Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index W > Category: Warm

Warm Quotes (20 quotes)

All scientific men will be delighted to extend their warmest congratulations to Tesla and to express their appreciation of his great contributions to science.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Appreciation (19)  |  Congratulations (3)  |  Contribution (49)  |  Delight (51)  |  Express (32)  |  Extend (20)  |  Great (300)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific (169)

Aristotle, in spite of his reputation, is full of absurdities. He says that children should be conceived in the Winter, when the wind is in the North, and that if people marry too young the children will be female. He tells us that the blood of females is blacker then that of males; that the pig is the only animal liable to measles; that an elephant suffering from insomnia should have its shoulders rubbed with salt, olive-oil, and warm water; that women have fewer teeth than men, and so on. Nevertheless, he is considered by the great majority of philosophers a paragon of wisdom.
From An Outline of Intellectual Rubbish (1937, 1943), 19. Collected in The Basic Writings of Bertrand Russell (2009), 63.
Science quotes on:  |  Absurdity (16)  |  Aristotle (141)  |  Black (27)  |  Blood (95)  |  Child (189)  |  Conception (63)  |  Elephant (16)  |  Female (20)  |  Fewer (5)  |  Insomnia (2)  |  Male (24)  |  Marriage (31)  |  North (7)  |  Paragon (4)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Pig (7)  |  Reputation (17)  |  Rub (2)  |  Salt (23)  |  Shoulder (13)  |  Teeth (11)  |  Water (244)  |  Wind (52)  |  Winter (22)  |  Wisdom (151)  |  Woman (94)  |  Young (72)

Bradley is one of the few basketball players who have ever been appreciatively cheered by a disinterested away-from-home crowd while warming up. This curious event occurred last March, just before Princeton eliminated the Virginia Military Institute, the year’s Southern Conference champion, from the NCAA championships. The game was played in Philadelphia and was the last of a tripleheader. The people there were worn out, because most of them were emotionally committed to either Villanova or Temple-two local teams that had just been involved in enervating battles with Providence and Connecticut, respectively, scrambling for a chance at the rest of the country. A group of Princeton players shooting basketballs miscellaneously in preparation for still another game hardly promised to be a high point of the evening, but Bradley, whose routine in the warmup time is a gradual crescendo of activity, is more interesting to watch before a game than most players are in play. In Philadelphia that night, what he did was, for him, anything but unusual. As he does before all games, he began by shooting set shots close to the basket, gradually moving back until he was shooting long sets from 20 feet out, and nearly all of them dropped into the net with an almost mechanical rhythm of accuracy. Then he began a series of expandingly difficult jump shots, and one jumper after another went cleanly through the basket with so few exceptions that the crowd began to murmur. Then he started to perform whirling reverse moves before another cadence of almost steadily accurate jump shots, and the murmur increased. Then he began to sweep hook shots into the air. He moved in a semicircle around the court. First with his right hand, then with his left, he tried seven of these long, graceful shots-the most difficult ones in the orthodoxy of basketball-and ambidextrously made them all. The game had not even begun, but the presumably unimpressible Philadelphians were applauding like an audience at an opera.
A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Accurate (21)  |  Activity (97)  |  Air (151)  |  Audience (13)  |  Back (55)  |  Basket (5)  |  Basketball (2)  |  Battle (30)  |  Begin (52)  |  Bradley (2)  |  Cadence (2)  |  Champion (3)  |  Championship (2)  |  Chance (122)  |  Cheer (5)  |  Close (40)  |  Commit (17)  |  Conference (8)  |  Country (121)  |  Court (16)  |  Crescendo (3)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Curious (24)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Disinterest (6)  |  Drop (27)  |  Eliminate (15)  |  Emotionally (2)  |  Event (97)  |  Exception (33)  |  First (174)  |  Foot (39)  |  Game (45)  |  Gradual (18)  |  Gradually (13)  |  Group (52)  |  Hand (103)  |  Hardly (12)  |  High (78)  |  Hook (4)  |  Increase (107)  |  Institute (7)  |  Interest (170)  |  Involve (27)  |  Jump (13)  |  Leave (63)  |  Local (15)  |  Long (95)  |  March (15)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Military (24)  |  Move (58)  |  Murmur (2)  |  Nearly (19)  |  Net (10)  |  Night (73)  |  Occur (26)  |  Opera (3)  |  Orthodoxy (7)  |  People (269)  |  Perform (27)  |  Philadelphia (3)  |  Play (60)  |  Player (5)  |  Point (72)  |  Preparation (33)  |  Presumably (3)  |  Princeton (3)  |  Promise (27)  |  Providence (6)  |  Respectively (2)  |  Rest (64)  |  Reverse (14)  |  Rhythm (12)  |  Right (144)  |  Routine (11)  |  Series (38)  |  Set (56)  |  Shoot (10)  |  Start (68)  |  Steadily (4)  |  Sweep (11)  |  Team (5)  |  Time (439)  |  Try (103)  |  Unusual (13)  |  Virginia (2)  |  Watch (39)  |  Whirl (2)  |  Worn Out (2)  |  Year (214)

