Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition, we must lead it... That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That’s what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Constitution

Constitution Quotes (76 quotes)

A l’aide de ces sciences expérimentales actives, l’homme devient un inventeur de phénomènes, un véritable contremaître de la création; et l'on ne saurait, sous ce rapport, assigner de limites à la puissance qu’il peut acquérir sur la nature, par les progrès futurs des sciences expérimentales
With the aid of these active experimental sciences man becomes an inventor of phenomena, a real foreman of creation; and under this head we cannot set limits to the power that he may gain over nature through future progress of the experimental sciences.
Original French text in Introduction à l'Étude de la Médecine Expérimentale (1898), 32. English version from An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Aid (97)  |  Become (815)  |  Creation (327)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (998)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Future (429)  |  Gain (145)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Limit (280)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Power (746)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rising (44)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Set (394)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universal (189)  |  Wholeness (9)

A man of science rises ever, in seeking truth; and if he never finds it in its wholeness, he discovers nevertheless very significant fragments; and these fragments of universal truth are precisely what constitutes science.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 222.
Science quotes on:  |  Constitute (97)  |  Discover (553)  |  Find (998)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Man (2251)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Significant (74)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universal (189)  |  Wholeness (9)

A rock or stone is not a subject that, of itself, may interest a philosopher to study; but, when he comes to see the necessity of those hard bodies, in the constitution of this earth, or for the permanency of the land on which we dwell, and when he finds that there are means wisely provided for the renovation of this necessary decaying part, as well as that of every other, he then, with pleasure, contemplates this manifestation of design, and thus connects the mineral system of this earth with that by which the heavenly bodies are made to move perpetually in their orbits.
Theory of the Earth, with Proofs and l1lustrations, Vol. 1 (1795), 276.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Connect (125)  |  Decay (53)  |  Design (195)  |  Earth (996)  |  Find (998)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hard (243)  |  Interest (386)  |  Land (115)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Move (216)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Orbit (81)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetually (20)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Planet (356)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Rock (161)  |  See (1081)  |  Stone (162)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  System (537)

According to the older view, for every single effect of a serum, there was a separate substance, or at least a particular chemical group... A normal serum contained as many different haemagglutinins as it agglutinated different cells. The situation was undoubtedly made much simpler if, to use the Ehrlich terminology... the separate haptophore groups can combine with an extremely large number of receptors in stepwise differing quantities as a stain does with different animal tissues, though not always with the same intensity. A normal serum would therefore visibly affect such a large number of different blood cells... not because it contained countless special substances, but because of the colloids of the serum, and therefore of the agglutinins by reason of their chemical constitution and the electrochemical properties resulting from it. That this manner of representation is a considerable simplification is clear; it also opens the way to direct experimental testing by the methods of structural chemistry.
'Die Theorien der Antikorperbildung ... ', Wiener klinische Wöchenschrift (1909), 22, 1623-1631. Trans. Pauline M. H. Mazumdar.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Animal (617)  |  Blood (134)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Colloid (5)  |  Combine (57)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Countless (36)  |  Different (577)  |  Direct (225)  |  Effect (393)  |  Electrochemical (4)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Immunology (14)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Large (394)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Reason (744)  |  Representation (53)  |  Separate (143)  |  Serum (11)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Single (353)  |  Situation (113)  |  Special (184)  |  Structural (29)  |  Structure (344)  |  Substance (248)  |  Terminology (12)  |  Tissue (45)  |  Use (766)  |  View (488)  |  Way (1217)

Alcoholism, the opium habit and tobaccoism are a trio of poison habits which have been weighty handicaps to human progress during the last three centuries. In the United States, the subtle spell of opium has been broken by restrictive legislation; the grip of the rum demon has been loosened by the Prohibition Amendment to the Constitution, but the tobacco habit still maintains its strangle-hold and more than one hundred million victims of tobaccoism daily burn incense to the smoke god.
In Tobaccoism: or, How Tobacco Kills (1922), Preface, 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Alcoholism (6)  |  Amendment (2)  |  Broken (56)  |  Burn (87)  |  Century (310)  |  Daily (87)  |  Demon (8)  |  God (757)  |  Grip (9)  |  Habit (168)  |  Handicap (6)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Last (426)  |  Legislation (10)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Million (114)  |  More (2559)  |  Opium (7)  |  Poison (40)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prohibition (3)  |  Restrictive (4)  |  Rum (3)  |  Smoke (28)  |  Smoking (27)  |  Spell (9)  |  State (491)  |  Still (613)  |  Stranglehold (2)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Tobacco (18)  |  United States (31)  |  Victim (35)

All that Anatomie can doe is only to shew us the gross and sensible parts of the body, or the vapid and dead juices all which, after the most diligent search, will be noe more able to direct a physician how to cure a disease than how to make a man; for to remedy the defects of a part whose organicall constitution and that texture whereby it operates, he cannot possibly know, is alike hard, as to make a part which he knows not how is made. Now it is certaine and beyond controversy that nature performs all her operations on the body by parts so minute and insensible that I thinke noe body will ever hope or pretend, even by the assistance of glasses or any other intervention, to come to a sight of them, and to tell us what organicall texture or what kinde offerment (for whether it be done by one or both of these ways is yet a question and like to be soe always notwithstanding all the endeavours of the most accurate dissections) separate any part of the juices in any of the viscera, or tell us of what liquors the particles of these juices are, or if this could be donne (which it is never like to be) would it at all contribute to the cure of the diseases of those very parts which we so perfectly knew.
'Anatomie' (1668). Quoted in Kenneth Dewhurst (ed.), Dr. Thomas Sydenham (1624-1689): His Life and Original Writings (1966), 85-6.
Science quotes on:  |  Accurate (86)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Assistance (20)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Controversy (29)  |  Cure (122)  |  Defect (31)  |  Diligence (20)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Direct (225)  |  Disease (328)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hope (299)  |  Intervention (16)  |  Juice (7)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Liquor (6)  |  Man (2251)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Particle (194)  |  Perform (121)  |  Physician (273)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Question (621)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Search (162)  |  Separate (143)  |  Sight (132)  |  Tell (340)  |  Viscera (2)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

At the outset do not be worried about this big question—Truth. It is a very simple matter if each one of you starts with the desire to get as much as possible. No human being is constituted to know the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; and even the best of men must be content with fragments, with partial glimpses, never the full fruition. In this unsatisfied quest the attitude of mind, the desire, the thirst—a thirst that from the soul must arise!—the fervent longing, are the be-all and the end-all.
'The Student Life' (1905). In G. L. Keynes (ed.), Selected Writings of Sir William Osler (1951), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attitude (82)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Contentment (11)  |  Desire (204)  |  Do (1908)  |  End (590)  |  Fervent (6)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Fruition (2)  |  Glimpse (13)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Know (1518)  |  Longing (19)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Outset (7)  |  Possible (552)  |  Quest (39)  |  Question (621)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Soul (226)  |  Start (221)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Whole (738)

Essentially only one thing in life interests us: our psychical constitution, the mechanism of which was and is wrapped in darkness. All human resources, art, religion, literature, philosophy and historical sciences, all of them join in bringing lights in this darkness. But man has still another powerful resource: natural science with its strictly objective methods. This science, as we all know, is making huge progress every day. The facts and considerations which I have placed before you at the end of my lecture are one out of numerous attempts to employ a consistent, purely scientific method of thinking in the study of the mechanism of the highest manifestations of life in the dog, the representative of the animal kingdom that is man's best friend.
'Physiology of Digestion', Nobel Lecture (12 Dec 1904). In Nobel Lectures: Physiology or Medicine 1901-1921 (1967), 134
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Kingdom (20)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Best (459)  |  Best Friend (4)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Darkness (68)  |  Dog (70)  |  Employ (113)  |  Employment (32)  |  End (590)  |  Essential (199)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Friend (168)  |  Historical (70)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Interest (386)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Literature (103)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Objective (91)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Progress (465)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Purely (109)  |  Religion (361)  |  Representative (14)  |  Resource (63)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Still (613)  |  Strictness (2)  |  Study (653)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Wrap (7)

