Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “I have no satisfaction in formulas unless I feel their arithmetical magnitude.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index S > Category: Secret

Secret Quotes (194 quotes)

... all the great scientists have one thing in common: each snatched from the subtle motions of nature one irrevocable secret; each caught one feather of the plumage of the Great White Bird that symbolizes everlasting truth.
With co-author Justus J. Schifferes, in The Autobiography of Science (1945).
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Common (436)  |  Great (1574)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Snatch (13)  |  Symbolize (8)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Truth (1057)  |  White (127)

La nature veut que dans certains temps les hommes se succèdent les uns aux autres par le moyen de la mort; il leur est permis de se défendre contr’elle jusqu’à un certain point; mais passé cela, on aura beau faire de nouvelles découvertes dans l’Anatomie, on aura beau pénétrer de plus en plus dans les secrets de la structure du corps humain, on ne prendra point la Nature pour dupe, on mourra comme à l’ordinaire.
Nature intends that at fixed periods men should succeed each other by the instrumentality of death. They are allowed to keep it at bay up to a certain point; but when that is passed, it will be of no use to make new discoveries in anatomy, or to penetrate more and more into the secrets of the structure of the human body; we shall never outwit nature, we shall die as usual.
In 'Dialogue 5: Dialogues De Morts Anciens', Nouveaux Dialogues des Morts (2nd Ed., 1683), Vol. 1, 154-155. As translated in Craufurd Tait Ramage, Beautiful Thoughts from French and Italian Authors (1866), 113.
Science quotes on:  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Body (537)  |  Certain (550)  |  Death (388)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Dupe (5)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Intend (16)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outwit (6)  |  Pass (238)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Period (198)  |  Plus (43)  |  Point (580)  |  Structure (344)  |  Succeed (109)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)

Question: If you were to pour a pound of molten lead and a pound of molten iron, each at the temperature of its melting point, upon two blocks of ice, which would melt the most ice, and why?
Answer: This question relates to diathermancy. Iron is said to be a diathermanous body (from dia, through, and thermo, I heat), meaning that it gets heated through and through, and accordingly contains a large quantity of real heat. Lead is said to be an athermanous body (from a, privative, and thermo, I heat), meaning that it gets heated secretly or in a latent manner. Hence the answer to this question depends on which will get the best of it, the real heat of the iron or the latent heat of the lead. Probably the iron will smite furthest into the ice, as molten iron is white and glowing, while melted lead is dull.
Genuine student answer* to an Acoustics, Light and Heat paper (1880), Science and Art Department, South Kensington, London, collected by Prof. Oliver Lodge. Quoted in Henry B. Wheatley, Literary Blunders (1893), 180-1, Question 14. (*From a collection in which Answers are not given verbatim et literatim, and some instances may combine several students' blunders.)
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Best (459)  |  Block (12)  |  Body (537)  |  Depend (228)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Dull (54)  |  Examination (98)  |  Heat (174)  |  Howler (15)  |  Ice (54)  |  Iron (96)  |  Large (394)  |  Latent (12)  |  Latent Heat (7)  |  Lead (384)  |  Manner (58)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Melting Point (3)  |  Molten (2)  |  Most (1731)  |  Point (580)  |  Pound (14)  |  Pour (10)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Question (621)  |  Smite (4)  |  Temperature (79)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  White (127)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)

A scientist who would know the laws of nature must sit passively before nature. He may not dictate to nature its laws, nor may he impose his own intelligence upon nature; rather, the more passive he is before nature, the more nature will reveal its secrets.
In The World's First Love (1952, 2010), 107.
Science quotes on:  |  Dictate (11)  |  Impose (22)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Passive (7)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Will (2355)

A weird happening has occurred in the case of a lansquenet named Daniel Burghammer, of the squadron of Captain Burkhard Laymann Zu Liebenau, of the honorable Madrucci Regiment in Piadena, in Italy. When the same was on the point of going to bed one night he complained to his wife, to whom he had been married by the Church seven years ago, that he had great pains in his belly and felt something stirring therein. An hour thereafter he gave birth to a child, a girl. When his wife was made aware of this, she notified the occurrence at once. Thereupon he was examined and questioned. … He confessed on the spot that he was half man and half woman and that for more than seven years he had served as a soldier in Hungary and the Netherlands… . When he was born he was christened as a boy and given in baptism the name of Daniel… . He also stated that while in the Netherlands he only slept once with a Spaniard, and he became pregnant therefrom. This, however, he kept a secret unto himself and also from his wife, with whom he had for seven years lived in wedlock, but he had never been able to get her with child… . The aforesaid soldier is able to suckle the child with his right breast only and not at all on the left side, where he is a man. He has also the natural organs of a man for passing water. Both are well, the child is beautiful, and many towns have already wished to adopt it, which, however, has not as yet been arranged. All this has been set down and described by notaries. It is considered in Italy to be a great miracle, and is to be recorded in the chronicles. The couple, however, are to be divorced by the clergy.
Anonymous
'From Piadena in Italy, the 26th day of May 1601'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) The Fugger Newsletter (1970), 247-248. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg. This was footnoted in The Story of the Secret Service (1937), 698. https://books.google.com/books?id=YfssAAAAMAAJ Richard Wilmer Rowan - 1937
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Birth (147)  |  Both (493)  |  Boy (94)  |  Captain (14)  |  Child (307)  |  Church (56)  |  Confess (42)  |  Consider (416)  |  Divorce (6)  |  Down (456)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happening (58)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honorable (14)  |  Hour (186)  |  Hungary (3)  |  Man (2251)  |  Miracle (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Name (333)  |  Natural (796)  |  Never (1087)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Organ (115)  |  Pain (136)  |  Passing (76)  |  Point (580)  |  Question (621)  |  Record (154)  |  Reproduction (72)  |  Right (452)  |  Set (394)  |  Side (233)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Something (719)  |  Water (481)  |  Wife (41)  |  Wish (212)  |  Woman (151)  |  Year (933)

A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.
In A Tale of Two Cities, originally serialized in 31 weekly parts in All the Year Round. This quote is from Chapter III, which appeared in Vol. 1. No. 1 (30 Apr 1859).
Science quotes on:  |  Constituted (5)  |  Creature (233)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Human (1468)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Other (2236)  |  Profound (104)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Wonderful (149)

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience.
In 'Education', The Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Vol X: Lectures and Biographical Sketches (1883), 152.
Science quotes on:  |  Adopt (19)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pace (14)  |  Patience (56)

Alchemy. The link between the immemorial magic arts and modern science. Humankind’s first systematic effort to unlock the secrets of matter by reproducible experiment.
In Good Words to You (1987), 6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Effort (227)  |  Experiment (695)  |  First (1283)  |  Humankind (11)  |  Link (43)  |  Magic (86)  |  Matter (798)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Reproducible (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Systematic (57)  |  Unlock (10)

All cell biologists are condemned to suffer an incurable secret sorrow: the size of the objects of their passion. … But those of us enamored of the cell must resign ourselves to the perverse, lonely fascination of a human being for things invisible to the naked human eye.
Opening sentence from The Center of Life: A Natural History of the Cell (1977, 1978), 5.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biologist (69)  |  Cell (138)  |  Condemn (44)  |  Condemned (5)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Incurable (10)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Lonely (24)  |  Must (1526)  |  Naked Eye (12)  |  Object (422)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Passion (114)  |  Size (60)  |  Sorrow (17)  |  Suffer (41)  |  Thing (1915)

All science, even the divine science, is a sublime detective story. Only it is not set to detect why a man is dead; but the darker secret of why he is alive.
From 'What Do They Think', The Thing: Why I Am Catholic (1929), 78. In Collected Works (1990), Vol. 3, 191.
Science quotes on:  |  Alive (90)  |  All (4108)  |  Dead (59)  |  Detect (44)  |  Detective (10)  |  Divine (112)  |  Man (2251)  |  Science (3879)  |  Set (394)  |  Story (118)  |  Sublime (46)  |  Why (491)

Although we are mere sojourners on the surface of the planet, chained to a mere point in space, enduring but for a moment of time, the human mind is not only enabled to number worlds beyond the unassisted ken of mortal eye, but to trace the events of indefinite ages before the creation of our race, and is not even withheld from penetrating into the dark secrets of the ocean, or the interior of the solid globe; free, like the spirit which the poet described as animating the universe.
In Principles of Geology (1830).
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Creation (327)  |  Dark (140)  |  Event (216)  |  Eye (419)  |  Free (232)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Indefinite (20)  |  Interior (32)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  Mortal (54)  |  Number (699)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Planet (356)  |  Point (580)  |  Race (268)  |  Solid (116)  |  Space (500)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Surface (209)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Universe (857)  |  World (1774)

Any physician who advertises a positive cure for any disease, who issues nostrum testimonials, who sells his services to a secret remedy, or who diagnoses and treats by mail patients he has never seen, is a quack.
'The Sure-Cure School,' Collier’s Weekly (14 Jul 1906). Reprinted in The Great American Fraud (1907), 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Advertising (9)  |  Cure (122)  |  Disease (328)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Never (1087)  |  Patient (199)  |  Physician (273)  |  Positive (94)  |  Quack (18)  |  Remedy (62)  |  Service (110)

As great Pythagoras of yore,
Standing beside the blacksmith’s door,
And hearing the hammers, as they smote
The anvils with a different note,
Stole from the varying tones, that hung
Vibrant on every iron tongue,
The secret of the sounding wire.
And formed the seven-chorded lyre.
From poem 'Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie' (1847), as collected in The Poetical Works of H.W. Longfellow (1855), 132.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anvil (3)  |  Blacksmith (5)  |  Chord (4)  |  Different (577)  |  Door (93)  |  Form (959)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hammer (25)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Iron (96)  |  Note (34)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Sound (183)  |  Standing (11)  |  Tone (22)  |  Tongue (43)  |  Vibrant (2)  |  Wire (35)

As to how far in advance of the first flight the man should know he’s going. I’m not in agreement with the argument that says word should be delayed until the last possible moment to save the pilot from developing a bad case of the jitters. If we don’t have the confidence to keep from getting clutched at that time, we have no business going at all. If I’m the guy going, I’ll be glad to get the dope as soon as possible. As for keeping this a big secret from us and having us all suited up and then saying to one man “you go” and stuffing him in and putting the lid on that thing and away he goes, well, we’re all big boys now.
As he wrote in an article for Life (14 Sep 1959), 38. In fact, he was the first to fly in Earth orbit on 20 Feb 1962, though Alan Shepard was picked for the earlier first suborbital flight.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Argument (138)  |  Bad (180)  |  Big (48)  |  Boy (94)  |  Business (149)  |  Case (99)  |  Clutch (2)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Delay (20)  |  Develop (268)  |  Dope (3)  |  First (1283)  |  Flight (98)  |  Glad (7)  |  Go (6)  |  Going (6)  |  Keep (101)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Moment (253)  |  Pilot (13)  |  Possible (552)  |  Save (118)  |  Say (984)  |  Soon (186)  |  Stuff (21)  |  Suit (11)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Word (619)

As we push ever more deeply into the universe, probing its secrets, discovering its way, we must also constantly try to learn to cooperate across the frontiers that really divide earth’s surface.
In 'The President’s News Conference at the LBJ Ranch' (29 Aug 1965). Collected in Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Lyndon B. Johnson: 1965 (1966), 945.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Cooperate (4)  |  Discover (553)  |  Divide (75)  |  Earth (996)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Learn (629)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Probe (12)  |  Push (62)  |  Really (78)  |  Surface (209)  |  Try (283)  |  Universe (857)  |  Way (1217)

At lunch Francis [Crick] winged into the Eagle to tell everyone within hearing distance that we had found the secret of life.
Purported remark made at The Eagle pub (28 Feb 1953), near the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, to celebrate the fact that they, Crick and Watson, had unravelled the structure of DNA. Stated by James Watson in The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA (1968, 1998), 197. However Francis Crick, in What Mad Pursuit (1990), 77, writes that was “according to Jim,” but “of that I have no recollection.” Nevertheless, some quote collections report this incident with a direct quote as “We have discovered the secret of life!”
Science quotes on:  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Biology (216)  |  Francis Crick (62)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distance (161)  |  DNA (77)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Hearing (49)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Tell (340)  |  Wing (75)

Books have always a secret influence on the understanding; we cannot at pleasure obliterate ideas; he that reads books of science, thogh without any fixed desire of improvement, will grow more knowing…
In Samuel Johnson and W. Jackson Bate (Ed.), ',The Adventurer, No. 137, Tuesday, 26 Febraury 1754.' The Selected Essays from the Rambler, Adventurer, and Idler (1968), 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  Desire (204)  |  Grow (238)  |  Idea (843)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Influence (222)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  More (2559)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Read (287)  |  Science (3879)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Will (2355)

But why, it has been asked, did you go there [the Antarctic]? Of what use to civilization can this lifeless continent be? ... [Earlier] expeditions contributed something to the accumulating knowledge of the Antarctic ... that helps us thrust back further the physical and spiritual shadows enfolding our terrestrial existence. Is it not true that one of the strongest and most continuously sustained impulses working in civilization is that which leads to discovery? As long as any part of the world remains obscure, the curiosity of man must draw him there, as the lodestone draws the mariner's needle, until he comprehends its secret.
In 'Hoover Presents Special Medal to Byrd...', New York Times (21 Jun 1930), 1.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accumulation (50)  |  Antarctic (6)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Back (390)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Continent (76)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Draw (137)  |  Existence (456)  |  Expedition (8)  |  Going (6)  |  Impulse (48)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lifeless (14)  |  Lodestone (7)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mariner (11)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Physical (508)  |  Remain (349)  |  Shadow (72)  |  Something (719)  |  Spiritual (91)  |  Strongest (38)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Use (766)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

By God’s mercy British and American science outpaced all German efforts. … This revelation of the secrets of nature, long mercifully withheld from man, should arouse the most solemn reflections in the mind and conscience of every human being capable of comprehension. We must indeed pray that these awful agencies will be made to conduce to peace among the nations, and that instead of wreaking measureless havoc upon the entire globe, may become a perennial fountain of world prosperity.
[Concerning use of the atomic bomb.]
Statement drafted by Churchill following the use of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. Due to the change in government, the statement was released by Clement Attlee (6 Aug 1945). In Sir Winston Churchill, Victory: War Speeches by the Right Hon. Winston Churchill (1946), 289.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Agency (14)  |  All (4108)  |  Arousal (2)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Awful (8)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  British (41)  |  Capability (41)  |  Capable (168)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Conduce (2)  |  Conscience (50)  |  Effort (227)  |  Fountain (16)  |  German (36)  |  Globe (47)  |  God (757)  |  Havoc (7)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mercy (11)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Peace (108)  |  Perennial (9)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Prosperity (21)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solemn (20)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

Coal … We may well call it black diamonds. Every basket is power and civilization; for coal is a portable climate. … Watt and Stephenson whispered in the ear of mankind their secret, that a half-ounce of coal will draw two tons a mile, and coal carries coal, by rail and by boat, to make Canada as warm as Calcutta, and with its comforts bring its industrial power.
In chapter 3, 'Wealth', The Conduct of Life (1860), collected in Emerson’s Complete Works (1892), Vol. 6, 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Basket (7)  |  Black (42)  |  Boat (16)  |  Bringing (10)  |  Call (769)  |  Canada (6)  |  Carrying (7)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Climate (97)  |  Coal (57)  |  Comfort (59)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Draw (137)  |  Ear (68)  |  Industry (137)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mile (39)  |  Ounce (8)  |  Portable (3)  |  Power (746)  |  Rail (4)  |  Ton (21)  |  Two (937)  |  Warm (69)  |  James Watt (11)  |  Whisper (11)  |  Will (2355)

Dear Mr. Bell: … Sir Wm. Thomson … speaks with much enthusiasm of your achievement. What yesterday he would have declared impossible he has today seen realized, and he declares it the most wonderful thing he has seen in America. You speak of it as an embryo invention, but to him it seems already complete, and he declares that, before long, friends will whisper their secrets over the electric wire. Your undulating current he declares a great and happy conception.
Letter to Alexander Graham Bell (25 Jun 1876). Quoted in Alexander Graham Bell, The Bell Telephone: The Deposition of Alexander Graham Bell, in the Suit Brought by the United States to Annul the Bell Patents (1908), 101. Note: William Thomson is better known as Lord Kelvin.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  Already (222)  |  America (127)  |  Bell (35)  |  Alexander Graham Bell (37)  |  Complete (204)  |  Conception (154)  |  Current (118)  |  Declare (45)  |  Declared (24)  |  Electric (76)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happy (105)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Invention (369)  |  Baron William Thomson Kelvin (71)  |  Long (790)  |  Most (1731)  |  Realize (147)  |  Speak (232)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Today (314)  |  Whisper (11)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wire (35)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Yesterday (36)

