Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index C > Category: Constituent

Constituent Quotes (13 quotes)

Dass die bis jetzt unzerlegten chemischen Elemente absolut unzerlegbare Stoffe seien, ist gegenwärtig mindestens sehr unwahrscheinlich. Vielmehr scheint es, dass die Atome der Elemente nicht die letzten, sondern nur die näheren Bestandtheile der Molekeln sowohl der Elemente wie der Verbindungen bilden, die Molekeln oder Molecule als Massentheile erster, die Atome als solche zweiter Ordnung anzusehen sind, die ihrerseits wiederum aus Massentheilchen einer dritten höheren Ordnung bestehen werden.
That the as yet undivided chemical elements are absolutely irreducible substances, is currently at least very unlikely. Rather it seems, that the atoms of elements are not the final, but only the immediate constituents of the molecules of both the elements and the compounds—the Molekeln or molecule as foremost division of matter, the atoms being considered as second order, in turn consisting of matter particles of a third higher order.
[Speculating in 1870, on the existence of subatomic particles, in opening remark of the paper by which he became established as co-discoverer of the Periodic Law.]
'Die Natur der chemischen Elemente als Function ihrer Atomgewichte' ('The Nature of the Chemical Elements as a Function of their Atomic Weight'), Annalen der Chemie (1870), supp. b, 354. Original German paper reprinted in Lothar Meyer and Dmitry Ivanovich Mendeleyev, Das natürliche System der chemischen Elemente: Abhandlungen (1895), 9. Translation by Webmaster, with punctuation faithful to the original, except a comma was changed to a dash to improve readability.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Compound (53)  |  Consisting (5)  |  Division (27)  |  Element (129)  |  Final (33)  |  Irreducible (5)  |  Matter (270)  |  Order (167)  |  Particle (90)  |  Undivided (3)  |  Unlikely (12)

Every proposition which we can understand must be composed wholly of constituents with which we are acquainted.
From 'Knowledge by Acquaintance', in Mysticism and Logic: And Other Essays (1918), 219.
Science quotes on:  |  Composed (3)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Understand (189)

Just as the spectroscope opened up a new astronomy by enabling the astronomer to determine some of the constituents of which distant stars are composed, so the seismograph, recording the unfelt motion of distant earthquakes, enables us to see into the earth and determine its nature with as great a certainty, up to a certain point, as if we could drive a tunnel through it and take samples of the matter passed through.
'The Constitution of the Interior of the Earth, as Revealed by Earthquakes', Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society (1906), 62, 456.
Science quotes on:  |  Astronomer (50)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Certainty (97)  |  Composition (52)  |  Determination (53)  |  Distance (54)  |  Earth (487)  |  Earthquake (27)  |  Enable (25)  |  Matter (270)  |  Motion (127)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Pass (60)  |  Recording (4)  |  Sample (8)  |  Seismograph (4)  |  Spectroscope (2)  |  Star (251)  |  Tunnel (7)

Life is order, death is disorder. A fundamental law of Nature states that spontaneous chemical changes in the universe tend toward chaos. But life has, during milliards of years of evolution, seemingly contradicted this law. With the aid of energy derived from the sun it has built up the most complicated systems to be found in the universe—living organisms. Living matter is characterized by a high degree of chemical organisation on all levels, from the organs of large organisms to the smallest constituents of the cell. The beauty we experience when we enjoy the exquisite form of a flower or a bird is a reflection of a microscopic beauty in the architecture of molecules.
The Nobel Prize for Chemistry: Introductory Address'. Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1981-1990 (1992), 69.
Science quotes on:  |  Aid (23)  |  Architecture (35)  |  Beauty (171)  |  Bird (96)  |  Build (80)  |  Cell (125)  |  Chaos (63)  |  Chemical Change (4)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Contradiction (44)  |  Disorder (19)  |  Energy (185)  |  Evolution (482)  |  Experience (268)  |  Flower (65)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Law Of Nature (52)  |  Life (917)  |  Microscopic (10)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Order (167)  |  Organ (60)  |  Organism (126)  |  Reflection (50)  |  Spontaneous (12)  |  Sun (211)  |  System (141)  |  Universe (563)

