Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index I > Category: Involved

Involved Quotes (90 quotes)

A cell has a history; its structure is inherited, it grows, divides, and, as in the embryo of higher animals, the products of division differentiate on complex lines. Living cells, moreover, transmit all that is involved in their complex heredity. I am far from maintaining that these fundamental properties may not depend upon organisation at levels above any chemical level; to understand them may even call for different methods of thought; I do not pretend to know. But if there be a hierarchy of levels we must recognise each one, and the physical and chemical level which, I would again say, may be the level of self-maintenance, must always have a place in any ultimate complete description.
'Some Aspects of Biochemistry', The Irish Journal of Medical Science (1932), 79, 346.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Call (769)  |  Cell (138)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complete (204)  |  Complex (188)  |  Depend (228)  |  Different (577)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Divide (75)  |  Division (65)  |  Do (1908)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Grow (238)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Hierarchy (17)  |  History (673)  |  Inherit (33)  |  Inherited (21)  |  Know (1518)  |  Living (491)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Must (1526)  |  Physical (508)  |  Product (160)  |  Say (984)  |  Self (267)  |  Structure (344)  |  Thought (953)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Understand (606)

A few days afterwards, I went to him [the same actuary referred to in another quote] and very gravely told him that I had discovered the law of human mortality in the Carlisle Table, of which he thought very highly. I told him that the law was involved in this circumstance. Take the table of the expectation of life, choose any age, take its expectation and make the nearest integer a new age, do the same with that, and so on; begin at what age you like, you are sure to end at the place where the age past is equal, or most nearly equal, to the expectation to come. “You don’t mean that this always happens?”—“Try it.” He did try, again and again; and found it as I said. “This is, indeed, a curious thing; this is a discovery!” I might have sent him about trumpeting the law of life: but I contented myself with informing him that the same thing would happen with any table whatsoever in which the first column goes up and the second goes down.
In Budget of Paradoxes (1872), 172.
Science quotes on:  |  Actuary (2)  |  Age (499)  |  Begin (260)  |  Choose (112)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Column (15)  |  Content (69)  |  Curious (91)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Down (456)  |  End (590)  |  Equal (83)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Find (998)  |  First (1283)  |  Gravely (2)  |  Happen (274)  |  Highly (16)  |  Human (1468)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Inform (47)  |  Informing (5)  |  Integer (10)  |  Involve (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Life (1795)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Mean (809)  |  Mortality (15)  |  Most (1731)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nearly (137)  |  New (1216)  |  New Age (6)  |  Past (337)  |  Place (177)  |  Quote (42)  |  Send (22)  |  Table (104)  |  Tell (340)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trumpet (2)  |  Try (283)  |  Up (5)  |  Whatsoever (41)

A large number of areas of the brain are involved when viewing equations, but when one looks at a formula rated as beautiful it activates the emotional brain—the medial orbito-frontal cortex—like looking at a great painting or listening to a piece of music. … Neuroscience can’t tell you what beauty is, but if you find it beautiful the medial orbito-frontal cortex is likely to be involved; you can find beauty in anything.
As quoted in James Gallagher, 'Mathematics: Why The Brain Sees Maths As Beauty,' BBC News (13 Feb 2014), on bbc.co.uk web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Activate (3)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Beauty (299)  |  Brain (270)  |  Cortex (3)  |  Emotional (17)  |  Equation (132)  |  Find (998)  |  Formula (98)  |  Frontal (2)  |  Great (1574)  |  Large (394)  |  Listen (73)  |  Listening (25)  |  Look (582)  |  Looking (189)  |  Music (129)  |  Neuroscience (3)  |  Number (699)  |  Painting (44)  |  Rat (37)  |  Tell (340)  |  View (488)

A sufferer from angina, Hunter found that his attacks were often brought on by anger. He declared, 'My life is at the mercy of the scoundrel who chooses to put me in a passion.' This proved prophetic: at a meeting of the board of St. George's Hospital, London, of which he was a member, he became involved in a heated argument with other board members, walked out of the meeting and dropped dead in the next room.
As described in Clifton Fadiman (ed.), André Bernard (ed.), Bartlett's Book of Anecdotes (2000), 282, citing New Scientist (9 Nov 1981).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Anger (20)  |  Argument (138)  |  Attack (84)  |  Choose (112)  |  Death (388)  |  Declared (24)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Hunter (24)  |  Life (1795)  |  Next (236)  |  Other (2236)  |  Passion (114)  |  Prophesy (10)  |  Scoundrel (8)  |  Sufferer (7)  |  Walk (124)

An organism is involved with the environment to which it is not only adapted but which is adapted to it as well.
In A.V. Lapo, 'Problemy biogeokhimii' (“Problems of Biogeochemistry”), Works of the Biogeochemical Laboratory (1980), 16, 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Environment (216)  |  Organism (220)

Any conception which is definitely and completely determined by means of a finite number of specifications, say by assigning a finite number of elements, is a mathematical conception. Mathematics has for its function to develop the consequences involved in the definition of a group of mathematical conceptions. Interdependence and mutual logical consistency among the members of the group are postulated, otherwise the group would either have to be treated as several distinct groups, or would lie beyond the sphere of mathematics.
In 'Mathematics', Encyclopedia Britannica (9th ed.).
Science quotes on:  |  Assign (13)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Complete (204)  |  Completely (135)  |  Conception (154)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consistency (31)  |  Consistent (48)  |  Definite (110)  |  Definition (221)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Determine (144)  |  Develop (268)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Element (310)  |  Finite (59)  |  Function (228)  |  Group (78)  |  Interdependence (4)  |  Involve (90)  |  Lie (364)  |  Logical (55)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Member (41)  |  Mutual (52)  |  Number (699)  |  Otherwise (24)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Say (984)  |  Several (32)  |  Specification (7)  |  Sphere (116)  |  Treat (35)

As I stood behind the coffin of my little son the other day, with my mind bent on anything but disputation, the officiating minister read, as part of his duty, the words, 'If the dead rise not again, let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.' I cannot tell you how inexpressibly they shocked me. Paul had neither wife nor child, or he must have known that his alternative involved a blasphemy against all that well best and noblest in human nature. I could have laughed with scorn. What! Because I am face to face with irreparable loss, because I have given back to the source from whence it came, the cause of a great happiness, still retaining through all my life the blessings which have sprung and will spring from that cause, I am to renounce my manhood, and, howling, grovel in bestiality? Why, the very apes know better, and if you shoot their young, the poor brutes grieve their grief out and do not immediately seek distraction in a gorge.
Letter to Charles Kingsley (23 Sep 1860). In L. Huxley, The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley (1903), Vol. 1, 318.
Science quotes on:  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Ape (53)  |  Back (390)  |  Behind (137)  |  Best (459)  |  Better (486)  |  Blasphemy (7)  |  Blessing (24)  |  Blessings (16)  |  Brute (28)  |  Cause (541)  |  Child (307)  |  Coffin (7)  |  Death (388)  |  Do (1908)  |  Drink (53)  |  Eat (104)  |  Face (212)  |  Great (1574)  |  Grief (18)  |  Happiness (115)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Nature (64)  |  Immediately (114)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Laugh (47)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Loss (110)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Other (2236)  |  Poor (136)  |  Read (287)  |  Renounce (5)  |  Rise (166)  |  Scorn (12)  |  Seek (213)  |  Shock (37)  |  Son (24)  |  Spring (133)  |  Still (613)  |  Tell (340)  |  Through (849)  |  Why (491)  |  Wife (41)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Young (227)

As science, of necessity, becomes more involved with itself, so also, of necessity, it becomes more international. I am impressed to know that of the 670 members of this Academy [National Academy of Sciences], 163 were born in other lands.
From Address to the Centennial Convocation of the National Academy of Sciences (22 Oct 1963), 'A Century of Scientific Conquest.' Online at The American Presidency Project.
Science quotes on:  |  Academy (35)  |  Become (815)  |  Born (33)  |  Impress (64)  |  Impressed (38)  |  International (37)  |  Know (1518)  |  Land (115)  |  Member (41)  |  More (2559)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Other (2236)  |  Science (3879)

As was predicted at the beginning of the Human Genome Project, getting the sequence will be the easy part as only technical issues are involved. The hard part will be finding out what it means, because this poses intellectual problems of how to understand the participation of the genes in the functions of living cells.
Loose Ends from Current Biology (1997), 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Beginning (305)  |  Easy (204)  |  Function (228)  |  Gene (98)  |  Genome (15)  |  Hard (243)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Genome (12)  |  Human Genome Project (5)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Living (491)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Participation (15)  |  Predict (79)  |  Problem (676)  |  Project (73)  |  Research (664)  |  Sequence (68)  |  Understand (606)  |  Will (2355)

As we survey all the evidence, the thought insistently arises that some supernatural agency—or, rather, Agency—must be involved. Is it possible that suddenly, without intending to, we have stumbled upon scientific proof of the existence of a Supreme Being? Was it God who stepped in and so providentially crafted the cosmos for our benefit?
In The Symbiotic Universe: Life and Mind in the Cosmos (1988), 27.
Science quotes on:  |  Agency (14)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Cosmos (63)  |  Craft (10)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Existence (456)  |  God (757)  |  Insistent (2)  |  Involve (90)  |  Must (1526)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proof (287)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Stumble (19)  |  Suddenly (88)  |  Supernatural (25)  |  Supreme (71)  |  Supreme Being (8)  |  Survey (33)  |  Thought (953)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accuracy (78)  |  Accurate (86)  |  Activity (210)  |  Air (347)  |  All (4108)  |  Appreciatively (2)  |  Audience (26)  |  Back (390)  |  Basket (7)  |  Basketball (3)  |  Battle (34)  |  Begin (260)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (5)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (239)  |  Cheer (7)  |  Close (69)  |  Commit (41)  |  Conference (17)  |  Country (251)  |  Court (33)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (24)  |  Curious (91)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (76)  |  Dropped (17)  |  Eliminate (21)  |  Emotionally (3)  |  Event (216)  |  Exception (73)  |  First (1283)  |  Foot (60)  |  Game (101)  |  Graceful (3)  |  Gradual (27)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Group (78)  |  Hand (143)  |  Hardly (19)  |  High (362)  |  Home (170)  |  Hook (4)  |  Increase (210)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Involve (90)  |  Jump (29)  |  Last (426)  |  Leave (130)  |  Local (19)  |  Long (790)  |  March (46)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Military (40)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1731)  |  Move (216)  |  Murmur (4)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Net (11)  |  Night (120)  |  Occur (150)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (9)  |  People (1005)  |  Perform (121)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (112)  |  Player (8)  |  Point (580)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (4)  |  Promise (67)  |  Providence (18)  |  Respectively (13)  |  Rest (280)  |  Reverse (33)  |  Rhythm (20)  |  Right (452)  |  Routine (25)  |  Series (149)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoot (19)  |  Southern (3)  |  Start (221)  |  Steadily (6)  |  Still (613)  |  Sweep (19)  |  Team (15)  |  Temple (42)  |  Through (849)  |  Time (1877)  |  Try (283)  |  Two (937)  |  Unusual (37)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Warm (69)  |  Warming (23)  |  Watch (109)  |  Whirl (8)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (933)

But, on the other hand, every one who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe—a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.
Letter (24 Jan 1936). Quoted in Helen Dukas and Banesh Hoffman, Albert Einstein: The Human Side (1981), 33.
Science quotes on:  |  Become (815)  |  Face (212)  |  Feel (367)  |  Humble (50)  |  Law (894)  |  Man (2251)  |  Modest (15)  |  Must (1526)  |  Other (2236)  |  Power (746)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Science (3879)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Superior (81)  |  Universe (857)

By the early 1960s Pauling had earned a reputation for being audacious, intuitive, charming, irreverent, self-promoting, self-reliant, self-involved to the point of arrogance and correct about almost everything.
In Force of Nature: The Life of Linus Pauling (1995), 13.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrogance (20)  |  Arrogant (3)  |  Audacious (4)  |  Being (1278)  |  Biography (240)  |  Charm (51)  |  Correct (86)  |  Early (185)  |  Everything (476)  |  Intuitive (14)  |  Irreverent (2)  |  Linus Pauling (60)  |  Point (580)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Self (267)

