Celebrating 20 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index O > Category: Opaque

Opaque Quotes (7 quotes)

Sea-water is, of course, opaque and this is the first difficulty that faces the oceanographer. Most of the tools needed to investigate the sea must use physical principles which are more complicated than the optical methods that are so satisfactory for studying the surface features of the land.
In 'Man Explores the Sea', Journal of the Royal Society of Arts (Sep 1963), 111, No. 5086, 786.
Science quotes on:  |  Complicated (115)  |  Course (408)  |  Difficulty (198)  |  Face (212)  |  First (1284)  |  Investigate (103)  |  Land (115)  |  Method (506)  |  Methods (204)  |  More (2559)  |  Most (1729)  |  Must (1526)  |  Need (290)  |  Optical (11)  |  Physical (508)  |  Principle (510)  |  Sea (309)  |  Study (656)  |  Studying (70)  |  Surface (209)  |  Tool (117)  |  Use (766)  |  Water (482)

The laboratory was an unattractive half basement and low ceilinged room with an inner dark room for the galvanometer and experimental animals. It was dark, crowded with equipment and uninviting. Into it came patients for electrocardiography, dogs for experiments, trays with coffee and buns for lunch. It was hot and dusty in summer and cold in winter. True a large fire burnt brightly in the winter but anyone who found time to warm his backside at it was not beloved by [Sir Thomas] Lewis. It was no good to try and look out of the window for relaxation, for it was glazed with opaque glass. The scientific peaks were our only scenery, and it was our job to try and find the pathways to the top.
Magazine
'Tribute to Sir Thomas Lewis', University College Hospital Magazine (1955), 40, 71.
Science quotes on:  |  Animal (617)  |  Basement (3)  |  Coffee (20)  |  Cold (112)  |  Dark (140)  |  Dog (70)  |  Equipment (43)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Experimental (192)  |  Find (999)  |  Fire (189)  |  Galvanometer (4)  |  Glass (92)  |  Good (889)  |  Hot (60)  |  Inner (71)  |  Job (82)  |  Laboratory (197)  |  Large (394)  |  Sir Thomas Lewis (2)  |  Look (582)  |  Low (81)  |  Lunch (6)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Patient (199)  |  Peak (20)  |  Scenery (7)  |  Scientific (940)  |  Summer (54)  |  Time (1877)  |  Top (96)  |  Try (283)  |  Warm (69)  |  Window (58)  |  Winter (44)

There was wildlife, untouched, a jungle at the border of the sea, never seen by those who floated on the opaque roof.
Describing his early experience, in 1936, when a fellow naval officer, Philippe Tailliez, gave him goggles to see below the Mediterranean Sea surface.
Quoted in 'Sport: Poet of the Depths', Time (28 Mar 1960)
Science quotes on:  |  Border (9)  |  Early (186)  |  Experience (470)  |  Fellow (88)  |  Float (30)  |  Floating (4)  |  Goggles (2)  |  Jungle (22)  |  Marine Biology (24)  |  Mediterranean (9)  |  Mediterranean Sea (6)  |  Never (1087)  |  Officer (12)  |  Roof (13)  |  Sea (309)  |  See (1082)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Surface (209)  |  Untouched (4)  |  Wildlife (14)