No collateral science had profited so much by palæontology as that which teaches the structure and mode of formation of the earth’s crust, with the relative position, time, and order of formation of its constituent stratified and unstratified parts. Geology has left her old hand-maiden mineralogy to rest almost wholly on the broad shoulders of her young and vigorous offspring, the science of organic remains.
In article 'Palæontology' contributed to Encyclopædia Britannica (8th ed., 1859), Vol. 17, 91.
Science quotes on:  |  Broad (18)  |  Collateral (3)  |  Crust (17)  |  Earth (487)  |  Formation (54)  |  Geology (187)  |  Mineralogy (15)  |  Mode (29)  |  Offspring (15)  |  Order (167)  |  Organic (48)  |  Paleontology (29)  |  Position (54)  |  Profit (28)  |  Relative (24)  |  Remains (9)  |  Rest (64)  |  Science (1699)  |  Shoulder (13)  |  Structure (191)  |  Teach (102)  |  Time (439)  |  Vigorous (11)  |  Young (72)

Of all the constituents of the human body, bone is the hardest, the driest, the earthiest, and the coldest; and, excepting only the teeth, it is devoid of sensation. God, the great Creator of all things, formed its substance to this specification with good reason, intending it to be like a foundation for the whole body; for in the fabric of the human body bones perform the same function as do walls and beams in houses, poles in tents, and keels and ribs in boats.
Bones Differentiated by Function
Some bones, by reason of their strength, form as it were props for the body; these include the tibia, the femur, the spinal vertebrae, and most of the bony framework. Others are like bastions, defense walls, and ramparts, affording natural protection to other parts; examples are the skull, the spines and transverse processes of the vertebrae, the breast bone, the ribs. Others stand in front of the joints between certain bones, to ensure that the joint does not move too loosely or bend to too acute an angle. This is the function of the tiny bones, likened by the professors of anatomy to the size of a sesame seed, which are attached to the second internode of the thumb, the first internode of the other four fingers and the first internodes of the five toes. The teeth, on the other hand, serve specifically to cut, crush, pound and grind our food, and similarly the two ossicles in the organ of hearing perform a specifically auditory function.
From De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem: (1543), Book I, 1, as translated by William Frank Richardson, in 'Nature of Bone; Function of Bones', On The Fabric of the Human Body: Book I: The Bones and Cartilages (1998), 1.
Science quotes on:  |  Acute (6)  |  Anatomy (59)  |  Angle (15)  |  Attached (2)  |  Bastion (2)  |  Beam (9)  |  Bend (8)  |  Boat (13)  |  Body (193)  |  Bone (57)  |  Breast (6)  |  Creator (40)  |  Crush (6)  |  Cut (36)  |  Defense (15)  |  Devoid (5)  |  Differentiation (17)  |  Driest (2)  |  Exception (33)  |  Fabric (13)  |  Finger (38)  |  Food (139)  |  Form (210)  |  Foundation (75)  |  Framework (15)  |  Function (90)  |  God (454)  |  Grind (8)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hardest (2)  |  Hearing (27)  |  House (36)  |  Human (445)  |  Joint (11)  |  Keel (3)  |  Move (58)  |  Natural (128)  |  Organ (60)  |  Pole (14)  |  Pound (7)  |  Process (201)  |  Professor (39)  |  Prop (6)  |  Protection (23)  |  Reason (330)  |  Rib (4)  |  Seed (52)  |  Sensation (22)  |  Serve (34)  |  Sesame (2)  |  Size (47)  |  Skull (5)  |  Specification (5)  |  Spine (5)  |  Strength (63)  |  Substance (73)  |  Teeth (11)  |  Tent (4)  |  Thumb (8)  |  Toe (5)  |  Vertebra (4)  |  Wall (20)