Coal … We may well call it black diamonds. Every basket is power and civilization; for coal is a portable climate. … Watt and Stephenson whispered in the ear of mankind their secret, that a half-ounce of coal will draw two tons a mile, and coal carries coal, by rail and by boat, to make Canada as warm as Calcutta, and with its comforts bring its industrial power.
In chapter 3, 'Wealth', The Conduct of Life (1860), collected in Emerson’s Complete Works (1892), Vol. 6, 86.
Science quotes on:  |  Basket (5)  |  Black (27)  |  Boat (13)  |  Bringing (10)  |  Canada (2)  |  Carrying (7)  |  Civilization (155)  |  Climate (38)  |  Coal (41)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Diamond (15)  |  Ear (21)  |  Industry (91)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Mile (24)  |  Ounce (5)  |  Portable (3)  |  Power (273)  |  Rail (3)  |  Secret (98)  |  Ton (7)  |  James Watt (11)  |  Whisper (5)

Does it seem all but incredible to you that intelligence should travel for two thousand miles, along those slender copper lines, far down in the all but fathomless Atlantic; never before penetrated … save when some foundering vessel has plunged with her hapless company to the eternal silence and darkness of the abyss? Does it seem … but a miracle … that the thoughts of living men … should burn over the cold, green bones of men and women, whose hearts, once as warm as ours, burst as the eternal gulfs closed and roared over them centuries ago?
A tribute to the Atlantic telegraph cable by Edward Everett, one of the topics included in his inauguration address at the Washington University of St. Louis (22 Apr 1857). In Orations and Speeches on Various Occasions: Volume 3 (1870), 509-511.
Science quotes on:  |  Abyss (20)  |  Atlantic Ocean (4)  |  Bone (57)  |  Burn (29)  |  Burst (17)  |  Century (94)  |  Cold (38)  |  Copper (18)  |  Fathomless (2)  |  Foundering (2)  |  Green (23)  |  Gulf (10)  |  Heart (110)  |  Incredible (18)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Line (44)  |  Living (44)  |  Mile (24)  |  Miracle (55)  |  Shipwreck (5)  |  Thought (374)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Travel (40)  |  Vessel (21)

Every man looks at his wood-pile with a kind of affection. … [T]hey warmed me twice, once while I was splitting them, and again when they were on the fire, so that no fuel could give out more heat.
In Walden: or, Life in the Woods (1854, 1899), 263.
Science quotes on:  |  Affection (14)  |  Axe (12)  |  Fire (117)  |  Fuel (27)  |  Heat (90)  |  Log (4)  |  Pile (8)  |  Split (11)  |  Twice (11)  |  Wood (33)

Food is at present obtained almost entirely from the energy of the sunlight. The radiation from the sun produces from the carbonic acid in the air more or less complicated carbon compounds which serve us in plants and vegetables. We use the latent chemical energy of these to keep our bodies warm, we convert it into muscular effort. We employ it in the complicated process of digestion to repair and replace the wasted cells of our bodies. … If the gigantic sources of power become available, food would be produced without recourse to sunlight. Vast cellars, in which artificial radiation is generated, may replace the cornfields and potato patches of the world.
From 'Fifty Years Hence', Strand Magazine (Dec 1931). Reprinted in Popular Mechanics (Mar 1932), 57, No. 3, 396-397.
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Artificial (26)  |  Available (18)  |  Body (193)  |  Carbon (48)  |  Carbonic Acid (4)  |  Cell (125)  |  Cellar (2)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Compound (53)  |  Convert (15)  |  Corn (10)  |  Digestion (23)  |  Effort (94)  |  Employ (14)  |  Energy (185)  |  Field (119)  |  Food (139)  |  Gigantic (16)  |  Latent (9)  |  Muscular (2)  |  Patch (6)  |  Plant (173)  |  Potato (6)  |  Power (273)  |  Process (201)  |  Radiation (22)  |  Recourse (6)  |  Repair (7)  |  Replace (16)  |  Source (71)  |  Sunlight (14)  |  Vast (56)  |  Vegetable (19)  |  Wasted (2)  |  World (667)

