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Who said: “Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
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Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Fever

Fever Quotes (11 quotes)

La jeunesse est une ivresse continuelle: c’est la fiθvre de la raison.
Youth is continual intoxication; it is a fever of reason.
Original French from Maximes et Rιflexions Morales (1796), 40, Maxim 279. This English translation in Maxims and Moral Reflexions: An Improved Edition (1797), 126, Maxim 503.
Science quotes on:  |  Continual (13)  |  Drunkenness (3)  |  Intoxication (5)  |  Mind (544)  |  Reason (330)  |  Youth (57)

A time will come, when fields will be manured with a solution of glass (silicate of potash), with the ashes of burnt straw, and with the salts of phosphoric acid, prepared in chemical manufactories, exactly as at present medicines are given for fever and goitre.
Agricultural Chemistry (1847), 4th edn., 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (18)  |  Ash (16)  |  Factory (13)  |  Fertilizer (10)  |  Field (119)  |  Goitre (2)  |  Industrial Chemistry (2)  |  Manure (6)  |  Medicine (322)  |  Phosphate (3)  |  Straw (5)

I had at one time a very bad fever of which I almost died. In my fever I had a long consistent delirium. I dreamt that I was in Hell, and that Hell is a place full of all those happenings that are improbable but not impossible. The effects of this are curious. Some of the damned, when they first arrive below, imagine that they will beguile the tedium of eternity by games of cards. But they find this impossible, because, whenever a pack is shuffled, it comes out in perfect order, beginning with the Ace of Spades and ending with the King of Hearts. There is a special department of Hell for students of probability. In this department there are many typewriters and many monkeys. Every time that a monkey walks on a typewriter, it types by chance one of Shakespeare's sonnets. There is another place of torment for physicists. In this there are kettles and fires, but when the kettles are put on the fires, the water in them freezes. There are also stuffy rooms. But experience has taught the physicists never to open a window because, when they do, all the air rushes out and leaves the room a vacuum.
'The Metaphysician's Nightmare', Nightmares of Eminent Persons and Other Stories (1954), 38-9.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrival (7)  |  Curiosity (89)  |  Damned (4)  |  Death (270)  |  Delirium (2)  |  Department (33)  |  Dream (92)  |  Effect (133)  |  Eternity (44)  |  Experience (268)  |  Fire (117)  |  Freeze (5)  |  Game (45)  |  Happening (32)  |  Hell (29)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Impossibility (50)  |  Improbable (9)  |  Kettle (2)  |  Monkey (37)  |  Opening (15)  |  Order (167)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Possibility (96)  |  Room (29)  |  Rush (12)  |  William Shakespeare (90)  |  Shuffle (4)  |  Sonnet (4)  |  Special (51)  |  Tedium (3)  |  Torment (13)  |  Typewriter (6)  |  Vacuum (29)  |  Walk (56)  |  Water (244)  |  Window (25)

I must … explain how I was led to concern myself with the pathogenic protozoa. … I was sent to Algeria and put in charge of a department of the hospital at Bone. A large number of my patients had malarial fevers and I was naturally led to study these fevers of which I had only seen rare and benign forms in France.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1907), 'Protozoa as Causes of Diseases', collected in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967, 1999), 264.
Science quotes on:  |  Benign (2)  |  Explain (61)  |  Form (210)  |  France (21)  |  Hospital (33)  |  Malaria (8)  |  Naturally (7)  |  Pathogen (4)  |  Patient (116)  |  Protozoa (3)  |  Rare (31)  |  Study (331)

If a patient is cold, if a patient is feverish, if a patient is faint, if he is sick after taking food, if he has a bed-sore, it is generally the fault not of the disease, but of the nursing.
In Notes on Nursing: What It Is and What It Is Not (1859), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Cold (38)  |  Disease (257)  |  Faint (5)  |  Fault (27)  |  Food (139)  |  Nursing (3)  |  Patient (116)  |  Sick (23)