Science has gone down into the mines and coal-pits, and before the safety-lamp the Gnomes and Genii of those dark regions have disappeared… Sirens, mermaids, shining cities glittering at the bottom of quiet seas and in deep lakes, exist no longer; but in their place, Science, their destroyer, shows us whole coasts of coral reef constructed by the labours of minute creatures; points to our own chalk cliffs and limestone rocks as made of the dust of myriads of generations of infinitesimal beings that have passed away; reduces the very element of water into its constituent airs, and re-creates it at her pleasure.
Book review of Robert Hunt, Poetry of Science (1848), in the London Examiner (1848). Although uncredited in print, biographers identified his authorship from his original handwritten work. Collected in Charles Dickens and ‎Frederic George Kitton (ed.) Old Lamps for New Ones: And Other Sketches and Essays (1897), 86-87.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Being (39)  |  Bottom (28)  |  Chalk (4)  |  City (37)  |  Cliff (6)  |  Coal (41)  |  Coast (11)  |  Constructing (3)  |  Coral (9)  |  Creature (127)  |  Dark (49)  |  Deep (81)  |  Destroyer (2)  |  Disappearance (21)  |  Dust (42)  |  Element (129)  |  Generation (111)  |  Genius (186)  |  Glitter (5)  |  Infinitesimal (8)  |  Labour (36)  |  Lake (12)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Mermaid (3)  |  Mine (15)  |  Minute (25)  |  Myriad (18)  |  Pleasure (98)  |  Pointing (4)  |  Quiet (12)  |  Reef (6)  |  Region (26)  |  Rock (107)  |  Safety Lamp (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Sea (143)  |  Shining (8)  |  Siren (3)  |  Water (244)

The nucleic acids, as constituents of living organisms, are comparable In importance to proteins. There is evidence that they are Involved In the processes of cell division and growth, that they participate In the transmission of hereditary characters, and that they are important constituents of viruses. An understanding of the molecular structure of the nucleic acids should be of value In the effort to understand the fundamental phenomena of life.
[Co-author with American chemist, B. Corey (1897-1971)]
'A Proposed Structure for the Nucleic Acids', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (1953), 39, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Cell (125)  |  Character (82)  |  Comparison (53)  |  Division (27)  |  Effort (94)  |  Fundamental (122)  |  Growth (111)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Importance (183)  |  Life (917)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Nucleic Acid (4)  |  Organism (126)  |  Participation (7)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Structure (191)  |  Transmission (23)  |  Understanding (317)  |  Value (180)  |  Virus (22)

The progress of synthesis, or the building up of natural materials from their constituent elements, proceeds apace. Even some of the simpler albuminoids, a class of substances of great importance in the life process, have recently been artificially prepared. ... Innumerable entirely new compounds have been produced in the last century. The artificial dye-stuffs, prepared from materials occurring in coal-tar, make the natural colours blush. Saccharin, which is hundreds of times sweeter than sugar, is a purely artificial substance. New explosives, drugs, alloys, photographic substances, essences, scents, solvents, and detergents are being poured out in a continuous stream.
In Matter and Energy (1912), 45-46.
Science quotes on:  |  Alloy (2)  |  Artificial (26)  |  Blush (3)  |  Building (51)  |  Century (94)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Class (64)  |  Coal Tar (2)  |  Color (78)  |  Compound (53)  |  Continuous (24)  |  Detergent (2)  |  Drug (40)  |  Element (129)  |  Entirely (23)  |  Essence (42)  |  Explosive (16)  |  Great (300)  |  Hundred (46)  |  Importance (183)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Last (19)  |  Life (917)  |  Material (124)  |  Natural (128)  |  New (340)  |  Occurrence (30)  |  Photograph (17)  |  Pour (7)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Proceeding (13)  |  Process (201)  |  Production (105)  |  Progress (317)  |  Purely (15)  |  Recent (23)  |  Saccharin (2)  |  Scent (4)  |  Simplicity (126)  |  Solvent (5)  |  Stream (27)  |  Substance (73)  |  Sugar (13)  |  Synthesis (38)