Having to squeeze the last drop of utility out of the land has the same desperate finality as having to chop up the furniture to keep warm.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Chop (5)  |  Conservation (139)  |  Desperate (4)  |  Drop (27)  |  Finality (2)  |  Furniture (8)  |  Keep (47)  |  Land (83)  |  Same (92)  |  Squeeze (4)  |  Utility (23)

I have long recognized the theory and aesthetic of such comprehensive display: show everything and incite wonder by sheer variety. But I had never realized how power fully the decor of a cabinet museum can promote this goal until I saw the Dublin [Natural History Museum] fixtures redone right ... The exuberance is all of one piece–organic and architectural. I write this essay to offer my warmest congratulations to the Dublin Museum for choosing preservation–a decision not only scientifically right, but also ethically sound and decidedly courageous. The avant-garde is not an exclusive locus of courage; a principled stand within a reconstituted rear unit may call down just as much ridicule and demand equal fortitude. Crowds do not always rush off in admirable or defendable directions.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Admirable (11)  |  Aesthetic (26)  |  Cabinet (4)  |  Call (68)  |  Choose (35)  |  Comprehensive (7)  |  Congratulations (3)  |  Courage (39)  |  Crowd (12)  |  Decision (58)  |  Demand (52)  |  Direction (56)  |  Display (22)  |  Down (44)  |  Dublin (2)  |  Equal (53)  |  Essay (9)  |  Ethically (4)  |  Everything (120)  |  Exclusive (9)  |  Fixture (2)  |  Fully (11)  |  Goal (81)  |  Incite (2)  |  Locus (3)  |  Long (95)  |  Museum (22)  |  Natural History (44)  |  Offer (16)  |  Organic (48)  |  Piece (32)  |  Power (273)  |  Preservation (28)  |  Principle (228)  |  Promote (14)  |  Realize (43)  |  Rear (6)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Reconstitute (2)  |  Ridicule (13)  |  Right (144)  |  Rush (12)  |  Scientifically (3)  |  See (197)  |  Sheer (6)  |  Show (55)  |  Sound (59)  |  Stand (60)  |  Theory (582)  |  Unit (25)  |  Variety (53)  |  Wonder (134)  |  Write (87)

Nurses that attend lying-in women ought to have provided, and in order, every thing that may be necessary for the woman, accoucheur, midwife, and child; such as linnen and cloaths, well aired and warm, for the woman and the bed, which she must know how to prepare when there is occasion; together with nutmeg, sugar, spirit of hartshorn, vinegar, Hungary water, white or brown caudle ready made, and a glyster-pipe fitted.
In A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Midwifery (1766), 444
Science quotes on:  |  Air (151)  |  Attend (9)  |  Bed (20)  |  Child (189)  |  Childbirth (2)  |  Cloth (4)  |  Fitted (2)  |  Know (321)  |  Linen (4)  |  Midwife (2)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Nurse (19)  |  Order (167)  |  Prepare (19)  |  Provide (48)  |  Ready-Made (2)  |  Sugar (13)  |  Vinegar (5)  |  Water (244)  |  Woman (94)

Our most distinguished “man of science” was the then veteran John Dalton. He was rarely absent from his seat in a warm corner of the room during the meetings of the Literary and Philosophical Society. Though a sober-minded Quaker, he was not devoid of some sense of fun; and there was a tradition amongst us, not only that he had once been a poet, but that, although a bachelor, two manuscript copies were still extant of his verses on the subject of matrimonial felicity; and it is my belief there was foundation for the tradition. The old man was sensitive on the subject of his age. Dining one day ... he was placed between two ladies ... [who] resolved to extract from him some admission on the tender point, but in vain. Though never other than courteous, Dalton foiled all their feminine arts and retained his secret. ... Dalton's quaint and diminutive figure was a strongly individualized one.
In Reminiscences of a Yorkshire Naturalist (1896), 73-74.
Science quotes on:  |  Absent (3)  |  Admission (10)  |  Age (137)  |  Art (205)  |  Biography (227)  |  Corner (24)  |  Courteous (2)  |  John Dalton (21)  |  Devoid (5)  |  Diminutive (2)  |  Distinguished (6)  |  Extract (13)  |  Felicity (2)  |  Feminine (3)  |  Figure (32)  |  Foiled (2)  |  Fun (28)  |  Individual (177)  |  Lady (6)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Manuscript (7)  |  Meeting (14)  |  Poet (59)  |  Quaint (5)  |  Quaker (2)  |  Resolve (11)  |  Room (29)  |  Seat (5)  |  Secret (98)  |  Sensitive (12)  |  Vain (26)  |  Verse (7)

