Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Science without religion is lame; religion without science is blind.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index F > Category: Fix

Fix Quotes (24 quotes)

All depends on keeping the eye steadily fixed on the facts of nature and so receiving their images simply as they are.
In Francis Bacon, James Spedding (ed.), Robert Leslie Ellis (ed.), 'The Plan of the Work: The Great Instauration', The Works of Francis Bacon: Translations of the Philosophical Works (1858), Vol. 4, 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Depend (85)  |  Eye (215)  |  Fact (717)  |  Image (55)  |  Keep (97)  |  Nature (1199)  |  Receive (58)  |  Simply (52)  |  Steady (16)

Archimedes … had stated that given the force, any given weight might be moved, and even boasted, we are told, relying on the strength of demonstration, that if there were another earth, by going into it he could remove this. Hiero being struck with amazement at this, and entreating him to make good this problem by actual experiment, and show some great weight moved by a small engine, he fixed accordingly upon a ship of burden out of the king’s arsenal, which could not be drawn out of the dock without great labor and many men; and, loading her with many passengers and a full freight, sitting himself the while far off with no great endeavor, but only holding the head of the pulley in his hand and drawing the cords by degrees, he drew the ship in a straight line, as smoothly and evenly, as if she had been in the sea. The king, astonished at this, and convinced of the power of the art, prevailed upon Archimedes to make him engines accommodated to all the purposes, offensive and defensive, of a siege. … the apparatus was, in most opportune time, ready at hand for the Syracusans, and with it also the engineer himself.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Accommodate (10)  |  According (9)  |  Actual (47)  |  Amazement (12)  |  Apparatus (36)  |  Archimedes (52)  |  Arsenal (6)  |  Art (280)  |  Astonished (8)  |  At Hand (4)  |  Boast (21)  |  Burden (27)  |  Convinced (21)  |  Cord (3)  |  Defensive (2)  |  Degree (79)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Draw (53)  |  Earth (632)  |  Endeavor (41)  |  Engine (29)  |  Engineer (93)  |  Experiment (596)  |  Far (154)  |  Force (248)  |  Freight (3)  |  Full (63)  |  Give (197)  |  Good (336)  |  Great (517)  |  Hand (140)  |  Head (79)  |  Hiero (2)  |  Hold (90)  |  King (32)  |  Labor (68)  |  Load (11)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (120)  |  Move (92)  |  Offensive (4)  |  Passenger (10)  |  Power (355)  |  Prevail (16)  |  Problem (483)  |  Pulley (2)  |  Purpose (188)  |  Ready (37)  |  Rely (11)  |  Remove (26)  |  Sea (186)  |  Ship (44)  |  Show (90)  |  Siege (2)  |  Sit (46)  |  Small (160)  |  Smoothly (2)  |  State (132)  |  Straight Line (17)  |  Strength (78)  |  Strike (37)  |  Syracuse (5)  |  Tell (108)  |  Time (586)  |  Weight (75)

Engineering stimulates the mind. Kids get bored easily. They have got to get out and get their hands dirty: make things, dismantle things, fix things. When schools can offer that, you’ll have an engineer for life.
Webmaster has not yet found a primary source for this quote. Can you help?
Science quotes on:  |  Bored (4)  |  Dirty (10)  |  Dismantle (2)  |  Easily (35)  |  Engineer (93)  |  Engineering (126)  |  Hand (140)  |  Kid (15)  |  Life (1113)  |  Mind (733)  |  Offer (40)  |  School (115)  |  Stimulate (18)

Everything flows and nothing abides; everything gives way and nothing stays fixed.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Abide (11)  |  Everything (178)  |  Flow (42)  |  Give (197)  |  Nothing (376)  |  Stay (24)