Chemistry is an art that has furnished the world with a great number of useful facts, and has thereby contributed to the improvement of many arts; but these facts lie scattered in many different books, involved in obscure terms, mixed with many falsehoods, and joined to a great deal of false philosophy; so that it is not great wonder that chemistry has not been so much studied as might have been expected with regard to so useful a branch of knowledge, and that many professors are themselves but very superficially acquainted with it. But it was particularly to be expected, that, since it has been taught in universities, the difficulties in this study should have been in some measure removed, that the art should have been put into form, and a system of it attempted—the scattered facts collected and arranged in a proper order. But this has not yet been done; chemistry has not yet been taught but upon a very narrow plan. The teachers of it have still confined themselves to the purposes of pharmacy and medicine, and that comprehends a small branch of chemistry; and even that, by being a single branch, could not by itself be tolerably explained.
John Thomson, An Account of the Life, Lectures and Writings of William Cullen, M.D. (1832), Vol. 1, 40.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Being (1278)  |  Book (392)  |  Branch (150)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Deal (188)  |  Different (577)  |  Expect (200)  |  Explain (322)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Facts (553)  |  Falsehood (28)  |  Form (959)  |  Furnish (96)  |  Great (1574)  |  Improvement (108)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Measure (232)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Number (699)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Order (632)  |  Pharmacy (4)  |  Philosophy (380)  |  Plan (117)  |  Professor (128)  |  Proper (144)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Regard (305)  |  Single (353)  |  Small (477)  |  Still (613)  |  Study (653)  |  System (537)  |  Teacher (143)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Useful (250)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

Chemistry is the study of material transformations. Yet a knowledge of the rate, or time dependence, of chemical change is of critical importance for the successful synthesis of new materials and for the utilization of the energy generated by a reaction. During the past century it has become clear that all macroscopic chemical processes consist of many elementary chemical reactions that are themselves simply a series of encounters between atomic or molecular species. In order to understand the time dependence of chemical reactions, chemical kineticists have traditionally focused on sorting out all of the elementary chemical reactions involved in a macroscopic chemical process and determining their respective rates.
'Molecular Beam Studies of Elementary Chemical Processes', Nobel Lecture, 8 Dec 1986. In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1981-1990 (1992), 320.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Become (815)  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Chemical Change (8)  |  Chemical Reaction (16)  |  Chemical Reactions (13)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Consist (223)  |  Critical (66)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Energy (344)  |  Focus (35)  |  Importance (286)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Material (353)  |  Matter (798)  |  New (1216)  |  Order (632)  |  Past (337)  |  Process (423)  |  Rate (29)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Series (149)  |  Species (401)  |  Study (653)  |  Successful (123)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Understand (606)  |  Utilization (15)

Colour, Figure, Motion, Extension and the like, considered only so many Sensations in the Mind, are perfectly known, there being nothing in them which is not perceived. But if they are looked on as notes or Images, referred to Things or Archetypes existing without the Mind, then are we involved all in Scepticism.
A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge [first published 1710], (1734), 109.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Archetype (5)  |  Being (1278)  |  Color (137)  |  Consider (416)  |  Extension (59)  |  Figure (160)  |  Image (96)  |  Known (454)  |  Look (582)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Scepticism (16)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Sense (770)  |  Thing (1915)

Every consideration that did not relate to “what is best for the patient” was dismissed. This was Sir William [Gull]’s professional axiom. … But the carrying of it out not unfrequently involved him in difficulty, and led occasionally to his being misunderstood. … He would frequently refuse to repeat a visit or consultation on the ground that he wished the sufferer to feel that it was unnecessary.
In Memoir, as Editor, prefacing Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), xviii.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Axiom (63)  |  Being (1278)  |  Best (459)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Consultation (4)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Dismiss (10)  |  Feel (367)  |  Good (889)  |  Ground (217)  |  Sir William Withey Gull (39)  |  Patient (199)  |  Professional (70)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Sufferer (7)  |  Unnecessary (23)  |  Visit (26)  |  Wish (212)

Every great advance in natural knowledge has involved the absolute rejection of authority.
'On the Advisableness of Improving Natural Knowledge', a lay sermon at St. Martin's Hall (Sunday 7 Jan 1866), The Fortnightly Review. In The Journal of Mental Science (1867), Vol. 12, No. 58, (Jul 1866), 279.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  Advance (280)  |  Authority (95)  |  Great (1574)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Natural (796)  |  Rejection (34)

Everybody using C is a dangerous thing. We have other languages that don’t have buffer overflows. But what is the longer-term cost to us as an enterprise in increased vulnerability, increased need for add-on security services or whatever else is involved? Those kinds of questions don’t get asked often enough.
As quoted in magazine article, an interview by John McCormick, 'Computer Security as a Business Enabler', Baseline (7 Jul 2007).
Science quotes on:  |  Ask (411)  |  C (3)  |  Cost (86)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Enough (340)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  Everybody (70)  |  Increase (210)  |  Involve (90)  |  Kind (557)  |  Language (293)  |  Long-Term (9)  |  Need (290)  |  Often (106)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overflow (9)  |  Question (621)  |  Security (47)  |  Service (110)  |  Term (349)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Vulnerability (5)  |  Whatever (234)

Fertilization of mammalian eggs is followed by successive cell divisions and progressive differentiation, first into the early embryo and subsequently into all of the cell types that make up the adult animal. Transfer of a single nucleus at a specific stage of development, to an enucleated unfertilized egg, provided an opportunity to investigate whether cellular differentiation to that stage involved irreversible genetic modification. The first offspring to develop from a differentiated cell were born after nuclear transfer from an embryo-derived cell line that had been induced to became quiescent. Using the same procedure, we now report the birth of live lambs from three new cell populations established from adult mammary gland, fetus and embryo. The fact that a lamb was derived from an adult cell confirms that differentiation of that cell did not involve the irreversible modification of genetic material required far development to term. The birth of lambs from differentiated fetal and adult cells also reinforces previous speculation that by inducing donor cells to became quiescent it will be possible to obtain normal development from a wide variety of differentiated cells.
[Co-author of paper announcing the cloned sheep, ‘Dolly’.]
In I. Wilmut, A. E. Schnieke, J. McWhir, et al., 'Viable Offspring Derived from Petal and Adult Mammalian Cells', Nature (1997), 385, 810.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Author (167)  |  Birth (147)  |  Cell Division (5)  |  Clone (8)  |  Confirm (57)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Division (65)  |  Dolly (2)  |  Early (185)  |  Egg (69)  |  Embryo (28)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Fertilization (15)  |  First (1283)  |  Follow (378)  |  Genetic (108)  |  Genetics (101)  |  Gland (14)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Involve (90)  |  Irreversible (12)  |  Lamb (6)  |  Live (628)  |  Mammal (37)  |  Material (353)  |  Modification (55)  |  New (1216)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Offspring (27)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Paper (182)  |  Population (110)  |  Possible (552)  |  Procedure (41)  |  Reinforce (5)  |  Required (108)  |  Single (353)  |  Specific (95)  |  Speculation (126)  |  Stage (143)  |  Successive (73)  |  Term (349)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Type (167)  |  Variety (132)  |  Wide (96)  |  Will (2355)

Finally, to the theme of the respiratory chain, it is especially noteworthy that David Kellin's chemically simple view of the respiratory chain appears now to have been right all along–and he deserves great credit for having been so reluctant to become involved when the energy-rich chemical intermediates began to be so fashionable. This reminds me of the aphorism: 'The obscure we see eventually, the completely apparent takes longer'.
'David Kellin's Respiratory Chain Concept and Its Chemiosmotic Consequences', Nobel Lecture (8 Dec 1978). In Nobel Lectures: Chemistry 1971-1980 (1993), 325.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Aphorism (21)  |  Apparent (84)  |  Become (815)  |  Chain (50)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Completely (135)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Energy (344)  |  Eventually (65)  |  Fashionable (15)  |  Great (1574)  |  Intermediate (37)  |  Obscure (62)  |  Reluctant (4)  |  Respiration (13)  |  Right (452)  |  See (1081)  |  Simple (406)  |  Theme (17)  |  View (488)

I have had a fairly long life, above all a very happy one, and I think that I shall be remembered with some regrets and perhaps leave some reputation behind me. What more could I ask? The events in which I am involved will probably save me from the troubles of old age. I shall die in full possession of my faculties, and that is another advantage that I should count among those that I have enjoyed. If I have any distressing thoughts, it is of not having done more for my family; to be unable to give either to them or to you any token of my affection and my gratitude is to be poor indeed.
Letter to Augez de Villiers, undated. Quoted in D. McKie, Antoine Lavoisier: Scientist, Economist, Social Reformer (1952), 303.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Affection (43)  |  Age (499)  |  All (4108)  |  Ask (411)  |  Behind (137)  |  Count (105)  |  Death (388)  |  Event (216)  |  Family (94)  |  Gratitude (13)  |  Happy (105)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Letter (109)  |  Life (1795)  |  Long (790)  |  More (2559)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Age (33)  |  Poor (136)  |  Possession (65)  |  Regret (30)  |  Remember (179)  |  Reputation (33)  |  Save (118)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thought (953)  |  Token (9)  |  Trouble (107)  |  Will (2355)

I like the word “nanotechnology.” I like it because the prefix “nano” guarantees it will be fundamental science for decades; the “technology” says it is engineering, something you’re involved in not just because you’re interested in how nature works but because it will produce something that has a broad impact.
From interview in 'Wires of Wonder', Technology Review (Mar 2001), 104, No. 2, 88.
Science quotes on:  |  Decade (59)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Guarantee (30)  |  Impact (42)  |  Interest (386)  |  Interested (5)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Produce (104)  |  Say (984)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Technology (257)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)  |  Work (1351)

I now think the answer is very simple: it’s true. God did create the universe about 13.7 billion years ago, and of necessity has involved Himself with His creation ever since. The purpose of this universe is something that only God knows for sure, but it is increasingly clear to modern science that the universe was exquisitely fine-tuned to enable human life.
In Letter (May 2005), sent to the Hope College 2005 Alumni Banquet, read in lieu of accepting an award in person, because of declining health from cancer.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Answer (366)  |  Billion (95)  |  Biography (240)  |  Create (235)  |  Creation (327)  |  Enable (119)  |  God (757)  |  Himself (461)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Life (29)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Science (52)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science And Religion (307)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Think (1086)  |  Universe (857)  |  Year (933)

I would have you to observe that the difficulty & mystery which often appear in matters of science & learning are only owing to the terms of art used in them, & if many gentlemen had not been rebuted by the uncouth dress in which science was offered to them, we must believe that many of these who now shew an acute & sound judgement in the affairs of life would also in science have excelled many of those who are devoted to it & who were engaged in it only by necessity & a phlegmatic temper. This is particularly the case with respect to chemistry, which is as easy to be comprehended as any of the common affairs of life, but gentlemen have been kept from applying to it by the jargon in which it has been industriously involved.
Cullen MSS, No. 23, Glasgow University library. In A. L. Donovan, Philosophical Chemistry In the Scottish Enlightenment: The Doctrines and Discoveries of Wllliam Cullen and Joseph Black (1975), 111.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (657)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Common (436)  |  Devoted (59)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Easy (204)  |  Jargon (13)  |  Learning (274)  |  Life (1795)  |  Matter (798)  |  Men Of Science (143)  |  Must (1526)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Observe (168)  |  Offer (141)  |  Owing (39)  |  Respect (207)  |  Science (3879)  |  Sound (183)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)

If all this damned quantum jumping were really here to stay, I should be sorry, I should be sorry I ever got involved with quantum theory.
As reported by Heisenberg describing Schrödinger’s time spent debating with Bohr in Copenhagen (Sep 1926). In Werner Heisenberg, Physics and Beyond: Encounters and Conversations (1971), 75. As cited in John Gribbin, Erwin Schrodinger and the Quantum Revolution.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Damned (4)  |  Involvement (4)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Mechanics (46)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Sorry (30)  |  Theory (970)

If, as a chemist, I see a flower, I know all that is involved in synthesizing a flower’s elements. And I know that even the fact that it exists is not something that is natural. It is a miracle.
In Pamela Weintraub (ed.), 'Through the Looking Glass', The Omni Interviews (1984), 161.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Biochemist (9)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Element (310)  |  Exist (443)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Flower (106)  |  Know (1518)  |  Miracle (83)  |  Natural (796)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Synthesize (3)

In 1945 J.A. Ratcliffe … suggested that I [join his group at Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge] to start an investigation of the radio emission from the Sun, which had recently been discovered accidentally with radar equipment. … [B]oth Ratcliffe and Sir Lawrence Bragg, then Cavendish Professor, gave enormous support and encouragement to me. Bragg’s own work on X-ray crystallography involved techniques very similar to those we were developing for “aperture synthesis,” and he always showed a delighted interest in the way our work progressed.
From Autobiography in Wilhelm Odelberg (ed.), Les Prix Nobel en 1974/Nobel Lectures (1975)
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accident (88)  |  Aperture (5)  |  Sir Lawrence Bragg (13)  |  Cambridge (16)  |  Crystallography (9)  |  Delight (108)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Emission (17)  |  Encouragement (23)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Interest (386)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Professor (128)  |  Progress (465)  |  Radar (8)  |  Radio (50)  |  Radio Telescope (5)  |  Ratcliffe_Jack (2)  |  Ray (114)  |  Show (346)  |  Start (221)  |  Sun (385)  |  Support (147)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Technique (80)  |  Way (1217)  |  Work (1351)  |  X-ray (37)  |  X-ray Crystallography (12)