The Himalayas are the crowning achievement of the Indo-Australian plate. India in the Oligocene crashed head on into Tibet, hit so hard that it not only folded and buckled the plate boundaries but also plowed into the newly created Tibetan plateau and drove the Himalayas five and a half miles into the sky. The mountains are in some trouble. India has not stopped pushing them, and they are still going up. Their height and volume are already so great they are beginning to melt in their own self-generated radioactive heat. When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in a warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as 20,000 feet below the sea floor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth.
If by some fiat, I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence; this is the one I would choose: the summit of Mount Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Already (16)  |  Begin (52)  |  Below (11)  |  Blank (11)  |  Boundary (27)  |  Buckle (4)  |  Choose (35)  |  Clear (52)  |  Climber (3)  |  Crash (8)  |  Create (98)  |  Creature (127)  |  Crown (19)  |  Drive (38)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fiat (5)  |  Five (14)  |  Flag (10)  |  Floor (16)  |  Fold (4)  |  Foot (39)  |  Great (300)  |  Half (35)  |  Hard (70)  |  Head (52)  |  Heat (90)  |  Height (24)  |  High (78)  |  Himalayas (2)  |  Hit (14)  |  India (15)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (186)  |  Marine (7)  |  Melt (15)  |  Mile (24)  |  Mount Everest (2)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Move (58)  |  Movement (65)  |  Newly (3)  |  North (7)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Plant (173)  |  Plate (5)  |  Plateau (4)  |  Plow (6)  |  Possibly (9)  |  Push (22)  |  Radioactive (7)  |  Remain (77)  |  Restrict (8)  |  Rock (107)  |  Sea (143)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Set (56)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (15)  |  Sky (68)  |  Snow (15)  |  Stop (56)  |  Summit (7)  |  Surface Of The Earth (2)  |  Tibet (2)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Trouble (55)  |  Turn (72)  |  Volume (13)  |  Write (87)

There are many good general practitioners, there is only one good universal practitioner—“a warm bed.”
In Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), lviii.
Science quotes on:  |  Bed (20)  |  Good (228)  |  Practitioner (12)  |  Treatment (88)  |  Universal (70)

There are two kinds of truth; the truth that lights the way and the truth that warms the heart. The first of these is science, and the second is art. Without art, science would be as useless as a pair of high forceps in the hands of a plumber. Without science, art would become a crude mess of folklore and emotional quackery.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Become (100)  |  Crude (14)  |  Emotional (13)  |  First (174)  |  Folklore (2)  |  Hand (103)  |  Heart (110)  |  High (78)  |  Kind (99)  |  Light (246)  |  Mess (10)  |  Pair (10)  |  Plumber (7)  |  Quackery (3)  |  Science (1699)  |  Second (33)  |  Truth (750)  |  Useless (24)

There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Sea. It is the Gulf Stream.
Opening paragraph of The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Arctic Sea (2)  |  Bank (8)  |  Bottom (28)  |  Cold (38)  |  Drought (9)  |  Failure (118)  |  Flood (26)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (4)  |  Gulf Stream (2)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Overflow (4)  |  River (68)  |  Water (244)

There is a river in the ocean. In the severest droughts it never fails, and in the mightiest floods it never overflows. Its banks and its bottom are of cold water, while its current is of warm. The Gulf of Mexico is its fountain, and its mouth is in the Arctic Seas. It is the Gulf Stream. There is in the world no other such majestic flow of waters. Its current is more rapid than the Mississippi or the Amazon.
In The Physical Geography of the Sea and Its Meteorology (1855), 25.
Science quotes on:  |  Amazon (6)  |  Arctic Sea (2)  |  Bank (8)  |  Bottom (28)  |  Cold (38)  |  Current (43)  |  Drought (9)  |  Fail (34)  |  Flood (26)  |  Flow (31)  |  Fountain (14)  |  Gulf Of Mexico (4)  |  Gulf Stream (2)  |  Majestic (7)  |  Mighty (7)  |  Mississippi (4)  |  Mouth (16)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Oceanography (16)  |  Overflow (4)  |  Rapid (17)  |  River (68)  |  Severe (7)  |  Stream (27)  |  Water (244)  |  World (667)