For myself, I found that I was fitted for nothing so well as for the study of Truth; as having a mind nimble and versatile enough to catch the resemblances of things (which is the chief point) , and at the same time steady enough to fix and distinguish their subtler differences; as being gifted by nature with desire to seek, patience to doubt, fondness to meditate, slowness to assert, readiness to reconsider, carefulness to dispose and set in order; and as being a man that neither affects what is new nor admires what is old, and that hates every kind of imposture. So I thought my nature had a kind of familiarity and relationship with Truth.
From 'Progress of philosophical speculations. Preface to intended treatise De Interpretatione Naturæ (1603), in Francis Bacon and James Spedding (ed.), Works of Francis Bacon (1868), Vol. 3, 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (43)  |  Affectation (3)  |  Assertion (31)  |  Being (41)  |  Catch (30)  |  Chief (37)  |  Desire (139)  |  Difference (242)  |  Disposition (15)  |  Distinguishing (14)  |  Doubt (158)  |  Enough (6)  |  Familiarity (16)  |  Fondness (7)  |  Gift (60)  |  Hate (37)  |  Imposture (2)  |  Kind (137)  |  Meditation (12)  |  Mind (733)  |  Nature (1199)  |  New (477)  |  Nimble (2)  |  Nothing (376)  |  Old (143)  |  Order (238)  |  Patience (39)  |  Point (122)  |  Readiness (6)  |  Reconsideration (2)  |  Relationship (71)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Setting (6)  |  Slowness (4)  |  Steady (16)  |  Study (456)  |  Subtlety (11)  |  Thing (37)  |  Time (586)  |  Truth (901)  |  Versatile (4)

For nothing is fixed, forever and forever and forever, it is not fixed; the earth is always shifting, the light is always changing, the sea does not cease to grind down rock. Generations do not cease to be born, and we are responsible to them because we are the only witnesses they have. The sea rises, the light fails, lovers cling to each other, and children cling to us. The moment we cease to hold each other, the sea engulfs us and the light goes out.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Bear (66)  |  Cease (37)  |  Change (358)  |  Child (244)  |  Cling (6)  |  Down (86)  |  Earth (632)  |  Fail (58)  |  Forever (59)  |  Generation (134)  |  Grind (11)  |  Hold (90)  |  Light (345)  |  Lover (11)  |  Moment (103)  |  Nothing (376)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Rise (70)  |  Rock (125)  |  Sea (186)  |  Shift (29)  |  Witness (31)

For the environmentalists, The Space Option is the ultimate environmental solution. For the Cornucopians, it is the technological fix that they are relying on. For the hard core space community, the obvious by-product would be the eventual exploration and settlement of the solar system. For most of humanity however, the ultimate benefit is having a realistic hope in a future with possibilities.... If our species does not soon embrace this unique opportunity with sufficient commitment, it may miss its one and only chance to do so. Humanity could soon be overwhelmed by one or more of the many challenges it now faces. The window of opportunity is closing as fast as the population is increasing. Our future will be either a Space Age or a Stone Age.
Arthur Woods and Marco Bernasconi
Science quotes on:  |  Benefit (72)  |  By-Product (6)  |  Challenge (59)  |  Chance (156)  |  Close (66)  |  Commitment (20)  |  Community (81)  |  Core (14)  |  Embrace (31)  |  Environment (178)  |  Environmentalist (5)  |  Eventual (8)  |  Exploration (122)  |  Face (108)  |  Fast (41)  |  Future (283)  |  Hard (98)  |  Hope (174)  |  Humanity (123)  |  Increase (143)  |  Miss (26)  |  Obvious (77)  |  Opportunity (61)  |  Option (9)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Population (77)  |  Possibility (115)  |  Realistic (6)  |  Rely (11)  |  Settlement (3)  |  Solar System (61)  |  Solution (208)  |  Soon (34)  |  Space (256)  |  Space Age (3)  |  Species (217)  |  Stone Age (10)  |  Sufficient (39)  |  Technological (18)  |  Ultimate (83)  |  Unique (40)  |  Window (40)

From my father I learned to build things, to take them apart, and to fix mechanical and electrical equipment in general. I spent vast hours in a woodworking shop he maintained in the basement of our house, building gadgets, working both with my father and alone, often late into the night. … This play with building, fixing, and designing was my favorite activity throughout my childhood, and was a wonderful preparation for my later career as an experimentalist working on the frontiers of chemistry and physics.
From 'Richard E. Smalley: Biographical', collected in Tore Frängsmyr (ed.), Les Prix Nobel: The Nobel Prizes 1996 (1997).
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (127)  |  Build (113)  |  Career (57)  |  Chemistry (250)  |  Childhood (28)  |  Design (110)  |  Electrical (12)  |  Equipment (29)  |  Experimenter (20)  |  Father (57)  |  Favorite (23)  |  Frontier (25)  |  Learn (277)  |  Mechanical (46)  |  Physics (342)  |  Play (109)  |  Preparation (41)  |  Wonderful (58)