In addition to this it [mathematics] provides its disciples with pleasures similar to painting and music. They admire the delicate harmony of the numbers and the forms; they marvel when a new discovery opens up to them an unexpected vista; and does the joy that they feel not have an aesthetic character even if the senses are not involved at all? … For this reason I do not hesitate to say that mathematics deserves to be cultivated for its own sake, and I mean the theories which cannot be applied to physics just as much as the others.
(1897) From the original French, “Et surtout, leurs adeptes y trouvent des jouissances analogues á celles que donnent la peinture et la musique. Ils admirent la délicate harmonie des nombres et des formes; ils s’émerveillent quand une découverte nouvelle leur ouvre une perspective inattendue; et la joie qu’ils éprouvent ainsi n’a-t-elle pas le caractère esthétique, bien que les sens n’y prennent aucune part?...C’est pourquoi je n’hésite pas à dire que les mathématiques méritent d’être cultivées pour elles-mêmes et que les théories qui ne peuvent être appliquées á la physique doivent l’être comme les autres.” Address read for him at the First International Congress of Mathematicians in Zurich: '‘Sur les rapports de l’analyse pure et de la physique', in Proceedings of that Congress 81-90, (1898). Also published as 'L’Analyse et la Physique', in La Valeur de la Science (1905), 137-151. As translated in Armand Borel, 'On the Place of Mathematics in Culture', in Armand Borel: Œvres: Collected Papers (1983), Vol. 4, 420-421.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  Admire (18)  |  Aesthetic (46)  |  All (4108)  |  Applied (177)  |  Character (243)  |  Cultivate (19)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Deserve (65)  |  Disciple (7)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Do (1908)  |  Feel (367)  |  Form (959)  |  Harmony (102)  |  Hesitate (22)  |  Joy (107)  |  Marvel (35)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Music (129)  |  New (1216)  |  Number (699)  |  Open (274)  |  Other (2236)  |  Painting (44)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Pleasure (178)  |  Reason (744)  |  Sake (58)  |  Say (984)  |  Sense (770)  |  Theory (970)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Vista (10)

In my view, the only recourse for a scientist concerned about the social consequences of his work is to remain involved with it to the end.
'Science and Social Responsibility: A Case Study', Annals of the New York Academy of Science, 1972, 196, 223.
Science quotes on:  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequence (203)  |  End (590)  |  Remain (349)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Social (252)  |  Social Responsibility (3)  |  View (488)  |  Work (1351)

In the discussion of the. energies involved in the deformation of nuclei, the concept of surface tension of nuclear matter has been used and its value had been estimated from simple considerations regarding nuclear forces. It must be remembered, however, that the surface tension of a charged droplet is diminished by its charge, and a rough estimate shows that the surface tension of nuclei, decreasing with increasing nuclear charge, may become zero for atomic numbers of the order of 100. It seems therefore possible that the uranium nucleus has only small stability of form, and may, after neutron capture, divide itself into two nuclei of roughly equal size (the precise ratio of sizes depending on liner structural features and perhaps partly on chance). These two nuclei will repel each other and should gain a total kinetic energy of c. 200 Mev., as calculated from nuclear radius and charge. This amount of energy may actually be expected to be available from the difference in packing fraction between uranium and the elements in the middle of the periodic system. The whole 'fission' process can thus be described in an essentially classical way, without having to consider quantum-mechanical 'tunnel effects', which would actually be extremely small, on account of the large masses involved.
[Co-author with Otto Robert Frisch]
Lise Meitner and O. R. Frisch, 'Disintegration of Uranium by Neutrons: a New Type of Nuclear Reaction', Nature (1939), 143, 239.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Amount (151)  |  Atomic Number (3)  |  Author (167)  |  Available (78)  |  Become (815)  |  Chance (239)  |  Charge (59)  |  Classical (45)  |  Concept (221)  |  Consider (416)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Deformation (3)  |  Difference (337)  |  Discussion (72)  |  Divide (75)  |  Effect (393)  |  Element (310)  |  Energy (344)  |  Estimate (57)  |  Expect (200)  |  Fission (10)  |  Force (487)  |  Form (959)  |  Gain (145)  |  Kinetic (12)  |  Kinetic Energy (3)  |  Large (394)  |  Matter (798)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Must (1526)  |  Neutron (17)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nucleus (49)  |  Number (699)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Possible (552)  |  Precise (68)  |  Process (423)  |  Quantum (117)  |  Quantum Theory (66)  |  Radius (4)  |  Ratio (39)  |  Remember (179)  |  Repulsion (7)  |  Show (346)  |  Simple (406)  |  Small (477)  |  Stability (25)  |  Structural (29)  |  Surface (209)  |  Surface Tension (2)  |  System (537)  |  Tension (24)  |  Total (94)  |  Tunnel (13)  |  Two (937)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Value (365)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)  |  Will (2355)  |  Zero (37)

In the modern interpretation of Mendelism, facts are being transformed into factors at a rapid rate. If one factor will not explain the facts, then two are involved; if two prove insufficient, three will sometimes work out. The superior jugglery sometimes necessary to account for the results may blind us, if taken too naively, to the common-place that the results are often so excellently 'explained' because the explanation was invented to explain them. We work backwards from the facts to the factors, and then, presto! explain the facts by the very factors that we invented to account for them. I am not unappreciative of the distinct advantages that this method has in handling the facts. I realize how valuable it has been to us to be able to marshal our results under a few simple assumptions, yet I cannot but fear that we are rapidly developing a sort of Mendelian ritual by which to explain the extraordinary facts of alternative inheritance. So long as we do not lose sight of the purely arbitrary and formal nature of our formulae, little harm will be done; and it is only fair to state that those who are doing the actual work of progress along Mendelian lines are aware of the hypothetical nature of the factor-assumption.
'What are 'Factors' in Mendelian Explanations?', American Breeders Association (1909), 5, 365.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Actual (117)  |  Advantage (134)  |  Arbitrary (26)  |  Assumption (92)  |  Backwards (17)  |  Being (1278)  |  Blind (95)  |  Common (436)  |  Distinct (97)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Explain (322)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Extraordinary (79)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Factor (46)  |  Facts (553)  |  Fear (197)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inheritance (34)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Little (707)  |  Long (790)  |  Lose (159)  |  Gregor Mendel (21)  |  Method (505)  |  Modern (385)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Progress (465)  |  Prove (250)  |  Purely (109)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Realize (147)  |  Result (677)  |  Ritual (9)  |  Sight (132)  |  Simple (406)  |  State (491)  |  Superior (81)  |  Transform (73)  |  Transformation (69)  |  Two (937)  |  Will (2355)  |  Work (1351)

In the year 1692, James Bernoulli, discussing the logarithmic spiral [or equiangular spiral, ρ = αθ] … shows that it reproduces itself in its evolute, its involute, and its caustics of both reflection and refraction, and then adds: “But since this marvellous spiral, by such a singular and wonderful peculiarity, pleases me so much that I can scarce be satisfied with thinking about it, I have thought that it might not be inelegantly used for a symbolic representation of various matters. For since it always produces a spiral similar to itself, indeed precisely the same spiral, however it may be involved or evolved, or reflected or refracted, it may be taken as an emblem of a progeny always in all things like the parent, simillima filia matri. Or, if it is not forbidden to compare a theorem of eternal truth to the mysteries of our faith, it may be taken as an emblem of the eternal generation of the Son, who as an image of the Father, emanating from him, as light from light, remains ὁμοούσιος with him, howsoever overshadowed. Or, if you prefer, since our spira mirabilis remains, amid all changes, most persistently itself, and exactly the same as ever, it may be used as a symbol, either of fortitude and constancy in adversity, or, of the human body, which after all its changes, even after death, will be restored to its exact and perfect self, so that, indeed, if the fashion of Archimedes were allowed in these days, I should gladly have my tombstone bear this spiral, with the motto, ‘Though changed, I arise again exactly the same, Eadem numero mutata resurgo.’”
In 'The Uses of Mathesis', Bibliotheca Sacra, Vol. 32, 516-516. [The Latin phrase “simillima filia matri” roughly translates as “the daughter resembles the mother”. “Spira mirabilis” is Latin for “marvellous spiral”. The Greek word (?µ???s???) translates as “consubstantial”, meaning of the same substance or essence (used especially of the three persons of the Trinity in Christian theology). —Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |  Add (40)  |  Adversity (3)  |  All (4108)  |  Allow (45)  |  Archimedes (55)  |  Arise (158)  |  Bear (159)  |  Jacob Bernoulli (6)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Caustic (2)  |  Change (593)  |  Compare (69)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Death (388)  |  Discuss (22)  |  Emanate (2)  |  Emblem (4)  |  Eternal (110)  |  Evolute (2)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exact (68)  |  Exactly (13)  |  Faith (203)  |  Fashion (30)  |  Father (110)  |  Forbid (14)  |  Forbidden (18)  |  Fortitude (2)  |  Generation (242)  |  Gladly (2)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Body (34)  |  Image (96)  |  Indeed (324)  |  Involve (90)  |  James (3)  |  Light (607)  |  Logarithmic (5)  |  Marvellous (25)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Matter (798)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motto (28)  |  Mystery (177)  |  Overshadow (2)  |  Parent (76)  |  Peculiarity (25)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Persistent (18)  |  Please (65)  |  Precisely (92)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Produce (104)  |  Progeny (15)  |  Reflect (32)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Refraction (11)  |  Remain (349)  |  Representation (53)  |  Reproduce (11)  |  Restore (8)  |  Same (157)  |  Satisfied (23)  |  Scarce (10)  |  Self (267)  |  Show (346)  |  Similar (36)  |  Singular (23)  |  Son (24)  |  Spiral (18)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Symbolic (15)  |  Theorem (112)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Tombstone (2)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Various (200)  |  Will (2355)  |  Wonderful (149)  |  Year (933)

In the year 1902 (while I was attempting to explain to an elementary class in chemistry some of the ideas involved in the periodic law) becoming interested in the new theory of the electron, and combining this idea with those which are implied in the periodic classification, I formed an idea of the inner structure of the atom which, although it contained certain crudities, I have ever since regarded as representing essentially the arrangement of electrons in the atom ... In accordance with the idea of Mendeleef, that hydrogen is the first member of a full period, I erroneously assumed helium to have a shell of eight electrons. Regarding the disposition in the positive charge which balanced the electrons in the neutral atom, my ideas were very vague; I believed I inclined at that time toward the idea that the positive charge was also made up of discrete particles, the localization of which determined the localization of the electrons.
Valence and the Structure of Atoms and Molecules (1923), 29-30.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrangement (91)  |  Atom (355)  |  Atomic Structure (3)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Certain (550)  |  Charge (59)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Class (164)  |  Classification (97)  |  Discrete (11)  |  Disposition (42)  |  Electron (93)  |  Elementary (96)  |  Explain (322)  |  First (1283)  |  Form (959)  |  Helium (11)  |  Hydrogen (75)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inclined (41)  |  Inner (71)  |  Interest (386)  |  Law (894)  |  Localization (3)  |  Neutral (13)  |  New (1216)  |  Particle (194)  |  Period (198)  |  Periodic Law (6)  |  Positive (94)  |  Regard (305)  |  Shell (63)  |  Structure (344)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Vague (47)  |  Year (933)

It has been just so in all my inventions. The first step is an intuition—and comes with a burst, then difficulties arise. This thing that gives out and then that—“Bugs”as such little faults and difficulties are called show themselves and months of anxious watching, study and labor are requisite before commercial success—or failure—is certainly reached.
[Describing his invention of a storage battery that involved 10,296 experiments. Note Edison's use of the term “Bug” in the engineering research field for a mechanical defect greatly predates the use of the term as applied by Admiral Grace Murray Hopper to a computing defect upon finding a moth in the electronic mainframe.]
Letter to Theodore Puskas (18 Nov 1878). In The Yale Book of Quotations (2006), 226.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  All (4108)  |  Anxiety (30)  |  Applied (177)  |  Arise (158)  |  Battery (12)  |  Bug (10)  |  Burst (39)  |  Call (769)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Commercial (26)  |  Defect (31)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Engineering (175)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Failure (161)  |  Fault (54)  |  Field (364)  |  First (1283)  |  Grace (31)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Invention (369)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Little (707)  |  Mainframe (3)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Month (88)  |  Reach (281)  |  Research (664)  |  Show (346)  |  Small (477)  |  Step (231)  |  Storage (6)  |  Study (653)  |  Success (302)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Use (766)  |  Watch (109)