To day we made the grand experiment of burning the diamond and certainly the phenomena presented were extremely beautiful and interesting… The Duke’s burning glass was the instrument used to apply heat to the diamond. It consists of two double convex lenses … The instrument was placed in an upper room of the museum and having arranged it at the window the diamond was placed in the focus and anxiously watched. The heat was thus continued for 3/4 of an hour (it being necessary to cool the globe at times) and during that time it was thought that the diamond was slowly diminishing and becoming opaque … On a sudden Sir H Davy observed the diamond to burn visibly, and when removed from the focus it was found to be in a state of active and rapid combustion. The diamond glowed brilliantly with a scarlet light, inclining to purple and, when placed in the dark, continued to burn for about four minutes. After cooling the glass heat was again applied to the diamond and it burned again though not for nearly so long as before. This was repeated twice more and soon after the diamond became all consumed. This phenomenon of actual and vivid combustion, which has never been observed before, was attributed by Sir H Davy to be the free access of air; it became more dull as carbonic acid gas formed and did not last so long.
Entry (Florence, 27 Mar 1814) in his foreign journal kept whilst on a continental tour with Sir Humphry Davy. In Michael Faraday, Bence Jones (ed.), The Life and Letters of Faraday (1870), Vol. 1, 119. Silvanus Phillips Thompson identifies the Duke as the Grand Duke of Tuscany, in Michael Faraday, His Life and Work (1901), 21.
Science quotes on:  |  Access (20)  |  Acid (83)  |  Active (76)  |  Actual (117)  |  Air (349)  |  All (4107)  |  Applied (176)  |  Apply (160)  |  Beautiful (259)  |  Becoming (96)  |  Being (1278)  |  Burn (87)  |  Burning (48)  |  Carbon (65)  |  Certainly (185)  |  Combustion (18)  |  Consist (223)  |  Convex (6)  |  Cooling (10)  |  Dark (140)  |  Sir Humphry Davy (49)  |  Diamond (21)  |  Dull (54)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Focus (35)  |  Form (960)  |  Free (233)  |  Gas (83)  |  Glass (92)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hour (186)  |  Instrument (144)  |  Interesting (153)  |  Last (426)  |  Light (609)  |  Long (789)  |  Minute (125)  |  More (2559)  |  Museum (31)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Necessary (363)  |  Never (1087)  |  Observed (149)  |  Phenomenon (319)  |  Present (620)  |  Soon (186)  |  State (491)  |  Sudden (66)  |  Thought (954)  |  Time (1877)  |  Two (937)  |  Vivid (23)  |  Watch (109)  |  Window (58)

Whatever the common-sense of earlier generations may have held in this respect, modern common-sense holds that the scientist’s answer is the only ultimately true one. In the last resort enlightened common-sense sticks by the opaque truth and refuses to go behind the returns given by the tangible facts.
From 'The Place of Science in Modern Civilisation', American Journal of Sociology (Mar 1906), 11, collected in The Place of Science in Modern Civilisation and Other Essays (1919), 4.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (366)  |  Behind (137)  |  Common (436)  |  Common Sense (130)  |  Early (186)  |  Enlighten (29)  |  Enlightened (24)  |  Fact (1212)  |  Facts (553)  |  Generation (242)  |  Last (426)  |  Modern (385)  |  Refuse (42)  |  Respect (207)  |  Return (125)  |  Scientist (825)  |  Sense (770)  |  Tangible (15)  |  Triangle (19)  |  Truth (1062)  |  Ultimate (146)  |  Ultimately (55)  |  Whatever (234)

Years ago I used to worry about the degree to which I specialized. Vision is limited enough, yet I was not really working on vision, for I hardly made contact with visual sensations, except as signals, nor with the nervous pathways, nor the structure of the eye, except the retina. Actually my studies involved only the rods and cones of the retina, and in them only the visual pigments. A sadly limited peripheral business, fit for escapists. But it is as though this were a very narrow window through which at a distance, one can only see a crack of light. As one comes closer the view grows wider and wider, until finally looking through the same narrow window one is looking at the universe. It is like the pupil of the eye, an opening only two to three millimetres across in daylight, but yielding a wide angle of view, and manoeuvrable enough to be turned in all directions. I think this is always the way it goes in science, because science is all one. It hardly matters where one enters, provided one can come closer, and then one does not see less and less, but more and more, because one is not dealing with an opaque object, but with a window.
In Scientific American, 1960s, attributed.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4107)  |  Angle (21)  |  Business (149)  |  Closer (43)  |  Cone (7)  |  Contact (65)  |  Crack (15)  |  Daylight (22)  |  Dealing (10)  |  Degree (275)  |  Direction (175)  |  Distance (163)  |  Enough (341)  |  Enter (142)  |  Eye (423)  |  Fit (134)  |  Grow (238)  |  Involved (90)  |  Light (609)  |  Limit (281)  |  Limited (102)  |  Looking (189)  |  Matter (801)  |  More (2559)  |  Narrow (84)  |  Object (422)  |  Opening (15)  |  Pathway (15)  |  Peripheral (3)  |  Pigment (8)  |  Pupil (61)  |  Really (78)  |  Retina (4)  |  Rod (5)  |  Science (3880)  |  See (1082)  |  Seeing (142)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Signal (27)  |  Structure (346)  |  Think (1086)  |  Through (849)  |  Turn (447)  |  Two (937)  |  Universe (861)  |  View (488)  |  Vision (122)  |  Way (1216)  |  Wide (96)  |  Window (58)  |  Year (932)