For between true Science, and erroneous Doctrines, Ignorance is in the middle. Naturall sense and imagination, are not subject to absurdity. Nature it selfe cannot erre: and as men abound in copiousnesses of language; so they become more wise, or more mad than ordinary. Nor is it possible without Letters for any man to become either excellently wise, or (unless his memory be hurt by disease, or ill constitution of organs) excellently foolish. For words are wise men's counters, they do but reckon by them; but they are the money of fools that value them by the authority of an Aristotle, a Cicero, or a Thomas, or any other Doctor whatsoever, if but a man.
Leviathan (1651), ed. C. B. Macpherson (1968), Part 1, Chapter 4, 106.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Abound (17)  |  Absurdity (32)  |  Saint Thomas Aquinas (16)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Authority (95)  |  Become (815)  |  Marcus Tullius Cicero (34)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Fool (116)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Language (293)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mad (53)  |  Man (2251)  |  Memory (134)  |  Money (170)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Organ (115)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Subject (521)  |  True Science (23)  |  Value (365)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  Wise (131)  |  Word (619)

From very ancient times, the question of the constitution of matter with respect to divisibility has been debated, some adopting the opinion that this divisibility is infinite …. We have absolutely no means at our disposal for deciding such a question, which remains at the present day in the same state as when it first engaged the attention of the Greek philosophers, or perhaps that of the sages of Egypt and Hindostan long before them.
In Elementary Chemistry, Theoretical and Practical (1854), 206. Note: this was the limit of knowledge, or even speculation, decades before the discovery of the nucleus, electron, proton and other particles.
Science quotes on:  |  Ancient (189)  |  Attention (190)  |  Debate (38)  |  Divisible (4)  |  Egypt (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Greek (107)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Present (619)  |  Question (621)  |  Remain (349)  |  Respect (207)  |  Sage (23)  |  State (491)  |  Time (1877)

He who would know what geometry is, must venture boldly into its depths and learn to think and feel as a geometer. I believe that it is impossible to do this, and to study geometry as it admits of being studied and am conscious it can be taught, without finding the reason invigorated, the invention quickened, the sentiment of the orderly and beautiful awakened and enhanced, and reverence for truth, the foundation of all integrity of character, converted into a fixed principle of the mental and moral constitution, according to the old and expressive adage “abeunt studia in mores”.
In 'A probationary Lecture on Geometry, in Collected Mathematical Papers (1908), Vol. 2, 9. [The Latin phrase, “abeunt studia in mores” translates as “studies pass on into character”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Abeunt Studia In Mores (2)  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Adage (4)  |  Admit (45)  |  All (4108)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belief (578)  |  Boldly (5)  |  Character (243)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Convert (22)  |  Depth (94)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Expressive (6)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Fix (25)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Geometer (24)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Integrity (17)  |  Invention (369)  |  Invigorate (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Learn (629)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Old (481)  |  Orderly (38)  |  Principle (507)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Sentiment (14)  |  Study (653)  |  Teach (277)  |  Think (1086)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Value Of Mathematics (60)  |  Venture (18)

He, who for an ordinary cause, resigns the fate of his patient to mercury, is a vile enemy to the sick; and, if he is tolerably popular, will, in one successful season, have paved the way for the business of life, for he has enough to do, ever afterward, to stop the mercurial breach of the constitutions of his dilapidated patients. He has thrown himself in fearful proximity to death, and has now to fight him at arm's length as long as the patient maintains a miserable existence.
Quoted by William M. Scribner, 'Treatment of Pneumonia and Croup, Once More, Etc,' in The Medical World (1885), 3, 187.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Arm (81)  |  Business (149)  |  Cause (541)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Enemy (82)  |  Enough (340)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fate (72)  |  Himself (461)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Patient (199)  |  Poison (40)  |  Season (47)  |  Sick (81)  |  Successful (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)

Human behaviour reveals uniformities which constitute natural laws. If these uniformities did not exist, then there would be neither social science nor political economy, and even the study of history would largely be useless. In effect, if the future actions of men having nothing in common with their past actions, our knowledge of them, although possibly satisfying our curiosity by way of an interesting story, would be entirely useless to us as a guide in life.
In Cours d’Economie Politique (1896-7), Vol. 2, 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Common (436)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Economy (55)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Future (429)  |  Guide (97)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Law (41)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Past (337)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Science (35)  |  Story (118)  |  Study (653)  |  Uniformity (37)  |  Uselessness (22)  |  Way (1217)

I have been driven to assume for some time, especially in relation to the gases, a sort of conducting power for magnetism. Mere space is Zero. One substance being made to occupy a given portion of space will cause more lines of force to pass through that space than before, and another substance will cause less to pass. The former I now call Paramagnetic & the latter are the diamagnetic. The former need not of necessity assume a polarity of particles such as iron has with magnetic, and the latter do not assume any such polarity either direct or reverse. I do not say more to you just now because my own thoughts are only in the act of formation, but this I may say: that the atmosphere has an extraordinary magnetic constitution, & I hope & expect to find in it the cause of the annual & diurnal variations, but keep this to yourself until I have time to see what harvest will spring from my growing ideas.
Letter to William Whewell, 22 Aug 1850. In L. Pearce Williams (ed.), The Selected Correspondence of Michael Faraday (1971), Vol. 2, 589.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Being (1278)  |  Call (769)  |  Cause (541)  |  Direct (225)  |  Do (1908)  |  Expect (200)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Formation (96)  |  Former (137)  |  Growing (98)  |  Harvest (27)  |  Hope (299)  |  Idea (843)  |  Iron (96)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Particle (194)  |  Pass (238)  |  Polarity (5)  |  Portion (84)  |  Power (746)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  See (1081)  |  Space (500)  |  Spring (133)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Variation (90)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zero (37)

I have read various articles on the fourth dimension, the relativity theory of Einstein, and other psychological speculation on the constitution of the universe; and after reading them I feel as Senator Brandegee felt after a celebrated dinner in Washington. “I feel,” he said, “as if I had been wandering with Alice in Wonderland and had tea with the Mad Hatter.”
Quoted in Michio Kaku, Einstein's Cosmos: How Albert Einstein's vision Transformed Our Understanding of Space and Time (2005), 118-119. [Note:Brandegee's original remark was in the context of politics after a White House conference with President Wilson (Feb 1917), and unrelated to Einstein's theory.]
Science quotes on:  |  Alice In Wonderland (6)  |  Article (22)  |  Dimension (61)  |  Einstein (101)  |  Albert Einstein (605)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fourth Dimension (3)  |  Mad (53)  |  Other (2236)  |  Psychological (42)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Relativity (88)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Tea (12)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Relativity (33)  |  Universe (857)  |  Various (200)  |  Wander (35)

I may finally call attention to the probability that the association of paternal and maternal chromosomes in pairs and their subsequent separation during the reducing division as indicated above may constitute the physical basis of the Mendelian law of heredity.
'On the Morphology of the Chromosome Group in Brachystola Magna', Biological Bulletin (1902), 4, 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Association (46)  |  Attention (190)  |  Basis (173)  |  Call (769)  |  Chromosome (23)  |  Chromosomes (17)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Division (65)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Indication (33)  |  Law (894)  |  Maternal (2)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Pair (9)  |  Paternal (2)  |  Physical (508)  |  Probability (130)  |  Reduction (51)  |  Separation (57)  |  Subsequent (33)

I should like to call the number of atom groups, with which an elementary atom coordinates … to form a complex radical, the coordination number of the atom in question … We must differentiate between valence number and coordination number. The valence number indicates the maximum number of monovalent atoms which can be bound directly to the atom in question without the participation of other elementary atoms … Perhaps this concept [of coordination number] is destined to serve as a basis for the theory of the constitution of inorganic compounds, just as valence theory formed the basis for the constitutional theory of carbon compounds.
In 'Beitrag zur Konstitution anorganischer Verbindungen', Zeitschrift fur anorganische Chemie, (1893), 3, 267-330. Translated in George G. Kauffman (ed.), Classics in Coordination Chemistry: Part I: The Selected Papers of Alfred Werner (1968), 84-87.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Basis (173)  |  Bound (119)  |  Call (769)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Complex (188)  |  Compound (113)  |  Concept (221)  |  Coordination (9)  |  Destined (42)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Form (959)  |  Group (78)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Inorganic (13)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Participation (15)  |  Question (621)  |  Radical (25)  |  Theory (970)