Doubtless the reasoning faculty, the mind, is the leading and characteristic attribute of the human race. By the exercise of this, man arrives at the properties of the natural bodies. This is science, properly and emphatically so called. It is the science of pure mathematics; and in the high branches of this science lies the truly sublime of human acquisition. If any attainment deserves that epithet, it is the knowledge, which, from the mensuration of the minutest dust of the balance, proceeds on the rising scale of material bodies, everywhere weighing, everywhere measuring, everywhere detecting and explaining the laws of force and motion, penetrating into the secret principles which hold the universe of God together, and balancing worlds against worlds, and system against system. When we seek to accompany those who pursue studies at once so high, so vast, and so exact; when we arrive at the discoveries of Newton, which pour in day on the works of God, as if a second fiat had gone forth from his own mouth; when, further, we attempt to follow those who set out where Newton paused, making his goal their starting-place, and, proceeding with demonstration upon demonstration, and discovery upon discovery, bring new worlds and new systems of worlds within the limits of the known universe, failing to learn all only because all is infinite; however we may say of man, in admiration of his physical structure, that “in form and moving he is express and admirable,” it is here, and here without irreverence, we may exclaim, “In apprehension how like a god!” The study of the pure mathematics will of course not be extensively pursued in an institution, which, like this [Boston Mechanics’ Institute], has a direct practical tendency and aim. But it is still to be remembered, that pure mathematics lie at the foundation of mechanical philosophy, and that it is ignorance only which can speak or think of that sublime science as useless research or barren speculation.
In Works (1872), Vol. 1, 180.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Acquisition (45)  |  Admirable (19)  |  Admiration (59)  |  Against (332)  |  Aim (165)  |  All (4108)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Balance (77)  |  Barren (30)  |  Body (537)  |  Boston (7)  |  Branch (150)  |  Bring (90)  |  Call (769)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Course (409)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Detect (44)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Doubtless (8)  |  Dust (64)  |  Emphatically (8)  |  Epithet (3)  |  Estimates of Mathematics (30)  |  Everywhere (94)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exclaim (13)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extensive (33)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Fail (185)  |  Far (154)  |  Fiat (6)  |  Follow (378)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Forth (13)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Goal (145)  |  God (757)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Institution (69)  |  Irreverence (3)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Known (454)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Making (300)  |  Man (2251)  |  Material (353)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Measure (232)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Mensuration (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Minute (125)  |  Motion (310)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Move (216)  |  Natural (796)  |  New (1216)  |  New Worlds (5)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Pause (6)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physical (508)  |  Pour (10)  |  Practical (200)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Properly (20)  |  Property (168)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Pursue (58)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Remember (179)  |  Research (664)  |  Rise (166)  |  Rising (44)  |  Say (984)  |  Scale (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Second (62)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Starting Point (14)  |  Still (613)  |  Structure (344)  |  Study (653)  |  Sublime (46)  |  System (537)  |  Tendency (99)  |  Think (1086)  |  Together (387)  |  Truly (116)  |  Universe (857)  |  Useless (33)  |  Vast (177)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Each discovery of science … adds a rung to a ladder of knowledge whose end is not in sight because we are building the ladder as we go along. As far as I can tell, as we assemble and ascend this ladder, we will forever uncover the secrets of the universe—one by one.
In magazine article, 'The Beginning of Science', Natural History (Mar 2001). Collected in Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries (2007), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Assemble (13)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Discovery (780)  |  End (590)  |  Forever (103)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Ladder (16)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sight (132)  |  Tell (340)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)

Earth has few secrets from the birds.
In The Bird: Its Form and Function (1906), Vol. 1, 18.
Science quotes on:  |  Bird (149)  |  Earth (996)

Every philosophy is tinged with the colouring of some secret imaginative background, which never emerges explicitly into its train of reasoning.
In Science and the Modern World (1925), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Background (43)  |  Color (137)  |  Emerge (22)  |  Explicitly (2)  |  Imaginative (8)  |  Never (1087)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Tinge (2)  |  Train (114)

Far from becoming discouraged, the philosopher should applaud nature, even when she appears miserly of herself or overly mysterious, and should feel pleased that as he lifts one part of her veil, she allows him to glimpse an immense number of other objects, all worthy of investigation. For what we already know should allow us to judge of what we will be able to know; the human mind has no frontiers, it extends proportionately as the universe displays itself; man, then, can and must attempt all, and he needs only time in order to know all. By multiplying his observations, he could even see and foresee all phenomena, all of nature's occurrences, with as much truth and certainty as if he were deducing them directly from causes. And what more excusable or even more noble enthusiasm could there be than that of believing man capable of recognizing all the powers, and discovering through his investigations all the secrets, of nature!
'Des Mulets', Oeuvres Philosophiques, ed. Jean Piveteau (1954), 414. Quoted in Jacques Roger, The Life Sciences in Eighteenth-Century French Thought, ed. Keith R. Benson and trans. Robert Ellrich (1997), 458.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Capable (168)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Display (56)  |  Enquiry (87)  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Extend (128)  |  Feel (367)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Immense (86)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Judge (108)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lift (55)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Noble (90)  |  Number (699)  |  Object (422)  |  Observation (555)  |  Occurrence (53)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Power (746)  |  See (1081)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universe (857)  |  Veil (26)  |  Will (2355)

Far from being the basis of the good society, the family, with its narrow privacy and tawdry secrets, is the source of all our discontents.
From transcript of BBC radio Reith Lecture (12 Nov 1967), 'A Runaway World', on the bbc.co.uk website.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Basis (173)  |  Being (1278)  |  Discontent (5)  |  Family (94)  |  Good (889)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Privacy (7)  |  Society (326)  |  Source (93)

From man or angel the great Architect did wisely to conceal, and not divulge his secrets to be scanned by them who ought rather admire; or if they list to try conjecture, he his fabric of the heavens left to their disputes, perhaps to move his laughter at their quaint opinions wide hereafter, when they come to model heaven calculate the stars, how they will wield the mighty frame, how build, unbuild, contrive to save appearances, how gird the sphere with centric and eccentric scribbled o’er, and epicycle, orb in orb.
Paradise Lost (1674, 1754), Book 8, 231.
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (44)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Architect (29)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Contrivance (9)  |  Contrive (10)  |  Cycle (40)  |  Dispute (32)  |  Eccentric (11)  |  Epicycle (4)  |  Fabric (27)  |  Frame (26)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Laughter (31)  |  Man (2251)  |  Model (102)  |  Move (216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Orb (20)  |  Quaint (7)  |  Save (118)  |  Saving (20)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Try (283)  |  Wide (96)  |  Wield (10)  |  Will (2355)

From my close observation of writers ... they fall in to two groups: 1) those who bleed copiously and visibly at any bad review, and 2) those who bleed copiously and secretly at any bad review.
In Gold: The Final Science Fiction Collection? (2003).
Science quotes on:  |  Bad (180)  |  Blood (134)  |  Fall (230)  |  Observation (555)  |  Review (26)  |  Two (937)  |  Writer (86)

From the age of 13, I was attracted to physics and mathematics. My interest in these subjects derived mostly from popular science books that I read avidly. Early on I was fascinated by theoretical physics and determined to become a theoretical physicist. I had no real idea what that meant, but it seemed incredibly exciting to spend one's life attempting to find the secrets of the universe by using one's mind.
From 'Autobiography', in Tore Frängsmyr (ed.) Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 2004, (2005).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Age (499)  |  Attempting (3)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Become (815)  |  Book (392)  |  Career (75)  |  Determination (78)  |  Early (185)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Find (998)  |  Idea (843)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  Interest (386)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Popular (29)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spend (95)  |  Subject (521)  |  Theoretical Physicist (19)  |  Theoretical Physics (25)  |  Universe (857)  |  Use (766)

God put a secret art into the forces of Nature so as to enable it to fashion itself out of chaos into a perfect world system.
Universal Natural History and Theory of the Heavens (1755), editted and translated by William Hastie in Kant's Cosmogony (1900), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Chaos (91)  |  Enable (119)  |  Force (487)  |  God (757)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  System (537)  |  World (1774)

Half of the secret of resistance to disease is cleanliness; the other half is dirtiness.
Anonymous
Saying.
Science quotes on:  |  Cleanliness (4)  |  Disease (328)  |  Other (2236)  |  Resistance (40)  |  French Saying (67)

Have you ever watched an eagle held captive in a zoo, fat and plump and full of food and safe from danger too?
Then have you seen another wheeling high up in the sky, thin and hard and battle-scarred, but free to soar and fly?
Well, which have you pitied the caged one or his brother? Though safe and warm from foe or storm, the captive, not the other!
There’s something of the eagle in climbers, don’t you see; a secret thing, perhaps the soul, that clamors to be free.
It’s a different sort of freedom from the kind we often mean, not free to work and eat and sleep and live in peace serene.
But freedom like a wild thing to leap and soar and strive, to struggle with the icy blast, to really be alive.
That’s why we climb the mountain’s peak from which the cloud-veils flow, to stand and watch the eagle fly, and soar, and wheel... below...
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alive (90)  |  Below (24)  |  Blast (13)  |  Brother (43)  |  Cage (12)  |  Captive (2)  |  Climb (35)  |  Climber (7)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Danger (115)  |  Different (577)  |  Eagle (19)  |  Eat (104)  |  Fat (11)  |  Flow (83)  |  Fly (146)  |  Foe (9)  |  Food (199)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Full (66)  |  Hard (243)  |  High (362)  |  Hold (95)  |  Icy (3)  |  Kind (557)  |  Leap (53)  |  Live (628)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peace (108)  |  Peak (20)  |  Pity (14)  |  Really (78)  |  Safe (54)  |  See (1081)  |  Serene (5)  |  Sky (161)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Soar (23)  |  Something (719)  |  Sort (49)  |  Soul (226)  |  Stand (274)  |  Storm (51)  |  Strive (46)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thin (16)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Veil (26)  |  Warm (69)  |  Watch (109)  |  Wheel (50)  |  Wheeling (3)  |  Why (491)  |  Wild (87)  |  Work (1351)  |  Zoo (8)

He that knows the secrets of nature with Albertus Magnus, or the motions of the heavens with Galileo, or the cosmography of the moon with Hevelius, or the body of man with Galen, or the nature of diseases with Hippocrates, or the harmonies in melody with Orpheus, or of poesy with Homer, or of grammar with Lilly, or of whatever else with the greatest artist; he is nothing if he knows them merely for talk or idle speculation, or transient and external use. But he that knows them for value, and knows them his own, shall profit infinitely.
In Bertram Doben (ed.), Centuries of Meditations (1908), The Third Century, No. 41, 189-190.
Science quotes on:  |  Artist (90)  |  Body (537)  |  Cosmography (4)  |  Disease (328)  |  External (57)  |  Galen (19)  |  Galileo Galilei (122)  |  Grammar (14)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hippocrates (49)  |  Homer (9)  |  Idle (33)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Moon (237)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Poesy (2)  |  Profit (52)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Talk (100)  |  Transient (12)  |  Use (766)  |  Value (365)  |  Whatever (234)

He [Robert Boyle] is very tall (about six foot high) and straight, very temperate, and vertuouse, and frugall: a batcheler; keepes a Coach; sojournes with his sister, the Lady Ranulagh. His greatest delight is Chymistrey. He has at his sister’s a noble laboratory, and severall servants (Prentices to him) to look to it. He is charitable to ingeniose men that are in want, and foreigne Chymists have had large proofe of his bountie, for he will not spare for cost to get any rare Secret.
John Aubrey, Brief Lives (1680), edited by Oliver Lawson Dick (1949), 37.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Robert Boyle (27)  |  Cost (86)  |  Delight (108)  |  Greatest (328)  |  High (362)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Large (394)  |  Look (582)  |  Noble (90)  |  Rare (89)  |  Servant (39)  |  Straight (73)  |  Want (497)  |  Will (2355)

Here man is no longer the center of the world, only a witness, but a witness who is also a partner in the silent life of nature, bound by secret affinities to the trees.
From Presidential Address (20 Dec 1957), to the Annual Meeting of the Swedish Academy, 'The Linnaeus Tradition and Our Time', collected in Servant of Peace: A Selection of the Speeches and Statements of Dag Hammarskjöld, Secretary-General of the United Nations, 1953-1961 (1962), 153. Also in Public Papers of the Secretaries-General of the United Nations (1973), Vol. 3, 703.
Science quotes on:  |  Affinity (27)  |  Bound (119)  |  Center (33)  |  Forest (150)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Partner (5)  |  Silent (29)  |  Tree (246)  |  Witness (54)  |  World (1774)

How peacefully he sleep!
Yet may his ever-questing spirit, freed at length
from all the frettings of this little world,
Wander at will among the uncharted stars.
Fairfield his name. Perchance celestial fields
disclosing long sought secrets of the past
Spread 'neath his enraptured gaze
And beasts and men that to his earthly sight
were merely bits of stone shall live again to
gladden those eager eyes.
o let us picture him—enthusiast—scientist—friend—
Seeker of truth and light through all eternity!
New York Sun (13 Nov 1935). Reprinted in 'Henry Fairfield Osborn', Supplement to Natural History (Feb 1936), 37:2, 135. Bound in Kofoid Collection of Pamphlets on Biography, University of California.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Beast (55)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Enthusiast (7)  |  Eternity (63)  |  Eulogy (2)  |  Eye (419)  |  Field (364)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Friend (168)  |  Gaze (21)  |  Gladness (5)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Little (707)  |  Live (628)  |  Long (790)  |  Merely (316)  |  Name (333)  |  Henry Fairfield Osborn (16)  |  Past (337)  |  Picture (143)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Sight (132)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Spread (83)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Stone (162)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Uncharted (10)  |  Wander (35)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

How twins are born my discourse will explain thus. The cause is chiefly the nature of the womb in woman. For if it has grown equally on either side of its mouth, and if it opens equally, and also dries equally after menstruation, it can give nourishment, if it conceive the secretion of the man so that it immediately divides into both parts of the womb equally. Now if the seed secreted from both parents be abundant and strong, it can grow in both places, as it masters the nourishment that reaches it. In all other cases twins are not formed. Now when the secretion from both parents is male, of necessity boys are begotten in both places; but when from both it is female, girls are begotten. But when one secretion is female and the other male, whichever masters the other gives the embryo its sex. Twins are like one another for the following reasons. First, the places are alike in which they grow; then they were secreted together; then they grow by the same nourishment, and at birth they reach together the light of day.
Regimen, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1931), Vol. 4, 273.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundant (22)  |  Alike (60)  |  All (4108)  |  Birth (147)  |  Both (493)  |  Boy (94)  |  Cause (541)  |  Chiefly (47)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Divide (75)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Equally (130)  |  Explain (322)  |  Female (50)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Girl (37)  |  Grow (238)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Menstruation (3)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sex (69)  |  Side (233)  |  Strong (174)  |  Together (387)  |  Twin (15)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)  |  Womb (24)

I am sure that one secret of a successful teacher is that he has formulated quite clearly in his mind what the pupil has got to know in precise fashion. He will then cease from half-hearted attempts to worry his pupils with memorising a lot of irrelevant stuff of inferior importance.
In 'The Rhythmic Claims of Freedom and Discipline', The Aims of Education and Other Essays (1929), 46.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (251)  |  Cease (79)  |  Education (378)  |  Formulation (36)  |  Heart (229)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inferior (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lot (151)  |  Memorization (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Precise (68)  |  Precision (68)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Will (2355)

I can’t think of any definition of the words mathematician or scientist that would apply to me. I think of myself as a journalist who knows just enough about mathematics to be able to take low-level math and make it clear and interesting to nonmathematicians. Let me say that I think not knowing too much about a subject is an asset for a journalist, not a liability. The great secret of my column is that I know so little about mathematics that I have to work hard to understand the subject myself. Maybe I can explain things more clearly than a professional mathematician can.
In Scot Morris, 'Interview: Martin Gardner', Omni, 4, No. 4 (Jan 1982), 68.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (160)  |  Asset (6)  |  Clearly (41)  |  Column (15)  |  Definition (221)  |  Enough (340)  |  Explain (322)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hard (243)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Journalist (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Liability (6)  |  Little (707)  |  Low (80)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Myself (212)  |  Professional (70)  |  Say (984)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Understand (606)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)  |  Work Hard (12)

I have been branded with folly and madness for attempting what the world calls impossibilities, and even from the great engineer, the late James Watt, who said ... that I deserved hanging for bringing into use the high-pressure engine. This has so far been my reward from the public; but should this be all, I shall be satisfied by the great secret pleasure and laudable pride that I feel in my own breast from having been the instrument of bringing forward new principles and new arrangements of boundless value to my country, and however much I may be straitened in pecuniary circumstances, the great honour of being a useful subject can never be taken from me, which far exceeds riches.
From letter to Davies Gilbert, written a few months before Trevithick's last illness. Quoted in Francis Trevithick, Life of Richard Trevithick: With an Account of his Inventions (1872), Vol. 2, 395-6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biography (240)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Call (769)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Circumstances (108)  |  Country (251)  |  Engine (98)  |  Engineer (121)  |  Feel (367)  |  Folly (43)  |  Forward (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hanging (4)  |  High (362)  |  Honour (56)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Invention (369)  |  Late (118)  |  Madness (33)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Poverty (37)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Pride (78)  |  Principle (507)  |  Public (96)  |  Reward (68)  |  Riches (12)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  Subject (521)  |  Use (766)  |  Useful (250)  |  Value (365)  |  James Watt (11)  |  World (1774)

I have often admired the mystical way of Pythagoras, and the secret magick of numbers.
In Religio Medici (1642, 1754), pt. 1, sec. 12, 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Admiration (59)  |  Magic (86)  |  Number (699)  |  Often (106)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Way (1217)

I know two people who have found it [the secret of success]. … Getting ready. Getting prepared. There were Edison and Lindbergh,—they both got ready before they started. I had to find that out too. I had to stop for ten years after I had started; I had to stop for ten years and get ready. I made my first car in 1893, but it was 1903 before I had it ready to sell. It is these simple things that young men ought to know, and they are hardest to grasp. Before everything else, get ready.
From Henry Ford and Ralph Waldo Trine, The Power that Wins (1929), 147. Often seen paraphrased as “Before everything else, getting ready is the secret of success,” for example, in Connie Robertson (ed.), The Wordsworth Dictionary of Quotations (1998), 129.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Car (71)  |  Thomas Edison (84)  |  Everything (476)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Hard (243)  |  Know (1518)  |  Charles A. Lindbergh (24)  |  People (1005)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Ready (39)  |  Sell (15)  |  Simple (406)  |  Start (221)  |  Stop (80)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Two (937)  |  Year (933)  |  Young (227)

I learnt very quickly that the only reason that would be accepted for not attending a committee meeting was that one already had a previous commitment to attend a meeting of another organization on the same day. I therefore invented a society, the Orion Society, a highly secret and very exclusive society that spawned a multitude of committees, sub-committees, working parties, evaluation groups and so on that, regrettably, had a prior claim on my attention. Soon people wanted to know more about this club and some even decided that they would like to join it. However, it was always made clear to them that applications were never entertained and that if they were deemed to qualify for membership they would be discreetly approached at the appropriate time.
Loose Ends from Current Biology (1997), 14.
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Already (222)  |  Application (242)  |  Approach (108)  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Attend (65)  |  Attention (190)  |  Claim (146)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Committee (15)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Evaluation (10)  |  Exclusive (29)  |  Know (1518)  |  Meeting (20)  |  More (2559)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Never (1087)  |  Organization (114)  |  People (1005)  |  Reason (744)  |  Society (326)  |  Soon (186)  |  Time (1877)  |  Want (497)