[Concerning] phosphorescent bodies, and in particular to uranium salts whose phosphorescence has a very brief duration. With the double sulfate of uranium and potassium ... I was able to perform the following experiment: One wraps a Lumiθre photographic plate with a bromide emulsion in two sheets of very thick black paper, such that the plate does not become clouded upon being exposed to the sun for a day. One places on the sheet of paper, on the outside, a slab of the phosphorescent substance, and one exposes the whole to the sun for several hours. When one then develops the photographic plate, one recognizes that the silhouette of the phosphorescent substance appears in black on the negative. If one places between the phosphorescent substance and the paper a piece of money or a metal screen pierced with a cut-out design, one sees the image of these objects appear on the negative. One can repeat the same experiments placing a thin pane of glass between the phosphorescent substance and the paper, which excludes the possibility of chemical action due to vapors which might emanate from the substance when heated by the sun's rays. One must conclude from these experiments that the phosphorescent substance in question emits rays which pass through the opaque paper and reduces silver salts.
[Although the sun is irrelevant, and he misinterprets the role of phosphorescence, he has discovered the effect of radioactivity.]
Read at French Academy of Science (24 Feb 1896). In Comptes Rendus (1896), 122, 420. As translated by Carmen Giunta on the Classic Chemistry web site.
Science quotes on:  |  Action (328)  |  Become (815)  |  Being (1278)  |  Brief (36)  |  Chemical (292)  |  Cloud (104)  |  Conclude (65)  |  Cut (114)  |  Design (196)  |  Develop (268)  |  Discover (553)  |  Discovery (785)  |  Due (141)  |  Effect (394)  |  Emit (15)  |  Experiment (696)  |  Expose (23)  |  Exposed (33)  |  Glass (92)  |  Heat (174)  |  Hour (186)  |  Image (96)  |  Metal (84)  |  Money (173)  |  Must (1526)  |  Negative (63)  |  Object (422)  |  Outside (141)  |  Paper (183)  |  Pass (238)  |  Perform (121)  |  Phosphorescence (2)  |  Phosphorescent (3)  |  Photograph (20)  |  Possibility (164)  |  Potassium (11)  |  Question (622)  |  Radioactivity (30)  |  Ray (114)  |  Recognize (125)  |  Reduce (95)  |  Role (85)  |  Salt (46)  |  See (1082)  |  Silhouette (3)  |  Silver (47)  |  Substance (248)  |  Sun (387)  |  Through (849)  |  Two (937)  |  Uranium (20)  |  Vapor (12)  |  Whole (738)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by: • Albert Einstein • Isaac Newton • Lord Kelvin • Charles Darwin • Srinivasa Ramanujan • Carl Sagan • Florence Nightingale • Thomas Edison • Aristotle • Marie Curie • Benjamin Franklin • Winston Churchill • Galileo Galilei • Sigmund Freud • Robert Bunsen • Louis Pasteur • Theodore Roosevelt • Abraham Lincoln • Ronald Reagan • Leonardo DaVinci • Michio Kaku • Karl Popper • Johann Goethe • Robert Oppenheimer • Charles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about: • Atomic  Bomb • Biology • Chemistry • Deforestation • Engineering • Anatomy • Astronomy • Bacteria • Biochemistry • Botany • Conservation • Dinosaur • Environment • Fractal • Genetics • Geology • History of Science • Invention • Jupiter • Knowledge • Love • Mathematics • Measurement • Medicine • Natural Resource • Organic Chemistry • Physics • Physician • Quantum Theory • Research • Science and Art • Teacher • Technology • Universe • Volcano • Virus • Wind Power • Women Scientists • X-Rays • Youth • Zoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |
- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton


by Ian Ellis
who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.