Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “A change in motion is proportional to the motive force impressed and takes place along the straight line in which that force is impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Exaggeration

Exaggeration Quotes (15 quotes)

Extremely hazardous is the desire to explain everything, and to supply whatever appears a gap in history—for in this propensity lies the first cause and germ of all those violent and arbitrary hypotheses which perplex and pervert the science of history far more than the open avowal of our ignorance, or the uncertainty of our knowledge: hypotheses which give an oblique direction, or an exaggerated and false extension, to a view of the subject originally not incorrect.
In Friedrich von Schlegel and James Burton Robertson (trans.), The Philosophy of History (1835), 12.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Cause (541)  |  Desire (204)  |  Direction (175)  |  Everything (476)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extension (59)  |  First (1283)  |  Gap (33)  |  Germ (53)  |  Hazard (18)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  More (2559)  |  Open (274)  |  Perplexing (2)  |  Pervert (7)  |  Science (3879)  |  Subject (521)  |  Supply (93)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  View (488)  |  Whatever (234)

Good work is no done by “humble” men. It is one of the first duties of a professor, for example, in any subject, to exaggerate a little both the importance of his subject and his own importance in it. A man who is always asking “Is what I do worth while?” and “Am I the right person to do it?” will always be ineffective himself and a discouragement to others. He must shut his eyes a little and think a little more of his subject and himself than they deserve. This is not too difficult: it is harder not to make his subject and himself ridiculous by shutting his eyes too tightly.
In A Mathematician’s Apology (1940, 1967), 66.
Science quotes on:  |  Asking (73)  |  Both (493)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Deserving (4)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Do (1908)  |  Duty (68)  |  Eye (419)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Harder (6)  |  Himself (461)  |  Humble (50)  |  Importance (286)  |  Ineffective (5)  |  Little (707)  |  Man (2251)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Professor (128)  |  Ridiculous (24)  |  Right (452)  |  Shut (41)  |  Subject (521)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Tightly (2)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worth (169)

I believe that certain erroneous developments in particle theory ... are caused by a misconception by some physicists that it is possible to avoid philosophical arguments altogether. Starting with poor philosophy, they pose the wrong questions. It is only a slight exaggeration to say that good physics has at times been spoiled by poor philosophy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Altogether (9)  |  Argument (138)  |  Avoid (116)  |  Belief (578)  |  Cause (541)  |  Certain (550)  |  Development (422)  |  Erroneous (30)  |  Good (889)  |  Misconception (5)  |  Particle (194)  |  Philosophical (23)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physicist (259)  |  Physics (533)  |  Poor (136)  |  Pose (9)  |  Possible (552)  |  Question (621)  |  Say (984)  |  Slight (31)  |  Spoil (7)  |  Start (221)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wrong (234)

I came to realize that exaggerated concern about what others are doing can be foolish. It can paralyze effort, and stifle a good idea. One finds that in the history of science almost every problem has been worked out by someone else. This should not discourage anyone from pursuing his own path.
From Theodore von Karman and Lee Edson (ed.), The Wind and Beyond: Theodore von Karman, Pioneer in Aviation and Pathfinder in Science (1967).
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (228)  |  Discourage (13)  |  Discouragement (8)  |  Doing (280)  |  Effort (227)  |  Find (998)  |  Foolish (40)  |  Good (889)  |  History (673)  |  History Of Science (63)  |  Idea (843)  |  Other (2236)  |  Paralysis (9)  |  Path (144)  |  Problem (676)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Realization (43)  |  Realize (147)  |  Science (3879)  |  Stifle (5)  |  Work (1351)

In earlier times they had no statistics and so they had to fall back on lies. Hence the huge exaggerations of primitive literature, giants, miracles, wonders! It's the size that counts. They did it with lies and we do it with statistics: but it's all the same.
In Model Memoirs and Other Sketches from Simple to Serious (1971), 265.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Back (390)  |  Count (105)  |  Do (1908)  |  Fall (230)  |  Giant (67)  |  Lie (364)  |  Literature (103)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Primitive (75)  |  Size (60)  |  Statistics (155)  |  Time (1877)  |  Wonder (236)