Malaria which is almost unknown in the north of Europe is however of great importance in the south of the Continent particularly in Greece and Italy; these fevers in many of the localities become the dominant disease and the forms become more grave.
From Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1907), 'Protozoa as Causes of Diseases', collected in Nobel Lectures, Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967, 1999), 264.
Science quotes on:  |  Continent (39)  |  Disease (257)  |  Dominant (11)  |  Europe (32)  |  Form (210)  |  Grave (20)  |  Greece (7)  |  Importance (183)  |  Italy (4)  |  Locality (6)  |  Malaria (8)  |  North (7)  |  Particularly (12)  |  South (8)  |  Unknown (87)

Six weeks with a fever is an eternity.
Attributed as a conversation on his death bed with his doctor. Quoted in Mary Frances Sandars, Honorι de Balzac, His Life and Writings (1905), 352, with footnote stating doubts by Vicomte de Spoelberch de Lovenjoul (an authority on Balzac) as to its accuracy when originally recounted in an article by Arsθne Houssaye in Figaro (20 Aug 1883), over three decades after Balzac's death.
Science quotes on:  |  Eternity (44)

The basic symptoms which occur in pneumonia and which are never lacking are acute fever, sticking pain in the side, short rapid breaths, serrated pulse, and cough, mostly with sputum.
As quoted in Robert Taylor, White Coat Tales: Medicine's Heroes, Heritage, and Misadventures (2010), 126.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (6)  |  Breath (24)  |  Cough (8)  |  Pain (82)  |  Pneumonia (6)  |  Pulse (8)  |  Rapid (17)  |  Sticking (3)  |  Symptom (16)

The signs of liver inflammation [hepatitis] are eight in number, as follows: high fever, thirst, complete anorexia, a tongue which is initially red and then turns black, biliary vomitus initially yellow egg yolk in color, which later turns dark green, pain on the right side which ascends up to the clavicle. … Occasionally a mild cough may occur and a sensation of heaviness which is first felt on the right side and then spreads widely.
As quoted in Fred Rosner, The Medical Legacy of Moses Maimonides (1998), 53-54.
Science quotes on:  |  Cough (8)  |  Inflammation (5)  |  Liver (12)  |  Pain (82)  |  Thirst (9)  |  Tongue (16)  |  Vomit (3)

Volcanic action is essentially paroxysmal; yet Mr. Lyell will admit no greater paroxysms than we ourselves have witnessed—no periods of feverish spasmodic energy, during which the very framework of nature has been convulsed and torn asunder. The utmost movements that he allows are a slight quivering of her muscular integuments.
'Address to the Geological Society, delivered on the Evening of the 18th of February 1831', Proceedings of the Geological Society (1834), 1, 307.
Science quotes on:  |  Asunder (2)  |  Convulsion (5)  |  Energy (185)  |  Framework (15)  |  Integument (3)  |  Movement (65)  |  Muscle (32)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Quiver (3)  |  Slight (18)  |  Utmost (8)  |  Volcano (36)

When I behold a fashionable table set out in all its magnificence, I fancy that I see gouts and dropsies, fevers and lethargies, with other innumerable distempers lying in ambuscade among the dishes. Nature delights in the most plain and simple diet. Every animal but man keeps to one dish. Herbs are the food of this species, fish of that, and flesh of a third. Man falls upon everything that comes in his way; not the smallest fruit or excrescence of the earth, scarce a berry or a mushroom can escape him.
Spectator, No. 195. In Samuel Austin Allibone, Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay (1880), 363.
Science quotes on:  |  Berry (2)  |  Diet (41)  |  Distemper (5)  |  Dropsy (2)  |  Fish (85)  |  Flesh (22)  |  Food (139)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Gluttony (6)  |  Gout (5)  |  Herb (4)  |  Mushroom (4)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
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Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
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Bible
Thomas Huxley
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Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
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- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
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Richard Feynman
James Hutton
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Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
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- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
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Francis Crick
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- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
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