I now never make the preparations for penetrating into some small province of nature hitherto undiscovered without breathing a prayer to the Being who hides His secrets from me only to allure me graciously on to the unfolding of them.
As quoted in E.P. Whipple, 'Recollections of Agassiz', in Henry Mills Alden (ed.), Harper's New Monthly Magazine (June 1879), 59, 103.
Science quotes on:  |  Allure (4)  |  Being (1278)  |  Breathing (23)  |  Graciously (2)  |  Hide (69)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Penetrating (3)  |  Prayer (28)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Province (35)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Small (477)  |  Undiscovered (15)  |  Unfolding (16)

I remember vividly my student days, spending hours at the light microscope, turning endlessly the micrometric screw, and gazing at the blurred boundary which concealed the mysterious ground substance where the secret mechanisms of cell life might be found.
Nobel Lecture, The Coming Age of the Cell, 12 Dec 1974
Science quotes on:  |  Boundary (51)  |  Cell (138)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hour (186)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Remember (179)  |  Research (664)  |  Screw (17)  |  Spending (24)  |  Student (300)  |  Substance (248)  |  Vividly (11)

I shall tell you a great secret, my friend. Do not wait for the last judgment. It takes place every day.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Do (1908)  |  Friend (168)  |  Great (1574)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Last (426)  |  Place (177)  |  Tell (340)  |  Wait (58)

I would “like” to be positivistic, [and do] research; but I can’t impress myself sufficiently by the “importance” of any possible research which I can imagine, to embark upon it.… The terrible secret is that I don’t believe in natural science. And yet I do, I do.
From notebook K12 manuscript, 2-3. As quoted and cited in Allan Beveridge, Portrait of the Psychiatrist as a Young Man: The Early Writing and Work of R.D. Laing, 1927-1960 (2011), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embark (7)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impress (64)  |  Myself (212)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Possible (552)  |  Research (664)  |  Science (3879)  |  Terrible (38)

In a famous passage, René Descartes tells us that he considered himself to be placed in three simultaneous domiciles, patiently recognizing his loyalties to the social past, fervidly believing in a final solution of nature’s secrets and in the meantime consecrated to the pursuit of scientific doubt. Here we have the half way house of the scientific laboratory, of the scientific mind in the midst of its campaign.
In 'The Three Dimensions of Time', Part I, 'The Classic of Science', A Classic and a Founder (1937), collected in Rosenstock-Huessy Papers (1981), Vol. 1, 14.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Belief (578)  |  Campaign (6)  |  Consecrate (3)  |  Consider (416)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Domicile (2)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Final (118)  |  Himself (461)  |  House (140)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Loyalty (9)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Passage (50)  |  Past (337)  |  Patiently (3)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Mind (13)  |  Simultaneous (22)  |  Social (252)  |  Solution (267)  |  Tell (340)  |  Way (1217)

In due time the evolution theory will have to abate its vehemence, cannot be allow’d to dominate everything else, and will have to take its place as a segment of the circle, the cluster—as but one of many theories, many thoughts, of profoundest value—and readjusting the differentiating much, yet leaving the divine secrets just as inexplicable and unreachable as before—maybe more so.
In Specimen days & Collect (1883), 326.
Science quotes on:  |  Abate (2)  |  Circle (110)  |  Cluster (16)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Divine (112)  |  Dominate (20)  |  Due (141)  |  Everything (476)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Inexplicable (8)  |  More (2559)  |  Profound (104)  |  Segment (6)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Value (365)  |  Vehemence (2)  |  Will (2355)

In my opinion there is no other salvation for civilization and even for the human race than the creation of a world government with security on the basis of law. As long as there are sovereign states with their separate armaments and armament secrets, new world wars cannot be avoided.
Interview comment reported in 'For a World Government: Einstein Says This is Only Way to Save Mankind', New York Times (15 Sep 1945), 11.
Science quotes on:  |  Armament (6)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Avoidance (11)  |  Basis (173)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Creation (327)  |  Government (110)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Law (894)  |  Long (790)  |  New (1216)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Other (2236)  |  Race (268)  |  Salvation (11)  |  Security (47)  |  Separate (143)  |  Sovereign (5)  |  State (491)  |  War (225)  |  World (1774)  |  World War II (8)

In nature's infinite book of secrecy
A little I can read.
In Antony and Cleopatra (1606-7), I, ii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Book (392)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Little (707)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)

In one word he told me the secret of success in mathematics: plagiarize only be sure always to call it please research.
In lyrics of his song 'Lobachevski' recorded on his first album Songs by Tom Lehrer (1953). First performed as part a musical revue, The Physical Revue (1951–1952).
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Please (65)  |  Research (664)  |  Success (302)  |  Tell (340)  |  Word (619)

In this House on July 24, 1895 the Secret of Dreams was revealed to Dr. Sigmund Freud.
Plaque was placed on 6 May 1977 at Bellevue (a house on the slopes of the Wienerwald) where the Freud family spent their summers.
From a letter to Wilhelm Fliess, 20 Jun 1900. Quoted in Ernst L. Freud (ed.), Letters of Sigmund Freud 1873-1939 (1961), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (208)  |  Family (94)  |  House (140)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Slope (9)  |  Spent (85)  |  Summer (54)

In your heart, keep one still secret spot where dreams may go and be sheltered so they may thrive and grow.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Dream (208)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heart (229)  |  Keep (101)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Spot (17)  |  Still (613)  |  Thrive (18)

Into whatsoever houses I enter, I will enter to help the sick, and I will abstain from all intentional wrong-doing and harm, especially from abusing the bodies of man or woman, bond or free. And whatsoever I shall see or hear in the course of my profession, as well as outside my profession in my intercourse with men, if it be what should not be published abroad, I will never divulge, holding such things to be holy secrets.
Oath, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. 1, 301.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  Abstain (7)  |  All (4108)  |  Bond (45)  |  Course (409)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enter (141)  |  Free (232)  |  Hear (139)  |  Holy (34)  |  House (140)  |  Man (2251)  |  Never (1087)  |  Oath (10)  |  Outside (141)  |  Physician (273)  |  Profession (99)  |  See (1081)  |  Sick (81)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Whatsoever (41)  |  Will (2355)  |  Woman (151)  |  Wrong (234)

Is it not evident, in these last hundred years (when the Study of Philosophy has been the business of all the Virtuosi in Christendome) that almost a new Nature has been revealed to us? that more errours of the School have been detected, more useful Experiments in Philosophy have been made, more Noble Secrets in Opticks, Medicine, Anatomy, Astronomy, discover'd, than in all those credulous and doting Ages from Aristotle to us? So true it is that nothing spreads more fast than Science, when rightly and generally cultivated.
Of Dramatic Poesie (1684 edition), lines 258-67, in James T. Boulton (ed.) (1964), 44
Science quotes on:  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Anatomy (69)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Business (149)  |  Credulous (9)  |  Detect (44)  |  Discover (553)  |  Error (321)  |  Evident (91)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Last (426)  |  Medicine (378)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Noble (90)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Optics (23)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  School (219)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spread (83)  |  Study (653)  |  Useful (250)  |  Year (933)

Is not Cuvier the great poet of our era? Byron has given admirable expression to certain moral conflicts, but our immortal naturalist has reconstructed past worlds from a few bleached bones; has rebuilt cities, like Cadmus, with monsters’ teeth; has animated forests with all the secrets of zoology gleaned from a piece of coal; has discovered a giant population from the footprints of a mammoth.
From 'La Peau de Chagrin' (1831). As translated by Ellen Marriage in The Wild Ass’s Skin (1906), 21-22.
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (19)  |  All (4108)  |  Animated (5)  |  Bleached (4)  |  Bone (95)  |  Lord George Gordon Byron (27)  |  Certain (550)  |  Coal (57)  |  Conflict (73)  |  Baron Georges Cuvier (30)  |  Discover (553)  |  Era (51)  |  Expression (175)  |  Footprint (15)  |  Forest (150)  |  Giant (67)  |  Glean (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Immortal (35)  |  Mammoth (9)  |  Monster (31)  |  Moral (195)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Past (337)  |  Poet (83)  |  Population (110)  |  Reconstruct (5)  |  Teeth (43)  |  Tooth (29)  |  World (1774)  |  Zoology (36)

It can even be thought that radium could become very dangerous in criminal hands, and here the question can be raised whether mankind benefits from knowing the secrets of Nature, whether it is ready to profit from it or whether this knowledge will not be harmful for it. The example of the discoveries of Nobel is characteristic, as powerful explosives have enabled man to do wonderful work. They are also a terrible means of destruction in the hands of great criminals who lead the peoples towards war. I am one of those who believe with Nobel that mankind will derive more good than harm from the new discoveries.
Nobel Lecture (6 June 1905), 'Radioactive Substances, Especially Radium', collected in Stig Lundqvist (ed.), Nobel Lectures: Physics 1901-1921 (1998), 78.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Derive (65)  |  Destruction (125)  |  Do (1908)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lead (384)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Nobel Prize (40)  |  Alfred Bernhard Nobel (16)  |  People (1005)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Profit (52)  |  Question (621)  |  Radium (25)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thought (953)  |  War (225)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Work (1351)

It is a right, yes a duty, to search in cautious manner for the numbers, sizes, and weights, the norms for everything [God] has created. For He himself has let man take part in the knowledge of these things ... For these secrets are not of the kind whose research should be forbidden; rather they are set before our eyes like a mirror so that by examining them we observe to some extent the goodness and wisdom of the Creator.
Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. In Michael B. Foster, Mystery and Philosophy, 61. Cited by Max Casper and Doris Hellman, trans., ed. Kepler (1954), 381. Cited by Gerald J. Galgan, Interpreting the Present: Six Philosophical Essays (1993), 105. Gerald J. Galgan
Science quotes on:  |  Caution (24)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Duty (68)  |  Everything (476)  |  Examination (98)  |  Extent (139)  |  Eye (419)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  God (757)  |  Goodness (25)  |  Himself (461)  |  Kind (557)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Number (699)  |  Observe (168)  |  Research (664)  |  Right (452)  |  Search (162)  |  Set (394)  |  Size (60)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Weight (134)  |  Wisdom (221)

It is an old dream: To travel on the back of a benevolent sea beast down to some secret underwater garden.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Beast (55)  |  Benevolent (9)  |  Down (456)  |  Dream (208)  |  Garden (60)  |  Old (481)  |  Sea (308)  |  Travel (114)  |  Underwater (5)

It is an open secret to the few who know it, but a mystery and stumbling block to the many, that Science and Poetry are own sisters; insomuch that in those branches of scientific inquiry which are most abstract, most formal, and most remote from the grasp of the ordinary sensible imagination, a higher power of imagination akin to the creative insight of the poet is most needed and most fruitful of lasting work.
From Introduction written for William Kingdon Clifford, Clifford’s Lectures and Essays (1879), Vol. 1, 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Branch (150)  |  Creative (137)  |  Formal (33)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Grasp (61)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Insight (102)  |  Know (1518)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Need (290)  |  Open (274)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Poet (83)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Power (746)  |  Remote (83)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Poetry (14)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sensible (27)  |  Sister (8)  |  Stumbling Block (6)  |  Work (1351)

It is most true that a natural and secret hatred and aversation towards society, in any man, hath somewhat of the savage beast.
In 'Of Friendship', Mary Augusta Scott (ed.), Essays of Francis Bacon (1908), 117. A footnote indicates “aversation towards” used in the translation means “aversion to”.
Science quotes on:  |  Aversion (8)  |  Beast (55)  |  Hatred (21)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Savage (29)  |  Society (326)  |  Sociology (46)  |  True (212)

It is no secret that the moon has no light of her own, but is, as it were, a mirror, receiving brightness from the influence of the sun
Vitruvius
In De Architectura, Book 9, Chap 2, Sec.3. As translated in Morris Hicky Morgan (trans.), Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture (1914), 263.
Science quotes on:  |  Brightness (12)  |  Influence (222)  |  Light (607)  |  Mirror (41)  |  Moon (237)  |  Sun (385)

It is they who hold the secret of the mysterious property of the mind by which error ministers to truth, and truth slowly but irrevocably prevails. Theirs is the logic of discovery, the demonstration of the advance of knowledge and the development of ideas, which as the earthly wants and passions of men remain almost unchanged, are the charter of progress, and the vital spark in history.
Lecture, 'The Study of History' (11 Jun 1895) delivered at Cambridge, published as A Lecture on The Study of History (1895), 54-55.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Error (321)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Logic (287)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Passion (114)  |  Prevail (46)  |  Progress (465)  |  Property (168)  |  Remain (349)  |  Spark (31)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Vital (85)  |  Want (497)

It is unlikely that we will ever see a star being born. Stars are like animals in the wild. We may see the very young, but never their actual birth, which is a veiled and secret event. Stars are born inside thick clouds of dust and gas in the spiral arms of the galaxy, so thick that visible light cannot penetrate them.
Perfect Symmetry: The Search for the Beginning of Time (1985), 44.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Animal (617)  |  Arm (81)  |  Arms (37)  |  Being (1278)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Dust (64)  |  Event (216)  |  Galaxy (51)  |  Gas (83)  |  Light (607)  |  Never (1087)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Penetration (18)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Thick (6)  |  Veil (26)  |  Visible (84)  |  Visible Light (2)  |  Wild (87)  |  Will (2355)  |  Young (227)

It was the secrets of heaven and earth that I desired to learn.
In Frankenstein: Or, The Modern Prometheus (Rev. ed. 1831, 1839), 24. Webmaster note: This line does not appear before this edition, revised by Shelley for Colburn and Bentley’s Standard Novels Series, No. 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Earth (996)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)

Its [mathematical analysis] chief attribute is clearness; it has no means for expressing confused ideas. It compares the most diverse phenomena and discovers the secret analogies which unite them. If matter escapes us, as that of air and light because of its extreme tenuity, if bodies are placed far from us in the immensity of space, if man wishes to know the aspect of the heavens at successive periods separated by many centuries, if gravity and heat act in the interior of the solid earth at depths which will forever be inaccessible, mathematical analysis is still able to trace the laws of these phenomena. It renders them present and measurable, and appears to be the faculty of the human mind destined to supplement the brevity of life and the imperfection of the senses, and what is even more remarkable, it follows the same course in the study of all phenomena; it explains them in the same language, as if in witness to the unity and simplicity of the plan of the universe, and to make more manifest the unchangeable order which presides over all natural causes.
From Théorie Analytique de la Chaleur (1822), Discours Préliminaire, xiv, (Theory of Heat, Introduction), as translated by Alexander Freeman in The Analytical Theory of Heat (1878), 7.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Appear (118)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Body (537)  |  Brevity (8)  |  Cause (541)  |  Century (310)  |  Chief (97)  |  Clearness (11)  |  Compare (69)  |  Confused (12)  |  Course (409)  |  Depth (94)  |  Destined (42)  |  Discover (553)  |  Diverse (17)  |  Earth (996)  |  Escape (80)  |  Explain (322)  |  Express (186)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Faculty (72)  |  Far (154)  |  Follow (378)  |  Forever (103)  |  Gravity (132)  |  Heat (174)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Immensity (30)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Interior (32)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Light (607)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Mathematical Analysis (20)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Measurable (3)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Order (632)  |  Period (198)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Place (177)  |  Plan (117)  |  Present (619)  |  Preside (3)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Render (93)  |  Same (157)  |  Sense (770)  |  Separate (143)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solid (116)  |  Space (500)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Successive (73)  |  Supplement (6)  |  Tenuity (2)  |  Trace (103)  |  Unchangeable (11)  |  Unite (42)  |  Unity (78)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Witness (54)

It’s not for glory that Soviet cosmonauts are in this assault on the cosmos; they are motivated by a limitless love for and devotion to their country, the Party and the people, and by a desire to help Soviet scientists to discover the secrets of the universe.
In First Man in Space: The Life and Achievement of Yuri Gagarin: a Collection (1984), 104. Cited as written as a foreword of a book at the request of the author.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Assault (12)  |  Cosmonaut (5)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Country (251)  |  Desire (204)  |  Devotion (34)  |  Discover (553)  |  Glory (58)  |  Help (105)  |  Limitless (12)  |  Love (309)  |  Motivate (6)  |  Motivated (14)  |  Party (18)  |  People (1005)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Soviet (9)  |  Universe (857)

Just as in the animal and vegetable kingdoms, an individual comes into being, so to speak, grows, remains in being, declines and passes on, will it not be the same for entire species? If our faith did not teach us that animals left the Creator's hands just as they now appear and, if it were permitted to entertain the slightest doubt as to their beginning and their end, may not a philosopher, left to his own conjectures, suspect that, from time immemorial, animal life had its own constituent elements, scattered and intermingled with the general body of matter, and that it happened when these constituent elements came together because it was possible for them to do so; that the embryo formed from these elements went through innumerable arrangements and developments, successively acquiring movement, feeling, ideas, thought, reflection, consciousness, feelings, emotions, signs, gestures, sounds, articulate sounds, language, laws, arts and sciences; that millions of years passed between each of these developments, and there may be other developments or kinds of growth still to come of which we know nothing; that a stationary point either has been or will be reached; that the embryo either is, or will be, moving away from this point through a process of everlasting decay, during which its faculties will leave it in the same way as they arrived; that it will disappear for ever from nature-or rather, that it will continue to exist there, but in a form and with faculties very different from those it displays at this present point in time? Religion saves us from many deviations, and a good deal of work. Had religion not enlightened us on the origin of the world and the universal system of being, what a multitude of different hypotheses we would have been tempted to take as nature's secret! Since these hypotheses are all equally wrong, they would all have seemed almost equally plausible. The question of why anything exists is the most awkward that philosophy can raise- and Revelation alone provides the answer.
Thoughts on the Interpretation of Nature and Other Philosophical Works (1753/4), ed. D. Adams (1999), Section LVIII, 75-6.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Alone (311)  |  Animal (617)  |  Animal Life (19)  |  Answer (366)  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Art (657)  |  Awkward (11)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Body (537)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Continue (165)  |  Creator (91)  |  Deal (188)  |  Decay (53)  |  Decline (26)  |  Development (422)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Different (577)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Display (56)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Element (310)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Emotion (100)  |  End (590)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Equally (130)  |  Exist (443)  |  Faith (203)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Feelings (52)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Good (889)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Idea (843)  |  Individual (404)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Kind (557)  |  Kingdom (78)  |  Know (1518)  |  Language (293)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Movement (155)  |  Multitude (47)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Origin (239)  |  Other (2236)  |  Pass (238)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plausible (22)  |  Point (580)  |  Possible (552)  |  Present (619)  |  Process (423)  |  Question (621)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remain (349)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sound (183)  |  Speak (232)  |  Species (401)  |  Stationary (10)  |  Still (613)  |  System (537)  |  Teach (277)  |  Thought (953)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Universal (189)  |  Vegetable (46)  |  Way (1217)  |  Why (491)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Wrong (234)  |  Year (933)