He who would know what geometry is, must venture boldly into its depths and learn to think and feel as a geometer. I believe that it is impossible to do this, and to study geometry as it admits of being studied and am conscious it can be taught, without finding the reason invigorated, the invention quickened, the sentiment of the orderly and beautiful awakened and enhanced, and reverence for truth, the foundation of all integrity of character, converted into a fixed principle of the mental and moral constitution, according to the old and expressive adage “abeunt studia in mores”.
In 'A probationary Lecture on Geometry, in Collected Mathematical Papers (1908), Vol. 2, 9. [The Latin phrase, “abeunt studia in mores” translates as “studies pass on into character”. —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Adage (3)  |  Admit (44)  |  Awaken (15)  |  Beautiful (137)  |  Belief (500)  |  Boldly (5)  |  Character (113)  |  Conscious (40)  |  Constitution (31)  |  Convert (22)  |  Depth (49)  |  Enhance (8)  |  Expressive (2)  |  Feel (164)  |  Find (400)  |  Foundation (105)  |  Geometer (21)  |  Geometry (213)  |  Impossible (106)  |  Integrity (13)  |  Invention (316)  |  Invigorate (3)  |  Know (536)  |  Learn (277)  |  Mental (77)  |  Moral (121)  |  Old (143)  |  Orderly (13)  |  Principle (279)  |  Quicken (7)  |  Reason (449)  |  Reverence (28)  |  Sentiment (13)  |  Study (456)  |  Teach (177)  |  Think (338)  |  Truth (901)  |  Value Of Mathematics (51)  |  Venture (18)

If you look at a tree and think of it as a design assignment, it would be like asking you to make something that makes oxygen, sequesters carbon, fixes nitrogen, distills water, provides habitat for hundreds of species, accrues solar energy’s fuel, makes complex sugars and food, changes colors with the seasons, creates microclimates, and self-replicates.
In audio segment, 'William McDonough: Godfather of Green', WNYC, Studio 360 broadcast on NPR radio (18 Mar 2008) and archived on the station website.
Science quotes on:  |  Accrue (3)  |  Assignment (10)  |  Carbon (49)  |  Change (358)  |  Chemical Engineering (4)  |  Color (98)  |  Complex (94)  |  Creation (239)  |  Design (110)  |  Distillation (9)  |  Food (150)  |  Fuel (31)  |  Habitat (14)  |  Nitrogen (19)  |  Oxygen (54)  |  Season (26)  |  Solar Energy (17)  |  Sugar (14)  |  Tree (169)  |  Water (289)

In India we have clear evidence that administrative statistics had reached a high state of organization before 300 B.C. In the Arthasastra of Kautilya … the duties of the Gopa, the village accountant, [include] “by setting up boundaries to villages, by numbering plots of grounds as cultivated, uncultivated, plains, wet lands, gardens, vegetable gardens, fences (váta), forests altars, temples of gods, irrigation works, cremation grounds, feeding houses (sattra), places where water is freely supplied to travellers (prapá), places of pilgrimage, pasture grounds and roads, and thereby fixing the boundaries of various villages, of fields, of forests, and of roads, he shall register gifts, sales, charities, and remission of taxes regarding fields.”
Editorial, introducing the new statistics journal of the Indian Statistical Institute, Sankhayā (1933), 1, No. 1. Also reprinted in Sankhyā: The Indian Journal of Statistics (Feb 2003), 65, No. 1, viii.
Science quotes on:  |  Accountant (3)  |  Administration (11)  |  Altar (7)  |  Boundary (38)  |  Charity (9)  |  Clear (96)  |  Cremation (2)  |  Cultivated (7)  |  Duty (67)  |  Evidence (179)  |  Fence (9)  |  Field (170)  |  Forest (104)  |  Garden (33)  |  Gift (60)  |  God (528)  |  Ground (88)  |  India (16)  |  Irrigation (10)  |  Land (115)  |  Number (275)  |  Organization (84)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Pilgrimage (2)  |  Place (171)  |  Plain (31)  |  Plot (10)  |  Register (10)  |  Remission (3)  |  Road (62)  |  Sale (3)  |  Statistics (147)  |  Tax (21)  |  Temple (25)  |  Traveler (26)  |  Uncultivated (2)  |  Various (46)  |  Vegetable (22)  |  Village (7)  |  Water (289)  |  Wet (6)