It has been stated that the research should be discontinued because it involved “meddling with evolution.” Homo sapiens has been meddling with evolution in many ways and for a long time. We started in a big way when we domesticated plants and animals. We continue every time we alter the environment. In general, recombinant DNA research docs not seem to represent a significant increase in the risks associated with such meddling—although it may significantly increase the rate at which we meddle.
In letter to the Board of Directors of Friends of the Earth, published in The Coevolutionary Quarterly (Spring 1978), as abstracted and cited in New Scientist (6 Jul 1978), 35.
Science quotes on:  |  Alter (62)  |  Altering (3)  |  Animal (617)  |  Continue (165)  |  DNA (77)  |  Domestication (5)  |  Environment (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  General (511)  |  Homo Sapiens (23)  |  Increase (210)  |  Long (790)  |  Meddling (2)  |  Plant (294)  |  Rate (29)  |  Represent (155)  |  Research (664)  |  Risk (61)  |  Significant (74)  |  Start (221)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

It might be thought … that evolutionary arguments would play a large part in guiding biological research, but this is far from the case. It is difficult enough to study what is happening now. To figure out exactly what happened in evolution is even more difficult. Thus evolutionary achievements can be used as hints to suggest possible lines of research, but it is highly dangerous to trust them too much. It is all too easy to make mistaken inferences unless the process involved is already very well understood.
In What Mad Pursuit: A Personal View of Scientific Discovery (1988), 138-139.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (179)  |  All (4108)  |  Already (222)  |  Argument (138)  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easy (204)  |  Enough (340)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Figure (160)  |  Guide (97)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Happening (58)  |  Hint (21)  |  Inference (45)  |  Large (394)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  Possible (552)  |  Process (423)  |  Research (664)  |  Study (653)  |  Suggest (34)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trust (66)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)

I’ve been very involved in science literacy because it’s critically important in our world today. … As a public, we’re asked to vote on issues, we’re asked to accept explanations, we’re asked to figure out what to do with our own health care, and you can’t do that unless you have some level of science literacy. Science literacy isn’t about figuring out how to solve equations like E=MC². Rather, it’s about being able to read an article in the newspaper about the environment, about health care and figuring out how to vote on it. It’s about being able to prepare nutritious meals. It’s about being able to think your way through the day.
As quoted in 'Then & Now: Dr. Mae Jemison' (19 Jun 2005) on CNN web site.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Accept (191)  |  Article (22)  |  Ask (411)  |  Being (1278)  |  Care (186)  |  Citizenship (6)  |  Do (1908)  |  Environment (216)  |  Equation (132)  |  Explanation (234)  |  Figure (160)  |  Health (193)  |  Health Care (9)  |  Literacy (10)  |  Meal (18)  |  Newspaper (32)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Read (287)  |  Science (3879)  |  Science Literacy (5)  |  Solve (130)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Vote (16)  |  Way (1217)  |  World (1774)

Man is merely a frequent effect, a monstrosity is a rare one, but both are equally natural, equally inevitable, equally part of the universal and general order. And what is strange about that? All creatures are involved in the life of all others, consequently every species... all nature is in a perpetual state of flux. Every animal is more or less a human being, every mineral more or less a plant, every plant more or less an animal... There is nothing clearly defined in nature.
D'Alembert's Dream (1769), in Rameau's Nephew and D' Alembert's Dream, trans. Leonard Tancock (Penguin edition 1966), 181.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Animal (617)  |  Being (1278)  |  Both (493)  |  Creature (233)  |  Effect (393)  |  Equally (130)  |  Flux (21)  |  General (511)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Life (1795)  |  Man (2251)  |  Merely (316)  |  Mineral (59)  |  Monstrosity (5)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Natural (796)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Order (632)  |  Other (2236)  |  Perpetual (57)  |  Plant (294)  |  Rare (89)  |  Species (401)  |  State (491)  |  Strange (157)  |  Universal (189)

Mathematics is a structure providing observers with a framework upon which to base healthy, informed, and intelligent judgment. Data and information are slung about us from all directions, and we are to use them as a basis for informed decisions. … Ability to critically analyze an argument purported to be logical, free of the impact of the loaded meanings of the terms involved, is basic to an informed populace.
In 'Mathematics Is an Edifice, Not a Toolbox', Notices of the AMS (Oct 1996), 43, No. 10, 1108.
Science quotes on:  |  Ability (152)  |  All (4108)  |  Analyze (10)  |  Argument (138)  |  Base (117)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basis (173)  |  Critical (66)  |  Data (156)  |  Decision (91)  |  Direction (175)  |  Framework (31)  |  Free (232)  |  Healthy (68)  |  Impact (42)  |  Inform (47)  |  Information (166)  |  Intelligent (100)  |  Involve (90)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Loaded (4)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Observer (43)  |  Populace (3)  |  Provide (69)  |  Purport (3)  |  Sling (4)  |  Structure (344)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Use (766)

Mostly, I spend my time being a mother to my two children, working in my organic garden, raising masses of sweet peas, being passionately involved in conservation, recycling and solar energy.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Being (1278)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Energy (344)  |  Garden (60)  |  Involve (90)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mother (114)  |  Organic (158)  |  Passionately (3)  |  Pea (4)  |  Raise (35)  |  Recycling (4)  |  Solar Energy (20)  |  Spend (95)  |  Sweet (39)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Work (1351)

My mother, my dad and I left Cuba when I was two [January, 1959]. Castro had taken control by then, and life for many ordinary people had become very difficult. My dad had worked [as a personal bodyguard for the wife of Cuban president Batista], so he was a marked man. We moved to Miami, which is about as close to Cuba as you can get without being there. It’s a Cuba-centric society. I think a lot of Cubans moved to the US thinking everything would be perfect. Personally, I have to say that those early years were not particularly happy. A lot of people didn’t want us around, and I can remember seeing signs that said: “No children. No pets. No Cubans.” Things were not made easier by the fact that Dad had begun working for the US government. At the time he couldn’t really tell us what he was doing, because it was some sort of top-secret operation. He just said he wanted to fight against what was happening back at home. [Estefan’s father was one of the many Cuban exiles taking part in the ill-fated, anti-Castro Bay of Pigs invasion to overthrow dictator Fidel Castro.] One night, Dad disappered. I think he was so worried about telling my mother he was going that he just left her a note. There were rumours something was happening back home, but we didn’t really know where Dad had gone. It was a scary time for many Cubans. A lot of men were involved—lots of families were left without sons and fathers. By the time we found out what my dad had been doing, the attempted coup had taken place, on April 17, 1961. Intitially he’d been training in Central America, but after the coup attempt he was captured and spent the next wo years as a political prisoner in Cuba. That was probably the worst time for my mother and me. Not knowing what was going to happen to Dad. I was only a kid, but I had worked out where my dad was. My mother was trying to keep it a secret, so she used to tell me Dad was on a farm. Of course, I thought that she didn’t know what had really happened to him, so I used to keep up the pretence that Dad really was working on a farm. We used to do this whole pretending thing every day, trying to protect each other. Those two years had a terrible effect on my mother. She was very nervous, just going from church to church. Always carrying her rosary beads, praying her little heart out. She had her religion, and I had my music. Music was in our family. My mother was a singer, and on my father’s side there was a violinist and a pianist. My grandmother was a poet.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  America (127)  |  April (9)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Back (390)  |  Bad (180)  |  Bay Of Pigs (2)  |  Become (815)  |  Begin (260)  |  Being (1278)  |  Capture (10)  |  Carry (127)  |  Fidel Castro (3)  |  Central (80)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Church (56)  |  Close (69)  |  Control (167)  |  Course (409)  |  Cuba (2)  |  Dad (4)  |  Dictator (4)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Do (1908)  |  Doing (280)  |  Early (185)  |  Easier (53)  |  Easy (204)  |  Effect (393)  |  Everything (476)  |  Exile (4)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Family (94)  |  Farm (26)  |  Father (110)  |  Fight (44)  |  Find (998)  |  Government (110)  |  Grandmother (4)  |  Happen (274)  |  Happened (88)  |  Happening (58)  |  Happy (105)  |  Heart (229)  |  Home (170)  |  Invasion (8)  |  Involve (90)  |  Keep (101)  |  Kid (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Little (707)  |  Lot (151)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mark (43)  |  Marked (55)  |  Mother (114)  |  Move (216)  |  Music (129)  |  Nervous (7)  |  Next (236)  |  Night (120)  |  Note (34)  |  Of Course (20)  |  Operation (213)  |  Ordinary (160)  |  Other (2236)  |  Overthrow (4)  |  Part (222)  |  Particularly (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Personal (67)  |  Personally (7)  |  Pet (8)  |  Pianist (2)  |  Place (177)  |  Poet (83)  |  Political (121)  |  Pray (16)  |  President (31)  |  Pretence (6)  |  Pretend (17)  |  Prisoner (7)  |  Probably (49)  |  Protect (58)  |  Really (78)  |  Religion (361)  |  Remember (179)  |  Rumour (2)  |  Say (984)  |  Scary (3)  |  Secret (194)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Side (233)  |  Sign (58)  |  Society (326)  |  Something (719)  |  Son (24)  |  Sort (49)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spent (85)  |  Tell (340)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Thought (953)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Training (80)  |  Try (283)  |  Trying (144)  |  Two (937)  |  Want (497)  |  Whole (738)  |  Wife (41)  |  Work (1351)  |  Worry (33)  |  Worst (57)  |  Year (933)

Nature seems to take advantage of the simple mathematical representations of the symmetry laws. When one pauses to consider the elegance and the beautiful perfection of the mathematical reasoning involved and contrast it with the complex and far-reaching physical consequences, a deep sense of respect for the power of the symmetry laws never fails to develop.
Nobel Lecture (11 Dec 1957). In Nobel Lectures: Physics, 1981-1990) (1998), 394-395.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  Beautiful (258)  |  Complex (188)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Contrast (44)  |  Deep (233)  |  Develop (268)  |  Elegance (37)  |  Fail (185)  |  Law (894)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Physical (508)  |  Power (746)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Representation (53)  |  Respect (207)  |  Sense (770)  |  Simple (406)  |  Symmetry (43)

On our planet, all objects are subject to continual and inevitable changes which arise from the essential order of things. These changes take place at a variable rate according to the nature, condition, or situation of the objects involved, but are nevertheless accomplished within a certain period of time. Time is insignificant and never a difficulty for Nature. It is always at her disposal and represents an unlimited power with which she accomplishes her greatest and smallest tasks.
Hydrogéologie (1802), trans. A. V. Carozzi (1964), 61.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Arise (158)  |  Certain (550)  |  Change (593)  |  Condition (356)  |  Continual (43)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Essential (199)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Inevitable (49)  |  Insignificant (32)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Object (422)  |  Order (632)  |  Period (198)  |  Planet (356)  |  Power (746)  |  Represent (155)  |  Situation (113)  |  Subject (521)  |  Task (147)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Unlimited (22)  |  Variable (34)

Once upon a time we were just plain people. But that was before we began having relationships with mechanical systems. Get involved with a machine and sooner or later you are reduced to a factor.
In 'The Human Factor,' The Washington Post (Jan 1987).
Science quotes on:  |  Machine (257)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  People (1005)  |  Relationship (104)  |  System (537)  |  Time (1877)

One may say that predictions are dangerous particularly for the future. If the danger involved in a prediction is not incurred, no consequence follows and the uncertainty principle is not violated.
Edward Teller , Wendy Teller and Wilson Talley, Conversations from the Dark Side of Physics (1991, 2002), 235.
Science quotes on:  |  Consequence (203)  |  Danger (115)  |  Dangerous (105)  |  Follow (378)  |  Future (429)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Principle (507)  |  Say (984)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Uncertainty Principle (8)  |  Violation (7)

One would have to have been brought up in the “spirit of militarism” to understand the difference between Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the one hand, and Auschwitz and Belsen on the other. The usual reasoning is the following: the former case is one of warfare, the latter of cold-blooded slaughter. But the plain truth is that the people involved are in both instances nonparticipants, defenseless old people, women, and children, whose annihilation is supposed to achieve some political or military objective.… I am certain that the human race is doomed, unless its instinctive detestation of atrocities gains the upper hand over the artificially constructed judgment of reason.
Max Born
In The Born-Einstein Letters: Correspondence Between Albert Einstein and Max Born (1971), 205. Born’s commentary (at age 86) added for the book, printed after letter to Albert Einstein, 8 Nov 1953.
Science quotes on:  |  Annihilation (14)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Atrocity (6)  |  Auschwitz (5)  |  Blood (134)  |  Both (493)  |  Certain (550)  |  Children (200)  |  Cold (112)  |  Cold-Blooded (2)  |  Construct (124)  |  Defenseless (3)  |  Difference (337)  |  Doom (32)  |  Former (137)  |  Gain (145)  |  Hiroshima (18)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Judgment (132)  |  Military (40)  |  Nagasaki (3)  |  Objective (91)  |  Old (481)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Political (121)  |  Race (268)  |  Reason (744)  |  Reasoning (207)  |  Slaughter (7)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Understand (606)  |  Warfare (11)