I, Galileo Galilei, son of the late Vincenzo Galilei, of Florence, aged seventy years, being brought personally to judgment, and kneeling before your Most Eminent and Most Reverend Lords Cardinals, General Inquisitors of the universal Christian republic against heretical depravity, having before my eyes the Holy Gospels, which I touch with my own hands, swear that I have always believed, and now believe, and with the help of God will in future believe, every article which the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of Rome holds, teaches, and preaches. But because I have been enjoined by this Holy Office altogether to abandon the false opinion which maintains that the sun is the centre and immovable, and forbidden to hold, defend, or teach the said false doctrine in any manner, and after it hath been signified to me that the said doctrine is repugnant with the Holy Scripture, I have written and printed a book, in which I treat of the same doctrine now condemned, and adduce reasons with great force in support of the same, without giving any solution, and therefore have been judged grievously suspected of heresy; that is to say, that I held and believed that the sun is the centre of the universe and is immovable, and that the earth is not the centre and is movable; willing, therefore, to remove from the minds of your Eminences, and of every Catholic Christian, this vehement suspicion rightfully entertained toward me, with a sincere heart and unfeigned faith, I abjure, curse, and detest the said errors and heresies, and generally every other error and sect contrary to Holy Church; and I swear that I will never more in future say or assert anything verbally, or in writing, which may give rise to a similar suspicion of me; but if I shall know any heretic, or anyone suspected of heresy, that I will denounce him to this Holy Office, or to the Inquisitor or Ordinary of the place where I may be; I swear, moreover, and promise, that I will fulfil and observe fully, all the penances which have been or shall be laid on me by this Holy Office. But if it shall happen that I violate any of my said promises, oaths, and protestations (which God avert!), I subject myself to all the pains and punishments which have been decreed and promulgated by the sacred canons, and other general and particular constitutions, against delinquents of this description. So may God help me, and his Holy Gospels which I touch with my own hands. I, the above-named Galileo Galilei, have abjured, sworn, promised, and bound myself as above, and in witness thereof with my own hand have subscribed this present writing of my abjuration, which I have recited word for word. At Rome, in the Convent of Minerva, June 22, 1633. I, Galileo Galilei, have abjured as above with my own hand.
Abjuration, 22 Jun 1633. In J.J. Fahie, Galileo, His Life and Work (1903), 319-321.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Abjuration (2)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Assert (66)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Bound (119)  |  Cardinal (9)  |  Catholic (15)  |  Christian (43)  |  Church (56)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Curse (17)  |  Denounce (6)  |  Earth (996)  |  Eminence (23)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Error (321)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Force (487)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  God (757)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heart (229)  |  Heliocentric Model (7)  |  Heretic (8)  |  Holy (34)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Know (1518)  |  Late (118)  |  Lord (93)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oath (10)  |  Observe (168)  |  Office (71)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pain (136)  |  Present (619)  |  Promise (67)  |  Punishment (14)  |  Reason (744)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remove (45)  |  Republic (15)  |  Repugnant (8)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rome (19)  |  Sacred (45)  |  Say (984)  |  Solution (267)  |  Subject (521)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Suspicion (35)  |  Swear (6)  |  Teach (277)  |  Touch (141)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Willing (44)  |  Witness (54)  |  Word (619)  |  Writing (189)  |  Year (933)

If a hundred or a thousand people, all of the same age, of the same constitution and habits, were suddenly seized by the same illness, and one half of them were to place themselves under the care of doctors, such as they are in our time, whilst the other half entrusted themselves to Nature and to their own discretion, I have not the slightest doubt that there would be more cases of death amongst the former, and more cases of recovery among the latter.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Among (3)  |  Care (186)  |  Case (99)  |  Death (388)  |  Discretion (3)  |  Doctor (187)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Entrust (2)  |  Former (137)  |  Habit (168)  |  Half (56)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Illness (34)  |  Latter (21)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Place (177)  |  Recovery (23)  |  Same (157)  |  Seize (15)  |  Slight (31)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Time (1877)  |  Whilst (3)

If we wish to give an account of the atomic constitution of the aromatic compounds, we are bound to explain the following facts:
1) All aromatic compounds, even the most simple, are relatively richer in carbon than the corresponding compounds in the class of fatty bodies.
2) Among the aromatic compounds, as well as among the fatty bodies, a large number of homologous substances exist.
3) The most simple aromatic compounds contain at least six atoms of carbon.
4) All the derivatives of aromatic substances exhibit a certain family likeness; they all belong to the group of 'Aromatic compounds'. In cases where more vigorous reactions take place, a portion of the carbon is often eliminated, but the chief product contains at least six atoms of carbon These facts justify the supposition that all aromatic compounds contain a common group, or, we may say, a common nucleus consisting of six atoms of carbon. Within this nucleus a more intimate combination of the carbon atoms takes place; they are more compactly placed together, and this is the cause of the aromatic bodies being relatively rich in carbon. Other carbon atoms can be joined to this nucleus in the same way, and according to the same law, as in the case of the group of fatty bodies, and in this way the existence of homologous compounds is explained.
Bulletin de la Societé Chimique de France (1865), 1, 98. Trans. W. H. Brock.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Aromatic (3)  |  Atom (355)  |  Being (1278)  |  Belong (162)  |  Bound (119)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chief (97)  |  Class (164)  |  Combination (144)  |  Common (436)  |  Compound (113)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Family (94)  |  Homologous (4)  |  Large (394)  |  Law (894)  |  Likeness (18)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Other (2236)  |  Portion (84)  |  Product (160)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Say (984)  |  Simple (406)  |  Substance (248)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Together (387)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wish (212)

In any of the learned professions a vigorous constitution is equal to at least fifty per cent more brain.
In Getting on in the World; Or, Hints on Success in Life (1873), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Academic (18)  |  Brain (270)  |  Equal (83)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  More (2559)  |  Profession (99)  |  Vigorous (20)

In the dog two conditions were found to produce pathological disturbances by functional interference, namely, an unusually acute clashing of the excitatory and inhibitory processes, and the influence of strong and extraordinary stimuli. In man precisely similar conditions constitute the usual causes of nervous and psychic disturbances. Different conditions productive of extreme excitation, such as intense grief or bitter insults, often lead, when the natural reactions are inhibited by the necessary restraint, to profound and prolonged loss of balance in nervous and psychic activity.
Ivan Pavlov and G. V. Anrep (ed., trans.), Conditioned Reflexes—An Investigation of the Physiological Activity of the Cerebral Cortex (1927), 397.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Acuteness (3)  |  Balance (77)  |  Bitter (30)  |  Bitterness (3)  |  Cause (541)  |  Clash (8)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Disturbance (31)  |  Dog (70)  |  Excitation (9)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Function (228)  |  Grief (18)  |  Influence (222)  |  Inhibition (13)  |  Insult (14)  |  Intensity (34)  |  Interference (21)  |  Lead (384)  |  Loss (110)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nervousness (2)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Production (183)  |  Productive (32)  |  Profound (104)  |  Profoundness (2)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Psychic (13)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Restraint (13)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Strong (174)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)

It is a happy world after all. The air, the earth, the water teem with delighted existence. In a spring noon, or a summer evening, on whichever side I turn my eyes, myriads of happy beings crowd upon my view. “The insect youth are on the wing.” Swarms of new-born flies are trying their pinions in the air. Their sportive motions, their wanton mazes, their gratuitous activity testify their joy and the exultation they feel in their lately discovered faculties … The whole winged insect tribe, it is probable, are equally intent upon their proper employments, and under every variety of constitution, gratified, and perhaps equally gratified, by the offices which the author of their nature has assigned to them.
Natural Theology: or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of The Deity, Collected from the Appearances of Nature (1802), 490-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Assignment (12)  |  Author (167)  |  Being (1278)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  Employment (32)  |  Equality (31)  |  Equally (130)  |  Evening (12)  |  Existence (456)  |  Exultation (4)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Fly (146)  |  Gratification (20)  |  Happy (105)  |  Insect (77)  |  Intent (8)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lateness (4)  |  Maze (10)  |  Motion (310)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  New-born (2)  |  Noon (14)  |  Office (71)  |  Probability (130)  |  Proper (144)  |  Properness (2)  |  Side (233)  |  Sport (22)  |  Spring (133)  |  Summer (54)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Teeming (5)  |  Testament (4)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Turn (447)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wing (75)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