It is curious to observe how differently these great men [Plato and Bacon] estimated the value of every kind of knowledge. Take Arithmetic for example. Plato, after speaking slightly of the convenience of being able to reckon and compute in the ordinary transactions of life, passes to what he considers as a far more important advantage. The study of the properties of numbers, he tells us, habituates the mind to the contemplation of pure truth, and raises us above the material universe. He would have his disciples apply themselves to this study, not that they may be able to buy or sell, not that they may qualify themselves to be shop-keepers or travelling merchants, but that they may learn to withdraw their minds from the ever-shifting spectacle of this visible and tangible world, and to fix them on the immutable essences of things.
Bacon, on the other hand, valued this branch of knowledge only on account of its uses with reference to that visible and tangible world which Plato so much despised. He speaks with scorn of the mystical arithmetic of the later Platonists, and laments the propensity of mankind to employ, on mere matters of curiosity, powers the whole exertion of which is required for purposes of solid advantage. He advises arithmeticians to leave these trifles, and employ themselves in framing convenient expressions which may be of use in physical researches.
In 'Lord Bacon', Edinburgh Review (Jul 1837). Collected in Critical and Miscellaneous Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review (1857), Vol. 1, 394.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (67)  |  Advantage (73)  |  Advise (7)  |  Apply (71)  |  Arithmetic (114)  |  Arithmetician (3)  |  Bacon (4)  |  Branch (100)  |  Buy (18)  |  Compute (18)  |  Consider (79)  |  Contemplation (51)  |  Convenience (32)  |  Curiosity (105)  |  Curious (41)  |  Despise (12)  |  Different (176)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Employ (35)  |  Essence (52)  |  Estimate (28)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (29)  |  Example (92)  |  Exertion (12)  |  Expression (103)  |  Frame (25)  |  Great (517)  |  Habituate (3)  |  Immutable (13)  |  Important (200)  |  Kind (137)  |  Knowledge (1275)  |  Lament (9)  |  Late (50)  |  Learn (277)  |  Leave (126)  |  Life (1113)  |  Mankind (238)  |  Material (153)  |  Matter (336)  |  Merchant (6)  |  Mere (74)  |  Mind (733)  |  Mystical (9)  |  Number (275)  |  Observe (75)  |  On The Other Hand (32)  |  Ordinary (67)  |  Pass (90)  |  Physical (127)  |  Plato (73)  |  Platonist (2)  |  Power (355)  |  Propensity (8)  |  Property (122)  |  Pure (97)  |  Purpose (188)  |  Raise (34)  |  Reckon (14)  |  Reference (32)  |  Require (78)  |  Research (583)  |  Scorn (7)  |  Sell (13)  |  Shifting (5)  |  Solid (50)  |  Speak (87)  |  Spectacle (14)  |  Study (456)  |  Tangible (8)  |  Transaction (6)  |  Travel (61)  |  Trifle (12)  |  Truth (901)  |  Universe (678)  |  Value (234)  |  Visible (37)  |  Whole (186)  |  Withdraw (9)  |  World (877)

It is this mythical, or rather this symbolic, content of the religious traditions which is likely to come into conflict with science. This occurs whenever this religious stock of ideas contains dogmatically fixed statements on subjects which be long in the domain of science. Thus, it is of vital importance for the preservation of true religion that such conflicts be avoided when they arise from subjects which, in fact, are not really essential for the pursuance of the religious aims.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Aim (85)  |  Arise (47)  |  Avoid (50)  |  Conflict (54)  |  Contain (67)  |  Content (62)  |  Domain (39)  |  Essential (114)  |  Fact (717)  |  Idea (573)  |  Importance (213)  |  Likely (33)  |  Long (167)  |  Mythical (3)  |  Occur (43)  |  Preservation (32)  |  Really (78)  |  Religion (235)  |  Religious (49)  |  Science (2017)  |  Statement (71)  |  Stock (7)  |  Subject (231)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Tradition (49)  |  True (192)  |  Vital (38)  |  Whenever (9)

