain particular way. And something unspeakably holy –I don’t know how else to say this–underlies our discovery and confirmation of the actual details that made our world and also, in realms of contingency, assured the minutiae of its construction in the manner we know, and not in any one of a trillion other ways, nearly all of which would not have included the evolution of a scribe to record the beauty, the cruelty, the fascination, and the mystery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (34)  |  Assure (11)  |  Beard (5)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Broad (18)  |  Care (73)  |  Certain (84)  |  Channel (17)  |  Class (64)  |  Compose (7)  |  Confirmation (15)  |  Construction (69)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Country (121)  |  Cross (9)  |  Cruelty (14)  |  Deed (17)  |  Delight (51)  |  Destined (5)  |  Detail (65)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Dodo (5)  |  English (23)  |  Event (97)  |  Eventually (14)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Faith (131)  |  Far (77)  |  Fascination (26)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Gentleman (17)  |  Globe (39)  |  Great (300)  |  Grow (66)  |  Happen (63)  |  Holy (14)  |  Include (27)  |  Know (321)  |  Live (186)  |  London (12)  |  Lose (53)  |  Love (164)  |  Manner (35)  |  Minutiae (6)  |  Mourn (2)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Particular (54)  |  Passage (14)  |  Realm (40)  |  Reason (330)  |  Record (56)  |  Same (92)  |  Say (126)  |  Scribe (3)  |  South (8)  |  Taxonomy (16)  |  Time (439)  |  Travel (40)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Trillion (2)  |  Trilobite (4)  |  Unspeakably (2)  |  Upper (3)  |  Version (6)  |  Vigorous (11)  |  White (38)  |  World (667)  |  Write (87)  |  Youth (57)

South Africa might be called the Daughter of Medicine. For was not the fight against scurvy the very reason for the establishment of the settlement at the Cape with its garden and hospital?
Anonymous
In article 'The History of Medicine in South Africa', South African Medical Journal (14 Sep 1957), 31, No. 37, 938. The expression 'daughter of medicine' has been used before in various contexts.
Science quotes on:  |  Hospital (33)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Scurvy (5)  |  South Africa (2)

Superstition is to religion what astrology is to astronomy; the mad daughter of a wise mother.
'A Treatise in Toleration'. In Voltaire, Tobias George Smollett (ed.) and William F. Fleming (trans.), The Works of Voltaire (1904), Vol. 4, 265.
Science quotes on:  |  Astrology (35)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Mad (15)  |  Mother (59)  |  Religion (210)  |  Superstition (50)

These facts shaw that mitosis is due to the co-ordinate play of an extremely complex system of forces which are as yet scarcely comprehended. Its purpose is, however, as obvious as its physiological explanation is difficult. It is the end of mitosis to divide every part of the chromatin of the mother-cell equally between the daughter-nuclei. All the other operations are tributary to this. We may therefore regard the mitotic figure as essentially an apparatus for the distribution of the hereditary substance, and in this sense as the especial instrument of inheritance.
The Cell in Development and Inheritance (1896), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Cell Division (4)  |  Chromatin (4)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Fact (609)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Inheritance (19)  |  Mother (59)  |  Physiological (6)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
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- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



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