Let me tell you the secret that has led me to my goal. My only strength lies in my tenacity.
Quoted in René Dubos, Louis Pasteur: Freelance of Science (1950). In W.I.B. Beveridge, The Art of Scientific Investigation (1953), 140.
Science quotes on:  |  Goal (145)  |  Lie (364)  |  Strength (126)  |  Success (302)  |  Tell (340)  |  Tenacity (10)

Magic and all that is ascribed to it is a deep presentiment of the powers of science. The shoes of swiftness, the sword of sharpness, the power of subduing the elements, of using the secret virtues of minerals, of understanding the voices of birds, are the obscure efforts of the mind in a right direction.
From 'History', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1903), 34.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bird (149)  |  Deep (233)  |  Direction (175)  |  Effort (227)  |  Element (310)  |  Magic (86)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Power (746)  |  Presentiment (2)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sharpness (8)  |  Shoe (11)  |  Swiftness (4)  |  Sword (15)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Using (6)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Voice (52)

Magic is a faculty of wonderful virtue, full of most high mysteries, containing the most profound contemplation of most secret things, together with the nature, power, quality, substance and virtues thereof, as also the knowledge of whole Nature, and it doth instruct us concerning the differing and agreement of things amongst themselves, whence it produceth its wonderful effects, by uniting the virtues of things through the application of them one to the other.
In De Occulta Philosophia (1533), Vol. 1. Translation by J.F. (1651) reprinted as The Philosophy of Natural Magic (1913), 38-39.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  Application (242)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Effect (393)  |  High (362)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Magic (86)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Profound (104)  |  Quality (135)  |  Substance (248)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Together (387)  |  Unite (42)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wonderful (149)

Man carries the world in his head, the whole astronomy and chemistry suspended in a thought. Because the history of nature is charactered in his brain, therefore he is the prophet and discoverer of her secrets. Every known fact in natural science was divined by the presentiment of somebody, before it was actually verified.
Essay, 'Nature', in Ralph Waldo Emerson, Alfred Riggs Ferguson (ed.) and Jean Ferguson Carr (ed.), The Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume III, Essays: Second Series (1984), 106-107.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Brain (270)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Discoverer (42)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Fact (1210)  |  History (673)  |  Idea (843)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Presentiment (2)  |  Prophet (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thought (953)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

Mathematics and music, the most sharply contrasted fields of scientific activity which can be found, and yet related, supporting each other, as if to show forth the secret connection which ties together all the activities of our mind, and which leads us to surmise that the manifestations of the artist’s genius are but the unconscious expressions of a mysteriously acting rationality.
In Vorträge und Reden (1884, 1896), Vol 1, 122. As translated in Robert Édouard Moritz, Memorabilia Mathematica; Or, The Philomath’s Quotation-book (1914), 191. From the original German, “Mathematik und Musik, der schärfste Gegensatz geistiger Thätigkeit, den man auffinden kann, und doch verbunden, sich unterstützend, als wollten sie die geheime Consequenz nachweisen, die sich durch alle Thätigkeiten unseres Geistes hinzieht, und die auch in den Offenbarungen des künstlerischen Genius uns unbewusste Aeusserungen geheimnissvoll wirkender Vernunftmässigkeit ahnen lässt.”
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Act (272)  |  Activity (210)  |  All (4108)  |  Artist (90)  |  Connection (162)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Expression (175)  |  Field (364)  |  Genius (284)  |  Lead (384)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics As A Fine Art (23)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Music (129)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Other (2236)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Relate (21)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sharp (14)  |  Show (346)  |  Support (147)  |  Surmise (7)  |  Tie (38)  |  Together (387)  |  Unconscious (22)

May there not be methods of using explosive energy incomparably more intense than anything heretofore discovered? Might not a bomb no bigger than an orange be found to possess a secret power to destroy a whole block of buildings—nay, to concentrate the force of a thousand tons of cordite and blast a township at a stroke? Could not explosives even of the existing type be guided automatically in flying machines by wireless or other rays, without a human pilot, in ceaseless procession upon a hostile city, arsenal, camp or dockyard?
'Shall We All Commit Suicide?' Pall Mall (Sep 1924). Reprinted in Thoughts and Adventures (1932), 250.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Blast (13)  |  Building (156)  |  Camp (10)  |  City (78)  |  Concentrate (26)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Discover (553)  |  Dockyard (2)  |  Energy (344)  |  Explosive (23)  |  Flying (72)  |  Flying Machine (13)  |  Force (487)  |  Human (1468)  |  Machine (257)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Missile (5)  |  More (2559)  |  Orange (14)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possess (156)  |  Power (746)  |  Procession (5)  |  Ray (114)  |  Stroke (18)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Ton (21)  |  Type (167)  |  War (225)  |  Whole (738)

MIND, n. A mysterious form of matter secreted by the brain. Its chief activity consists in the endeavor to ascertain its own nature, the futility of the attempt being due to the fact that it has nothing but itself to know itself with.
The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce (1911), Vol. 7, The Devil's Dictionary,  217.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Ascertain (38)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brain (270)  |  Chief (97)  |  Consist (223)  |  Due (141)  |  Endeavor (67)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Form (959)  |  Futility (7)  |  Humour (116)  |  Know (1518)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)

Most of us who become experimental physicists do so for two reasons; we love the tools of physics because to us they have intrinsic beauty, and we dream of finding new secrets of nature as important and as exciting as those uncovered by our scientific heroes.
In Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1968), 'Recent Developments in Particle Physics', collected in Nobel Lectures: Physics 1963-1970 (1972), 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Become (815)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dream (208)  |  Exciting (47)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Experimental Physicist (10)  |  Find (998)  |  Hero (42)  |  Important (209)  |  Intrinsic (18)  |  Love (309)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Reason (744)  |  Research (664)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Tool (117)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncover (20)

My mother, my dad and I left Cuba when I was two [January, 1959]. Castro had taken control by then, and life for many ordinary people had become very difficult. My dad had worked [as a personal bodyguard for the wife of Cuban president Batista], so he was a marked man. We moved to Miami, which is about as close to Cuba as you can get without being there. It’s a Cuba-centric society. I think a lot of Cubans moved to the US thinking everything would be perfect. Personally, I have to say that those early years were not particularly happy. A lot of people didn’t want us around, and I can remember seeing signs that said: “No children. No pets. No Cubans.” Things were not made easier by the fact that Dad had begun working for the US government. At the time he couldn’t really tell us what he was doing, because it was some sort of top-secret operation. He just said he wanted to fight against what was happening back at home. [Estefan’s father was one of the many Cuban exiles taking part in the ill-fated, anti-Castro Bay of Pigs invasion to overthrow dictator Fidel Castro.] One night, Dad disappered. I think he was so worried about telling my mother he was going that he just left her a note. There were rumours something was happening back home, but we didn’t really know where Dad had gone. It was a scary time for many Cubans. A lot of men were involved—lots of families were left without sons and fathers. By the time we found out what my dad had been doing, the attempted coup had taken place, on April 17, 1961. Intitially he’d been training in Central America, but after the coup attempt he was captured and spent the next wo years as a political prisoner in Cuba. That was probably the worst time for my mother and me. Not knowing what was going to happen to Dad. I was only a kid, but I had worked out where my dad was. My mother was trying to keep it a secret, so she used to tell me Dad was on a farm. Of course, I thought that she didn’t know what had really happened to him, so I used to keep up the pretence that Dad really was working on a farm. We used to do this whole pretending thing every day, trying to protect each other. Those two years had a terrible effect on my mother. She was very nervous, just going from church to church. Always carrying her rosary beads, praying her little heart out. She had her religion, and I had my music. Music was in our family. My mother was a singer, and on my father’s side there was a violinist and a pianist. My grandmother was a poet.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  April (9)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bay Of Pigs (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capture (10)  |  Carry (127)  |  Fidel Castro (3)  |  Central (80)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Church (56)  |  Close (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Course (409)  |  Cuba (2)  |  Dad (4)  |  Dictator (4)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Early (185)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exile (4)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Family (94)  |  Farm (26)  |  Father (110)  |  Fight (44)  |  Find (998)  |  Government (110)  |  Grandmother (4)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Happening (58)  |  Happy (105)  |  Heart (229)  |  Home (170)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Involve (90)  |  Involved (90)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kid (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mother (114)  |  Move (216)  |  Music (129)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Note (34)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Operation (213)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Particularly (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personal (67)  |  Personally (7)  |  Pet (8)  |  Pianist (2)  |  Place (177)  |  Poet (83)  |  Political (121)  |  Pray (16)  |  President (31)  |  Pretence (6)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Probably (49)  |  Protect (58)  |  Really (78)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rumour (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Scary (3)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Side (233)  |  Sign (58)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Son (24)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Tell (340)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Training (80)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wife (41)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

My scientific work is motivated by an irresistible longing to understand the secrets of nature and by no other feeling. My love for justice and striving to contribute towards the improvement of human conditions are quite independent from my scientific interests.
In Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffman, Albert Einstein, the Human Side: New Glipses from his Archives (1971) 18. In Vladimir Burdyuzha, The Future of Life and the Future of Our Civilization (2006), 374.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (356)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Feeling (250)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Condition (6)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Independence (34)  |  Interest (386)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Justice (39)  |  Longing (19)  |  Love (309)  |  Motivated (14)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Work (1351)

Nature hides her secret because of her essential loftiness, but not by means of ruse.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Essential (199)  |  Hide (69)  |  Loftiness (3)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)

Nature is nowhere accustomed more openly to display her secret mysteries than in cases where she shows tracings of her workings apart from the beaten paths; nor is there any better way to advance the proper practice of medicine than to give our minds to the discovery of the usual law of nature, by careful investigation of cases of rarer forms of disease.
Letter IX, to John Vlackveld (24 Apr 1657), in The Circulation of the Blood (2006), 200.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Advance (280)  |  Better (486)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Display (56)  |  Form (959)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Path (144)  |  Practice (204)  |  Proper (144)  |  Show (346)  |  Way (1217)

Nature never wears a mean appearance. Neither does the wisest man extort her secret, and lose his curiosity by finding out all her perfection.
In Emerson’s Complete Works: Volume 1, Nature, Addresses and Lectures (1855, 1889), 13-14.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Extort (2)  |  Finding (30)  |  Lose (159)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Wear (18)

Nature tells every secret once.
From 'Behavior', collected in The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume 6: The Conduct of Life (1860), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Nature (1926)  |  Once (4)  |  Tell (340)  |  Telling (23)

Nature uncovers the inner secrets of nature in two ways: one by the force of bodies operating outside it; the other by the very movements of its innards. The external actions are strong winds, rains, river currents, sea waves, ice, forest fires, floods; there is only one internal force—earthquake.
About the Layers of the Earth and other Works on Geology (1757), trans. A. P. Lapov (1949), 45.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (327)  |  Current (118)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flood (50)  |  Force (487)  |  Forest (150)  |  Geology (220)  |  Ice (54)  |  Inner (71)  |  Internal (66)  |  Movement (155)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Outside (141)  |  Rain (62)  |  River (119)  |  Sea (308)  |  Strong (174)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Wave (107)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wind (128)

Nature! … We live in her midst and know her not. She is incessantly speaking to us, but betrays not her secret. We constantly act upon her, and yet have no power over her.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Betray (8)  |  Constantly (27)  |  Incessant (8)  |  Know (1518)  |  Live (628)  |  Midst (7)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Power (746)  |  Speak (232)  |  Speaking (119)

Neither had Watt of the Steam engine a heroic origin, any kindred with the princes of this world. The princes of this world were shooting their partridges… While this man with blackened fingers, with grim brow, was searching out, in his workshop, the Fire-secret.
From Chartism, collected in James Wood (ed.) The Carlyle Reader (1894), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Black (42)  |  Brow (3)  |  Engine (98)  |  Finger (44)  |  Fire (189)  |  Grim (5)  |  Hero (42)  |  Kindred (12)  |  Man (2251)  |  Origin (239)  |  Partridge (2)  |  Prince (13)  |  Searching (5)  |  Shooting (6)  |  Steam (80)  |  Steam Engine (45)  |  James Watt (11)  |  Workshop (14)  |  World (1774)

No pessimist ever discovered the secret of the stars or sailed an uncharted land, or opened a new doorway for the human spirit.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Discover (553)  |  Doorway (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Spirit (12)  |  Land (115)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Pessimist (7)  |  Sail (36)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Uncharted (10)

Nobody before the Pythagoreans had thought that mathematical relations held the secret of the universe. Twenty-five centuries later, Europe is still blessed and cursed with their heritage. To non-European civilizations, the idea that numbers are the key to both wisdom and power, seems never to have occurred.
In The Sleepwalkers: A History of Man's Changing Vision of the Universe (1959), Preface, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Bless (25)  |  Blessed (20)  |  Both (493)  |  Century (310)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Europe (43)  |  Heritage (20)  |  Idea (843)  |  Key (50)  |  Later (18)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nobody (104)  |  Number (699)  |  Occur (150)  |  Power (746)  |  Pythagoras (38)  |  Relation (157)  |  Still (613)  |  Thought (953)  |  Universe (857)  |  Wisdom (221)

Nuclear energy and foreign policy cannot coexist on the planet. The more deep the secret, the greater the determination of every nation to discover and exploit it. Nuclear energy insists on global government, on law, on order, and on the willingness of the community to take the responsibility for the acts of the individual. And to what end? Why, for liberty, first of blessings. Soldier, we await you, and if the
In 'The Talk of the Town', The New Yorker (18 Aug 1945), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Act (272)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Coexist (4)  |  Community (104)  |  Deep (233)  |  Determination (78)  |  Discover (553)  |  End (590)  |  Energy (344)  |  Exploit (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Global (35)  |  Government (110)  |  Greater (288)  |  Individual (404)  |  Insist (20)  |  Law (894)  |  More (2559)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Energy (15)  |  Order (632)  |  Planet (356)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Soldier (26)  |  Why (491)  |  Willingness (10)

On consideration and by the advice of learned men, I thought it improper to unfold the secrets of the art (alchemy) to the vulgar, as few persons are capable of using its mysteries to advantage and without detriment.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Advice (55)  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Art (657)  |  Capable (168)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Detriment (3)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Person (363)  |  Thought (953)  |  Vulgar (33)

Once I found out the secret of the universe. I have forgotten what it was, but I know that the Creator does not take Creation seriously, for I remember that He sat in Space with all His work in front of Him and laughed.
In The Hashish Man, collected in E.F. Bleiler (ed.), Gods, Men and Ghosts: The Best Supernatural Fiction of Lord Dunsany (1972), 158.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Creation (327)  |  Creator (91)  |  Find (998)  |  Forget (115)  |  Forgotten (53)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Remember (179)  |  Seriously (19)  |  Space (500)  |  Universe (857)  |  Work (1351)

One feature which will probably most impress the mathematician accustomed to the rapidity and directness secured by the generality of modern methods is the deliberation with which Archimedes approaches the solution of any one of his main problems. Yet this very characteristic, with its incidental effects, is calculated to excite the more admiration because the method suggests the tactics of some great strategist who foresees everything, eliminates everything not immediately conducive to the execution of his plan, masters every position in its order, and then suddenly (when the very elaboration of the scheme has almost obscured, in the mind of the spectator, its ultimate object) strikes the final blow. Thus we read in Archimedes proposition after proposition the bearing of which is not immediately obvious but which we find infallibly used later on; and we are led by such easy stages that the difficulties of the original problem, as presented at the outset, are scarcely appreciated. As Plutarch says: “It is not possible to find in geometry more difficult and troublesome questions, or more simple and lucid explanations.” But it is decidedly a rhetorical exaggeration when Plutarch goes on to say that we are deceived by the easiness of the successive steps into the belief that anyone could have discovered them for himself. On the contrary, the studied simplicity and the perfect finish of the treatises involve at the same time an element of mystery. Though each step depends on the preceding ones, we are left in the dark as to how they were suggested to Archimedes. There is, in fact, much truth in a remark by Wallis to the effect that he seems “as it were of set purpose to have covered up the traces of his investigation as if he had grudged posterity the secret of his method of inquiry while he wished to extort from them assent to his results.” Wallis adds with equal reason that not only Archimedes but nearly all the ancients so hid away from posterity their method of Analysis (though it is certain that they had one) that more modern mathematicians found it easier to invent a new Analysis than to seek out the old.
In The Works of Archimedes (1897), Preface, vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Add (40)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Approach (108)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Assent (12)  |  Bear (159)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blow (44)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conducive (3)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cover (37)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Decidedly (2)  |  Deliberation (5)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easiness (4)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Element (310)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Equal (83)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exaggeration (15)  |  Excite (15)  |  Execution (25)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extort (2)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feature (44)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Finish (59)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Generality (45)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grudge (2)  |  Hide (69)  |  Himself (461)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impress (64)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Involve (90)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lucid (8)  |  Main (28)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Old (481)  |  Order (632)  |  Original (58)  |  Outset (7)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plutarch (15)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Precede (23)  |  Present (619)  |  Probably (49)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remark (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Secure (22)  |  Secured (18)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectator (10)  |  Stage (143)  |  Step (231)  |  Strike (68)  |  Study (653)  |  Successive (73)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Tactic (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  John Wallis (3)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

One wonders whether the rare ability to be completely attentive to, and to profit by, Nature’s slightest deviation from the conduct expected of her is not the secret of the best research minds and one that explains why some men turn to most remarkably good advantage seemingly trivial accidents. Behind such attention lies an unremitting sensitivity.
In The Furtherance of Medical Research (1941), 98.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Ability (152)  |  Accident (88)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Attention (190)  |  Attentive (14)  |  Behind (137)  |  Best (459)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Deviation (17)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expected (5)  |  Explain (322)  |  Good (889)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Profit (52)  |  Rare (89)  |  Remarkable (48)  |  Research (664)  |  Seemingly (28)  |  Sensitivity (10)  |  Trivial (57)  |  Turn (447)  |  Why (491)  |  Wonder (236)