It is not surprising, in view of the polydynamic constitution of the genuinely mathematical mind, that many of the major heros of the science, men like Desargues and Pascal, Descartes and Leibnitz, Newton, Gauss and Bolzano, Helmholtz and Clifford, Riemann and Salmon and Plücker and Poincaré, have attained to high distinction in other fields not only of science but of philosophy and letters too. And when we reflect that the very greatest mathematical achievements have been due, not alone to the peering, microscopic, histologic vision of men like Weierstrass, illuminating the hidden recesses, the minute and intimate structure of logical reality, but to the larger vision also of men like Klein who survey the kingdoms of geometry and analysis for the endless variety of things that flourish there, as the eye of Darwin ranged over the flora and fauna of the world, or as a commercial monarch contemplates its industry, or as a statesman beholds an empire; when we reflect not only that the Calculus of Probability is a creation of mathematics but that the master mathematician is constantly required to exercise judgment—judgment, that is, in matters not admitting of certainty—balancing probabilities not yet reduced nor even reducible perhaps to calculation; when we reflect that he is called upon to exercise a function analogous to that of the comparative anatomist like Cuvier, comparing theories and doctrines of every degree of similarity and dissimilarity of structure; when, finally, we reflect that he seldom deals with a single idea at a tune, but is for the most part engaged in wielding organized hosts of them, as a general wields at once the division of an army or as a great civil administrator directs from his central office diverse and scattered but related groups of interests and operations; then, I say, the current opinion that devotion to mathematics unfits the devotee for practical affairs should be known for false on a priori grounds. And one should be thus prepared to find that as a fact Gaspard Monge, creator of descriptive geometry, author of the classic Applications de l’analyse à la géométrie; Lazare Carnot, author of the celebrated works, Géométrie de position, and Réflections sur la Métaphysique du Calcul infinitesimal; Fourier, immortal creator of the Théorie analytique de la chaleur; Arago, rightful inheritor of Monge’s chair of geometry; Poncelet, creator of pure projective geometry; one should not be surprised, I say, to find that these and other mathematicians in a land sagacious enough to invoke their aid, rendered, alike in peace and in war, eminent public service.
In Lectures on Science, Philosophy and Art (1908), 32-33.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  A Priori (26)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Administrator (11)  |  Admit (45)  |  Affair (29)  |  Aid (97)  |  Alike (60)  |  Alone (311)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Anatomist (23)  |  Application (242)  |  François Arago (14)  |  Army (33)  |  Attain (125)  |  Author (167)  |  Balance (77)  |  Behold (18)  |  Bernhard Bolzano (2)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Call (769)  |  Lazare-Nicolas-Marguerite Carnot (4)  |  Celebrated (2)  |  Central (80)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chair (24)  |  Civil (26)  |  Classic (11)  |  William Kingdon Clifford (21)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Compare (69)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Current (118)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  Deal (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Descriptive (17)  |  Descriptive Geometry (3)  |  Devotee (5)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dissimilar (6)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Division (65)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Due (141)  |  Eminent (17)  |  Empire (14)  |  Endless (56)  |  Engage (39)  |  Enough (340)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fact (1210)  |  False (100)  |  Fauna (13)  |  Field (364)  |  Finally (26)  |  Find (998)  |  Flora (9)  |  Flourish (34)  |  Baron Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (17)  |  Function (228)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (77)  |  General (511)  |  Genuinely (4)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Ground (217)  |  Group (78)  |  Hero (42)  |  Hide (69)  |  High (362)  |  Histology (3)  |  Host (16)  |  Idea (843)  |  Illuminate (24)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Industry (137)  |  Infinitesimal (29)  |  Inheritor (2)  |  Interest (386)  |  Intimate (15)  |  Invoke (6)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Felix Klein (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Land (115)  |  Large (394)  |  Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (49)  |  Letter (109)  |  Logical (55)  |  Major (84)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Matter (798)  |  Microscopic (26)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Monarch (4)  |  Gaspard Monge (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Office (71)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Organize (29)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Blaise Pascal (80)  |  Peace (108)  |  Peer (12)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Henri Poincaré (96)  |  Jean-Victor Poncelet (2)  |  Position (77)  |  Practical (200)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Probability (130)  |  Projective Geometry (3)  |  Public Service (5)  |  Pure (291)  |  Range (99)  |  Reality (261)  |  Recess (8)  |  Reduce (94)  |  Reducible (2)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Relate (21)  |  Render (93)  |  Require (219)  |  Required (108)  |  Bernhard Riemann (7)  |  Rightful (3)  |  Sagacious (7)  |  Salmon (7)  |  Say (984)  |  Scatter (6)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Service (110)  |  Similarity (31)  |  Single (353)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Structure (344)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Survey (33)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tune (19)  |  Unfit (12)  |  Variety (132)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (123)  |  War (225)  |  Karl Weierstrass (9)  |  Wield (10)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

It seems to me that the physical constitution of the valley, on which I am reporting, must cast doubt in the minds of those who may have accepted the assumptions of any of the geologic systems hitherto proposed; and that those who delight in science would do better to enrich themselves with empirical facts than take upon themselves the burden of defending and applying general hypotheses.
Della valle vulcanico-marina di Roncà nel Territorio Veronese (1778), trans. Ezio Vaccari, vii-viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Better (486)  |  Cast (66)  |  Delight (108)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Empirical (54)  |  Enrich (24)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  General (511)  |  Geology (220)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Physical (508)  |  Reporting (9)  |  Science (3879)  |  System (537)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Valley (32)

Man may be excused for feeling some pride at having risen, though not through his own exertions, to the very summit of the organic scale; and the fact of his having thus risen, instead of having been aboriginally placed there, may give him hopes for a still higher destiny in the distant future. But we are not here concerned with hopes or fears, only with the truth as far as our reason allows us to discover it. I have given the evidence to the best of my ability; and we must acknowledge, as it seems to me, that man with all his noble qualities, with sympathy which feels for the most debased, with benevolence which extends not only to other men but to the humblest living creature, with his god-like intellect which has penetrated into the movements and constitution of the solar system—with all these exalted powers—Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin.
Concluding remarks. The Descent of Man (1871), Vol. 2, 405.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Acknowledge (33)  |  All (4108)  |  Bear (159)  |  Benevolence (8)  |  Best (459)  |  Concern (228)  |  Creature (233)  |  Destiny (50)  |  Discover (553)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Extend (128)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fear (197)  |  Feel (367)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Future (429)  |  God (757)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Humblest (4)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Must (1526)  |  Noble (90)  |  Organic (158)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Pride (78)  |  Reason (744)  |  Scale (121)  |  Solar System (77)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Still (613)  |  Summit (25)  |  Sympathy (30)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)

Mathematics as an expression of the human mind reflects the active will, the contemplative reason, and the desire for aesthetic perfection. Its basic elements are logic and intuition, analysis and construction, generality and individuality. Though different traditions may emphasize different aspects, it is only the interplay of these antithetic forces and the struggle for their synthesis that constitute the life, usefulness, and supreme value of mathematical science.
As co-author with Herbert Robbins, in What Is Mathematics?: An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods (1941, 1996), x.
Science quotes on:  |  Active (76)  |  Activity (210)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  Aesthetics (5)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Antithesis (7)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Basic (138)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Construction (112)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Desire (204)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Element (310)  |  Emphasis (17)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Expression (175)  |  Force (487)  |  Generality (45)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Individuality (22)  |  Interplay (7)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Life (1795)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)

Men that looke no further than their outsides thinke health an appertinance unto life, and quarrell with their constitutions for being sick; but I that have examined the parts of man, and know upon what tender filaments that Fabrick hangs, doe wonder what we are not alwayes so; and considering the thousand dores that lead to death doe thanke my God that we can die but once.
Religio Medici (1642), Part I, Section 44. In L. C. Martin (ed.), Thomas Browne: Religio Medici and Other Works (1964), 42.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Death (388)  |  Filament (4)  |  God (757)  |  Hang (45)  |  Health (193)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lead (384)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Outside (141)  |  Sick (81)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Wonder (236)

Modern anthropology has taught us, through comparative investigation of so-called primitive cultures, that the social behavior of human beings may differ greatly, depending upon prevailing cultural patterns and the types of organisation which predominate in society. It is on this that those who are striving to improve the lot of man may ground their hopes: human beings are not condemned, because of their biological constitution, to annihilate each other or to be at the mercy of a cruel, self-inflicted fate.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Anthropology (58)  |  Behavior (84)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biological (137)  |  Call (769)  |  Comparative (13)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Cruel (25)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Culture (143)  |  Depend (228)  |  Differ (85)  |  Fate (72)  |  Greatly (12)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Improve (58)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Modern (385)  |  Organisation (7)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Predominate (7)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Self (267)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Social (252)  |  Society (326)  |  Strive (46)  |  Teach (277)  |  Through (849)  |  Type (167)