The responsibility for maintaining the composition of the blood in respect to other constituents devolves largely upon the kidneys. It is no exaggeration to say that the composition of the blood is determined not by what the mouth ingests but by what the kidneys keep; they are the master chemists of our internal environment, which, so to speak, they synthesize in reverse. When, among other duties, they excrete the ashes of our body fires, or remove from the blood the infinite variety of foreign substances which are constantly being absorbed from our indiscriminate gastrointestinal tracts, these excretory operations are incidental to the major task of keeping our internal environment in an ideal, balanced state. Our glands, our muscles, our bones, our tendons, even our brains, are called upon to do only one kind of physiological work, while our kidneys are called upon to perform an innumerable variety of operations. Bones can break, muscles can atrophy, glands can loaf, even the brain can go to sleep, without immediately endangering our survival, but when the kidneys fail to manufacture the proper kind of blood neither bone, muscle, gland nor brain can carry on.
'The Evolution of the Kidney', Lectures on the Kidney (1943), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Absorption (8)  |  Ash (16)  |  Atrophy (5)  |  Balance (43)  |  Blood (95)  |  Body (193)  |  Bone (57)  |  Brain (181)  |  Break (33)  |  Chemist (79)  |  Composition (52)  |  Condition (119)  |  Constant (40)  |  Determined (8)  |  Environment (138)  |  Exaggeration (7)  |  Excretion (4)  |  Failure (118)  |  Fire (117)  |  Foreign (20)  |  Gland (7)  |  Ideal (52)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Incidental (8)  |  Indiscriminate (2)  |  Infinite (88)  |  Innumerable (17)  |  Internal (18)  |  Keep (47)  |  Kidney (13)  |  Loaf (2)  |  Major (24)  |  Manufacturing (21)  |  Master (55)  |  Mouth (16)  |  Muscle (32)  |  Operation (96)  |  Performance (27)  |  Proper (27)  |  Removal (10)  |  Responsibility (47)  |  Reverse (14)  |  Sleep (42)  |  State (96)  |  Substance (73)  |  Survival (49)  |  Synthesis (38)  |  Task (68)  |  Tract (3)  |  Variety (53)

To Nature nothing can be added; from Nature nothing can be taken away; the sum of her energies is constant, and the utmost man can do in the pursuit of physical truth, or in the applications of physical knowledge, is to shift the constituents of the never-varying total. The law of conservation rigidly excludes both creation and annihilation. Waves may change to ripples, and ripples to waves; magnitude may be substituted for number, and number for magnitude; asteroids may aggregate to suns, suns may resolve themselves into florae and faunae, and floras and faunas melt in air: the flux of power is eternally the same. It rolls in music through the ages, and all terrestrial energy—the manifestations of life as well as the display of phenomena—are but the modulations of its rhythm.
Conclusion of Heat Considered as a Mode of Motion: Being a Course of Twelve Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in the Season of 1862 (1863), 449.
Science quotes on:  |  Add (26)  |  Age (137)  |  Aggregate (8)  |  Air (151)  |  Annihilation (6)  |  Asteroid (11)  |  Change (291)  |  Conservation Of Energy (25)  |  Constant (40)  |  Creation (211)  |  Display (22)  |  Energy (185)  |  Eternally (3)  |  Exclude (4)  |  Fauna (10)  |  Flora (6)  |  Flux (8)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Magnitude (21)  |  Manifestation (30)  |  Melt (15)  |  Modulation (3)  |  Music (66)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Nothing (267)  |  Number (179)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Power (273)  |  Resolve (11)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Ripple (3)  |  Same (92)  |  Shift (21)  |  Substitute (23)  |  Sum (30)  |  Sun (211)  |  Take Away (3)  |  Terrestrial (14)  |  Total (29)  |  Truth (750)  |  Wave (55)

Where a cell arises, there a cell must have previously existed (omnis cellula e cellula), just as an animal can spring only from an animal, a plant only from a plant. In this manner, although there are still a few spots in the body where absolute demonstration has not yet been afforded, the principle is nevertheless established, that in the whole series of living things, whether they be entire plants or animal organisms, or essential constituents of the same, an eternal law of continuous development prevails.
In Lecture II 'Physiological Tissues' (1858), as translated by Frank Chance in Cellular Pathology (1860), 27-28.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (309)  |  Body (193)  |  Cell (125)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Development (228)  |  Eternal (43)  |  Existence (254)  |  Law (418)  |  Life (917)  |  Organism (126)  |  Plant (173)  |  Principle (228)

[Henry Cavendish] fixed the weight of the earth; he established the proportions of the constituents of the air; he occupied himself with the quantitative study of the laws of heat; and lastly, he demonstrated the nature of water and determined its volumetric composition. Earth, air, fire, and water—each and all came within the range of his observations.
Essays in Historical Chemistry (1894), 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Henry Cavendish (7)  |  Composition (52)  |  Density (11)  |  Earth (487)  |  Fire (117)  |  Gravitation (27)  |  Law (418)  |  Observation (418)  |  Proportion (47)  |  Quantitative (15)  |  Study (331)  |  Water (244)  |  Weight (61)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.