It was found after many troublesome experiments that when the vacuum within the lamp globe was good, and the contact between the carbon and the conductor which supported it sufficient, there was no blackening of the globes, and no appreciable wasting away of the carbons. Thus was swept away a pernicious error, which, like a misleading finger post proclaiming “No road this way,” tended to bar progress along a good thoroughfare. It only remained to perfect the details of the lamp, to find the best material from which to form the carbon, and to fix this material in the lamp in the best manner. These points, I think, I have now satisfactorily settled, and you see the result in the lamp before me on the table.
In Lecture (20 Oct 1880) at Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, as quoted in United States Courts of Appeals Reports: Cases Adjudged in the United States Circuit Court of Appeals (1894), Vol. 11, 419-420.
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciable (2)  |  Bar (8)  |  Carbon (49)  |  Conductor (9)  |  Contact (33)  |  Detail (84)  |  Error (272)  |  Experiment (596)  |  Find (400)  |  Form (305)  |  Globe (47)  |  Lamp (16)  |  Manner (56)  |  Material (153)  |  Misleading (15)  |  Perfect (80)  |  Pernicious (3)  |  Progress (360)  |  Result (361)  |  Satisfactory (16)  |  See (368)  |  Settle (18)  |  Signpost (3)  |  Support (77)  |  Table (35)  |  Thoroughfare (2)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  Vacuum (33)

Nothing afflicted Marcellus so much as the death of Archimedes, who was then, as fate would have it, intent upon working out some problem by a diagram, and having fixed his mind alike and his eyes upon the subject of his speculation, he never noticed the incursion of the Romans, nor that the city was taken. In this transport of study and contemplation, a soldier, unexpectedly coming up to him, commanded him to follow to Marcellus, which he declined to do before he had worked out his problem to a demonstration; the soldier, enraged, drew his sword and ran him through. Others write, that a Roman soldier, running upon him with a drawn sword, offered to kill him; and that Archimedes, looking back, earnestly besought him to hold his hand a little while, that he might not leave what he was at work upon inconclusive and imperfect; but the soldier, nothing moved by his entreaty, instantly killed him. Others again relate, that as Archimedes was carrying to Marcellus mathematical instruments, dials, spheres, and angles, by which the magnitude of the sun might be measured to the sight, some soldiers seeing him, and thinking that he carried gold in a vessel, slew him. Certain it is, that his death was very afflicting to Marcellus; and that Marcellus ever after regarded him that killed him as a murderer; and that he sought for his kindred and honoured them with signal favours.
Plutarch
In John Dryden (trans.), Life of Marcellus.
Science quotes on:  |  Afflict (4)  |  Alike (22)  |  Angle (19)  |  Archimedes (52)  |  Back (103)  |  Beseech (2)  |  Carry (58)  |  Certain (121)  |  City (47)  |  Command (26)  |  Contemplation (51)  |  Death (297)  |  Decline (17)  |  Demonstration (81)  |  Diagram (13)  |  Dial (4)  |  Draw (53)  |  Earnestly (4)  |  Eye (215)  |  Fate (46)  |  Favor (30)  |  Follow (121)  |  Gold (68)  |  Hand (140)  |  Hold (90)  |  Honour (25)  |  Imperfect (18)  |  Inconclusive (3)  |  Incursion (2)  |  Instantly (5)  |  Instrument (90)  |  Intent (8)  |  Kill (51)  |  Kindred (6)  |  Leave (126)  |  Little (182)  |  Magnitude (41)  |  Marcellus (2)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (120)  |  Mathematics (1130)  |  Measure (100)  |  Mind (733)  |  Move (92)  |  Murderer (3)  |  Nothing (376)  |  Notice (34)  |  Offer (40)  |  Problem (483)  |  Regard (91)  |  Relate (19)  |  Roman (26)  |  Run (56)  |  See (368)  |  Seek (101)  |  Sight (46)  |  Signal (18)  |  Soldier (15)  |  Speculation (102)  |  Sphere (56)  |  Study (456)  |  Subject (231)  |  Sun (276)  |  Sword (15)  |  Think (338)  |  Transport (15)  |  Unexpected (35)  |  Vessel (28)  |  Work (615)  |  Write (150)

Obstacles cannot crush me. Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Change (358)  |  Crush (7)  |  Mind (733)  |  Obstacle (31)  |  Resolve (19)  |  Star (335)  |  Stern (3)  |  Yield (35)