Our laboratory work involved close contact with many non-clinical scientists. Sir Peter Medawar, 1960 Nobel Laureate, was a frequent visitor to our lab and to the hospital. He once commented, after visiting an early renal transplant patient, that it was the first time he had been in a hospital ward.
In Tore Frängsmyr and Jan E. Lindsten (eds.), Nobel Lectures: Physiology Or Medicine: 1981-1990 (1993), 556.
Science quotes on:  |  Clinical (15)  |  Comment (11)  |  Contact (65)  |  Early (185)  |  First (1283)  |  Hospital (43)  |  Laboratory (196)  |  Sir Peter B. Medawar (57)  |  Nobel Laureate (3)  |  Patient (199)  |  Renal (4)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transplant (12)  |  Visitor (3)  |  Ward (7)  |  Work (1351)

Painting is but one single small mode of expressing my own cosmology, which enables me, through my genius and paranoia, to create a synthesis of nature impossible even for the scientist, because the scientist is too much involved in his specialization.
As quoted in 'Playboy Interview: Salvador Dalí, a candid conversation with the flamboyantly eccentric grand vizier of surrealism', Playboy Magazine (Jul 1964), 46, 48. Quoted and cited in Michael R. Taylor, 'God and the Atom: Salvador Dalí’s Mystical Manifesto and the Contested Origins of Nuclear Painting', Avant-garde Studies (Fall 2016), No. 2, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Cosmology (25)  |  Create (235)  |  Enable (119)  |  Express (186)  |  Genius (284)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Involve (90)  |  Mode (41)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Painting (44)  |  Paranoia (3)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Single (353)  |  Small (477)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Through (849)

Pure Mathematics is the class of all propositions of the form “p implies q,” where p and q are propositions containing one or more variables, the same in the two propositions, and neither p nor q contains any constants except logical constants. And logical constants are all notions definable in terms of the following: Implication, the relation of a term to a class of which it is a member, the notion of such that, the notion of relation, and such further notions as may be involved in the general notion of propositions of the above form. In addition to these, mathematics uses a notion which is not a constituent of the propositions which it considers, namely the notion of truth.
In 'Definition of Pure Mathematics', Principles of Mathematics (1903), 3.
Science quotes on:  |  Addition (66)  |  All (4108)  |  Class (164)  |  Consider (416)  |  Constant (144)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Definition (221)  |  Definitions and Objects of Mathematics (33)  |  Form (959)  |  General (511)  |  Implication (23)  |  Logic (287)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  More (2559)  |  Notion (113)  |  Proposition (123)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Relation (157)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Two (937)  |  Use (766)  |  Variable (34)

Science has hitherto been proceeding without the guidance of any rational theory of logic, and has certainly made good progress. It is like a computer who is pursuing some method of arithmetical approximation. Even if he occasionally makes mistakes in his ciphering, yet if the process is a good one they will rectify themselves. But then he would approximate much more rapidly if he did not commit these errors; and in my opinion, the time has come when science ought to be provided with a logic. My theory satisfies me; I can see no flaw in it. According to that theory universality, necessity, exactitude, in the absolute sense of these words, are unattainable by us, and do not exist in nature. There is an ideal law to which nature approximates; but to express it would require an endless series of modifications, like the decimals expressing surd. Only when you have asked a question in so crude a shape that continuity is not involved, is a perfectly true answer attainable.
Letter to G. F. Becker, 11 June 1893. Merrill Collection, Library of Congress. Quoted in Nathan Reingold, Science in Nineteenth-Century America: A Documentary History (1966), 231-2.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (145)  |  According (237)  |  Answer (366)  |  Approximate (25)  |  Approximation (31)  |  Arithmetic (136)  |  Ask (411)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Commit (41)  |  Commitment (27)  |  Computer (127)  |  Continuity (38)  |  Crude (31)  |  Crudity (4)  |  Decimal (20)  |  Do (1908)  |  Endless (56)  |  Error (321)  |  Exactitude (10)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Express (186)  |  Flaw (17)  |  Good (889)  |  Guidance (28)  |  Hitherto (6)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Law (894)  |  Logic (287)  |  Method (505)  |  Mistake (169)  |  Modification (55)  |  More (2559)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Proceeding (39)  |  Process (423)  |  Progress (465)  |  Provision (16)  |  Pursuing (27)  |  Pursuit (121)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Rational (90)  |  Rationality (24)  |  Require (219)  |  Satisfaction (74)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Sense (770)  |  Series (149)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time Has Come (8)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Universality (22)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

Science is a dynamic undertaking directed to lowering the degree of the empiricism involved in solving problems; or, if you prefer, science is a process of fabricating a web of interconnected concepts and conceptual schemes arising from experiments and ob
Modern Science and Modern Man, p. 62, New York (1952).
Science quotes on:  |  Arise (158)  |  Arising (22)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conceptual (10)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direct (225)  |  Dynamic (14)  |  Empiricism (21)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fabricate (6)  |  Involve (90)  |  Lowering (4)  |  Prefer (25)  |  Problem (676)  |  Process (423)  |  Scheme (57)  |  Science (3879)  |  Solve (130)  |  Undertake (33)  |  Undertaking (16)  |  Web (16)

Scientists and particularly the professional students of evolution are often accused of a bias toward mechanism or materialism, even though believers in vitalism and in finalism are not lacking among them. Such bias as may exist is inherent in the method of science. The most successful scientific investigation has generally involved treating phenomena as if they were purely materialistic, rejecting any metaphysical hypothesis as long as a physical hypothesis seems possible. The method works. The restriction is necessary because science is confined to physical means of investigation and so it would stultify its own efforts to postulate that its subject is not physical and so not susceptible to its methods.
The Meaning of Evolution: A Study of the History of Life and of its Significance for Man (1949), 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Accusation (6)  |  Belief (578)  |  Believer (25)  |  Bias (20)  |  Confinement (4)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Exist (443)  |  Hypothesis (296)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Lacking (2)  |  Long (790)  |  Materialism (11)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Mechanism (96)  |  Metaphysical (38)  |  Metaphysics (50)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Necessity (191)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Possible (552)  |  Postulate (38)  |  Professional (70)  |  Purely (109)  |  Rejection (34)  |  Restriction (11)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientific Method (175)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Student (300)  |  Stultify (5)  |  Subject (521)  |  Success (302)  |  Successful (123)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Vitalism (5)  |  Work (1351)

Space travel is at the frontier of my profession. It is going to be accomplished and I want to be in on it. There is also an element of simple duty involved. I am convinced that I have something to give this project.
As he wrote in an article for Life (14 Sep 1959), 38.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (93)  |  Convince (41)  |  Duty (68)  |  Element (310)  |  Frontier (38)  |  Give (202)  |  Involve (90)  |  Profession (99)  |  Project (73)  |  Simple (406)  |  Something (719)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Travel (19)  |  Travel (114)  |  Want (497)

Teapot Dome involved the conservation of the oil resources of the United States, especially those situated upon the public lands.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Conservation (168)  |  Dome (8)  |  Especially (31)  |  Involve (90)  |  Land (115)  |  Oil (59)  |  Public (96)  |  Resource (63)  |  Situate (3)  |  State (491)  |  Teapot (3)  |  United States (23)

That radioactive elements created by us are found in nature is an astounding event in the history of the earth. And of the Human race. To fail to consider its importance and its consequences would be a folly for which humanity would have to pay a terrible price. When public opinion has been created in the countries concerned and among all the nations, an opinion informed of the dangers involved in going on with the tests and led by the reason which this information imposes, then the statesmen may reach an agreement to stop the experiments.
In 'Excerpts from Message by Schweitzer', New York Times (24 Apr 1957), 4, translated from a letter issued by Schweitzer through the Nobel Committee, asking that public opinion demand an end to nuclear tests.
Science quotes on:  |  Agreement (53)  |  All (4108)  |  Astounding (9)  |  Concern (228)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Consider (416)  |  Danger (115)  |  Earth (996)  |  Element (310)  |  Event (216)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fail (185)  |  Folly (43)  |  History (673)  |  History Of The Earth (3)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Race (100)  |  Humanity (169)  |  Importance (286)  |  Inform (47)  |  Information (166)  |  Nation (193)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Opinion (281)  |  Price (51)  |  Public Opinion (2)  |  Race (268)  |  Radioactive (22)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Reach (281)  |  Reason (744)  |  Statesman (19)  |  Stop (80)  |  Terrible (38)  |  Test (211)

The actual evolution of mathematical theories proceeds by a process of induction strictly analogous to the method of induction employed in building up the physical sciences; observation, comparison, classification, trial, and generalisation are essential in both cases. Not only are special results, obtained independently of one another, frequently seen to be really included in some generalisation, but branches of the subject which have been developed quite independently of one another are sometimes found to have connections which enable them to be synthesised in one single body of doctrine. The essential nature of mathematical thought manifests itself in the discernment of fundamental identity in the mathematical aspects of what are superficially very different domains. A striking example of this species of immanent identity of mathematical form was exhibited by the discovery of that distinguished mathematician … Major MacMahon, that all possible Latin squares are capable of enumeration by the consideration of certain differential operators. Here we have a case in which an enumeration, which appears to be not amenable to direct treatment, can actually be carried out in a simple manner when the underlying identity of the operation is recognised with that involved in certain operations due to differential operators, the calculus of which belongs superficially to a wholly different region of thought from that relating to Latin squares.
In Presidential Address British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheffield, Section A, Nature (1 Sep 1910), 84, 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  Actually (27)  |  All (4108)  |  Amenable (4)  |  Analogous (5)  |  Appear (118)  |  Aspect (124)  |  Belong (162)  |  Body (537)  |  Both (493)  |  Branch (150)  |  Build (204)  |  Building (156)  |  Calculus (65)  |  Capable (168)  |  Carry (127)  |  Case (99)  |  Certain (550)  |  Classification (97)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Connection (162)  |  Consideration (139)  |  Develop (268)  |  Different (577)  |  Differential (7)  |  Direct (225)  |  Discernment (4)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Distinguish (160)  |  Distinguished (83)  |  Doctrine (75)  |  Domain (69)  |  Due (141)  |  Employ (113)  |  Enable (119)  |  Essential (199)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Example (94)  |  Exhibit (20)  |  Find (998)  |  Form (959)  |  Frequent (23)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Generalization (57)  |  Identity (19)  |  Include (90)  |  Independent (67)  |  Independently (24)  |  Induction (77)  |  Involve (90)  |  Latin (38)  |  Percy Alexander MacMahon (3)  |  Major (84)  |  Manifest (21)  |  Manner (58)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Method (505)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Observation (555)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Operation (213)  |  Operations (107)  |  Operator (3)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Possible (552)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Process (423)  |  Really (78)  |  Recognise (9)  |  Region (36)  |  Relate (21)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Simple (406)  |  Single (353)  |  Sometimes (45)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Square (70)  |  Strictly (13)  |  Strike (68)  |  Striking (48)  |  Subject (521)  |  Superficial (12)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Synthesize (3)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thought (953)  |  Treatment (130)  |  Trial (57)  |  Underlying (30)  |  Wholly (88)

The apodictic quality of mathematical thought, the certainty and correctness of its conclusions, are due, not to a special mode of ratiocination, but to the character of the concepts with which it deals. What is that distinctive characteristic? I answer: precision, sharpness, completeness,* of definition. But how comes your mathematician by such completeness? There is no mysterious trick involved; some ideas admit of such precision, others do not; and the mathematician is one who deals with those that do.
In 'The Universe and Beyond', Hibbert Journal (1904-1905), 3, 309. An editorial footnote indicates “precision, sharpness, completeness” — i.e., in terms of the absolutely clear and indefinable.
Science quotes on:  |  Admit (45)  |  Answer (366)  |  Apodictic (3)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Character (243)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Clear (100)  |  Completeness (19)  |  Concept (221)  |  Conclusion (254)  |  Correctness (12)  |  Deal (188)  |  Definition (221)  |  Distinctive (25)  |  Do (1908)  |  Due (141)  |  Idea (843)  |  Indefinable (5)  |  Involve (90)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mode (41)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Nature Of Mathematics (80)  |  Other (2236)  |  Precision (68)  |  Quality (135)  |  Ratiocination (4)  |  Sharpness (8)  |  Special (184)  |  Term (349)  |  Thought (953)  |  Trick (35)