In his wretched life of less than twenty-seven years Abel accomplished so much of the highest order that one of the leading mathematicians of the Nineteenth Century (Hermite, 1822-1901) could say without exaggeration, “Abel has left mathematicians enough to keep them busy for five hundred years.” Asked how he had done all this in the six or seven years of his working life, Abel replied, “By studying the masters, not the pupils.”
The Queen of the Sciences (1931, 1938), 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Niels Henrik Abel (15)  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Century (310)  |  Enough (340)  |  Charles Hermite (10)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Life (1795)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Order (632)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Say (984)  |  Study (653)  |  Studying (70)  |  Wretched (8)  |  Year (933)

In psycho-analysis nothing is true except the exaggerations.
Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life (1974), 28.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (233)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Psychoanalysis (37)

It is hardly an exaggeration to say that a chimpanzee kept in solitude is not a real chimpanzee at all.
The Mentality of Apes (1925), 293.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Ape (53)  |  Chimpanzee (13)  |  Say (984)  |  Solitude (18)

It is probably no exaggeration to suppose that in order to improve such an organ as the eye at all, it must be improved in ten different ways at once. And the improbability of any complex organ being produced and brought to perfection in any such way is an improbability of the same kind and degree as that of producing a poem or a mathematical demonstration by throwing letters at random on a table.
[Expressing his reservations about Darwin's proposed evolution of the eye by natural selection.]
Opening address to the Belfast Natural History Society, as given in the 'Belfast Northern Whig,' (19 Nov 1866). As cited by Charles Darwin in The Variation of Animals & Plants Under Domestication (1868), 222.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bring (90)  |  Complex (188)  |  Degree (276)  |  Demonstration (113)  |  Different (577)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Eye (419)  |  Improbability (11)  |  Improve (58)  |  Kind (557)  |  Letter (109)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Selection (96)  |  Order (632)  |  Organ (115)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Poem (96)  |  Produce (104)  |  Produced (187)  |  Random (41)  |  Selection (128)  |  Suppose (156)  |  Table (104)  |  Throw (43)  |  Throwing (17)  |  Way (1217)

It may be asserted without exaggeration that the domain of mathematical knowledge is the only one of which our otherwise omniscient journalism has not yet possessed itself.
In Ueber Wert und angeblichen Unwert der Mathematik'’ Jahresbericht der Deulschen Mathematiker Vereinigung (1904), 367.
Science quotes on:  |  Assert (66)  |  Domain (69)  |  Journalism (3)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Omniscient (6)  |  Possess (156)