Quantity is that which is operated with according to fixed mutually consistent laws. Both operator and operand must derive their meaning from the laws of operation. In the case of ordinary algebra these are the three laws already indicated [the commutative, associative, and distributive laws], in the algebra of quaternions the same save the law of commutation for multiplication and division, and so on. It may be questioned whether this definition is sufficient, and it may be objected that it is vague; but the reader will do well to reflect that any definition must include the linear algebras of Peirce, the algebra of logic, and others that may be easily imagined, although they have not yet been developed. This general definition of quantity enables us to see how operators may be treated as quantities, and thus to understand the rationale of the so called symbolical methods.
In 'Mathematics', Encyclopedia Britannica (9th ed.).
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  Algebra (92)  |  Consistent (17)  |  Definition (190)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (31)  |  Derive (33)  |  Distributive (2)  |  Division (33)  |  Include (39)  |  Law (511)  |  Linear (4)  |  Logic (244)  |  Meaning (110)  |  Method (225)  |  Multiplication (22)  |  Mutually (7)  |  Operate (17)  |  Operation (118)  |  Operator (3)  |  Charles Sanders Peirce (22)  |  Quantity (64)  |  Quaternion (7)  |  Question (399)  |  Reader (37)  |  Reflect (31)  |  Vague (25)

Strive for design simplicity. You never have to fix anything you leave out.
In J.S. "Torch" Lewis, 'Lear the Legend', Aviation Week & Space Technology (2 Jul 2001), 155 Supplement, No 1, 116.
Science quotes on:  |  Design (110)  |  Leave (126)  |  Simplicity (145)  |  Striving (2)

The overwhelming astonishment, the queerest structure we know about so far in the whole universe, the greatest of all cosmological scientific puzzles, confounding all our efforts to comprehend it, is the earth. We are only now beginning to appreciate how strange and splendid it is, how it catches the breath, the loveliest object afloat around the sun, enclosed in its own blue bubble of atmosphere, manufacturing and breathing its own oxygen, fixing its own nitrogen from the air into its own soil, generating its own weather at the surface of its rain forests, constructing its own carapace from living parts: chalk cliffs, coral reefs, old fossils from earlier forms of life now covered by layers of new life meshed together around the globe, Troy upon Troy.
In Late Night Thoughts on Listening to Mahler’s Ninth Symphony (1984), 22-23.
Science quotes on:  |  Afloat (4)  |  Air (187)  |  Appreciate (28)  |  Astonish (6)  |  Atmosphere (78)  |  Blue (56)  |  Breath (32)  |  Breathe (36)  |  Bubble (15)  |  Catch (30)  |  Chalk (6)  |  Cliff (11)  |  Comprehend (38)  |  Confound (14)  |  Construct (40)  |  Coral Reef (8)  |  Cosmos (52)  |  Cover (37)  |  Early (60)  |  Earth (632)  |  Effort (143)  |  Enclose (2)  |  Form (305)  |  Fossil (111)  |  Generate (14)  |  Geology (199)  |  Globe (47)  |  Know (536)  |  Layer (22)  |  Life (1113)  |  Lovely (10)  |  Manufacturing (22)  |  Mesh (2)  |  Meteorology (31)  |  New (477)  |  Nitrogen (19)  |  Object (167)  |  Overwhelm (5)  |  Oxygen (54)  |  Part (216)  |  Puzzle (35)  |  Queer (7)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Scientific (230)  |  Soil (62)  |  Splendid (12)  |  Strange (89)  |  Structure (219)  |  Sun (276)  |  Surface (100)  |  Troy (3)  |  Universe (678)  |  Weather (32)