The energy liberated when substrates undergo air oxidation is not liberated in one large burst, as was once thought, but is released in stepwise fashion. At least six separate steps seem to be involved. The process is not unlike that of locks in a canal. As each lock is passed in the ascent from a lower to a higher level a certain amount of energy is expended. Similarly, the total energy resulting from the oxidation of foodstuffs is released in small units or parcels, step by step. The amount of free energy released at each step is proportional to the difference in potential of the systems comprising the several steps.
'Oxidative Mechanisms in Animal Tissues', A Symposium on Respiratory Enzymes (1942), 22.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (347)  |  Amount (151)  |  Biochemistry (49)  |  Burst (39)  |  Canal (17)  |  Certain (550)  |  Difference (337)  |  Energy (344)  |  Free (232)  |  Large (394)  |  Nutrition (23)  |  Oxidation (7)  |  Pass (238)  |  Potential (69)  |  Process (423)  |  Separate (143)  |  Small (477)  |  Step (231)  |  Step By Step (11)  |  System (537)  |  Thought (953)  |  Total (94)

The energy of a covalent bond is largely the energy of resonance of two electrons between two atoms. The examination of the form of the resonance integral shows that the resonance energy increases in magnitude with increase in the overlapping of the two atomic orbitals involved in the formation of the bond, the word ‘overlapping” signifying the extent to which regions in space in which the two orbital wave functions have large values coincide... Consequently it is expected that of two orbitals in an atom the one which can overlap more with an orbital of another atom will form the stronger bond with that atom, and, moreover, the bond formed by a given orbital will tend to lie in that direction in which the orbital is concentrated.
Nature of the Chemical Bond and the Structure of Molecules and Crystals (1939), 76.
Science quotes on:  |  Atom (355)  |  Bond (45)  |  Concentration (29)  |  Conincidence (4)  |  Covalent (2)  |  Direction (175)  |  Electron (93)  |  Energy (344)  |  Examination (98)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expectation (65)  |  Extent (139)  |  Form (959)  |  Formation (96)  |  Function (228)  |  Increase (210)  |  Integral (26)  |  Large (394)  |  Lie (364)  |  Magnitude (83)  |  More (2559)  |  Nomenclature (146)  |  Orbital (4)  |  Orbitals (2)  |  Overlap (8)  |  Region (36)  |  Resonance (7)  |  Show (346)  |  Significance (113)  |  Space (500)  |  Strength (126)  |  Stronger (36)  |  Tend (124)  |  Two (937)  |  Value (365)  |  Wave (107)  |  Will (2355)  |  Word (619)

The highest mathematical principles may be involved in the production of the simplest mechanical result.
In 'Academical Education', Orations and Speeches on Various Occasions (1870), Vol. 3, 513. This is seen misattributed to Eric Temple Bell, but he only quoted it, attributing it to Everett, in for example, Mathematics: Queen and Servant of Sciences (1938), 20.
Science quotes on:  |  Engineering (175)  |  Higher (37)  |  Involve (90)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mechanical (140)  |  Principle (507)  |  Production (183)  |  Result (677)  |  Simple (406)

The law of gravitation is indisputably and incomparably the greatest scientific discovery ever made, whether we look at the advance which it involved, the extent of truth disclosed, or the fundamental and satisfactory nature of this truth.
In History of the Inductive Sciences, Bk. 7, chap. 8, sect. 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Disclose (18)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Extent (139)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Gravitation (70)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Incomparable (12)  |  Indisputable (8)  |  Involve (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Gravitation (22)  |  Look (582)  |  Mathematicians and Anecdotes (141)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Satisfactory (17)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Truth (1057)

The Law of Inhibition. The strength of a reflex may be decreased through presentation of a second stimulus which has no other relation to the effector involved.
In The Behavior of Organisms: An Experimental Analysis (1938), 17.
Science quotes on:  |  Decrease (15)  |  Inhibition (13)  |  Involve (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Other (2236)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Reflex (14)  |  Relationship (104)  |  Stimulus (26)  |  Strength (126)  |  Through (849)

The maintenance of biological diversity requires special measures that extend far beyond the establishment of nature reserves. Several reasons for this stand out. Existing reserves have been selected according to a number of criteria, including the desire to protect nature, scenery, and watersheds, and to promote cultural values and recreational opportunities. The actual requirements of individual species, populations, and communities have seldom been known, nor has the available information always been employed in site selection and planning for nature reserves. The use of lands surrounding nature reserves has typically been inimical to conservation, since it has usually involved heavy use of pesticides, industrial development, and the presence of human settlements in which fire, hunting, and firewood gathering feature as elements of the local economy.
The Fragmented Forest: Island Biogeography Theory and the Preservation of Biotic Diversity (1984), xii.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  Actual (117)  |  Available (78)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Biodiversity (11)  |  Biological (137)  |  Community (104)  |  Conservation (168)  |  Criteria (6)  |  Cultural (25)  |  Desire (204)  |  Development (422)  |  Diversity (73)  |  Economy (55)  |  Element (310)  |  Employ (113)  |  Establishment (47)  |  Extend (128)  |  Far (154)  |  Fire (189)  |  Gather (72)  |  Gathering (23)  |  Heavy (23)  |  Human (1468)  |  Hunting (23)  |  Individual (404)  |  Industrial Development (4)  |  Information (166)  |  Involve (90)  |  Known (454)  |  Land (115)  |  Maintenance (20)  |  Measure (232)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Nature Reserve (2)  |  Number (699)  |  Opportunity (87)  |  Pesticide (5)  |  Plan (117)  |  Planning (20)  |  Population (110)  |  Presence (63)  |  Promote (29)  |  Protect (58)  |  Reason (744)  |  Recreation (20)  |  Require (219)  |  Requirement (63)  |  Reserve (24)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Seldom (65)  |  Select (44)  |  Selection (128)  |  Settlement (3)  |  Site (14)  |  Special (184)  |  Species (401)  |  Stand (274)  |  Stand Out (5)  |  Surround (30)  |  Typical (13)  |  Use (766)  |  Usually (176)  |  Value (365)  |  Watershed (3)

The majority of mathematical truths now possessed by us presuppose the intellectual toil of many centuries. A mathematician, therefore, who wishes today to acquire a thorough understanding of modern research in this department, must think over again in quickened tempo the mathematical labors of several centuries. This constant dependence of new truths on old ones stamps mathematics as a science of uncommon exclusiveness and renders it generally impossible to lay open to uninitiated readers a speedy path to the apprehension of the higher mathematical truths. For this reason, too, the theories and results of mathematics are rarely adapted for popular presentation … This same inaccessibility of mathematics, although it secures for it a lofty and aristocratic place among the sciences, also renders it odious to those who have never learned it, and who dread the great labor involved in acquiring an understanding of the questions of modern mathematics. Neither in the languages nor in the natural sciences are the investigations and results so closely interdependent as to make it impossible to acquaint the uninitiated student with single branches or with particular results of these sciences, without causing him to go through a long course of preliminary study.
In Mathematical Essays and Recreations (1898), 32.
Science quotes on:  |  Adapt (66)  |  Apprehension (26)  |  Branch (150)  |  Century (310)  |  Constant (144)  |  Course (409)  |  Department (92)  |  Dependence (45)  |  Dependent (24)  |  Dread (13)  |  Great (1574)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Inaccessible (18)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Labor (107)  |  Language (293)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Lofty (13)  |  Long (790)  |  Majority (66)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Modern (385)  |  Modern Mathematics (50)  |  Must (1526)  |  Natural (796)  |  Natural Science (128)  |  Never (1087)  |  New (1216)  |  Odious (3)  |  Old (481)  |  Open (274)  |  Path (144)  |  Popular (29)  |  Possess (156)  |  Preliminary (5)  |  Presentation (23)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Question (621)  |  Reader (40)  |  Reason (744)  |  Render (93)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Single (353)  |  Speedy (2)  |  Stamp (36)  |  Student (300)  |  Study (653)  |  Tempo (3)  |  Theory (970)  |  Think (1086)  |  Thorough (40)  |  Through (849)  |  Today (314)  |  Toil (25)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Uncommon (14)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Uninitiated (2)

The mathematics involved in string theory … in subtlety and sophistication vastly exceeds previous uses of mathematics in physical theories. … String theory has led to a whole host of amazing results in mathematics in areas that seem far removed from physics. To many this indicates that string theory must be on the right track.
In Book Review 'Pulling the Strings,' of Lawrence Krauss's Hiding in the Mirror: The Mysterious Lure of Extra Dimensions, from Plato to String Theory and Beyond in Nature (22 Dec 2005), 438, 1082.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazing (35)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Must (1526)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Result (677)  |  Right (452)  |  Sophistication (9)  |  String Theory (10)  |  Subtle (35)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Theory (970)  |  Track (38)  |  Use (766)  |  Whole (738)

The mind can proceed only so far upon what it knows and can prove. There comes a point where the mind takes a higher plane of knowledge, but can never prove how it got there. All great discoveries have involved such a leap
As recollected from a visit some months earlier, and quoted in William Miller, 'Old Man’s Advice to Youth: “Never Lose a Holy Curiosity”', Life (2 May 1955), 64.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Great (1574)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Leap (53)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Never (1087)  |  Point (580)  |  Proceed (129)  |  Proof (287)  |  Prove (250)

The nucleic acids, as constituents of living organisms, are comparable In importance to proteins. There is evidence that they are Involved In the processes of cell division and growth, that they participate In the transmission of hereditary characters, and that they are important constituents of viruses. An understanding of the molecular structure of the nucleic acids should be of value In the effort to understand the fundamental phenomena of life.
[Co-author with American chemist, B. Corey (1897-1971)]
'A Proposed Structure for the Nucleic Acids', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (1953), 39, 84.
Science quotes on:  |  Acid (83)  |  Author (167)  |  Cell (138)  |  Cell Division (5)  |  Character (243)  |  Chemist (156)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Constituent (45)  |  Division (65)  |  Effort (227)  |  Evidence (248)  |  Fundamental (250)  |  Growth (187)  |  Heredity (60)  |  Importance (286)  |  Life (1795)  |  Living (491)  |  Molecular Structure (8)  |  Molecule (174)  |  Nucleic Acid (23)  |  Organism (220)  |  Participation (15)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Protein (54)  |  Structure (344)  |  Transmission (34)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Value (365)  |  Virus (27)

The present state of the system of nature is evidently a consequence of what it was in the preceding moment, and if we conceive of an intelligence that at a given instant comprehends all the relations of the entities of this universe, it could state the respective position, motions, and general affects of all these entities at any time in the past or future. Physical astronomy, the branch of knowledge that does the greatest honor to the human mind, gives us an idea, albeit imperfect, of what such an intelligence would be. The simplicity of the law by which the celestial bodies move, and the relations of their masses and distances, permit analysis to follow their motions up to a certain point; and in order to determine the state of the system of these great bodies in past or future centuries, it suffices for the mathematician that their position and their velocity be given by observation for any moment in time. Man owes that advantage to the power of the instrument he employs, and to the small number of relations that it embraces in its calculations. But ignorance of the different causes involved in the production of events, as well as their complexity, taken together with the imperfection of analysis, prevents our reaching the same certainty about the vast majority of phenomena. Thus there are things that are uncertain for us, things more or less probable, and we seek to compensate for the impossibility of knowing them by determining their different degrees of likelihood. So it was that we owe to the weakness of the human mind one of the most delicate and ingenious of mathematical theories, the science of chance or probability.
'Recherches, 1º, sur l'Intégration des Équations Différentielles aux Différences Finies, et sur leur Usage dans la Théorie des Hasards' (1773, published 1776). In Oeuvres complètes de Laplace, 14 Vols. (1843-1912), Vol. 8, 144-5, trans. Charles Coulston Gillispie, Pierre-Simon Laplace 1749-1827: A Life in Exact Science (1997), 26.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (134)  |  All (4108)  |  Analysis (233)  |  Astronomy (229)  |  Branch (150)  |  Calculation (127)  |  Cause (541)  |  Celestial (53)  |  Certain (550)  |  Certainty (174)  |  Chance (239)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Conceive (98)  |  Consequence (203)  |  Degree (276)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Determine (144)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Distance (161)  |  Embrace (46)  |  Employ (113)  |  Event (216)  |  Evidently (26)  |  Follow (378)  |  Future (429)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Honor (54)  |  Honour (56)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Mind (128)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ignorance (240)  |  Imperfect (45)  |  Imperfection (31)  |  Impossibility (61)  |  Ingenious (55)  |  Instant (45)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Law (894)  |  Likelihood (10)  |  Majority (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mass (157)  |  Mathematician (387)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Moment (253)  |  More (2559)  |  More Or Less (68)  |  Most (1731)  |  Motion (310)  |  Move (216)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Number (699)  |  Observation (555)  |  Order (632)  |  Owe (71)  |  Past (337)  |  Permit (58)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Point (580)  |  Position (77)  |  Power (746)  |  Prediction (82)  |  Present (619)  |  Prevent (94)  |  Probability (130)  |  Production (183)  |  Relation (157)  |  Science (3879)  |  Seek (213)  |  Simplicity (167)  |  Small (477)  |  State (491)  |  System (537)  |  Theory (970)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Uncertain (44)  |  Uncertainty (56)  |  Universe (857)  |  Vast (177)  |  Velocity (48)  |  Weakness (48)