It would seem at first sight as if the rapid expansion of the region of mathematics must be a source of danger to its future progress. Not only does the area widen but the subjects of study increase rapidly in number, and the work of the mathematician tends to become more and more specialized. It is, of course, merely a brilliant exaggeration to say that no mathematician is able to understand the work of any other mathematician, but it is certainly true that it is daily becoming more and more difficult for a mathematician to keep himself acquainted, even in a general way, with the progress of any of the branches of mathematics except those which form the field of his own labours. I believe, however, that the increasing extent of the territory of mathematics will always be counteracted by increased facilities in the means of communication. Additional knowledge opens to us new principles and methods which may conduct us with the greatest ease to results which previously were most difficult of access; and improvements in notation may exercise the most powerful effects both in the simplification and accessibility of a subject. It rests with the worker in mathematics not only to explore new truths, but to devise the language by which they may be discovered and expressed; and the genius of a great mathematician displays itself no less in the notation he invents for deciphering his subject than in the results attained. … I have great faith in the power of well-chosen notation to simplify complicated theories and to bring remote ones near and I think it is safe to predict that the increased knowledge of principles and the resulting improvements in the symbolic language of mathematics will always enable us to grapple satisfactorily with the difficulties arising from the mere extent of the subject.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Section A., (1890), Nature, 42, 466.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  Accessibility (3)  |  Acquaint (9)  |  Additional (6)  |  Area (31)  |  Arise (158)  |  Arising (22)  |  Attain (125)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Belief (578)  |  Both (493)  |  Branch (150)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Bring (90)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Chosen (48)  |  Communication (94)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Counteract (4)  |  Course (409)  |  Daily (87)  |  Danger (115)  |  Decipher (7)  |  Devise (14)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Display (56)  |  Ease (35)  |  Effect (393)  |  Enable (119)  |  Exercise (110)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Express (186)  |  Extent (139)  |  Facility (11)  |  Faith (203)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  First Sight (6)  |  Form (959)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Genius (284)  |  Grapple (10)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Himself (461)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Increase (210)  |  Invent (51)  |  Keep (101)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Labour (98)  |  Language (293)  |  Less (103)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mere (84)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Must (1526)  |  New (1216)  |  Notation (27)  |  Number (699)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Powerful (139)  |  Predict (79)  |  Previously (11)  |  Principle (507)  |  Progress (465)  |  Rapid (33)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Region (36)  |  Remote (83)  |  Rest (280)  |  Result (677)  |  Safe (54)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Say (984)  |  Seem (145)  |  Sight (132)  |  Simplification (20)  |  Simplify (13)  |  Source (93)  |  Specialized (8)  |  Study (653)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Subject (521)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Tend (124)  |  Territory (24)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  True (212)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Way (1217)  |  Well-Chosen (2)  |  Widen (10)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worker (31)

One feature which will probably most impress the mathematician accustomed to the rapidity and directness secured by the generality of modern methods is the deliberation with which Archimedes approaches the solution of any one of his main problems. Yet this very characteristic, with its incidental effects, is calculated to excite the more admiration because the method suggests the tactics of some great strategist who foresees everything, eliminates everything not immediately conducive to the execution of his plan, masters every position in its order, and then suddenly (when the very elaboration of the scheme has almost obscured, in the mind of the spectator, its ultimate object) strikes the final blow. Thus we read in Archimedes proposition after proposition the bearing of which is not immediately obvious but which we find infallibly used later on; and we are led by such easy stages that the difficulties of the original problem, as presented at the outset, are scarcely appreciated. As Plutarch says: “It is not possible to find in geometry more difficult and troublesome questions, or more simple and lucid explanations.” But it is decidedly a rhetorical exaggeration when Plutarch goes on to say that we are deceived by the easiness of the successive steps into the belief that anyone could have discovered them for himself. On the contrary, the studied simplicity and the perfect finish of the treatises involve at the same time an element of mystery. Though each step depends on the preceding ones, we are left in the dark as to how they were suggested to Archimedes. There is, in fact, much truth in a remark by Wallis to the effect that he seems “as it were of set purpose to have covered up the traces of his investigation as if he had grudged posterity the secret of his method of inquiry while he wished to extort from them assent to his results.” Wallis adds with equal reason that not only Archimedes but nearly all the ancients so hid away from posterity their method of Analysis (though it is certain that they had one) that more modern mathematicians found it easier to invent a new Analysis than to seek out the old.
In The Works of Archimedes (1897), Preface, vi.
Science quotes on:  |  Accustom (52)  |  Accustomed (46)  |  Add (40)  |  Admiration (59)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Anyone (35)  |  Appreciate (63)  |  Approach (108)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Assent (12)  |  Bear (159)  |  Belief (578)  |  Blow (44)  |  Calculate (54)  |  Certain (550)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Conducive (3)  |  Contrary (141)  |  Cover (37)  |  Dark (140)  |  Deceive (26)  |  Decidedly (2)  |  Deliberation (5)  |  Depend (228)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discover (553)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easiness (4)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Elaboration (11)  |  Element (310)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Equal (83)  |  Everything (476)  |  Excite (15)  |  Execution (25)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extort (2)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Feature (44)  |  Final (118)  |  Find (998)  |  Finish (59)  |  Foresee (19)  |  Generality (45)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grudge (2)  |  Hide (69)  |  Himself (461)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Impress (64)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Inquiry (78)  |  Invent (51)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Involve (90)  |  Late (118)  |  Lead (384)  |  Leave (130)  |  Lucid (8)  |  Main (28)  |  Master (178)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Modern (385)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  Object (422)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Old (481)  |  Order (632)  |  Original (58)  |  Outset (7)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Plan (117)  |  Plutarch (15)  |  Position (77)  |  Possible (552)  |  Posterity (29)  |  Precede (23)  |  Present (619)  |  Probably (49)  |  Problem (676)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Read (287)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remark (28)  |  Result (677)  |  Same (157)  |  Say (984)  |  Scarcely (74)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Secret (194)  |  Secure (22)  |  Secured (18)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Simple (406)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Solution (267)  |  Spectator (10)  |  Stage (143)  |  Step (231)  |  Strike (68)  |  Study (653)  |  Successive (73)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Tactic (7)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trace (103)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Troublesome (7)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  John Wallis (3)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wish (212)