Most impediments to scientific understanding are conceptual locks, not factual lacks. Most difficult to dislodge are those biases that escape our scrutiny because they seem so obviously, even ineluctably, just. We know ourselves best and tend to view other creatures as mirrors of our own constitution and social arrangements. (Aristotle, and nearly two millennia of successors, designated the large bee that leads the swarm as a king.)
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Bee (40)  |  Best (459)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Creature (233)  |  Designation (13)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Escape (80)  |  Factual (8)  |  Impediment (11)  |  Ineluctably (2)  |  King (35)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lack (119)  |  Large (394)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lock (13)  |  Millennia (4)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Obviously (11)  |  Other (2236)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scrutiny (15)  |  Seem (145)  |  Social (252)  |  Successor (14)  |  Swarm (14)  |  Tend (124)  |  Two (937)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  View (488)

My many years of work and research as a biological and social anthropologist have made it abundantly clear to me that from an evolutionary and biological standpoint, the female is more advanced and constitutionally more richly endowed than the male.
In The Natural Superiority of Women (1952, 1999), 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Advanced (11)  |  Anthropologist (6)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Endow (14)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Female (50)  |  Male (26)  |  More (2559)  |  Research (664)  |  Rich (62)  |  Social (252)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

Next came the patent laws. These began in England in 1624, and in this country with the adoption of our Constitution. Before then any man [might] instantly use what another man had invented, so that the inventor had no special advantage from his own invention. The patent system changed this, secured to the inventor for a limited time exclusive use of his inventions, and thereby added the fuel of interest to the fire of genius in the discovery and production of new and useful things.
Lecture 'Discoveries, Inventions and Improvements' (22 Feb 1860) in John George Nicolay and John Hay (eds.), Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln (1894), Vol. 5, 113. In Eugene C. Gerhart, Quote it Completely! (1998), 802.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Country (251)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Fire (189)  |  Genius (284)  |  Instantly (19)  |  Interest (386)  |  Invention (369)  |  Inventor (71)  |  Law (894)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Patent (33)  |  Production (183)  |  Secured (18)  |  Special (184)  |  System (537)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)

Of all regions of the earth none invites speculation more than that which lies beneath our feet, and in none is speculation more dangerous; yet, apart from speculation, it is little that we can say regarding the constitution of the interior of the earth. We know, with sufficient accuracy for most purposes, its size and shape: we know that its mean density is about 5½ times that of water, that the density must increase towards the centre, and that the temperature must be high, but beyond these facts little can be said to be known. Many theories of the earth have been propounded at different times: the central substance of the earth has been supposed to be fiery, fluid, solid, and gaseous in turn, till geologists have turned in despair from the subject, and become inclined to confine their attention to the outermost crust of the earth, leaving its centre as a playground for mathematicians.
'The Constitution of the Interior of the Earth, as Revealed by Earthquakes', Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society (1906), 62, 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (78)  |  All (4108)  |  Attention (190)  |  Become (815)  |  Beneath (64)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Central (80)  |  Crust (38)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Density (25)  |  Despair (40)  |  Different (577)  |  Earth (996)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Geologist (75)  |  High (362)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Increase (210)  |  Interior (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Lie (364)  |  Little (707)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Playground (6)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Say (984)  |  Solid (116)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Subject (521)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Turn (447)  |  Water (481)

Of all the supervised conditions for life offered man, those under U.S.A.’s constitution have proved the best. Wherefore, be sure when you start modifying, corrupting or abrogating it.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Best (459)  |  Condition (356)  |  The Constitution of the United States (7)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Offer (141)  |  Start (221)

Of the Passive Principle, and Material Cause of the Small Pox ... Nature, in the first compounding and forming of us, hath laid into the Substance and Constitution of each something equivalent to Ovula, of various distinct Kinds, productive of all the contagious, venomous Fevers, we can possibly have as long as we live.
Exanthematologia: Or, An Attempt to Give a Rational Account of Eruptive Fevers, Especially of the Measles and SmallPox (1730), Part II, 'Of the Small-Pox', 175. In Ludvig Hektoen, 'Thomas Fuller 1654-1734: Country Physician and Pioneer Exponent of Specificness in Infection and Immunity', read to the Society (8 Nov 1921), published in Bulletin of the Society of Medical History of Chicago (Mar 1922), 2, 329, or in reprint form, p. 11.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cause (541)  |  Disease (328)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Equivalent (45)  |  Fever (29)  |  First (1283)  |  Forming (42)  |  Germ (53)  |  Kind (557)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Material (353)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Principle (507)  |  Productive (32)  |  Small (477)  |  Smallpox (14)  |  Something (719)  |  Substance (248)  |  Various (200)

Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.
Letter to Jean Baptiste Le Roy, 13 Nov 1789. Quoted in Albert Henry Smyth (ed.) The Writings of Benjamin Franklin (1907), vol. 10, 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Appearance (140)  |  Certain (550)  |  Death (388)  |  New (1216)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Promise (67)  |  Tax (26)  |  World (1774)

People are usually surprised to discover that I hate the phrase “constitutional rights.” I hate the phrase because it is terribly misleading. Most of the people who say it or hear it have the impression that the Constitution “grants” them their rights. Nothing could be further from the truth. Strictly speaking it is the Bill of Rights that enumerates our rights, but none of our founding documents bestow anything on you at all [...] The government can burn the Constitution and shred the Bill of Rights, but those actions wouldn’t have the slightest effect on the rights you’ve always had.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Bestow (18)  |  Bill (14)  |  Burn (87)  |  Discover (553)  |  Document (7)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enumerate (3)  |  Far (154)  |  Founding (5)  |  Government (110)  |  Grant (73)  |  Hate (64)  |  Hear (139)  |  Impression (114)  |  Misleading (21)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nothing (966)  |  People (1005)  |  Phrase (61)  |  Right (452)  |  Say (984)  |  Shred (7)  |  Slight (31)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Usually (176)

Persons possessing great intellect and a capacity for excelling in the creative arts and also in the sciences are generally likely to have heavier brains than the ordinary individual. Arguing from this we might expect to find a corresponding lightness in the brain of the criminal, but this is not always the case ... Many criminals show not a single anomaly in their physical or mental make-up, while many persons with marked evidences of morphological aberration have never exhibited the criminal tendency.
Every attempt to prove crime to be due to a constitution peculiar only to criminals has failed signally. It is because most criminals are drawn from the ranks of the low, the degraded, the outcast, that investigators were ever deceived into attempting to set up a 'type' of criminal. The social conditions which foster the great majority of crimes are more needful of study and improvement.
From study of known normal brains we have learned that there is a certain range of variation. No two brains are exactly alike, and the greatest source of error in the assertions of Benedict and Lombroso has been the finding of this or that variation in a criminal’s brains, and maintaining such to be characteristic of the 'criminal constitution,' unmindful of the fact that like variations of structure may and do exist in the brains of normal, moral persons.
Address to the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia (28 Dec 1904), as quoted in 'Americans of Future Will Have Best Brains', New York Times (29 Dec 1904), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Aberration (8)  |  Alike (60)  |  Anomaly (11)  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Brain (270)  |  Capacity (100)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Condition (356)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Crime (38)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Error (321)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Exist (443)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Foster (12)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Known (454)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Low (80)  |  Majority (66)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mental (177)  |  Moral (195)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Person (363)  |  Physical (508)  |  Prove (250)  |  Range (99)  |  Rank (67)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Show (346)  |  Single (353)  |  Social (252)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Two (937)  |  Type (167)  |  Variation (90)

Physicians and politicians resemble one another in this respect, that some defend the constitution and others destroy it.
Anonymous
Acton or the Circle of Life : A Collection of Thoughts and Observations (1849), 190.
Science quotes on:  |  The Constitution of the United States (7)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Other (2236)  |  Physician (273)  |  Politician (38)  |  Resemble (63)  |  Respect (207)

Science has penetrated the constitution of nature, and unrolled the mysterious pages of its history, and started again many, as yet, unanswered questions in respect to the mutual relations of matter and spirit, of nature and of God.
Fifteen Years in the Chapel of Yale College (1887), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  God (757)  |  History (673)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Question (621)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Start (221)  |  Unanswered (8)

Science is the study of the admitted laws of existence, which cannot prove a universal negative about whether those laws could ever be suspended by something admittedly above them. It is as if we were to say that a lawyer was so deeply learned in the American Constitution that he knew there could never be a revolution in America..
From 'The Early Bird in History',The Thing: Why I Am Catholic (1929), 207. In Collected Works (1990), Vol. 3, 296.
Science quotes on:  |  Above (6)  |  Admitted (3)  |  Admittedly (2)  |  America (127)  |  Existence (456)  |  Law (894)  |  Lawyer (27)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Negative (63)  |  Never (1087)  |  Prove (250)  |  Revolution (129)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Study (653)  |  Suspended (5)  |  Universal (189)