The steady states of the fluid matrix of the body are commonly preserved by physiological reactions, i.e., by more complicated processes than are involved in simple physico-chemical equilibria. Special designations, therefore, are appropriate:—“homeostasis” to designate stability of the organism; “homeostatic conditions,” to indicate details of the stability; and “homeostatic reactions,” to signify means for maintaining stability.
'Physiological Regulation of Normal States: Some Tentative Postulates Concerning Biological Homeostatics', 1926. Reprinted in L. L. Langley (ed.), Homeostasis: Origins of the Concept (1973), 246.
Science quotes on:  |  Appropriate (61)  |  Body (537)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Complicated (115)  |  Condition (356)  |  Designation (13)  |  Detail (146)  |  Fluid (51)  |  Homeostasis (2)  |  Indicate (61)  |  Matrix (14)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  More (2559)  |  Organism (220)  |  Physiological (62)  |  Physiology (95)  |  Reaction (104)  |  Signify (17)  |  Simple (406)  |  Special (184)  |  Stability (25)  |  State (491)  |  Steady (44)  |  Steady State (6)

The theory here developed is that mega-evolution normally occurs among small populations that become preadaptive and evolve continuously (without saltation, but at exceptionally rapid rates) to radically different ecological positions. The typical pattern involved is probably this: A large population is fragmented into numerous small isolated lines of descent. Within these, inadaptive differentiation and random fixation of mutations occur. Among many such inadaptive lines one or a few are preadaptive, i.e., some of their characters tend to fit them for available ecological stations quite different from those occupied by their immediate ancestors. Such groups are subjected to strong selection pressure and evolve rapidly in the further direction of adaptation to the new status. The very few lines that successfully achieve this perfected adaptation then become abundant and expand widely, at the same time becoming differentiated and specialized on lower levels within the broad new ecological zone.
Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), 123.
Science quotes on:  |  Abundance (25)  |  Abundant (22)  |  Achievement (179)  |  Adaptation (58)  |  Ancestor (60)  |  Available (78)  |  Become (815)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Character (243)  |  Descent (27)  |  Develop (268)  |  Development (422)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Differentiation (25)  |  Direction (175)  |  Ecology (74)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Expand (53)  |  Expansion (41)  |  Fit (134)  |  Fixation (5)  |  Fragment (54)  |  Group (78)  |  Immediate (95)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Large (394)  |  Level (67)  |  Mutation (37)  |  New (1216)  |  Numerous (68)  |  Occupation (48)  |  Occupied (45)  |  Occur (150)  |  Pattern (110)  |  Perfect (216)  |  Perfection (129)  |  Population (110)  |  Position (77)  |  Pressure (63)  |  Probability (130)  |  Radically (5)  |  Random (41)  |  Rapidity (26)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Selection (128)  |  Small (477)  |  Specialization (23)  |  Station (29)  |  Status (35)  |  Strong (174)  |  Subject (521)  |  Tend (124)  |  Theory (970)  |  Time (1877)  |  Typical (13)  |  Zone (5)

The traditional boundaries between various fields of science are rapidly disappearing and what is more important science does not know any national borders. The scientists of the world are forming an invisible network with a very free flow of scientific information - a freedom accepted by the countries of the world irrespective of political systems or religions. ... Great care must be taken that the scientific network is utilized only for scientific purposes - if it gets involved in political questions it loses its special status and utility as a nonpolitical force for development.
Banquet speech accepting Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (10 Dec 1982). In Wilhelm Odelberg (editor) Les Prix Nobel. The Nobel Prizes 1982 (1983)
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Border (9)  |  Boundary (51)  |  Care (186)  |  Country (251)  |  Development (422)  |  Disappear (82)  |  Field (364)  |  Flow (83)  |  Force (487)  |  Forming (42)  |  Free (232)  |  Freedom (129)  |  Great (1574)  |  Information (166)  |  Invisible (63)  |  Know (1518)  |  Lose (159)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nation (193)  |  Network (21)  |  Political (121)  |  Politics (112)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Question (621)  |  Rapidly (66)  |  Religion (361)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Special (184)  |  Status (35)  |  System (537)  |  Utility (49)  |  Various (200)  |  World (1774)

The tropical rain forests of the world harbor the majority of the planet’s species, yet this wealth of species is being quickly spent. While the exact numbers of species involved and the rate of forest clearing are still under debate, the trend is unmistakable—the richest terrestrial biome is being altered at a scale unparalleled in geologic history.
In The Fragmented Forest: Island Biogeography Theory and the Preservation of Biotic Diversity (1984),
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Alter (62)  |  Altered (32)  |  Being (1278)  |  Clearing (2)  |  Debate (38)  |  Deforestation (45)  |  Forest (150)  |  Geologic History (2)  |  Harbor (6)  |  History (673)  |  Majority (66)  |  Number (699)  |  Planet (356)  |  Rain (62)  |  Rain Forest (29)  |  Rate (29)  |  Richest (2)  |  Scale (121)  |  Species (401)  |  Spent (85)  |  Still (613)  |  Terrestrial (61)  |  Trend (22)  |  Tropical (8)  |  Unmistakable (6)  |  Unparalleled (3)  |  Wealth (94)  |  World (1774)

The universe does not exist “out there,” independent of us. We are inescapably involved in bringing about that which appears to be happening. We are not only observers. We are participators. In some strange sense, this is a participatory universe. Physics is no longer satisfied with insights only into particles, fields of force, into geometry, or even into time and space. Today we demand of physics some understanding of existence itself.
Quoted in Denis Brian, The Voice Of Genius: Conversations with Nobel Scientists and Other Luminaries, 127.
Science quotes on:  |  Demand (123)  |  Exist (443)  |  Existence (456)  |  Field (364)  |  Force (487)  |  Geometry (255)  |  Happening (58)  |  Insight (102)  |  Observation (555)  |  Particle (194)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Sense (770)  |  Space (500)  |  Strange (157)  |  Time (1877)  |  Time And Space (39)  |  Today (314)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Universe (857)

The whole biological community needs to be talking to one another so that people can get a comprehension of the turmoil in which our planet is involved at the moment, which is a biological turmoil above anything else.
In short extract from interview with Alice Roberts for the Biology: Changing the World project, 'Attenborough: The Earth is in “Biological Turmoil”', The Biologist (Apr/May 2015), 62, No. 2, 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Biological (137)  |  Biology (216)  |  Community (104)  |  Comprehension (66)  |  Moment (253)  |  People (1005)  |  Planet (356)  |  Talk (100)  |  Talking (76)  |  Turmoil (8)  |  Whole (738)

To my knowledge there are no written accounts of Fermi’s contributions to the [first atomic bomb] testing problems, nor would it be easy to reconstruct them in detail. This, however, was one of those occasions in which Fermi’s dominion over all physics, one of his most startling characteristics, came into its own. The problems involved in the Trinity test ranged from hydrodynamics to nuclear physics, from optics to thermodynamics, from geophysics to nuclear chemistry. Often they were closely interrelated, and to solve one’it was necessary to understand all the others. Even though the purpose was grim and terrifying, it was one of the greatest physics experiments of all time. Fermi completely immersed himself in the task. At the time of the test he was one of the very few persons (or perhaps the only one) who understood all the technical ramifications.
In Enrico Fermi: Physicist (1970), 145
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Account (192)  |  All (4108)  |  Atomic Bomb (111)  |  Characteristic (148)  |  Chemistry (353)  |  Completely (135)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Detail (146)  |  Dominion (11)  |  Easy (204)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Enrico Fermi (19)  |  First (1283)  |  Geophysics (4)  |  Greatest (328)  |  Grim (5)  |  Himself (461)  |  Hydrodynamics (5)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Most (1731)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Nuclear (107)  |  Nuclear Physics (5)  |  Occasion (85)  |  Optics (23)  |  Other (2236)  |  Person (363)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Problem (676)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Ramification (7)  |  Solve (130)  |  Startling (15)  |  Task (147)  |  Terror (30)  |  Test (211)  |  Thermodynamics (40)  |  Time (1877)  |  Trinity (9)  |  Understand (606)  |  Understood (156)

Unless the materials involved can be traced back to the material of common sense concern there is nothing whatever for scientific concern to be concerned with.
In 'Common Sense and Science: Their Respective Frames of Reference', The Journal of Philosophy (8 Apr 1948), 45, No. 8, 206.
Science quotes on:  |  Back (390)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Concern (228)  |  Involve (90)  |  Material (353)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Sense (770)  |  Trace (103)  |  Whatever (234)

Very few of us can now place ourselves in the mental condition in which even such philosophers as the great Descartes were involved in the days before Newton had announced the true laws of the motion of bodies.
'Introductory Lecture on Experimental Physics', 1871. In W. D. Niven (ed.), The Scientific Papers of James Clerk Maxwell (1890), Vol. 2, 241.
Science quotes on:  |  Condition (356)  |  René Descartes (81)  |  Great (1574)  |  Law (894)  |  Laws Of Motion (10)  |  Mental (177)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Motion (310)  |  Sir Isaac Newton (333)  |  Ourselves (245)  |  Philosopher (258)

We may see how unexpectedly recondite parts of pure mathematics may bear upon physical science, by calling to mind the circumstance that Fresnel obtained one of the most curious confirmations of the theory (the laws of Circular Polarization by reflection) through an interpretation of an algebraical expression, which, according to the original conventional meaning of the symbols, involved an impossible quantity.
In History of Scientific Ideas, Bk. 2, chap. 14, sect. 8.
Science quotes on:  |  Accord (36)  |  According (237)  |  Algebra (113)  |  Bear (159)  |  Call (769)  |  Circular (19)  |  Circumstance (136)  |  Confirmation (22)  |  Conventional (30)  |  Curious (91)  |  Expression (175)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Interpretation (85)  |  Involve (90)  |  Law (894)  |  Mathematics (1328)  |  Mean (809)  |  Meaning (233)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Most (1731)  |  Obtain (163)  |  Original (58)  |  Part (222)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physical Science (101)  |  Polarization (4)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Mathematics (67)  |  Quantity (132)  |  Recondite (8)  |  Reflection (90)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Study And Research In Mathematics (61)  |  Symbol (93)  |  Theory (970)  |  Through (849)  |  Unexpected (52)

What is peculiar and new to the [19th] century, differentiating it from all its predecessors, is its technology. It was not merely the introduction of some great isolated inventions. It is impossible not to feel that something more than that was involved. … The process of change was slow, unconscious, and unexpected. In the nineteeth century, the process became quick, conscious, and expected. … The whole change has arisen from the new scientific information. Science, conceived not so much in its principles as in its results, is an obvious storehouse of ideas for utilisation. … Also, it is a great mistake to think that the bare scientific idea is the required invention, so that it has only to be picked up and used. An intense period of imaginative design lies between. One element in the new method is just the discovery of how to set about bridging the gap between the scientific ideas, and the ultimate product. It is a process of disciplined attack upon one difficulty after another This discipline of knowledge applies beyond technology to pure science, and beyond science to general scholarship. It represents the change from amateurs to professionals. … But the full self-conscious realisation of the power of professionalism in knowledge in all its departments, and of the way to produce the professionals, and of the importance of knowledge to the advance of technology, and of the methods by which abstract knowledge can be connected with technology, and of the boundless possibilities of technological advance,—the realisation of all these things was first completely attained in the nineteeth century.
In Science and the Modern World (1925, 1997), 96.
Science quotes on:  |  19th Century (33)  |  Abstract (124)  |  Advance (280)  |  All (4108)  |  Amateur (19)  |  Attack (84)  |  Attain (125)  |  Bare (33)  |  Beyond (308)  |  Boundless (26)  |  Century (310)  |  Change (593)  |  Completely (135)  |  Connect (125)  |  Conscious (45)  |  Department (92)  |  Design (195)  |  Differentiate (19)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Discipline (77)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Element (310)  |  Expect (200)  |  Expected (5)  |  Feel (367)  |  First (1283)  |  Gap (33)  |  General (511)  |  Great (1574)  |  Idea (843)  |  Ideal (99)  |  Imagination (328)  |  Importance (286)  |  Impossible (251)  |  Information (166)  |  Introduction (35)  |  Invention (369)  |  Isolated (14)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Lie (364)  |  Merely (316)  |  Method (505)  |  Methods (204)  |  Mistake (169)  |  More (2559)  |  New (1216)  |  Obvious (126)  |  Peculiar (113)  |  Period (198)  |  Power (746)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Principle (507)  |  Process (423)  |  Product (160)  |  Professional (70)  |  Pure (291)  |  Pure Science (27)  |  Realisation (4)  |  Represent (155)  |  Required (108)  |  Result (677)  |  Scholarship (20)  |  Science (3879)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Self (267)  |  Set (394)  |  Slow (101)  |  Something (719)  |  Storehouse (6)  |  Technological (61)  |  Technology (257)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Think (1086)  |  Ultimate (144)  |  Unconscious (22)  |  Unexpected (52)  |  Way (1217)  |  Whole (738)