Only by following out the injunction of our great predecessor [William Harvey] to search out and study the secrets of Nature by way of experiment, can we hope to attain to a comprehension of 'the wisdom of the body and the understanding of the heart,' and thereby to the mastery of disease and pain, which will enable us to relieve the burden of mankind.
'The Wisdom of the Body', The Lancet (1923), 205, 870.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Body (537)  |  Burden (27)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Disease (328)  |  Enable (119)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Following (16)  |  Great (1574)  |  William Harvey (29)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hope (299)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Mastery (34)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Pain (136)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Relief (30)  |  Search (162)  |  Study (653)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Way (1217)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wisdom (221)

Only puny secrets need protection. Great discoveries are protected by public incredulity.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Discovery (780)  |  Great (1574)  |  Incredulity (5)  |  Need (290)  |  Protect (58)  |  Protection (36)  |  Public (96)  |  Puny (8)

Our children will enjoy in their homes electrical energy too cheap to meter. ... Transmutation of the elements, unlimited power, ability to investigate the working of living cells by tracer atoms, the secret of photosynthesis about to be uncovered, these and a host of other results, all in about fifteen short years. It is not too much to expect that our children will know of great periodic famines in the world only as matters of history, will travel effortlessly over the seas and under the and through the air with a minimum of danger and at great speeds, and will experience a life span far longer than ours, as disease yields and man comes to understand what causes him to age.
Speech at the 20th anniversary of the National Association of Science Writers, New York City (16 Sep 1954), asquoted in 'Abundant Power From Atom Seen', New York Times (17 Sep 1954) 5.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Age (499)  |  Aging (9)  |  Air (347)  |  Airplane (41)  |  All (4108)  |  Atom (355)  |  Cause (541)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cheapness (2)  |  Children (200)  |  Danger (115)  |  Disease (328)  |  Electrical (57)  |  Electricity (159)  |  Element (310)  |  Energy (344)  |  Enjoyment (35)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Experience (467)  |  Famine (15)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Home (170)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lifespan (7)  |  Living (491)  |  Man (2251)  |  Matter (798)  |  Meter (9)  |  Minimum (12)  |  Other (2236)  |  Photosynthesis (19)  |  Power (746)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Sea (308)  |  Ship (62)  |  Short (197)  |  Speed (65)  |  Submarine (12)  |  Through (849)  |  Transmutation (22)  |  Travel (114)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Unlimited (22)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)  |  Yield (81)

Our earth is very old, an old warrior that has lived through many battles. Nevertheless, the face of it is still changing, and science sees no certain limit of time for its stately evolution. Our solid earth, apparently so stable, inert, and finished, is changing, mobile, and still evolving. Its major quakings are largely the echoes of that divine far-off event, the building of our noble mountains. The lava floods and intriguing volcanoes tell us of the plasticity, mobility, of the deep interior of the globe. The slow coming and going of ancient shallow seas on the continental plateaus tell us of the rhythmic distortion of the deep interior-deep-seated flow and changes of volume. Mountain chains prove the earth’s solid crust itself to be mobile in high degree. And the secret of it all—the secret of the earthquake, the secret of the “temple of fire,” the secret of the ocean basin, the secret of the highland—is in the heart of the earth, forever invisible to human eyes.
In Our Mobile Earth (1926), 320.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Building (156)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Coming (114)  |  Crust (38)  |  Deep (233)  |  Degree (276)  |  Distortion (13)  |  Divine (112)  |  Earth (996)  |  Earthquake (34)  |  Event (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Face (212)  |  Finish (59)  |  Fire (189)  |  Flood (50)  |  Flow (83)  |  Forever (103)  |  Heart (229)  |  High (362)  |  Human (1468)  |  Inert (14)  |  Interior (32)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Lava (9)  |  Limit (280)  |  Lithosphere (2)  |  Magma (3)  |  Major (84)  |  Mobility (11)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Noble (90)  |  Ocean (202)  |  Old (481)  |  Plasticity (7)  |  Prove (250)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sea (308)  |  See (1081)  |  Slow (101)  |  Solid (116)  |  Stable (30)  |  Stately (12)  |  Still (613)  |  Tell (340)  |  Temple (42)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Volcano (39)

Our most distinguished “man of science” was the then veteran John Dalton. He was rarely absent from his seat in a warm corner of the room during the meetings of the Literary and Philosophical Society. Though a sober-minded Quaker, he was not devoid of some sense of fun; and there was a tradition amongst us, not only that he had once been a poet, but that, although a bachelor, two manuscript copies were still extant of his verses on the subject of matrimonial felicity; and it is my belief there was foundation for the tradition. The old man was sensitive on the subject of his age. Dining one day ... he was placed between two ladies ... [who] resolved to extract from him some admission on the tender point, but in vain. Though never other than courteous, Dalton foiled all their feminine arts and retained his secret. ... Dalton's quaint and diminutive figure was a strongly individualized one.
In Reminiscences of a Yorkshire Naturalist (1896), 73-74.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Absent (3)  |  Admission (17)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Bachelor (3)  |  Belief (578)  |  Biography (240)  |  Corner (57)  |  Courteous (2)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Devoid (11)  |  Diminutive (3)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Extract (40)  |  Felicity (4)  |  Feminine (4)  |  Figure (160)  |  Foiled (2)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Fun (38)  |  Individual (404)  |  Lady (11)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manuscript (9)  |  Meeting (20)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Never (1087)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poet (83)  |  Point (580)  |  Quaint (7)  |  Quaker (2)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Retain (56)  |  Room (40)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seat (6)  |  Sense (770)  |  Sensitive (14)  |  Society (326)  |  Still (613)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tradition (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Vain (83)  |  Verse (11)  |  Warm (69)

Our [scientists] enterprise, the exploration of nature’s secrets, had no beginning and will have no end. Exploration is as natural an activity for human beings as conversation.
In From Eros to Gaia (1992), 197.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Activity (210)  |  Beginning (305)  |  Being (1278)  |  Conversation (43)  |  End (590)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Will (2355)

Penetrating so many secrets, we cease to believe in the Unknowable. But there it sits, nevertheless, calmly licking its chops.
John Mitchinson and John Lloyd, If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?: Smart Quotes for Dumb Times (2009), 217.
Science quotes on:  |  Belief (578)  |  Cease (79)  |  Chop (7)  |  Lick (4)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Sit (48)  |  Unknowable (2)

Putting together the mysteries of nature with the laws of mathematics, he dared to hope to be able to unlock the secrets of both with the same key.
Epitaph of René Descartes
Epitaph
In Peter Pešic, Labyrinth: A Search for the Hidden Meaning of Science (2001), 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Dare (50)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Hope (299)  |  Key (50)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Together (387)  |  Unlock (10)

Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that this is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not bring us any closer to the secrets of the “Old One.” I, at any rate, am convinced that He is not playing at dice.
Letter to Max Born (4 Dec 1926). Collected in The Born-Einstein Letters: Correspondence between Albert Einstein and Max and Hedwig Born from 1916-1955 (1971), 91. Also seen as “God does not play dice [with the universe].”
Science quotes on:  |  Certainly (185)  |  Closer (43)  |  Dice (21)  |  God (757)  |  Inner (71)  |  Lot (151)  |  Mechanic (119)  |  Mechanics (131)  |  Old (481)  |  Playing (42)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Say (984)  |  Tell (340)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)

Questions of personal priority, however interesting they may be to the persons concerned, sink into insignificance in the prospect of any gain of deeper insight into the secrets of nature.
As quoted in Silvanus Phillips Thompson, The Life of Lord Kelvin (1910), Vol. 2, 602.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (228)  |  Deeper (4)  |  Gain (145)  |  Insight (102)  |  Insignificance (10)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Person (363)  |  Personal (67)  |  Priority (10)  |  Prospect (30)  |  Question (621)  |  Sink (37)

Radium could become very dangerous in criminal hands, and here the question can be raised whether mankind benefits from knowing the secrets of Nature…
Nobel Lecture (6 June 1905), 'Radioactive Substances, Especially Radium', collected in Stig Lundqvist (ed.), Nobel Lectures: Physics 1901-1921 (1998), 78. A longer version of this quote on this web page begins, “It can even be thought that…”
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Criminal (19)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mankind (339)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Question (621)  |  Radium (25)

Rutherford was as straightforward and unpretentious as a physicist as he was elsewhere in life, and that no doubt was one of the secrets of his success. “I was always a believer in simplicity, being a simple man myself,” he said. If a principle of physics could not be explained to a barmaid, he insisted, the problem was with the principle, not the barmaid.
In Great Physicists (2001), 328.
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Believer (25)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Explain (322)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Myself (212)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Principle (507)  |  Problem (676)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Straightforward (10)  |  Success (302)

Science unfolded her treasures and her secrets to the desperate demands of men, and placed in their hands agencies and apparatus almost decisive in their character.
Reflecting on the outcome of World War I, and an ominous future.
The Second World War: The Gathering Storm (1948, 1986), Vol. 1, 35. Quoting himself from his earlier book, The Aftermath: Being a Sequel to The World Crisis (1929).
Science quotes on:  |  Apparatus (68)  |  Character (243)  |  Decisive (25)  |  Demand (123)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Future (429)  |  Ominous (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Treasure (57)  |  War (225)  |  Weapon (92)  |  World (1774)

Science, unguided by a higher abstract principle, freely hands over its secrets to a vastly developed and commercially inspired technology, and the latter, even less restrained by a supreme culture saving principle, with the means of science creates all the instruments of power demanded from it by the organization of Might.
In the Shadow of Tomorrow, ch. 9 (1936).
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  All (4108)  |  Commercially (3)  |  Create (235)  |  Culture (143)  |  Demand (123)  |  Develop (268)  |  Freely (13)  |  Hand (143)  |  High (362)  |  Inspire (52)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Latter (21)  |  Less (103)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Organization (114)  |  Power (746)  |  Principle (507)  |  Restrain (6)  |  Save (118)  |  Science (3879)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Technology (257)  |  Vastly (8)

Secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster.
In A Christmas Carol (1843, 1846), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Oyster (11)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Contained (3)  |  Solitary (15)

Seeing and thinking have done much for human progress; in the sphere of mind and morals everything, and could the world have been saved by armchair philosophy, the Greeks would have done it; but only a novum organon could do this, the powerful possibilities of which were only revealed when man began to search our the secrets of nature by way of experiment, to use the words of Harvey.
Address at the opening of the new Pathological Institute of the Royal Infirmary, Glasgow (4 Oct 1911). Printed in 'The Pathological Institute of a General Hospital', Glasgow Medical Journal (1911), 76, 326.
Science quotes on:  |  Armchair (3)  |  Do (1908)  |  Everything (476)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Greek (107)  |  William Harvey (29)  |  Human (1468)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moral (195)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Organon (2)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Revelation (48)  |  Search (162)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Use (766)  |  Way (1217)  |  Word (619)  |  World (1774)

Selborne is the secret, private parish inside each one of us.
Alluding to the Hampshire village of Selborne about which curate Gilbert White wrote A Natural History of Selborne, one of the most frequently published books in the English language.
The Naturalist in Britain: A Social History (1976), 51.
Science quotes on:  |  Book (392)  |  History (673)  |  Language (293)  |  Most (1731)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural History (70)  |  White (127)  |  Gilbert White (13)

Since the discovery of secret things and in the investigation of hidden causes, stronger reasons are obtained from sure experiments and demonstrated arguments than from probable conjectures and the opinions of philosophical speculators of the common sort; therefore to the end that the noble substance of that great loadstone, our common mother (the earth), still quite unknown, and also the forces extraordinary and exalted of this globe may the better be understood, we have decided first to begin with the common stony and ferruginous matter, and magnetic bodies, and the parts of the earth that we may handle and may perceive with the senses; then to proceed with plain magnetic experiments, and to penetrate to the inner parts of the earth.
On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies and on the Great Magnet the Earth: A New Physiology, Demonstrated with many Arguments and Experiments (1600), trans. P. Fleury Mottelay (1893), Author’s Preface, xlvii.
Science quotes on:  |  Argument (138)  |  Begin (260)  |  Better (486)  |  Cause (541)  |  Common (436)  |  Conjecture (49)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Earth (996)  |  End (590)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  First (1283)  |  Force (487)  |  Great (1574)  |  Handle (28)  |  Inner (71)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Magnetic (44)  |  Magnetism (41)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mother (114)  |  Noble (90)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sense (770)  |  Still (613)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Substance (248)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Understood (156)  |  Unknown (182)

So-called extraordinary events always split into two extremes naturalists who have not witnessed them: those who believe blindly and those who do not believe at all. The latter have always in mind the story of the golden goose; if the facts lie slightly beyond the limits of their knowledge, they relegate them immediately to fables. The former have a secret taste for marvels because they seem to expand Nature; they use their imagination with pleasure to find explanations. To remain doubtful is given to naturalists who keep a middle path between the two extremes. They calmly examine facts; they refer to logic for help; they discuss probabilities; they do not scoff at anything, not even errors, because they serve at least the history of the human mind; finally, they report rather than judge; they rarely decide unless they have good evidence.
Quoted in Albert V. Carozzi, Histoire des sciences de la terre entre 1790 et 1815 vue à travers les documents inédités de la Societé de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève, trans. Albert V. and Marguerite Carozzi. (1990), 175.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Belief (578)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Blindness (11)  |  Call (769)  |  Decision (91)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doubtful (29)  |  Error (321)  |  Event (216)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Examine (78)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Fable (12)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Former (137)  |  Gold (97)  |  Golden (45)  |  Good (889)  |  Goose (12)  |  History (673)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Judge (108)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Limit (280)  |  Logic (287)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Naturalist (70)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Path (144)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Probability (130)  |  Rare (89)  |  Relegation (3)  |  Remain (349)  |  Report (38)  |  Scoff (7)  |  Service (110)  |  So-Called (71)  |  Split (13)  |  Story (118)  |  Taste (90)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Witness (54)

The animals of the Burgess Shale are holy objects–in the unconventional sense that this word conveys in some cultures. We do not place them on pedestals and worship from afar. We climb mountains and dynamite hillsides to find them. We quarry them, split them, carve them, draw them, and dissect them, struggling to wrest their secrets. We vilify and curse them for their damnable intransigence. They are grubby little creatures of a sea floor 530 million years old, but we greet them with awe because they are the Old Ones, and they are trying to tell us something.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Afar (6)  |  Animal (617)  |  Awe (43)  |  Carve (5)  |  Climb (35)  |  Convey (16)  |  Creature (233)  |  Culture (143)  |  Curse (17)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Dynamite (6)  |  Find (998)  |  Floor (20)  |  Greet (6)  |  Hillside (4)  |  Holy (34)  |  Intransigence (2)  |  Little (707)  |  Million (114)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Object (422)  |  Old (481)  |  Pedestal (3)  |  Place (177)  |  Quarry (13)  |  Sea (308)  |  Sense (770)  |  Something (719)  |  Split (13)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Tell (340)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Unconventional (4)  |  Vilify (2)  |  Word (619)  |  Worship (32)  |  Wrest (3)  |  Year (933)

The beautiful is a manifestation of secret laws of nature, which but for this phenomenon would have remained hidden from us for ever.
Quoted in The Life of Goethe (1905), 101, citing Sprüche in Prosa, No. 197.
Science quotes on:  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Law (894)  |  Manifestation (58)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Remain (349)  |  Remained (2)

The close observation of little things is the secret of success in business, in art, in science, and in every pursuit in life.
In Self-help: With Illustrations of Character and Conduct (1861), 100.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Business (149)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)

The dream is a little hidden door in the innermost and most secret recesses of the psyche, opening into the cosmic night which was psyche long before there was any ego-consciousness, and which will remain psyche no matter how far our ego-consciousness may extend.
Carl Jung
In Civilization in Transition (1964), 144.
Science quotes on:  |  Consciousness (123)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Door (93)  |  Dream (208)  |  Ego (17)  |  Extend (128)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Night (120)  |  Opening (15)  |  Psyche (9)  |  Psychology (154)  |  Recess (8)  |  Remain (349)  |  Will (2355)

The End of our Foundation is the knowledge of Causes; and secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of Human Empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
'New Atlantis' (1626) in James Spedding, Robert Ellis and Douglas Heath (eds.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1887-1901), Vol. 3, 156.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bound (119)  |  Cause (541)  |  End (590)  |  Foundation (171)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Motion (310)  |  Possible (552)  |  Science (3879)  |  Thing (1915)

The end of our foundation [Salomon's House in the New Atlantis] is the knowledge of Causes and the secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of Human Empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
In Francis Bacon and William Rawle (ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon: Philosophical Works (1887), 156.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Bound (119)  |  Cause (541)  |  Effect (393)  |  Empire (14)  |  End (590)  |  Enlargement (7)  |  Foundation (171)  |  House (140)  |  Human (1468)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Motion (310)  |  New (1216)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Possible (552)  |  Thing (1915)

The Europeans and the Americans are not throwing $10 billion down this gigantic tube for nothing. We're exploring the very forefront of physics and cosmology with the Large Hadron Collider because we want to have a window on creation, we want to recreate a tiny piece of Genesis to unlock some of the greatest secrets of the universe.
Quoted by Alexander G. Higgins (AP), in 'Particle Collider: Black Hole or Crucial Machine', The Journal Gazette (7 Aug 2009).
Science quotes on:  |  America (127)  |  Billion (95)  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Creation (327)  |  Dollar (22)  |  Down (456)  |  Europe (43)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Forefront (2)  |  Genesis (23)  |  Gigantic (40)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Large (394)  |  Large Hadron Collider (6)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Piece (38)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Research (664)  |  Throw (43)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Tiny (72)  |  Tube (5)  |  Universe (857)  |  Unlock (10)  |  Unlocking (2)  |  Want (497)  |  Window (58)

The fascination of any search after truth lies not in the attainment, which at best is found to be very relative, but in the pursuit, where all the powers of the mind and character are brought into play and are absorbed by the task. One feels oneself in contact with something that is infinite and one finds joy that is beyond expression in sounding the abyss of science and the secrets of the infinite mind.
In Isabel Fothergill Smith, The Stone Lady: a Memoir of Florence Bascom (1981). Cited in Earth Sciences History: Journal of the History of the Earth Sciences Society (992), Vols. 11-12, 39.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Abyss (29)  |  All (4108)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Best (459)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Character (243)  |  Contact (65)  |  Expression (175)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Feel (367)  |  Find (998)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lie (364)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Oneself (33)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Something (719)  |  Sounding (2)  |  Task (147)  |  Truth (1057)