She [Rosalind Franklin] discovered in a series of beautifully executed researches the fundamental distinction between carbons that turned on heating into graphite and those that did not. Further she related this difference to the chemical constitution of the molecules from which carbon was made. She was already a recognized authority in industrial physico-chemistry when she chose to abandon this work in favour of the far more difficult and more exciting fields of biophysics.
Comment in The Times, 19 Apr 1958, shortly after Franklin's death. In Jenifer Glynn, 'Rosalind Franklin', in E. Shils and C. Blacker (eds.), Cambridge Women: Twelve Portraits (1996), 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Already (222)  |  Authority (95)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Difference (337)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Field (364)  |  Rosalind Franklin (17)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Series (149)  |  Turn (447)  |  Work (1351)

The Qualities then that are in Bodies rightly considered, are of Three sorts.
First, the Bulk, Figure, Number, Situation, and Motion, or Rest of their solid Parts; those are in them, whether we perceive them or no; and when they are of that size, that we can discover them, we have by these an Idea of the thing, as it is in it self, as is plain in artificial things. These I call primary Qualities.
Secondly, The Power that is in any Body, by Reason of its insensible primary Qualities, to operate after a peculiar manner on any of our Senses, and thereby produce in us the different Ideas of several Colours, Sounds, Smells, Tastes, etc. These are usually called sensible Qualities.
Thirdly, The Power that is in any Body, by Reason of the particular Constitution of its primary Qualities, to make such a change in the Bulk, Figure, Texture, and Motion of another Body, as to make it operate on our Senses, differently from what it did before. Thus the Sun has a Power to make Wax white, and Fire to make Lead fluid. These are usually called Powers.
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690). Edited by Peter Nidditch (1975), Book 2, Chapter 8, Section 23, 140-1.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Bulk (24)  |  Call (769)  |  Change (593)  |  Color (137)  |  Consider (416)  |  Different (577)  |  Discover (553)  |  Figure (160)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Idea (843)  |  Lead (384)  |  Motion (310)  |  Number (699)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Power (746)  |  Primary (80)  |  Quality (135)  |  Reason (744)  |  Rest (280)  |  Self (267)  |  Sense (770)  |  Situation (113)  |  Smell (27)  |  Solid (116)  |  Sound (183)  |  Sun (385)  |  Taste (90)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Usually (176)  |  Wax (13)  |  White (127)

The chemical compounds are comparable to a system of planets in that the atoms are held together by chemical affinity. They may be more or less numerous, simple or complex in composition, and in the constitution of the materials, they play the same role as Mars and Venus do in our planetary system, or the compound members such as our earth with its moon, or Jupiter with its satellites... If in such a system a particle is replaced by one of different character, the equilibrium can persist, and then the new compound will exhibit properties similar to those shown by the original substance.
Quoted in Ralph Oesper, The Human Side of Scientists (1975), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (27)  |  Atom (355)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complex (188)  |  Composition (84)  |  Compound (113)  |  Different (577)  |  Do (1908)  |  Earth (996)  |  Equilibrium (33)  |  Jupiter (26)  |  Mars (44)  |  Material (353)  |  Moon (237)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  New (1216)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Particle (194)  |  Planet (356)  |  Planetary (29)  |  Role (86)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Simple (406)  |  Substance (248)  |  System (537)  |  Together (387)  |  Venus (20)  |  Will (2355)

The chemical differences among various species and genera of animals and plants are certainly as significant for the history of their origins as the differences in form. If we could define clearly the differences in molecular constitution and functions of different kinds of organisms, there would be possible a more illuminating and deeper understanding of question of the evolutionary reactions of organisms than could ever be expected from morphological considerations.
'Uber das Vorkommen von Haemoglobin in den Muskeln der Mollusken und die Verbreitung desselben in den lebenden Organismen', Pflügers Archiv für die gesamte Physiologie des Menschen und der Tiere, 1871, 4, 318-9. Trans. Joseph S. Fruton, Proteins, Enzymes, Genes: The Interplay of Chemistry and Biology (1999), 270.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Define (49)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expect (200)  |  Form (959)  |  Function (228)  |  Genus (25)  |  History (673)  |  Illuminating (12)  |  Kind (557)  |  Molecule (174)  |  More (2559)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Organism (220)  |  Origin (239)  |  Plant (294)  |  Possible (552)  |  Question (621)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Significance (113)  |  Significant (74)  |  Species (401)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Various (200)

The Constitution never sanctioned the patenting of gadgets. Patents serve a higher end—the advance of science.
Concurring in Great A. & P. Teas Co.. V. Supermarket Equip. Corp. 340 U.S. 147, 155 (1950). In Eugene C. Gerhart, Quote it Completely! (1998), 802.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  The Constitution of the United States (7)  |  End (590)  |  Never (1087)  |  Patent (33)  |  Progress (465)  |  Sanction (7)  |  Science (3879)

The dogma of the impossibility of determining the atomic constitution of substances, which until recently was advocated with such fervor by the most able chemists, is beginning to be abandoned and forgotten; and one can predict that the day is not far in the future when a sufficient collection of facts will permit determination of the internal architecture of molecules. A series of experiments directed toward such a goal is the object of this paper.
Science quotes on:  |  Abandon (68)  |  Architecture (48)  |  Atom (355)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Collection (64)  |  Determination (78)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dogma (48)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fervor (7)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Future (429)  |  Goal (145)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Internal (66)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Object (422)  |  Paper (182)  |  Permit (58)  |  Predict (79)  |  Series (149)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sufficient (128)  |  Will (2355)

The earth and its atmosphere constitute a vast distilling apparatus in which the equatorial ocean plays the part of the boiler, and the chill regions of the poles the part of the condenser. In this process of distillation heat plays quite as necessary a part as cold.
In Forms of Water in Clouds and Rivers, Ice and Glaciers (1872), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Boiler (7)  |  Chill (9)  |  Cold (112)  |  Condenser (4)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Distillation (10)  |  Earth (996)  |  Equator (6)  |  Heat (174)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Part (222)  |  Playing (42)  |  Pole (46)  |  Process (423)  |  Region (36)  |  Vast (177)

The genotypic constitution of a gamete or a zygote may be parallelized with a complicated chemico-physical structure. This reacts exclusively in consequence of its realized state, but not in consequence of the history of its creation. So it may be with the genotypical constitution of gametes and zygotes: its history is without influence upon its reactions, which are determined exclusively by its actual nature. The genotype-conception is thus an 'ahistoric' view of the reactions of living beings—of course only as far as true heredity is concerned. This view is an analog to the chemical view, as already pointed out; chemical compounds have no compromising ante-act, H2O is always H2O, and reacts always in the same manner, whatsoever may be the 'history' of its formation or the earlier states of its elements. I suggest that it is useful to emphasize this 'radical' ahistoric genotype-conception of heredity in its strict antagonism to the transmission—or phenotype-view.
'The Genotype Conception of Heredity', The American Naturalist (1911), 45, 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Actual (117)  |  Already (222)  |  Analog (3)  |  Antagonism (6)  |  Being (1278)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Compound (113)  |  Conception (154)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Course (409)  |  Creation (327)  |  Element (310)  |  Emphasize (23)  |  Formation (96)  |  Gamete (5)  |  Genotype (8)  |  Heredity (60)  |  History (673)  |  Influence (222)  |  Living (491)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenotype (5)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Radical (25)  |  Reaction (104)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Useful (250)  |  View (488)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Zygote (3)

The mechanist is intimately convinced that a precise knowledge of the chemical constitution, structure, and properties of the various organelles of a cell will solve biological problems. This will come in a few centuries. For the time being, the biologist has to face such concepts as orienting forces or morphogenetic fields. Owing to the scarcity of chemical data and to the complexity of life, and despite the progresses of biochemistry, the biologist is still threatened with vertigo.
Problems of Morphogenesis in Ciliates: The Kinetosomes in Development, Reproduction and Evolution (1950), 92-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Concept (221)  |  Data (156)  |  Face (212)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mechanist (3)  |  Owing (39)  |  Precise (68)  |  Problem (676)  |  Solve (130)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Threaten (32)  |  Time (1877)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)

The more the subject is examined the more complex must we suppose the constitution of matter in order to explain the remarkable effects observed.
In Radio-activity (1905), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Complex (188)  |  Effect (393)  |  Examine (78)  |  Explain (322)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observe (168)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Subject (521)  |  Suppose (156)