There is no area in our minds reserved for superstition, such as the Greeks had in their mythology; and superstition, under cover of an abstract vocabulary, has revenged itself by invading the entire realm of thought. Our science is like a store filled with the most subtle intellectual devices for solving the most complex problems, and yet we are almost incapable of applying the elementary principles of rational thought. In every sphere, we seem to have lost the very elements of intelligence: the ideas of limit, measure, degree, proportion, relation, comparison, contingency, interdependence, interrelation of means and ends. To keep to the social level, our political universe is peopled exclusively by myths and monsters; all it contains is absolutes and abstract entities. This is illustrated by all the words of our political and social vocabulary: nation, security, capitalism, communism, fascism, order, authority, property, democracy. We never use them in phrases such as: There is democracy to the extent that... or: There is capitalism in so far as... The use of expressions like “to the extent that” is beyond our intellectual capacity. Each of these words seems to represent for us an absolute reality, unaffected by conditions, or an absolute objective, independent of methods of action, or an absolute evil; and at the same time we make all these words mean, successively or simultaneously, anything whatsoever. Our lives are lived, in actual fact, among changing, varying realities, subject to the casual play of external necessities, and modifying themselves according to specific conditions within specific limits; and yet we act and strive and sacrifice ourselves and others by reference to fixed and isolated abstractions which cannot possibly be related either to one another or to any concrete facts. In this so-called age of technicians, the only battles we know how to fight are battles against windmills. [p.222]
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (96)  |  Abstract (79)  |  Abstraction (38)  |  Accord (36)  |  Act (113)  |  Action (184)  |  Actual (47)  |  Age (174)  |  Apply (71)  |  Area (29)  |  Authority (63)  |  Battle (34)  |  Beyond (104)  |  Capacity (62)  |  Capitalism (7)  |  Casual (7)  |  Change (358)  |  Communism (10)  |  Comparison (61)  |  Complex (94)  |  Concrete (31)  |  Condition (157)  |  Contain (67)  |  Contingency (11)  |  Cover (37)  |  Degree (79)  |  Democracy (26)  |  Device (28)  |  Element (162)  |  Elementary (45)  |  End (194)  |  Entire (46)  |  Entity (30)  |  Evil (78)  |  Exclusively (10)  |  Expression (103)  |  Extent (49)  |  External (52)  |  Fact (717)  |  Far (154)  |  Fascism (3)  |  Fight (43)  |  Fill (58)  |  Greek (69)  |  Idea (573)  |  Illustrate (9)  |  Incapable (17)  |  Independent (65)  |  Intellectual (116)  |  Intelligence (164)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Interrelation (7)  |  Invade (5)  |  Isolate (20)  |  Keep (97)  |  Know (536)  |  Level (66)  |  Limit (121)  |  Live (266)  |  Lose (91)  |  Mean (101)  |  Means (167)  |  Measure (100)  |  Method (225)  |  Mind (733)  |  Modify (15)  |  Monster (24)  |  Myth (48)  |  Mythology (13)  |  Nation (132)  |  Necessity (141)  |  Objective (60)  |  Order (238)  |  Ourselves (51)  |  P (2)  |  People (382)  |  Phrase (25)  |  Play (109)  |  Political (36)  |  Possibly (19)  |  Principle (279)  |  Problem (483)  |  Property (122)  |  Proportion (70)  |  Rational (54)  |  Reality (184)  |  Realm (54)  |  Reference (32)  |  Relate (19)  |  Relation (146)  |  Represent (41)  |  Reserve (15)  |  Revenge (7)  |  Sacrifice (32)  |  Same (154)  |  Science (2017)  |  Security (33)  |  Seem (140)  |  Simultaneous (17)  |  So-Called (21)  |  Social (107)  |  Solve (74)  |  Specific (35)  |  Sphere (56)  |  Store (19)  |  Strive (41)  |  Subject (231)  |  Subtle (33)  |  Superstition (56)  |  Technician (7)  |  Themselves (44)  |  Thought (531)  |  Time (586)  |  Unaffected (4)  |  Universe (678)  |  Vary (24)  |  Vocabulary (5)  |  Whatsoever (9)  |  Windmill (4)  |  Word (296)

Time is a fixed income and, as with any income, the real problem facing most of us is how to live successfully within our daily allotment.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Daily (28)  |  Face (108)  |  Income (10)  |  Live (266)  |  Problem (483)  |  Real (144)  |  Successfully (5)  |  Time (586)