The genuine spirit of Mathesis is devout. No intellectual pursuit more truly leads to profound impressions of the existence and attributes of a Creator, and to a deep sense of our filial relations to him, than the study of these abstract sciences. Who can understand so well how feeble are our conceptions of Almighty Power, as he who has calculated the attraction of the sun and the planets, and weighed in his balance the irresistible force of the lightning? Who can so well understand how confused is our estimate of the Eternal Wisdom, as he who has traced out the secret laws which guide the hosts of heaven, and combine the atoms on earth? Who can so well understand that man is made in the image of his Creator, as he who has sought to frame new laws and conditions to govern imaginary worlds, and found his own thoughts similar to those on which his Creator has acted?
In 'The Imagination in Mathematics', North American Review, 85, 226.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstract (124)  |  Act (272)  |  Almighty (23)  |  Atom (355)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Attribute (61)  |  Balance (77)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Combine (57)  |  Conception (154)  |  Condition (356)  |  Confused (12)  |  Creator (91)  |  Deep (233)  |  Devout (5)  |  Earth (996)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Existence (456)  |  Feeble (27)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Frame (26)  |  Genuine (52)  |  Govern (64)  |  Guide (97)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Host (16)  |  Image (96)  |  Imaginary (16)  |  Impression (114)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Irresistible (16)  |  Law (894)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lightning (45)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  New (1216)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Profound (104)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Sense (770)  |  Similar (36)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Study (653)  |  Sun (385)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trace (103)  |  Truly (116)  |  Understand (606)  |  Weigh (49)  |  Wisdom (221)  |  World (1774)

The great secret, known to internists…, but still hidden from the general public, is that most things get better by themselves. Most things, in fact, are better by morning.
In 'Aspects of Biomedical Science Policy', The New England Journal of Medicine (12 Oct 1972), 3. Also published as Occasional Paper of the Institute of Medicine.
Science quotes on:  |  Better (486)  |  Diagnosis (64)  |  Fact (1210)  |  General (511)  |  General Public (7)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Internist (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Morning (94)  |  Most (1731)  |  Recover (11)  |  Still (613)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)

The history of mathematics may be instructive as well as agreeable; it may not only remind us of what we have, but may also teach us to increase our store. Says De Morgan, “The early history of the mind of men with regards to mathematics leads us to point out our own errors; and in this respect it is well to pay attention to the history of mathematics.” It warns us against hasty conclusions; it points out the importance of a good notation upon the progress of the science; it discourages excessive specialization on the part of the investigator, by showing how apparently distinct branches have been found to possess unexpected connecting links; it saves the student from wasting time and energy upon problems which were, perhaps, solved long since; it discourages him from attacking an unsolved problem by the same method which has led other mathematicians to failure; it teaches that fortifications can be taken by other ways than by direct attack, that when repulsed from a direct assault it is well to reconnoiter and occupy the surrounding ground and to discover the secret paths by which the apparently unconquerable position can be taken.
In History of Mathematics (1897), 1-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  Agreeable (18)  |  Apparently (20)  |  Assault (12)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attention (190)  |  Branch (150)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Connect (125)  |  Augustus De Morgan (45)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Discover (553)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Early (185)  |  Energy (344)  |  Error (321)  |  Excessive (23)  |  Failure (161)  |  Find (998)  |  Fortification (6)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hasty (6)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Mathematics (7)  |  Importance (286)  |  Increase (210)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Lead (384)  |  Link (43)  |  Long (790)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Notation (27)  |  Occupy (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Part (222)  |  Path (144)  |  Pay (43)  |  Point (580)  |  Point Out (8)  |  Position (77)  |  Possess (156)  |  Problem (676)  |  Progress (465)  |  Reconnoitre (2)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remind (13)  |  Repulse (2)  |  Respect (207)  |  Save (118)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Show (346)  |  Solve (130)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Store (48)  |  Student (300)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Surround (30)  |  Teach (277)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unconquerable (3)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Warn (5)  |  Waste (101)  |  Way (1217)

The human race has reached a turning point. Man has opened the secrets of nature and mastered new powers. If he uses them wisely, he can reach new heights of civilization. If he uses them foolishly, they may destroy him. Man must create the moral and legal framework for the world which will insure that his new powers are used for good and not for evil.
State of the Union Address (4 Jan 1950). In William J. Federer, A Treasury of Presidential Quotations (2004), 291.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (204)  |  Create (235)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Evil (116)  |  Framework (31)  |  Good (889)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Man (2251)  |  Master (178)  |  Moral (195)  |  Morality (52)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  New (1216)  |  Open (274)  |  Point (580)  |  Power (746)  |  Race (268)  |  Reach (281)  |  Turning Point (8)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The imagination is the secret and marrow of civilization. It is the very eye of faith. The soul without imagination is what an observatory would be without a telescope.
In Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit (1887), 9.
Science quotes on:  |  Civilization (204)  |  Eye (419)  |  Faith (203)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Marrow (5)  |  Observatory (15)  |  Soul (226)  |  Telescope (98)

The inner circle of creative mathematicians have the well-kept trade secret that in a great many cases theorems come first and axioms second.
In 'The Narrow Mathematician', The American Mathematical Monthly (Jun-Jul 1962), 69, No. 6, 464.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (63)  |  Case (99)  |  Circle (110)  |  Creative (137)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Inner (71)  |  Many (4)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Second (62)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Trade (31)

The intellect is a cleaver; it discerns and rifts its way into the secret of things.
In 'Where I Lived and What I Lived For', in Walden: Or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1899), 112.
Science quotes on:  |  Discern (33)  |  Discerning (16)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Rift (3)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Way (1217)

The interpretations of science do not give us this intimate sense of objects as the interpretations of poetry give it; they appeal to a limited faculty, and not to the whole man. It is not Linnaeus or Cavendish or Cuvier who gives us the true sense of animals, or water, or plants, who seizes their secret for us, who makes us participate in their life; it is Shakspeare [sic] … Wordsworth … Keats … Chateaubriand … Senancour.
'Maurice de Guerin' Essays in Criticism (1865), in R.H. Super (ed.) The Complete Prose Works of Matthew Arnold: Lectures and Essays in Criticism (1962), Vol. 3, 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Do (1908)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Life (1795)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Man (2251)  |  Object (422)  |  Plant (294)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sense (770)  |  Water (481)  |  Whole (738)

The joy of suddenly learning a former secret and the joy of suddenly discovering a hitherto unknown truth are the same to me—both have the flash of enlightenment, the almost incredibly enhanced vision, and the ecstasy and euphoria of released tension.
In I Want to be a Mathematician: An Automathography (1985), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Both (493)  |  Discover (553)  |  Ecstasy (9)  |  Enhance (16)  |  Enlightenment (20)  |  Euphoria (2)  |  Flash (49)  |  Former (137)  |  Incredible (41)  |  Joy (107)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learning (274)  |  Released (2)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Tension (24)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Vision (123)

The mathematician’s best work is art, a high and perfect art, as daring as the most secret dreams of imagination, clear, and limpid. Mathematical genius and artistic genius touch each other.
As quoted in Havelock Ellis, The Dance of Life (1923), 139.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Best (459)  |  Clear (100)  |  Daring (17)  |  Dream (208)  |  Genius (284)  |  High (362)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Limpid (3)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Touch (141)  |  Work (1351)

The mathematician’s best work is art, a high perfect art, as daring as the most secret dreams of imagination, clear and limpid. Mathematical genius and artistic genius touch one another.
As quoted, without citation, in Havelock Ellis, The Dance of Life (1923), 139.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Art (657)  |  Artistic (23)  |  Best (459)  |  Clear (100)  |  Dare (50)  |  Daring (17)  |  Dream (208)  |  Genius (284)  |  High (362)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Limpid (3)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mathematics And Art (8)  |  Most (1731)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Touch (141)  |  Work (1351)

The most heated defenders of a science, who cannot endure the slightest sneer at it, are commonly those who have not made very much progress in it and are secretly aware of this defect.
Aphorism 8 in Notebook F, as translated by R.J. Hollingdale in Aphorisms (1990), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Defect (31)  |  Defend (30)  |  Defender (5)  |  Heat (174)  |  Most (1731)  |  Progress (465)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sneer (9)

The nature of the connexion between the mind and nervous matter has ever been, and must continue to be, the deepest mystery in physiology; and they who study the laws of Nature, as ordinances of God, will regard it as one of those secrets of his counsels ‘which Angels desire to look into.’
[Co-author with William Bowman]
In Robert Todd and William Bowman, The Physiological Anatomy and Physiology of Man (1845), Vol. 1, 262. Bowman was a British surgeon (1816-1892).
Science quotes on:  |  Angel (44)  |  Author (167)  |  British (41)  |  Coauthor (2)  |  Connection (162)  |  Continue (165)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Deepest (4)  |  Desire (204)  |  God (757)  |  Law (894)  |  Look (582)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Ordinance (2)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Regard (305)  |  Study (653)  |  Surgeon (63)  |  Will (2355)

THE OATH. I swear by Apollo [the healing God], the physician and Aesclepius [son of Apollo], and Health [Hygeia], and All-heal [Panacea], and all the gods and goddesses, that, according to my ability and judgment, I will keep this Oath and this stipulation—to reckon him who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my substance with him, and relieve his necessities if required; to look upon his offspring in the same footing as my own brothers, and to teach them this art, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, and every other mode of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of the Art to my own sons, and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, but to none others. I will follow that system of regimen which, according to my ability and judgment, I consider for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous. I will give no deadly medicine to any one if asked, nor suggest any such counsel; and in like manner I will not give to a woman a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and with holiness I will pass my life and practice my Art. I will not cut persons laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be done by men who are practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses I enter, I will go into them for the benefit of the sick, and will abstain from every voluntary act of mischief and corruption; and, further, from the seduction of females or males, of freemen and slaves. Whatever, in connection with my professional practice or not, in connection with it, I see or hear, in the life of men, which ought not to be spoken of abroad, I will not divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept secret. While I continue to keep this Oath unviolated, may it be granted to me to enjoy life and the practice of the art, respected by all men, in all times! But should I trespass and violate this Oath, may the reverse be my lot!
The Genuine Works of Hippocrates, trans. Francis Adams (1886), Vol. 2, 344-5.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  Abortion (4)  |  Abroad (18)  |  Abstain (7)  |  According (237)  |  Act (272)  |  All (4108)  |  Art (657)  |  Ask (411)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Bound (119)  |  Brother (43)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consider (416)  |  Continue (165)  |  Corruption (15)  |  Counsel (11)  |  Cut (114)  |  Deadly (21)  |  Enter (141)  |  Equally (130)  |  Female (50)  |  Follow (378)  |  God (757)  |  Grant (73)  |  Healing (25)  |  Health (193)  |  Hear (139)  |  Holiness (6)  |  House (140)  |  Impart (23)  |  Instruction (91)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Learn (629)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Life (1795)  |  Look (582)  |  Lot (151)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Mischief (13)  |  Mischievous (11)  |  Oath (10)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Other (2236)  |  Parent (76)  |  Pass (238)  |  Patient (199)  |  Person (363)  |  Physician (273)  |  Practice (204)  |  Practitioner (20)  |  Precept (10)  |  Professional (70)  |  Reckon (31)  |  Reckoning (19)  |  Required (108)  |  Respect (207)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Seduction (3)  |  See (1081)  |  Share (75)  |  Sick (81)  |  Slave (37)  |  Stone (162)  |  Substance (248)  |  Swear (6)  |  System (537)  |  Teach (277)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trespass (5)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Woman (151)  |  Work (1351)

The open secret of real success is to throw your whole personality into your problem.
How to Solve it: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (1957), 207.
Science quotes on:  |  Open (274)  |  Personality (62)  |  Problem (676)  |  Success (302)  |  Whole (738)

The origin of an adaptive structure and the purposes it comes to fulfill are only chance combinations. Purposefulness is a very human conception for usefulness. It is usefulness looked at backwards. Hard as it is to imagine, inconceivably hard it may appear to many, that there is no direct relation between the origin of useful variations and the ends they come to serve, yet the modern zoologist takes his stand as a man of science on this ground. He may admit in secret to his father confessor, the metaphysician, that his poor intellect staggers under such a supposition, but he bravely carries forward his work of investigation along the only lines that he has found fruitful.
'For Darwin', The Popular Science Monthly (1909), 74, 380.
Science quotes on:  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Chance (239)  |  Combination (144)  |  Conception (154)  |  Direct (225)  |  End (590)  |  Father (110)  |  Forward (102)  |  Fruitful (58)  |  Ground (217)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Imagine (164)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Metaphysician (7)  |  Modern (385)  |  Origin (239)  |  Poor (136)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stand (274)  |  Structure (344)  |  Supposition (50)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Variation (90)  |  Work (1351)  |  Zoologist (12)

The prestige of government has undoubtedly been lowered considerably by the prohibition law. For nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced. It is an open secret that the dangerous increase of crime in the United States is closely connected with this.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Closely (12)  |  Connect (125)  |  Crime (38)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Destructive (8)  |  Enforce (11)  |  Government (110)  |  Increase (210)  |  Land (115)  |  Law (894)  |  Lowered (2)  |  More (2559)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Open (274)  |  Pass (238)  |  Passing (76)  |  Prestige (14)  |  Prohibition (3)  |  Respect (207)  |  State (491)  |  Undoubtedly (3)  |  United States (23)

The prohibition of science would be contrary to the Bible, which in hundreds of places teaches us how the greatness and the glory of God shine forth marvelously in all His works, and is to be read above all in the open book of the heavens. And let no one believe that the reading of the most exalted thoughts which are inscribed upon these pages is to be accomplished through merely staring up at the radiance of the stars. There are such profound secrets and such lofty conceptions that the night labors and the researches of hundreds and yet hundreds of the keenest minds, in investigations extending over thousands of years would not penetrate them, and the delight of the searching and finding endures forever.
As stated by William H. Hobbs, 'The Making of Scientific Theories,' Address of the president of Michigan Academy of Science at the Annual Meeting, Ann Arbor (28 Mar 1917) in Science (11 May 1917), N.S. 45, No. 1167, 443.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Book (392)  |  Conception (154)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Delight (108)  |  Exalt (27)  |  Exalted (22)  |  Forever (103)  |  God (757)  |  Greatness (54)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Labor (107)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Open (274)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Profound (104)  |  Prohibition (3)  |  Radiance (7)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Science (3879)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  Thought (953)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Through (849)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)

The real secret of success is enthusiasm.
Science quotes on:  |  Enthusiasm (52)  |  Success (302)

The science of alchemy I like very well. I like it not only for the profits it brings in melting metals, in decocting, preparing, extracting, and distilling herbs, roots; I like it also for the sake of the allegory and secret signification, which is exceedingly fine, touching the resurrection of the dead at the last day.
In The Table Talk (1569).
Science quotes on:  |  Alchemy (30)  |  Allegory (7)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Dead (59)  |  Exceedingly (28)  |  Extract (40)  |  Herb (5)  |  Last (426)  |  Melt (16)  |  Metal (84)  |  Prepare (37)  |  Preparing (21)  |  Profit (52)  |  Resurrection (4)  |  Root (120)  |  Sake (58)  |  Science (3879)  |  Signification (2)  |  Touch (141)  |  Touching (16)

The secret of science is to ask the right question, and it is the choice of problem more than anything else that marks the man of genius in the scientific world.
As quoted in the Inaugural Sir Henry Tizard Memorial Lecture at Westminster School (21 Feb 1963) by Sir George Thomson 'Research in Theory and Practice'. As cited Ray Corrigan, Digital Decision Making: Back to the Future (2007), 142.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Choice (110)  |  Genius (284)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  More (2559)  |  Problem (676)  |  Question (621)  |  Right (452)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  World (1774)

The secret of success is constancy to purpose.
Speech (24 Jun 1872) at banquet of the National Union of Conservative and Constitutional Associations, Crystal Palace, London, as quoted in 'Mr. Disraeli at Sydenham', The Times (25 Jun 1872), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Constancy (12)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Success (302)

The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Creativity (76)  |  Hide (69)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Source (93)

The secret [of my success] is comprised in three words — Work, Finish, Publish.
Advice to a young chemist, recalled in obituary, 'Faraday', in William Crookes (ed.), The Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science (30 Aug 1867), 16, No. 404, 111. William Crookes was identified as that young chemist (and the obituary writer) in Silvanus Phillips Thompson, Michael Faraday: His Life and Work (1898), 267.
Science quotes on:  |  Finish (59)  |  Publication (101)  |  Success (302)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

The secrets of evolution are death and time—the deaths of enormous numbers of lifeforms that were imperfectly adapted to the environment; and time for a long succession of small mutations.
Cosmos (1980, 1985), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Death (388)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Extinction (74)  |  Lifeform (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Mutation (37)  |  Number (699)  |  Small (477)  |  Succession (77)  |  Time (1877)

The three of us have worked on the development of the small and totally harmless fruit fly, Drosophila. This animal has been extremely cooperative in our hands - and has revealed to us some of its innermost secrets and tricks for developing from a single celled egg to a complex living being of great beauty and harmony. ... None of us expected that our work would be so successful or that our findings would ever have relevance to medicine.
Nobel Banquet Speech, 10 Dec 1995
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Being (1278)  |  Complex (188)  |  Development (422)  |  Drosophila (7)  |  Egg (69)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fly (146)  |  Fruit (102)  |  Fruit Fly (6)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Living (491)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Relevance (16)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Single (353)  |  Small (477)  |  Successful (123)  |  Trick (35)  |  Work (1351)

The universe may be a mystery but it’s no secret.
On back cover of A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing the Universe (1994).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Universe (857)

The value the world sets upon motives is often grossly unjust and inaccurate. Consider, for example, two of them: mere insatiable curiosity and the desire to do good. The latter is put high above the former, and yet it is the former that moves some of the greatest men the human race has yet produced: the scientific investigators. What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep down in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows by life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. No man of self-respect could devote himself to pathology on such terms. What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity–his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. His prototype is not the liberator releasing slaves, the good Samaritan lifting up the fallen, but the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes.
In 'Types of Men: The Scientist', Prejudices (1923), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Consider (416)  |  Cure (122)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Down (456)  |  Find (998)  |  Former (137)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Harm (39)  |  High (362)  |  Himself (461)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Inaccurate (4)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Insatiable (7)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Investigator (67)  |  Know (1518)  |  Last (426)  |  Liberator (2)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motive (59)  |  Move (216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Pathology (18)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Praise (26)  |  Produced (187)  |  Profit (52)  |  Prototype (9)  |  Race (268)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Respect (207)  |  Save (118)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scoundrel (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Self (267)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Slave (37)  |  Society (326)  |  Soul (226)  |  Surely (101)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Two (937)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Unjust (6)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Value (365)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)