The nature of heredity is based upon the transmission of nuclear substance with a specific molecular constitution. This substance is the specific nucleoplasm of the germ-cell, to which I have given the name of germ-plasm.
Trans. Joseph S. Froton, Proteins, Enzymes, Genes: The Interplay of Chemistry and Biology (1999), 391.
Science quotes on:  |  Basis (173)  |  Germ (53)  |  Germ Cell (2)  |  Germ-Plasm (2)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleoplasm (2)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Specific (95)  |  Substance (248)  |  Transmission (34)

The neutral zone of selective advantage in the neighbourhood of zero is thus so narrow that changes in the environment, and in the genetic constitution of species, must cause this zone to be crossed and perhaps recrossed relatively rapidly in the course of evolutionary change, so that many possible gene substitutions may have a fluctuating history of advance and regression before the final balance of selective advantage is determined.
'The Distribution of Gene Ratios for Rare Mutations', Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 1930, 50, 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Balance (77)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Course (409)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Final (118)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genetic (108)  |  History (673)  |  Must (1526)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Neutral (13)  |  Possible (552)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Regression (2)  |  Selective (19)  |  Species (401)  |  Zero (37)

The nicest constitutions of government are often like the finest pieces of clock-work, which, depending on so many motions, are therefore more subject to be out of order.
'Thoughts On Various Subjects', The Works of Alexander Pope (1806), Vol. 6, 406.
Science quotes on:  |  Clock (47)  |  Clockwork (7)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Government (110)  |  More (2559)  |  Motion (310)  |  Order (632)  |  Out Of Order (2)  |  Subject (521)  |  Work (1351)

The present knowledge of the biochemical constitution of the cell was achieved largely by the use of destructive methods. Trained in the tradition of the theory of solutions, many a biochemist tends, even today, to regard the cell as a “bag of enzymes”. However, everyone realizes now that the biochemical processes studied in vitro may have only a remote resemblance to the events actually occurring in the living cell.
Nucleo-cytoplasmic Relations in Micro-Organisms: Their Bearing on Cell Heredity and Differentiation (1953), 108.
Science quotes on:  |  Biochemist (9)  |  Cell (138)  |  Enzyme (17)  |  Event (216)  |  In Vitro (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Living (491)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Realize (147)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remote (83)  |  Resemblance (38)  |  Solution (267)  |  Solution. (53)  |  Tend (124)  |  Theory (970)  |  Today (314)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Train (114)  |  Use (766)

The right that must become paramount is not the right to procreate, but rather the right of every child to be born with a sound physical and mental constitution, based on a sound genotype. No parents will in that future time have the right to burden society with a malformed or mentally incompetent child. Just as every child must have the right to full educational opportunity and a sound nutrition, so every child has the inalienable right to a sound heritage.
Expressing concern that in a coming overpopulated world, “sacred rights of man must alter.” Presidential Address (28 Dec 1970) to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 'Science: Endless Horizons or Golden Age?', Science (8 Jan 1971), 171, No. 3866, 24. As quoted in obituary by Douglas Martin, New York Times (20 Jan 2005).
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Burden (27)  |  Child (307)  |  Future (429)  |  Genotype (8)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Incompetent (4)  |  Mental (177)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Paramount (10)  |  Parent (76)  |  Physical (508)  |  Procreate (4)  |  Right (452)  |  Society (326)  |  Sound (183)  |  Time (1877)  |  Will (2355)

The test of science is not whether you are reasonable—there would not be much of physics if that was the case—the test is whether it works. And the great point about Newton’s theory of gravitation was that it worked, that you could actually say something about the motion of the moon without knowing very much about the constitution of the Earth.
From Assumption and Myth in Physical Theory (1967), 10.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Actually (27)  |  Earth (996)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Moon (237)  |  Motion (310)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Point (580)  |  Reasonable (27)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Test (211)  |  Theory (970)  |  Theory Of Gravitation (6)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worked (2)

The theory is confirmed that pea hybrids form egg and pollen cells, which, in their constitution, represent in equal numbers all constant forms which result for the combination of the characters united in fertilization.
As collected in Forest Ray Moulton (ed.), The Autobiography of Science (1945), 586.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Cell (138)  |  Character (243)  |  Combination (144)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Constant (144)  |  Egg (69)  |  Equal (83)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Form (959)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Hybrid (14)  |  Number (699)  |  Pea (4)  |  Pollen (6)  |  Represent (155)  |  Result (677)  |  Theory (970)  |  United (14)

The theory of medicine, therefore, presents what is useful in thought, but does not indicate how it is to be applied in practice—the mode of operation of these principles. The theory, when mastered, gives us a certain kind of knowledge. Thus we say, for example, there are three forms of fevers and nine constitutions. The practice of medicine is not the work which the physician carries out, but is that branch of medical knowledge which, when acquired, enables one to form an opinion upon which to base the proper plan of treatment.
Avicenna
'The Definition of Medicine', in The Canon of Medicine, adapted by L. Bakhtiar (1999), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Applied (177)  |  Base (117)  |  Branch (150)  |  Certain (550)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Enable (119)  |  Fever (29)  |  Form (959)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Master (178)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Operation (213)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Physician (273)  |  Plan (117)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proper (144)  |  Say (984)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Useful (250)  |  Work (1351)

There is nothing, in itself, valuable or despicable, desirable or hateful, beautiful or deformed; but that these attributes arise from the particular constitution and fabric of human sentiment and affection.
Essay XVIII, 'The Sceptic', Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects (1742, New ed. 1767), Vol. 1, 184.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (43)  |  Arise (158)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Desirable (33)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Human (1468)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Value (365)

There is, however, no genius so gifted as not to need control and verification. ... [T]he brightest flashes in the world of thought are incomplete until they have been proved to have their counterparts in the world of fact. Thus the vocation of the true experimentalist may be defined as the continued exercise of spiritual insight, and its incessant correction and realisation. His experiments constitute a body, of which his purified intuitions are, as it were, the soul.
In 'Vitality', Scientific Use of the Imagination and Other Essays (1872), 43.
Science quotes on:  |  Body (537)  |  Bright (79)  |  Brightest (12)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Control (167)  |  Correction (40)  |  Counterpart (9)  |  Definition (221)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Experimentalist (20)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flash (49)  |  Genius (284)  |  Gift (104)  |  Gifted (23)  |  Incessant (8)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Incompleteness (2)  |  Insight (102)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Need (290)  |  Proof (287)  |  Purification (7)  |  Realisation (4)  |  Realization (43)  |  Soul (226)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Thought (953)  |  Verification (31)  |  Vocation (6)  |  World (1774)

This constitution we designate by the word genotype. The word is entirely independent of any hypothesis; it is fact, not hypothesis that different zygotes arising by fertilisation can thereby have different qualities, that, even under quite similar conditions of life, phenotypically diverse individuals can develop.
Elemente der Exakten Erblichkeitslehre (1909), 165-70. Trans. in Ernst Mayr, The Growth of Biological Thought: Diversity, Evolution and Inheritance (1982), 782.
Science quotes on:  |  Arising (22)  |  Condition (356)  |  Develop (268)  |  Different (577)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  Genotype (8)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Individual (404)  |  Life (1795)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Word (619)  |  Zygote (3)

Thus the system of the world only oscillates around a mean state from which it never departs except by a very small quantity. By virtue of its constitution and the law of gravity, it enjoys a stability that can be destroyed only by foreign causes, and we are certain that their action is undetectable from the time of the most ancient observations until our own day. This stability in the system of the world, which assures its duration, is one of the most notable among all phenomena, in that it exhibits in the heavens the same intention to maintain order in the universe that nature has so admirably observed on earth for the sake of preserving individuals and perpetuating species.
'Sur l'Équation Séculaire de la Lune' (1786, published 1788). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 11, 248-9, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 145.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  The Constitution of the United States (7)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Duration (10)  |  Earth (996)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Individual (404)  |  Intention (46)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravity (15)  |  Maintain (105)  |  Mean (809)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Order (632)  |  Oscillation (13)  |  Perpetuate (10)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Preservation (33)  |  Preserving (18)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Sake (58)  |  Small (477)  |  Species (401)  |  Stability (25)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Time (1877)  |  Undetectable (3)  |  Universe (857)  |  Virtue (109)  |  World (1774)

We are sometimes told that chemistry is a modern science: that is not true. The moment that men’s minds began to experiment on the constitution of matter, there was a science of chemistry.
In address, as printed in 'Chemical Society’s Jubilee', Nature (26 Mar 1891), 43, No. 1117, 492.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Begin (260)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Moment (253)  |  Science (3879)  |  True (212)