What these two sciences of recognition, evolution and immunology, have in common is not found in nonbiological systems such as 'evolving' stars. Such physical systems can be explained in terms of energy transfer, dynamics, causes, and even 'information transfer'. But they do not exhibit repertoires of variants ready for interaction by selection to give a population response according to a hereditary principle. The application of a selective principle in a recognition system, by the way, does not necessarily mean that genes must be involved—it simply means that any state resulting after selection is highly correlated in structure with the one that gave rise to it and that the correlation continues to be propagated. Nor is it the case that selection cannot itself introduce variation. But a constancy or 'memory' of selected events is necessary. If changes occurred so fast that what was selected could not emerge in the population or was destroyed, a recognition system would not survive. Physics proper does not deal with recognition systems, which are by their nature biological and historical systems. But all the laws of physics nevertheless apply to recognition systems.
Bright and Brilliant Fire, On the Matters of the Mind (1992), 79.
Science quotes on:  |  According (237)  |  All (4108)  |  Application (242)  |  Apply (160)  |  Biological (137)  |  Cause (541)  |  Change (593)  |  Common (436)  |  Constancy (12)  |  Continue (165)  |  Correlation (18)  |  Deal (188)  |  Destroy (180)  |  Do (1908)  |  Energy (344)  |  Event (216)  |  Evolution (590)  |  Explain (322)  |  Gene (98)  |  Historical (70)  |  Immunology (14)  |  Information (166)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Introduce (63)  |  Law (894)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Memory (134)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Necessarily (135)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Neurobiology (4)  |  Nevertheless (90)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physical (508)  |  Physics (533)  |  Population (110)  |  Principle (507)  |  Proper (144)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Response (53)  |  Rise (166)  |  Science (3879)  |  Select (44)  |  Selection (128)  |  Selective (19)  |  Star (427)  |  Stars (304)  |  State (491)  |  Structure (344)  |  Survive (79)  |  System (537)  |  Term (349)  |  Terms (184)  |  Transfer (20)  |  Two (937)  |  Variant (9)  |  Variation (90)  |  Way (1217)

What was really great about 'Star Trek' when I was growing up as a little girl is not only did they have Lt. Uhura played by Nichelle Nichols as a technical officer—she was African. ... At the same time, they had this crew that was composed of people from all around the world and they were working together to learn more about the universe. ... So that helped to fuel my whole idea that I could be involved in space exploration as well as in the sciences.
As quoted in 'Then & Now: Dr. Mae Jemison' (19 Jun 2005) on CNN web site.
Science quotes on:  |  African (10)  |  African American (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Crew (9)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Girl (37)  |  Great (1574)  |  Growing (98)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inspiration (75)  |  International (37)  |  Learn (629)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  Officer (12)  |  People (1005)  |  Science (3879)  |  Space (500)  |  Space Exploration (13)  |  Star (427)  |  Time (1877)  |  Together (387)  |  Universe (857)  |  Whole (738)  |  World (1774)

When a man of science speaks of his “data,” he knows very well in practice what he means. Certain experiments have been conducted, and have yielded certain observed results, which have been recorded. But when we try to define a “datum” theoretically, the task is not altogether easy. A datum, obviously, must be a fact known by perception. But it is very difficult to arrive at a fact in which there is no element of inference, and yet it would seem improper to call something a “datum” if it involved inferences as well as observation. This constitutes a problem. …
In The Analysis of Matter (1954).
Science quotes on:  |  Call (769)  |  Certain (550)  |  Conduct (69)  |  Constitute (97)  |  Data (156)  |  Datum (3)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Easy (204)  |  Element (310)  |  Experiment (695)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Inference (45)  |  Know (1518)  |  Known (454)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mean (809)  |  Means (579)  |  Must (1526)  |  Observation (555)  |  Observed (149)  |  Perception (97)  |  Practice (204)  |  Problem (676)  |  Record (154)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Something (719)  |  Speak (232)  |  Task (147)  |  Try (283)  |  Yield (81)

When I'm asked about the relevance to Black people of what I do, I take that as an affront. It presupposes that Black people have never been involved in exploring the heavens, but this is not so. Ancient African empires - Mali, Songhai, Egypt - had scientists, astronomers. The fact is that space and its resources belong to all of us, not to any one group.
In Current Biography Yearbook (1993), Vol. 54, 280.
Science quotes on:  |  Africa (35)  |  African (10)  |  African American (6)  |  All (4108)  |  Ancient (189)  |  Ask (411)  |  Astronomer (93)  |  Belong (162)  |  Do (1908)  |  Egypt (29)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Group (78)  |  Heaven (258)  |  Heavens (125)  |  Never (1087)  |  People (1005)  |  Presuppose (15)  |  Relevance (16)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Space (500)

Willis Rodney Whitney ... once compared scientific research to a bridge being constructed by a builder who was fascinated by the construction problems involved. Basic research, he suggested, is such a bridge built wherever it strikes the builder's fancy—wherever the construction problems seem to him to be most challenging. Applied research, on the other hand, is a bridge built where people are waiting to get across the river. The challenge to the builder's ingenuity and skill, Whitney pointed out, can be as great in one case as the other.
'Willis Rodney Whitney', National Academy of Sciences, Biographical Memoirs (1960), 351.
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Applied (177)  |  Applied Research (2)  |  Basic (138)  |  Basic Research (14)  |  Being (1278)  |  Bridge (47)  |  Builder (12)  |  Challenge (85)  |  Comparison (102)  |  Construct (124)  |  Construction (112)  |  Fancy (50)  |  Fascination (32)  |  Great (1574)  |  Ingenuity (39)  |  Most (1731)  |  Other (2236)  |  People (1005)  |  Point (580)  |  Problem (676)  |  Research (664)  |  River (119)  |  Scientific (941)  |  Skill (109)  |  Strike (68)  |  Wait (58)  |  Waiting (43)  |  Wherever (51)  |  Willis R. Whitney (17)

Years ago I used to worry about the degree to which I specialized. Vision is limited enough, yet I was not really working on vision, for I hardly made contact with visual sensations, except as signals, nor with the nervous pathways, nor the structure of the eye, except the retina. Actually my studies involved only the rods and cones of the retina, and in them only the visual pigments. A sadly limited peripheral business, fit for escapists. But it is as though this were a very narrow window through which at a distance, one can only see a crack of light. As one comes closer the view grows wider and wider, until finally looking through the same narrow window one is looking at the universe. It is like the pupil of the eye, an opening only two to three millimetres across in daylight, but yielding a wide angle of view, and manoeuvrable enough to be turned in all directions. I think this is always the way it goes in science, because science is all one. It hardly matters where one enters, provided one can come closer, and then one does not see less and less, but more and more, because one is not dealing with an opaque object, but with a window.
In Scientific American, 1960s, attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Angle (20)  |  Business (149)  |  Closer (43)  |  Cone (7)  |  Contact (65)  |  Crack (15)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Degree (276)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distance (161)  |  Enough (340)  |  Enter (141)  |  Eye (419)  |  Fit (134)  |  Grow (238)  |  Light (607)  |  Limit (280)  |  Limited (101)  |  Looking (189)  |  Matter (798)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Object (422)  |  Opaque (7)  |  Opening (15)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Peripheral (3)  |  Pigment (8)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Really (78)  |  Retina (4)  |  Rod (5)  |  Science (3879)  |  See (1081)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Signal (27)  |  Structure (344)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (857)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (123)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wide (96)  |  Window (58)  |  Year (933)

[About the great synthesis of atomic physics in the 1920s:] It was a heroic time. It was not the doing of any one man; it involved the collaboration of scores of scientists from many different lands. But from the first to last the deeply creative, subtle and critical spirit of Niels Bohr guided, restrained, deepened and finally transmuted the enterprise.
Quoted in Bill Becker, 'Pioneer of the Atom', New York Times Sunday Magazine (20 Oct 1957), 54.
Science quotes on:  |  Atomic Physics (7)  |  Niels Bohr (54)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Creative (137)  |  Creativity (76)  |  Critical (66)  |  Deep (233)  |  Difference (337)  |  Different (577)  |  Doing (280)  |  Enterprise (54)  |  First (1283)  |  Great (1574)  |  Guide (97)  |  Land (115)  |  Last (426)  |  Man (2251)  |  Physic (517)  |  Physics (533)  |  Restrain (6)  |  Scientist (820)  |  Spirit (265)  |  Subtlety (19)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Time (1877)  |  Transmutation (22)

[American] Fathers are spending too much time taking care of babies. No other civilization ever let responsible and important men spend their time in this way. They should not be involved in household details. They should take the children on trips, explore with them and talk things over. Men today have lost something by turning towards the home instead of going out of it.
As quoted in Frances Glennon, 'Student and Teacher of Human Ways', Life (14 Sep 1959), 147.
Science quotes on:  |  Baby (28)  |  Care (186)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Civilization (204)  |  Detail (146)  |  Exploration (134)  |  Father (110)  |  Go (6)  |  Home (170)  |  Household (8)  |  Important (209)  |  Instead (21)  |  Involve (90)  |  Other (2236)  |  Responsible (17)  |  Something (719)  |  Spend (95)  |  Spending (24)  |  Talk (100)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Time (1877)  |  Today (314)  |  Trip (10)  |  Turn (447)  |  Way (1217)

[Reading a cartoon story,] the boy favored reading over reality. Adults might have characterized him in any number of negative ways—as uninquisitive, uninvolved, apathetic about the world around him and his place in it. I’ve often wondered: Are many adults much different when they read the scriptures of their respective faiths?
In Jacques Cousteau and Susan Schiefelbein, The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus: Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World (2007), 117.
Science quotes on:  |  Adult (19)  |  Apathetic (2)  |  Boy (94)  |  Characterize (20)  |  Different (577)  |  Faith (203)  |  Favor (63)  |  Inquisitive (5)  |  Negative (63)  |  Number (699)  |  Read (287)  |  Reading (133)  |  Reality (261)  |  Scripture (12)  |  Story (118)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wonder (236)  |  World (1774)

[There] are cases where there is no dishonesty involved but where people are tricked into false results by a lack of understanding about what human beings can do to themselves in the way of being led astray by subjective effects, wishful thinking or threshold interactions. These are examples of pathological science. These are things that attracted a great deal of attention. Usually hundreds of papers have been published upon them. Sometimes they have lasted for fifteen or twenty years and then they gradually die away.
[Coining the term “pathological science” for the self-deceiving application of science to a phenomenon that doesn't exist.]
From a Colloquium at The Knolls Research Laboratory (18 Dec 1953). Transcribed and edited by R. N. Hall. In General Electric Laboratories, Report No. 68-C-035 (April 1968).
Science quotes on:  |  Application (242)  |  Astray (11)  |  Attention (190)  |  Being (1278)  |  Deal (188)  |  Deceiving (5)  |  Dishonesty (9)  |  Do (1908)  |  Effect (393)  |  Exist (443)  |  False (100)  |  Gradually (102)  |  Great (1574)  |  Human (1468)  |  Human Being (175)  |  Human Beings (117)  |  Hundred (229)  |  Interaction (46)  |  Lack (119)  |  Last (426)  |  Paper (182)  |  Pathological (21)  |  People (1005)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Research (664)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Self (267)  |  Self-Deception (2)  |  Subjective (19)  |  Term (349)  |  Themselves (433)  |  Thing (1915)  |  Thinking (414)  |  Threshold (10)  |  Trick (35)  |  Understanding (513)  |  Usually (176)  |  Way (1217)  |  Wishful (6)  |  Year (933)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.