The whole secret of the study of nature lies in learning how to use one’s eyes.
In Nouvelles Lettres d'un Voyageur (1869).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Eye (419)  |  Learning (274)  |  Lie (364)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Study (653)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)

The year that Rutherford died (1938 [sic]) there disappeared forever the happy days of free scientific work which gave us such delight in our youth. Science has lost her freedom. Science has become a productive force. She has become rich but she has become enslaved and part of her is veiled in secrecy. I do not know whether Rutherford would continue to joke and laugh as he used to.
'Notes from Here and There', Science Policy News (1969), 1, No 2, 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Continue (165)  |  Delight (108)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Do (1908)  |  Force (487)  |  Forever (103)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Happy (105)  |  Joke (83)  |  Know (1518)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Money (170)  |  Productive (32)  |  Sir Ernest Rutherford (53)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Slave (37)  |  Veil (26)  |  Work (1351)  |  Year (933)  |  Youth (101)

There are three ways to encourage initiative. One is to cut off people’s heads as they do in Russia. Another is to subject people to public criticism, which is impossible in such secret work as this. A third way is to set up competition. This is Livermore’s most valuable function: simply to be a competitor.
Explaining the merit in setting up a second laboratory, at Livermore, California, to continue his thermonuclear research after he left Los Alamos due to disagreements he had there. As quoted in Robert Coughlan, 'Dr. Edward Teller’s Magnificent Obsession', Life (6 Sep 1954), 70-72.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Competition (39)  |  Competitor (4)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Cut (114)  |  Do (1908)  |  Encourage (40)  |  Execution (25)  |  Function (228)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Initiative (17)  |  Most (1731)  |  People (1005)  |  Public (96)  |  Russia (13)  |  Set (394)  |  Simply (53)  |  Subject (521)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)

There is a road in the hearts of all of us, hidden and seldom traveled, which leads to an unknown, secret place.
Quoted in Kim Lim (ed.), 1,001 Pearls of Spiritual Wisdom: Words to Enrich, Inspire, and Guide Your Life (2014), 249
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Heart (229)  |  Hide (69)  |  Lead (384)  |  Place (177)  |  Road (64)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Travel (114)  |  Unknown (182)

There is another form of temptation even more fraught with danger. This is the disease of curiosity. ... It is this which drives us on to try to discover the secrets of nature, those secrets which are beyond our understanding, which can avail us nothing and which men should not wish to learn.
In Dragons of Eden by Carl Sagan (1977).
Science quotes on:  |  Beyond (308)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Danger (115)  |  Discover (553)  |  Disease (328)  |  Form (959)  |  Learn (629)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Try (283)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Wish (212)

There will still be things that machines cannot do. They will not produce great art or great literature or great philosophy; they will not be able to discover the secret springs of happiness in the human heart; they will know nothing of love and friendship.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  Friendship (18)  |  Great (1574)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Heart (229)  |  Human (1468)  |  Know (1518)  |  Literature (103)  |  Love (309)  |  Machine (257)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Produce (104)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Will (2355)

These rocks, these bones, these fossil forms and shells
Shall yet be touched with beauty and reveal
The secrets if the book of earth to man.
In The Book of Earth (1925), 157.
Science quotes on:  |  Beauty (299)  |  Bone (95)  |  Book (392)  |  Earth (996)  |  Form (959)  |  Fossil (136)  |  Man (2251)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealing (4)  |  Rock (161)  |  Shell (63)  |  Touch (141)

This day relenting God
Hath placed within my hand
A wondrous thing; and God
Be praised. At His command,
Seeking His secret deeds
With tears and toiling breath,
I find thy cunning seeds,
O million-murdering Death.
I know this little thing
A myriad men will save.
O Death, where is thy sting?
Thy victory, O Grave?
Poem he wrote following the discovery that the malaria parasite was carried by the amopheline mosquito.
From a privately printed book of verse, anonymously published, by R.R., In Exile (1906). As cited by S. Weir Mitchell, in 'The Literary Side of a Physician’s Life—Ronald Ross as a Poet', Journal of the American Medical Association (7 Sep 1907), 49, No. 10, 853. In his book, Ronald Ross stated “These verses were written in India between the years 1891 and 1899, as a means of relief after the daily labors of a long, scientific research.”
Science quotes on:  |  Breath (59)  |  Command (58)  |  Cunning (16)  |  Death (388)  |  Deed (34)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Find (998)  |  God (757)  |  Grave (52)  |  Know (1518)  |  Little (707)  |  Malaria (10)  |  Mosquito (14)  |  Myriad (31)  |  Parasite (33)  |  Poem (96)  |  Save (118)  |  Seed (93)  |  Sting (3)  |  Tear (42)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Victory (39)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wondrous (21)

This is, in truth, the first charm of chemistry, and the secret of the almost universal interest excited by its discoveries. The serious complacency which is afforded by the sense of truth, utility, permanence, and progression, blends with and ennobles the exhilarating surprise and the pleasurable sting of curiosity, which accompany the propounding and the solving of an Enigma... If in SHAKPEARE [sic] we find Nature idealized into Poetry, through the creative power of a profound yet observant meditation, so through the meditative observation of a DAVY, a WOOLLASTON [sic], or a HATCHETT; we find poetry, as if were, substantiated and realized in nature.
Essays on the Principle of Method, Essay VI (1818). In The Collected Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: The Friend (1969), Vol. 4, 1, Barbara E. Rooke (ed.), 471.
Science quotes on:  |  Accompany (22)  |  Charm (51)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Creative (137)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (47)  |  Enigma (14)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Interest (386)  |  Meditation (19)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Observation (555)  |  Permanence (24)  |  Poetry (143)  |  Power (746)  |  Profound (104)  |  Progression (23)  |  Sense (770)  |  Serious (91)  |  William Shakespeare (102)  |  Surprise (86)  |  Through (849)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universal (189)  |  Utility (49)  |  William Hyde Wollaston (3)

Though Darwin may proclaim the law,
And spread it far abroad, O!
The man that first the secret saw,
Was honest old Monboddo.
The Architect precedence takes
Of him that bears the hod, 0!
So up and at them, Land of Cakes!
We’ll vindicate Monboddo.
Anonymous
From Ballad, 'The Memory of Monboddo', in Blackwood’s Magazine (Sep 1861), 90, No. 551, 364, Verse 5 (of 6). Written to the Air, The Looking Glass. It is footnoted to explain that Lord (James Burnett) Monboddo “has written a book about the origin of language, in which he traces monkeys up to men.” The note is quoted and cited from Boswell’s Life of Johnson, Vol. 4, 73.
Science quotes on:  |  Abroad (18)  |  Architect (29)  |  Bear (159)  |  Cake (5)  |  Charles Darwin (303)  |  First (1283)  |  Honest (50)  |  Land (115)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Lord James Burnett Monboddo (2)  |  Old (481)  |  Precedence (4)  |  Proclaim (30)  |  Saw (160)  |  Spread (83)  |  Vindicate (4)

Though much new light is shed by ... studies in radioactivity, the nucleus of the atom, with its hoard of energy, thus continues to present us with a fascinating mystery. ... Our assault on atoms has broken down the outer fortifications. We feel that we know the fundamental rules according to which the outer part of the atom is built. The appearance and properties of the electron atmosphere are rather familiar. Yet that inner citadel, the atomic nucleus, remains unconquered, and we have reason to believe that within this citadel is secreted a great treasure. Its capture may form the main objective of the physicists’ next great drive.
'Assault on Atoms' (Read 23 Apr 1931 at Symposium—The Changing World) Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society (1931), 70, No. 3, 229.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Appearance (140)  |  Assault (12)  |  Atmosphere (103)  |  Atom (355)  |  Belief (578)  |  Broken (56)  |  Built (7)  |  Capture (10)  |  Citadel (4)  |  Continue (165)  |  Down (456)  |  Drive (55)  |  Electron (93)  |  Energy (344)  |  Familiar (43)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Feel (367)  |  Form (959)  |  Fortification (6)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Great (1574)  |  Hoard (2)  |  Inner (71)  |  Know (1518)  |  Light (607)  |  Main (28)  |  Mystery (177)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Objective (91)  |  Outer (13)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Present (619)  |  Property (168)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remain (349)  |  Rule (294)  |  Study (653)  |  Treasure (57)

To arrive at the simplest truth, as Newton knew and practiced, requires years of contemplation. Not activity Not reasoning. Not calculating. Not busy behaviour of any kind. Not reading. Not talking. Not making an effort. Not thinking. Simply bearing in mind what it is one needs to know. And yet those with the courage to tread this path to real discovery are not only offered practically no guidance on how to do so, they are actively discouraged and have to set about it in secret, pretending meanwhile to be diligently engaged in the frantic diversions and to conform with the deadening personal opinions which are continually being thrust upon them.
In 'Appendix 1', The Laws of Form (1969), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Actively (3)  |  Activity (210)  |  Arrive (35)  |  Behaviour (41)  |  Being (1278)  |  Busy (28)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Conform (13)  |  Contemplation (73)  |  Continual (43)  |  Courage (69)  |  Diligent (19)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Diversion (10)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effort (227)  |  Engage (39)  |  Frantic (2)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Kind (557)  |  Know (1518)  |  Making (300)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Offer (141)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Path (144)  |  Personal (67)  |  Practically (10)  |  Practice (204)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Real (149)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Require (219)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simply (53)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thrust (12)  |  Tread (17)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Year (933)

To me it is enough to wonder at the secrets.
on 'Biography,' 1991.
Science quotes on:  |  Enough (340)  |  Wonder (236)

To unfold the secret laws and relations of those high faculties of thought by which all beyond the merely perceptive knowledge of the world and of ourselves is attained or matured, is a object which does not stand in need of commendation to a rational mind.
An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Attain (125)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Commendation (3)  |  Faculty (72)  |  High (362)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Matured (2)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Need (290)  |  Object (422)  |  Ourself (13)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Perception (97)  |  Perceptive (3)  |  Rational (90)  |  Relation (157)  |  Stand (274)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unfold (12)  |  World (1774)

To-day we no longer beg of nature; we command her, because we have discovered certain of her secrets and shall discover others each day. We command her in the name of laws she can not challenge because they are hers; these laws we do not madly ask her to change, we are the first to submit to them. Nature can only be governed by obeying her.
In Henri Poincaré and George Bruce Halsted (trans.), The Value of Science: Essential Writings of Henri Poincare (1907), 85.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Beg (5)  |  Certain (550)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Change (593)  |  Command (58)  |  Discover (553)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Govern (64)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Mad (53)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Obey (40)  |  Other (2236)  |  Submit (18)

Today there remain but a few small areas on the world’s map unmarked by explorers’ trails. Human courage and endurance have conquered the Poles; the secrets of the tropical jungles have been revealed. The highest mountains of the earth have heard the voice of man. But this does not mean that the youth of the future has no new worlds to vanquish. It means only that the explorer must change his methods.
On the Trail of Ancient Man (1926), 5.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Change (593)  |  Conquer (37)  |  Courage (69)  |  Earth (996)  |  Endurance (6)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Explorer (28)  |  Future (429)  |  Human (1468)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Man (2251)  |  Map (44)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Pole (46)  |  Remain (349)  |  Reveal (148)  |  Revealed (60)  |  Small (477)  |  Today (314)  |  World (1774)  |  Youth (101)

Try and penetrate with our limited means the secrets of nature and you will find that, behind all the discernible concatenations, there remains something subtle, intangible and inexplicable. Veneration for this force beyond anything that we can comprehend is my religion. To that extent I am, in point of fact, religious.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Behind (137)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Comprehend (40)  |  Discernible (9)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Inexplicable (8)  |  Intangible (6)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Point (580)  |  Religion (361)  |  Religious (126)  |  Remain (349)  |  Something (719)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Try (283)  |  Veneration (2)  |  Will (2355)

We are always chasing after things that other companies won't touch. That is a big secret to our success.
[About Sony, 1998]
From a 1998 interview with The Associated Press, quoted in obituary, L.A. Times (24 Apr 2011).
Science quotes on:  |  Chase (14)  |  Company (59)  |  Other (2236)  |  Success (302)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Touch (141)

We boast that we are mastering the secrets of Nature, but Nature has no secrets. We only tear off one by one the infinite peels of our ignorance.
Maxim 1895 in Maxims for a Modern Man (1965), 218.
Science quotes on:  |  Boast (22)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Mastering (11)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Peel (5)  |  Tear (42)

We do not ask for what useful purpose the birds do sing, for song is their pleasure since they were created for singing. Similarly, we ought not to ask why the human mind troubles to fathom the secrets of the heavens ... The diversity of the phenomena of Nature is so great, and the treasures hidden in the heavens so rich, precisely in order that the human mind shall never be lacking in fresh nourishment.
From Mysterium Cosmographicum. Quote as translated in Carl Sagan, Cosmos (1980, 1985), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Bird (149)  |  Creation (327)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fathom (15)  |  Fresh (67)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Lacking (2)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Order (632)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Precision (68)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Richness (14)  |  Singing (19)  |  Song (37)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Useful (250)  |  Usefulness (86)  |  Why (491)

We do not ask what hope of gain makes a little bird warble, since we know that it takes delight in singing because it is for that very singing that the bird was made, so there is no need to ask why the human mind undertakes such toil in seeking out these secrets of the heavens. ... And just as other animals, and the human body, are sustained by food and drink, so the very spirit of Man, which is something distinct from Man, is nourished, is increased, and in a sense grows up on this diet of knowledge, and is more like the dead than the living if it is touched by no desire for these things.
Mysterium Cosmographicum. Translated by A. M. Duncan in The Secret of the Universe (1981), 55.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Ask (411)  |  Asking (73)  |  Bird (149)  |  Body (537)  |  Dead (59)  |  Delight (108)  |  Desire (204)  |  Diet (54)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Distinction (72)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drink (53)  |  Food (199)  |  Gain (145)  |  Grow (238)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Hope (299)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Increase (210)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Little (707)  |  Living (491)  |  Made (14)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  More (2559)  |  Need (290)  |  Nourishment (26)  |  Other (2236)  |  Seeking (31)  |  Sense (770)  |  Singing (19)  |  Something (719)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Sustain (46)  |  Sustenance (3)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Toil (25)  |  Touch (141)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Why (491)

We have corrupted the term research to mean study and experiment and development toward selected objectives, and we have even espoused secret and classified projects. This was not the old meaning of university research. We need a new term, or the revival of a still older one, to refer to the dedicated activities of the scholar, the intensive study of special aspects of a subject for its own sake, motivated by the love of knowledge and truth.
In 'Technology and National Research Policy', Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Oct 1953), 292.
Science quotes on:  |  Activity (210)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Corrupt (4)  |  Dedicated (19)  |  Development (422)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Intensive (8)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Love (309)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Motivated (14)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Need (290)  |  New (1216)  |  Objective (91)  |  Old (481)  |  Project (73)  |  Research (664)  |  Sake (58)  |  Scholar (48)  |  Select (44)  |  Special (184)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  Subject (521)  |  Term (349)  |  Truth (1057)  |  University (121)

We have the opportunity of observing her [Nature] through these delicate and pellucid teguments of the bodies of Insects acting according to her usual course and way, undisturbed, whereas when we endeavour to pry into her secrets by breaking open the doors upon her, and dissecting and mangling creatures whil'st there is life yet within them, we find her indeed at work, but put into such disorder by the violence offer'd, as it may easily be imagin'd how differing a thing we should find, if we could, as we can with a Microscope, in these smaller creatures, quietly peep in at the windows, without frighting her out of her usual byas.
Micrographia, or some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries thereupon (1665), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Course (409)  |  Creature (233)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Disorder (41)  |  Door (93)  |  Endeavour (63)  |  Find (998)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Insect (77)  |  Life (1795)  |  Microscope (80)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Offer (141)  |  Open (274)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Through (849)  |  Violence (34)  |  Way (1217)  |  Window (58)  |  Work (1351)

We must not, however, reject all discoveries of secrets and all new inventions. It is with them as with theatrical pieces, there may be one good out of a thousand.
In A Philosophical Dictionary (1824), Vol. 1, 66.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Good (889)  |  Invention (369)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Reject (63)  |  Theatre (5)  |  Thousand (331)

We speak of it [astrology] as an extinct science; yet let but an eclipse of the sun happen, or a comet visit the evening sky, and in a moment we all believe in astrology. In vain do you tell the gazers on such spectacles that a solar eclipse is only the moon acting for the time as a candle-extinguisher to the sun, and give them bits of smoked glass to look through, and draw diagrams on the blackboard to explain it all. They listen composedly, and seem convinced, but in their secret hearts they are saying—“What though you can see it through a glass darkly, and draw it on a blackboard, does that show that it has no moral significance? You can draw a gallows or a guillotine, or write the Ten Commandments on a blackboard, but does that deprive them of meaning?” And so with the comet. No man will believe that the splendid stranger is hurrying through the sky solely on a momentous errand of his own. No! he is plainly signalling, with that flashing sword of his, something of importance to men,—something at all events that, if we could make it out, would be found of huge concern to us.
From 'Introductory Lecture on Technology for 1858-59', published as The Progress of the Telegraph (1859), 19-20.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Astrology (43)  |  Blackboard (11)  |  Candle (30)  |  Comet (54)  |  Commandment (8)  |  Concern (228)  |  Deprive (12)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Draw (137)  |  Eclipse (23)  |  Event (216)  |  Explain (322)  |  Extinct (21)  |  Glass (92)  |  Guillotine (5)  |  Happen (274)  |  Heart (229)  |  Importance (286)  |  Listen (73)  |  Look (582)  |  Man (2251)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Moment (253)  |  Momentous (5)  |  Moon (237)  |  Moral (195)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Show (346)  |  Significance (113)  |  Sky (161)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Spectacle (33)  |  Spectacles (10)  |  Splendid (23)  |  Sun (385)  |  Tell (340)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vain (83)  |  Will (2355)  |  Write (230)