We avoid the gravest difficulties when, giving up the attempt to frame hypotheses concerning the constitution of matter, we pursue statistical inquiries as a branch of rational mechanics.
Elementary Principles in Statistical Mechanics (1902), ix.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Branch (150)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Rational (90)  |  Statistical Mechanics (7)

We cannot conceive how the Foetus is form'd in the Womb, nor as much as how a Plant springs from the Earth we tread on ... And if we are ignorant of the most obvious things about us, and the most considerable within our selves, 'tis then no wonder that we know not the constitution and powers of the creatures, to whom we are such strangers.
Saducismus Triumphatus or Full and Plain Evidence Concerning Witches and Apparitions (1689),72-3.
Science quotes on:  |  Conceive (98)  |  Considerable (75)  |  Creature (233)  |  Earth (996)  |  Form (959)  |  Growth (187)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Plant (294)  |  Power (746)  |  Spring (133)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Tread (17)  |  Womb (24)  |  Wonder (236)

We define thermodynamics ... as the investigation of the dynamical and thermal properties of bodies, deduced entirely from the first and second law of thermodynamics, without speculation as to the molecular constitution.
The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (2003), 664-665.
Science quotes on:  |  Dynamical (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Law (894)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Second Law Of Thermodynamics (14)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Thermal (15)  |  Thermodynamics (40)

We may fairly claim for the study of Physics the recognition that it answers to an impulse implanted by nature in the constitution of man.
From 'On the Study of Physics', a Lecture delivered in the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Spring of 1854. Collected in Fragments of Science for Unscientific People: A Series of Detached Essays, Lectures, and Reviews (1892), Vol. 1, 284.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Claim (146)  |  Implant (4)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Study (653)

We may regard the cell quite apart from its familiar morphological aspects, and contemplate its constitution from the purely chemical standpoint. We are obliged to adopt the view, that the protoplasm is equipped with certain atomic groups, whose function especially consists in fixing to themselves food-stuffs, of importance to the cell-life. Adopting the nomenclature of organic chemistry, these groups may be designated side-chains. We may assume that the protoplasm consists of a special executive centre (Leistungs-centrum) in connection with which are nutritive side-chains… The relationship of the corresponding groups, i.e., those of the food-stuff, and those of the cell, must be specific. They must be adapted to one another, as, e.g., male and female screw (Pasteur), or as lock and key (E. Fischer).
Croonian Lecture, 'On Immunity with Special Reference to Cell Life', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 1900, 66, 433-434.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Cell (138)  |  Certain (550)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consist (223)  |  Equipped (17)  |  Female (50)  |  Emil Fischer (7)  |  Food (199)  |  Function (228)  |  Importance (286)  |  Life (1795)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Organic (158)  |  Organic Chemistry (40)  |  Louis Pasteur (81)  |  Protoplasm (13)  |  Purely (109)  |  Regard (305)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Screw (17)  |  Side (233)  |  Special (184)  |  Specific (95)  |  Standpoint (28)  |  Themselves (433)  |  View (488)

We’re inquiring into the deepest nature of our constitutions: How we inherit from each other. How we can change. How our minds think. How our will is related to our thoughts. How our thoughts are related to our molecules.
Newsweek 4 Jul 76
Science quotes on:  |  Change (593)  |  Deep (233)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Inquire (23)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Relate (21)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Will (2355)

Whatever opinions we may adopt as to the physical constitution of comets, we must admit that they serve some grand and important purpose in the economy of the universe; for we cannot suppose that the Almighty has created such an immense number of bodies, and set them in rapid motion according to established laws, without an end worthy of his perfections, and, on the whole, beneficial to the inhabitants of the system through which they move.
In The Sidereal Heavens and Other Subjects Connected with Astronomy: As Illustrative of the Character of the Deity, and of an Infinity of Worlds (1871), 353.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Beneficial (13)  |  Comet (54)  |  Economy (55)  |  End (590)  |  Establish (57)  |  God (757)  |  Immense (86)  |  Inhabitant (49)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physical (508)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Set (394)  |  Suppose (156)  |  System (537)  |  Through (849)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Whole (738)

When a physician is called to a patient, he should decide on the diagnosis, then the prognosis, and then the treatment. … Physicians must know the evolution of the disease, its duration and gravity in order to predict its course and outcome. Here statistics intervene to guide physicians, by teaching them the proportion of mortal cases, and if observation has also shown that the successful and unsuccessful cases can be recognized by certain signs, then the prognosis is more certain.
From An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine (1865), as translated by Henry Copley Greene (1957), 213.
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Course (409)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Disease (328)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Find (998)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Guide (97)  |  Know (1518)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  More (2559)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Predict (79)  |  Prognosis (5)  |  Proportion (136)  |  Rising (44)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Successful (123)  |  Teaching (188)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universal (189)  |  Wholeness (9)

When... the biologist is confronted with the fact that in the organism the parts are so adapted to each other as to give rise to a harmonious whole; and that the organisms are endowed with structures and instincts calculated to prolong their life and perpetuate their race, doubts as to the adequacy of a purely physiochemical viewpoint in biology may arise. The difficulties besetting the biologist in this problem have been rather increased than diminished by the discovery of Mendelian heredity, according to which each character is transmitted independently of any other character. Since the number of Mendelian characters in each organism is large, the possibility must be faced that the organism is merely a mosaic of independent hereditary characters. If this be the case the question arises: What moulds these independent characters into a harmonious whole? The vitalist settles this question by assuming the existence of a pre-established design for each organism and of a guiding 'force' or 'principle' which directs the working out of this design. Such assumptions remove the problem of accounting for the harmonious character of the organism from the field of physics or chemistry. The theory of natural selection invokes neither design nor purpose, but it is incomplete since it disregards the physiochemical constitution of living matter about which little was known until recently.
The Organism as a Whole: From a Physiochemical Viewpoint (1916), v-vi.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Adapt (66)  |  Arise (158)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Biology (216)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Design (195)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Existence (456)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Harmonious (18)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Incomplete (30)  |  Independently (24)  |  Instinct (88)  |  Known (454)  |  Large (394)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Matter (798)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Merely (316)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Number (699)  |  Organism (220)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetuate (10)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Prolong (29)  |  Purely (109)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Race (268)  |  Remove (45)  |  Rise (166)  |  Selection (128)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Viewpoint (12)  |  Whole (738)

[Mercurial medicines] affect the human constitution in a peculiar manner, taking, so to speak, an iron grasp of all its systems, and penetrating even to the bones, by which they not only change the healthy action of its vessels, and general structure, but greatly impair and destroy its energies; so that their abuse is rarely overcome. When the tone of the stomach, intestines, or nervous system generally, has been once injured by this mineral ... it could seldom be restored.
Quoted in Wooster Beach, A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Health (1848), 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Abuse (22)  |  Action (327)  |  All (4108)  |  Bone (95)  |  Change (593)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Drug (57)  |  General (511)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Human (1468)  |  Intestine (14)  |  Iron (96)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Nervous System (34)  |  Overcome (39)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Poison (40)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Speak (232)  |  Stomach (39)  |  Structure (344)  |  System (537)  |  Tone (22)  |  Vessel (63)

[The Constitution] is an experiment as all life is an experiment.
Oliver Wendell Holmes and Alfred Lief (ed.), The Dissenting Opinions of Mr. Justice Holmes (1981), 50.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  The Constitution of the United States (7)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Life (1795)

“Unless,” said I [Socrates], “either philosophers become kings in our states or those whom we now call our kings and rulers take to the pursuit of' philosophy seriously and adequately, and there is a conjunction of these two things, political power and philosophic intelligence, while the motley horde of the natures who at present pursue either apart from the other are compulsorily excluded, there can be no cessation of troubles, dear Glaucon, for our states, nor, I fancy for the human race either. Nor, until this happens, will this constitution which we have been expounding in theory ever be put into practice within the limits of possibility and see the light of the sun.”
Plato
From The Republic 5 473 c-e, in Paul Shorey (trans.), Plato in Twelve Volumes (1930, 1969), Vol. 5, 509.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Call (769)  |  Cessation (12)  |  Compulsion (17)  |  Conjunction (10)  |  Exclusion (16)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happening (58)  |  Horde (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  King (35)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Power (746)  |  Practice (204)  |  Present (619)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Race (268)  |  Ruler (21)  |  See (1081)  |  Socrates (16)  |  State (491)  |  Sun (385)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.