To have a railroad, there must have been first the discoverers, who found out the properties of wood and iron, fire and water, and their latent power to carry men over the earth; next the organizers, who put these elements together, surveyed the route, planned the structure, set men to grade the hill, to fill the valley, and pave the road with iron bars; and then the administrators, who after all that is done, procure the engines, engineers, conductors, ticket-distributors, and the rest of the “hands;” they buy the coal and see it is not wasted, fix the rates of fare, calculate the savings, and distribute the dividends. The discoverers and organizers often fare hard in the world, lean men, ill-clad and suspected, often laughed at, while the administrator is thought the greater man, because he rides over their graves and pays the dividends, where the organizer only called for the assessments, and the discoverer told what men called a dream. What happens in a railroad happens also in a Church, or a State.
Address at the Melodeon, Boston (5 Mar 1848), 'A Discourse occasioned by the Death of John Quincy Adams'. Collected in Discourses of Politics: The Collected Works of Theodore Parker: Part 4 (1863), 139. Note: Ralph Waldo Emerson earlier used the phrase “pave the road with iron bars,” in Nature (1836), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Administrator (10)  |  Assessment (2)  |  Bar (8)  |  Buy (18)  |  Calculate (31)  |  Church (34)  |  Coal (45)  |  Conductor (9)  |  Discoverer (15)  |  Distribute (9)  |  Dividend (3)  |  Dream (162)  |  Element (162)  |  Engine (29)  |  Engineer (93)  |  Fare (5)  |  Fill (58)  |  Fire (132)  |  Grade (11)  |  Grave (26)  |  Hand (140)  |  Hill (20)  |  Iron (64)  |  Latent (12)  |  Pave (4)  |  Pay (42)  |  Plan (87)  |  Power (355)  |  Procure (5)  |  Property (122)  |  Railroad (27)  |  Rate (29)  |  Road (62)  |  Route (15)  |  Saving (20)  |  State (132)  |  Structure (219)  |  Survey (20)  |  Tell (108)  |  Ticket (5)  |  Valley (21)  |  Waste (64)  |  Water (289)  |  Wood (49)

We find that whole communities suddenly fix their minds upon one object, and go mad in its pursuit; that millions of people become simultaneously impressed with one delusion, and run after it, till their attention is caught by some new folly more captivating than the first.
From Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions (1841), Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Attention (113)  |  Become (173)  |  Captivate (3)  |  Catch (30)  |  Community (81)  |  Delusion (21)  |  First (306)  |  Folly (32)  |  Impressed (15)  |  Mad (24)  |  Million (108)  |  Mind (733)  |  New (477)  |  Object (167)  |  People (382)  |  Pursuit (76)  |  Run (56)  |  Simultaneous (17)  |  Sudden (32)

We pass with admiration along the great series of mathematicians, by whom the science of theoretical mechanics has been cultivated, from the time of Newton to our own. There is no group of men of science whose fame is higher or brighter. The great discoveries of Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, had fixed all eyes on those portions of human knowledge on which their successors employed their labors. The certainty belonging to this line of speculation seemed to elevate mathematicians above the students of other subjects; and the beauty of mathematical relations and the subtlety of intellect which may be shown in dealing with them, were fitted to win unbounded applause. The successors of Newton and the Bernoullis, as Euler, Clairaut, D’Alembert, Lagrange, Laplace, not to introduce living names, have been some of the most remarkable men of talent which the world has seen.
In History of the Inductive Sciences, Vol. 1, Bk. 4, chap. 6, sect. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (43)  |  Applause (9)  |  Beauty (236)  |  Belong (53)  |  Jacob Bernoulli (5)  |  Bright (42)  |  Certainty (128)  |  Alexis Claude Clairaut (2)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Jean le Rond D’Alembert (10)  |  Deal (47)  |  Discovery (675)  |  Elevate (11)  |  Employ (35)  |  Leonhard Euler (33)  |  Eye (215)  |  Fame (37)  |  Fit (46)  |  Galileo Galilei (121)  |  Great (517)  |  Group (72)  |  High (150)  |  Human (544)  |  Intellect (187)  |  Introduce (41)  |  Knowledge (1275)  |  Labor (68)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (24)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (61)  |  Line (88)  |  Live (266)  |  Mathematician (361)  |  Mathematics (1130)  |  Mechanic (22)  |  Men Of Science (130)  |  Name (164)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (327)  |  Pass (90)  |  Portion (24)  |  Relation (146)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Science (2017)  |  See (368)  |  Seem (140)  |  Series (50)  |  Show (90)  |  Speculation (102)  |  Student (198)  |  Subject (231)  |  Subtlety (11)  |  Successor (9)  |  Talent (61)  |  Theoretical (19)  |  Time (586)  |  Unbounded (5)  |  Win (35)  |  World (877)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.