We stand by the river and admire the great body of water flowing so sweetly on; could you trace it back to its source, you might find a mere rivulet, but meandering on, joined by other streams and by secret springs, and fed by the rains and dews of heaven, it gathers volume and force, makes its way through the gorges of the mountains, plows, widens and deepens its channel through the provinces, and attains its present majesty.
From Address (1 Aug 1875), 'The Growth of Principles' at Saratoga. Collected in William L. Snyder (ed.), Great Speeches by Great Lawyers: A Collection of Arguments and Speeches (1901), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (125)  |  Back (390)  |  Body (537)  |  Channel (21)  |  Deepen (6)  |  Dew (9)  |  Erosion (19)  |  Find (998)  |  Force (487)  |  Gather (72)  |  Geology (220)  |  Gorge (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Hydrology (9)  |  Majesty (21)  |  Meander (3)  |  Mountain (185)  |  Other (2236)  |  Plow (7)  |  Present (619)  |  Province (35)  |  Rain (62)  |  River (119)  |  Rivulet (5)  |  Source (93)  |  Spring (133)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stream (81)  |  Through (849)  |  Trace (103)  |  Volume (19)  |  Water (481)  |  Way (1217)  |  Widen (10)

What animates a great pathologist? Is it the desire to cure disease, to save life? Surely not, save perhaps as an afterthought. He is too intelligent, deep in his soul, to see anything praiseworthy in such a desire. He knows from life-long observation that his discoveries will do quite as much harm as good, that a thousand scoundrels will profit to every honest man, that the folks who most deserve to be saved will probably be the last to be saved. ... What actually moves him is his unquenchable curiosity—his boundless, almost pathological thirst to penetrate the unknown, to uncover the secret, to find out what has not been found out before. ... [like] the dog sniffing tremendously at an infinite series of rat-holes. ... And yet he stands in the very front rank of the race
In 'The Scientist', Prejudices: third series (1922), 269-70.
Science quotes on:  |  Afterthought (6)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Cure (122)  |  Curiosity (128)  |  Deep (233)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Desire (204)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Disease (328)  |  Do (1908)  |  Dog (70)  |  Find (998)  |  Good (889)  |  Great (1574)  |  Harm (39)  |  Honest (50)  |  Honesty (25)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinite Series (8)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Last (426)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  Man (2251)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motivation (27)  |  Move (216)  |  Observation (555)  |  Pathological (21)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Penetrate (67)  |  Penetration (18)  |  Praiseworthy (2)  |  Profit (52)  |  Race (268)  |  Rank (67)  |  Rat (37)  |  Rat-Hole (2)  |  Save (118)  |  Saving (20)  |  Scoundrel (8)  |  See (1081)  |  Series (149)  |  Soul (226)  |  Stand (274)  |  Surely (101)  |  Thirst (11)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Uncover (20)  |  Uncovering (2)  |  Unknown (182)  |  Will (2355)

What attracted me to immunology was that the whole thing seemed to revolve around a very simple experiment: take two different antibody molecules and compare their primary sequences. The secret of antibody diversity would emerge from that. Fortunately at the time I was sufficiently ignorant of the subject not to realise how naive I was being.
From Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1984), collected in Tore Frängsmyr and Jan Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures in Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 248.
Science quotes on:  |  Antibody (6)  |  Attraction (56)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Being (1278)  |  Compare (69)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Different (577)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fortunately (8)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Ignorant (90)  |  Immunology (14)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Naive (13)  |  Primary (80)  |  Realisation (4)  |  Revolve (25)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Subject (521)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Whole (738)

What is a scientist?… We give the name scientist to the type of man who has felt experiment to be a means guiding him to search out the deep truth of life, to lift a veil from its fascinating secrets, and who, in this pursuit, has felt arising within him a love for the mysteries of nature, so passionate as to annihilate the thought of himself.
The Montessori Method, trans. Anne E. George,(1964), 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilate (9)  |  Arising (22)  |  Deep (233)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fascinating (37)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Guide (97)  |  Himself (461)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lift (55)  |  Love (309)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Name (333)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Passion (114)  |  Passionate (22)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Search (162)  |  Self (267)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Type (167)  |  Veil (26)

What terrible questions we are learning to ask! The former men believed in magic, by which temples, cities, and men were swallowed up, and all trace of them gone. We are coming on the secret of a magic which sweeps out of men's minds all vestige of theism and beliefs which they and their fathers held and were framed upon.
In 'Illusions', The Atlantic Monthly (Nov 1858), 1, 60.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Belief (578)  |  City (78)  |  Coming (114)  |  Father (110)  |  Former (137)  |  Frame (26)  |  Hold (95)  |  Learning (274)  |  Magic (86)  |  Men (20)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Question (621)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Temple (42)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Trace (103)  |  Vestige (11)

What we call man is a mechanism made up of … uncrystallized matter … all the colloid matter of his mechanism is concentrated in a countless number of small cells. … [T]hese cells [are] dwelling places, communes, a walled town within which are many citizens. ... [T]hese are the units of life and when they pass out into space man as we think we know him is dead, a mere machine from which the crew have left,so to speak. ... [T]hese units are endowed with great intelligence. They have memories, they must be divided into countless thousands of groups, most are workers, there are directing groups. Some are chemists, they manufacture the most complicated chemicals that are secreted by the glands.
Diary and Sundry Observations of Thomas Alva Edison (1948), 203-44. In Mark Seltzer, Serial Killers (1998), 215-6.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Citizen (51)  |  Colloid (5)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Countless (36)  |  Divided (50)  |  Endowed (52)  |  Gland (14)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Machine (257)  |  Man (2251)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Memory (134)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  Number (699)  |  Pass (238)  |  Secretion (5)  |  Small (477)  |  Space (500)  |  Speak (232)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thousand (331)  |  Wall (67)

What’s the best part of being a mathematician? I'm not a religious man, but it’s almost like being in touch with God when you’re thinking about mathematics. God is keeping secrets from us, and it’s fun to try to learn some of the secrets.
From interview with Donald J. Albers. In John H. Ewing and Frederick W. Gehring, Paul Halmos Celebrating 50 Years of Mathematics (1991), 21.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  God (757)  |  Learn (629)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Religious (126)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Touch (141)  |  Try (283)

While Newton seemed to draw off the veil from some of the mysteries of nature, he showed at the same time the imperfections of the mechanical philosophy; and thereby restored her ultimate secrets to that obscurity, in which they ever did and ever will remain.
The History Of Great Britain, Containing the Commonwealth and the Reigns of Charles II. and James II. (2nd ed. 1759), Vol. 2, 450.
Science quotes on:  |  Draw (137)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Obscurity (27)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Remain (349)  |  Show (346)  |  Time (1877)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Veil (26)  |  Will (2355)

Who of us would not be glad to lift the veil behind which the future lies hidden; to cast a glance at the next advances of our science and at the secrets of its development during future centuries? What particular goals will there be toward which the leading mathematical spirits of coming generations will strive? What new methods and new facts in the wide and rich field of mathematical thought will the new centuries disclose?
Opening of Lecture (1900), 'Mathematische Probleme' (Mathematical Problems), to the International Congress of Mathematicians, Paris. From the original German reprinted in David Hilbert: Gesammelte Abhandlungen (Collected Treatises, 1970), Vol. 3. For full citation, see the quote that begins, “This conviction of the solvability…”, on the David Hilbert Quotes page on this website.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Behind (137)  |  Cast (66)  |  Century (310)  |  Coming (114)  |  Development (422)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Field (364)  |  Future (429)  |  Generation (242)  |  Glad (7)  |  Glance (34)  |  Goal (145)  |  Hide (69)  |  Lead (384)  |  Lie (364)  |  Lift (55)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  New (1216)  |  Next (236)  |  Particular (76)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Thought (953)  |  Toward (45)  |  Veil (26)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

Why do I call [Isaac Newton] a magician? Because he looked on the whole universe and all that is in it as a riddle, as a secret which could be read by applying pure thought to certain evidence, certain mystic clues which God had laid about the world to allow a sort of philosopher's treasure hunt.
In 'Newton, the Man' (1946). In Geoffrey Keynes (ed.), Essays in Biography, 2nd edition (1951), 313.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Clue (17)  |  Do (1908)  |  Evidence (248)  |  God (757)  |  Hidden (42)  |  Hunt (30)  |  Look (582)  |  Magician (14)  |  Mystic (20)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Pure (291)  |  Read (287)  |  Riddle (28)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treasure (57)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  Why (491)  |  World (1774)

Why should a lobster be any more ridiculous than a dog? ... or a cat, or a gazelle, or a lion, or any other animal one chooses to take for a walk? I have a liking for lobsters. They are peaceful, serious creatures. ... Goethe had an aversion to dogs, and he wasn't mad. They know the secrets of the sea, they don't bark.
[By walking a lobster at the end of a blue silk ribbon in the gardens of the Palais-Royal, he mocked middle-class pretensions, but caused concern for his sanity.]
Quoted by his friend, Théophile Gautier, in Portraits et souvenirs littéraires (1875). In Théophile Gautier, My Fantoms, translated by Richard Holmes (1976), 150.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Aversion (8)  |  Bark (18)  |  Cat (47)  |  Choice (110)  |  Choose (112)  |  Class (164)  |  Concern (228)  |  Creature (233)  |  Dog (70)  |  End (590)  |  Garden (60)  |  Gazelle (2)  |  Know (1518)  |  Liking (4)  |  Lion (22)  |  Lobster (5)  |  Mad (53)  |  Madness (33)  |  More (2559)  |  Other (2236)  |  Peace (108)  |  Ridicule (23)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Royal (57)  |  Sanity (9)  |  Sea (308)  |  Serious (91)  |  Seriousness (10)  |  Silk (13)  |  Walk (124)  |  Why (491)

With the key of the secret he marches faster
From strength to strength, and for night brings day,
While classes or tribes too weak to master
The flowing conditions of life, give way.
From poem 'Rex' from one of his Poetry Notebooks, used as epigraph to 'Education', The Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Vol X: Lectures and Biographical Sketches (1883), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Bring (90)  |  Class (164)  |  Condition (356)  |  Day (42)  |  Fast (45)  |  Faster (50)  |  Flow (83)  |  Give (202)  |  Key (50)  |  Life (1795)  |  March (46)  |  Master (178)  |  Night (120)  |  Strength (126)  |  Tribe (22)  |  Way (1217)  |  Weak (71)

Young men, have confidence in those powerful and safe methods, of which we do not yet know all the secrets. And, whatever your career may be, do not let yourselves become tainted by a deprecating and barren skepticism … Live … until the time comes when you have the immense happiness of thinking that you have contributed in some way to the progress and to the good of humanity.
Acceptance speech (27 Dec 1892) when awarded a 70th birthday commemorative medal by the Academy of Sciences in the great theatre of the Sorbonne, as translated in René Vallery-Radot and Mrs R.L. Devonshire (trans.), The Life of Pasteur (1902), Vol. 2, 297-298. Pasteur addressed an audience that included “deep masses of students” and “boys from the lycées.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Barren (30)  |  Become (815)  |  Career (75)  |  Confidence (69)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Do (1908)  |  Good (889)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Immense (86)  |  Know (1518)  |  Live (628)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Progress (465)  |  Safe (54)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Skepticism (28)  |  Taint (10)  |  Tainted (5)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Young (227)

Young men, trust those certain and powerful methods, only the first secrets of which we yet know. And all of you, whatever your career, … do not allow yourselves to be discouraged by the gloom of certain hours which pass a nation.
Advice in Speech (27 Dec 1892) to young scientists at the Golden Jubilee celebration for Pasteur's 70th birthday. As translated in Nature (1893), 47, 205. Also translated as “Young men, have faith in those powerful and safe methods, of which we do not yet know all the secrets. And, whatever your career may be, do not let yourselves be discouraged by the sadness of certain hours which pass over nations.” By René J. Dubos, quoted and cited in Maurice B. Strauss, Familiar Medical Quotations (1968), 526.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Career (75)  |  Certain (550)  |  Discouraged (2)  |  Do (1908)  |  First (1283)  |  Gloom (9)  |  Hour (186)  |  Know (1518)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Nation (193)  |  Pass (238)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Student (300)  |  Trust (66)  |  Whatever (234)  |  Young (227)

Your Grace will no doubt have learnt from the weekly reports of one Marco Antonio Bragadini, called Mamugnano. … He is reported to be able to turn base metal into gold… . He literally throws gold about in shovelfuls. This is his recipe: he takes ten ounces of quicksilver, puts it into the fire, and mixes it with a drop of liquid, which he carries in an ampulla. Thus it promptly turns into good gold. He has no other wish but to be of good use to his country, the Republic. The day before yesterday he presented to the Secret Council of Ten two ampullas with this liquid, which have been tested in his absence. The first test was found to be successful and it is said to have resulted in six million ducats. I doubt not but that this will appear mighty strange to your Grace.
Anonymous
'The Famous Alchemist Bragadini. From Vienna on the 1st day of November 1589'. As quoted in George Tennyson Matthews (ed.) News and Rumor in Renaissance Europe: The Fugger Newsletters (1959), 173. A handwritten collection of news reports (1568-1604) by the powerful banking and merchant house of Fugger in Ausburg.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (117)  |  Call (769)  |  Council (8)  |  Country (251)  |  Doubt (304)  |  Drop (76)  |  Fire (189)  |  First (1283)  |  Gold (97)  |  Good (889)  |  Grace (31)  |  Liquid (50)  |  Literally (30)  |  Mamugnano (2)  |  Mercury (49)  |  Metal (84)  |  Other (2236)  |  Present (619)  |  Quicksilver (7)  |  Recipe (7)  |  Republic (15)  |  Result (677)  |  Strange (157)  |  Successful (123)  |  Test (211)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)  |  Yesterday (36)

[On the practical applications of particle physics research with the Large Hadron Collider.] Sometimes the public says, “What's in it for Numero Uno? Am I going to get better television reception? Am I going to get better Internet reception?” Well, in some sense, yeah. … All the wonders of quantum physics were learned basically from looking at atom-smasher technology. … But let me let you in on a secret: We physicists are not driven to do this because of better color television. … That's a spin-off. We do this because we want to understand our role and our place in the universe.
As quoted in Alan Boyle, 'Discovery of Doom? Collider Stirs Debate', article (8 Sep 2008) on a msnbc.com web page. The article writer included the information that Kaku noted that past discoveries from the world of particle physics ushered in many of the innovations we enjoy today, ranging from satellite communications and handheld media players to medical PET scanners (which put antimatter to practical use)."
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atom Smasher (2)  |  Better (486)  |  Color (137)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Internet (17)  |  Large (394)  |  Large Hadron Collider (6)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Looking (189)  |  Particle (194)  |  Particle Physics (13)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Practical (200)  |  Public (96)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Physics (18)  |  Reception (15)  |  Research (664)  |  Role (86)  |  Satellite (28)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Spin (26)  |  Spin-Off (2)  |  Technology (257)  |  Television (30)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)  |  Want (497)  |  Wonder (236)

[Richard Feynman] would be standing in front of the hall smiling at us all as we came in, his fingers tapping out a complicated rhythm on the black top of the demonstration bench that crossed the front of the lecture hall. As latecomers took their seats, he picked up the chalk and began spinning it rapidly through his fingers in a manner of a professional gambler playing with a poker chip, still smiling happily as if at some secret joke. And then—still smiling—he talked to us about physics, his diagrams and equations helping us to share his understanding. It was no secret joke that brought the smile and the sparkle in his eye, it was physics. The joy of physics!
Describing his experience as a student attending Feynman lectures, in Introduction to Richard P. Feynman Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! : Adventures of a Curious Character (1986, 2010), 9-10.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bench (8)  |  Chalk (8)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Diagram (20)  |  Equation (132)  |  Eye (419)  |  Joke (83)  |  Joy (107)  |  Lecture (105)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Playing (42)  |  Professional (70)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Share (75)  |  Smile (31)  |  Sparkle (8)  |  Spinning (18)  |  Still (613)  |  Through (849)  |  Top (96)  |  Understanding (513)

[Simplicio] is much puzzled and perplexed. I think I hear him say, 'To whom then should we repair for the decision of our controversies if Aristotle were removed from the choir? What other author should we follow in the schools, academies, and studies? What philosopher has written all the divisions of Natural Philosophy, and so methodically, without omitting as much as a single conclusion? Shall we then overthrow the building under which so many voyagers find shelter? Shall we destroy that sanctuary, that Prytaneum, where so many students find commodious harbour; where without exposing himself to the injuries of the air, with only the turning over of a few leaves, one may learn all the secrets of Nature.'
Dialogue on the Great World Systems (1632). Revised and Annotated by Giorgio De Santillana (1953), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Aristotle (163)  |  Author (167)  |  Building (156)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Decision (91)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Division (65)  |  Find (998)  |  Follow (378)  |  Hear (139)  |  Himself (461)  |  Learn (629)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Philosophy (52)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Philosopher (258)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Sanctuary (11)  |  Say (984)  |  School (219)  |  Shelter (22)  |  Single (353)  |  Student (300)  |  Think (1086)

[The secret of success is] … Before everything else, get ready.
From Henry Ford and Ralph Waldo Trine, The Power that Wins (1929), 147. Often seen paraphrased as “Before everything else, getting ready is the secret of success.”
Science quotes on:  |  Everything (476)  |  Ready (39)  |  Success (302)

…what is man in the midst of nature? A nothing in comparison with the infinite, an all in comparison with nothingness: a mean between nothing and all. Infinitely far from comprehending the extremes, the end of things and their principle are for him inevitably concealed in an impenetrable secret; equally incapable of seeing the nothingness whence he is derived, and the infinity in which he is swallowed up.
Pensées. Collected in Blaise Pascal and O.W. Wright (trans.), The Thoughts, Letters and Opuscules of Blaise Pascal (1859), 160. There are versions by other translators. For example, an alternate translation for the last sentence is: [Man is] “equally incapable of seeing the nothingness from which he emerges and the infinity in which he is engulfed.”
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Concealed (25)  |  Concealment (10)  |  Deriving (2)  |  Emergence (33)  |  End (590)  |  Equal (83)  |  Equally (130)  |  Extreme (75)  |  Impenetrable (5)  |  Incapability (2)  |  Incapable (40)  |  Inevitability (9)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Infinity (90)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Nothingness (12)  |  Principle (507)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Thing (1915)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.