The full impact of the Lobatchewskian method of challenging axioms has probably yet to be felt. It is no exaggeration to call Lobatchewsky the Copernicus of Geometry [as did Clifford], for geometry is only a part of the vaster domain which he renovated; it might even be just to designate him as a Copernicus of all thought.
From a page of quotations, without citations, in G.E. Martin The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1975), 225. If you know the primary source, please contact Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Call (769)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Nicolaus Copernicus (48)  |  Designation (13)  |  Domain (69)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Impact (42)  |  Method (505)  |  Renovation (2)  |  Thought (953)

The progress of Science is generally regarded as a kind of clean, rational advance along a straight ascending line; in fact it has followed a zig-zag course, at times almost more bewildering than the evolution of political thought. The history of cosmic theories, in particular, may without exaggeration be called a history of collective obsessions and controlled schizophrenias; and the manner in which some of the most important individual discoveries were arrived at reminds one more of a sleepwalker’s performance than an electronic brain’s.
From 'Preface', in The Sleepwalkers: A History of Man’s Changing Vision of the Universe (1959), 15.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Advance (280)  |  Ascend (30)  |  Bewildering (3)  |  Brain (270)  |  Call (769)  |  Clean (50)  |  Collective (24)  |  Cosmic (72)  |  Course (409)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Electronic (12)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Follow (378)  |  History (673)  |  Important (209)  |  Individual (404)  |  Kind (557)  |  Line (91)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obsession (13)  |  Performance (48)  |  Political (121)  |  Progress (465)  |  Progress Of Science (34)  |  Rational (90)  |  Regard (305)  |  Remind (13)  |  Schizophrenia (4)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sleepwalker (2)  |  Straight (73)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Zigzag (2)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorb (49)  |  Absorption (12)  |  Ash (20)  |  Atrophy (7)  |  Balance (77)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blood (134)  |  Body (537)  |  Bone (95)  |  Brain (270)  |  Break (99)  |  Call (769)  |  Carry (127)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Composition (84)  |  Condition (356)  |  Constant (144)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Determined (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Excretion (7)  |  Fail (185)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fire (189)  |  Foreign (45)  |  Gland (14)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Incidental (15)  |  Indiscriminate (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Innumerable (55)  |  Internal (66)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kidney (18)  |  Kind (557)  |  Loaf (5)  |  Major (84)  |  Manufacture (29)  |  Manufacturing (27)  |  Master (178)  |  Mouth (53)  |  Muscle (45)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perform (121)  |  Performance (48)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Proper (144)  |  Removal (11)  |  Remove (45)  |  Respect (207)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Say (984)  |  Sleep (76)  |  Speak (232)  |  State (491)  |  Substance (248)  |  Survival (94)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Task (147)  |  Tract (5)  |  Variety (132)  |  Work (1351)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.