We inhabit a dead ember swimming wide in the blank of space, dizzily spinning as it swims, and lighted up from several million miles away by a more horrible hell-fire than was ever conceived by the theological imagination. Yet the dead ember is a green, commodious dwelling-place; and the reverberation of this hell-fire ripens flower and fruit and mildly warms us on summer eves upon the lawn.
In Lay Morals, collected in Works: Letters and Miscellanies of Robert Louis Stevenson: Sketches, Criticism, Etc. (1898) Vol. 22, 552.
Science quotes on:  |  Blank (11)  |  Conceive (22)  |  Dead (45)  |  Dizzy (3)  |  Dwelling (9)  |  Eve (3)  |  Flower (65)  |  Fruit (63)  |  Green (23)  |  Horrible (7)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Inhabit (13)  |  Lawn (3)  |  Light (246)  |  Mildly (2)  |  Mile (24)  |  Million (89)  |  Reverberation (3)  |  Ripen (3)  |  Space (154)  |  Spin (8)  |  Summer (26)  |  Swim (12)  |  Theological (2)  |  Wide (14)

We should therefore, with grace and optimism, embrace NOMA’s tough-minded demand: Acknowledge the personal character of these human struggles about morals and meanings, and stop looking for definite answers in nature’s construction. But many people cannot bear to surrender nature as a ‘transitional object’–a baby’s warm blanket for our adult comfort. But when we do (for we must) , nature can finally emerge in her true form: not as a distorted mirror of our needs, but as our most fascinating comp anion. Only then can we unite the patches built by our separate magisteria into a beautiful and coherent quilt called wisdom.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Acknowledge (13)  |  Adult (11)  |  Anion (2)  |  Answer (201)  |  Baby (18)  |  Bear (28)  |  Beautiful (81)  |  Blanket (6)  |  Build (80)  |  Call (68)  |  Character (82)  |  Coherent (12)  |  Comfort (42)  |  Construction (69)  |  Definite (27)  |  Demand (52)  |  Distort (6)  |  Embrace (22)  |  Emerge (16)  |  Fascinating (17)  |  Finally (10)  |  Form (210)  |  Grace (13)  |  Human (445)  |  Meanings (2)  |  Mirror (21)  |  Moral (100)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Need (211)  |  Object (110)  |  Optimism (10)  |  Patch (6)  |  People (269)  |  Personal (49)  |  Separate (46)  |  Stop (56)  |  Struggle (60)  |  Surrender (13)  |  Transitional (2)  |  True (120)  |  Unite (13)  |  Wisdom (151)

When the climbers in 1953 planted their flags on the highest mountain, they set them in snow over the skeletons of creatures that had lived in the warm clear ocean that India, moving north, blanked out. Possibly as much as twenty thousand feet below the seafloor, the skeletal remains had turned into rock. This one fact is a treatise in itself on the movements of the surface of the earth. If by some fiat I had to restrict all this writing to one sentence, this is the one I would choose: The summit of Mt. Everest is marine limestone.
Annals of the Former World
Science quotes on:  |  Below (11)  |  Blank (11)  |  Choose (35)  |  Clear (52)  |  Climber (3)  |  Creature (127)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fiat (5)  |  Flag (10)  |  Foot (39)  |  High (78)  |  India (15)  |  Limestone (6)  |  Live (186)  |  Marine (7)  |  Mountain (111)  |  Move (58)  |  Movement (65)  |  North (7)  |  Ocean (115)  |  Plant (173)  |  Possibly (9)  |  Remain (77)  |  Restrict (8)  |  Rock (107)  |  Seafloor (2)  |  Sentence (20)  |  Set (56)  |  Skeletal (2)  |  Skeleton (15)  |  Snow (15)  |  Summit (7)  |  Surface Of The Earth (2)  |  Thousand (106)  |  Treatise (19)  |  Turn (72)  |  Write (87)

[William Gull] sought to teach his students not to think they could cure disease. “The best of all remedies,” he would say, “is a warm bed.” “ I can tell you something of how you get ill, but I cannot tell you how you get well.” “ Healing is accomplished ‘By an operation more divine Than tongue or pen can give expression to.’” “Remedies act best when there is a tendency to get well.”
Stated in Sir William Withey Gull and Theodore Dyke Acland (ed.), A Collection of the Published Writings of William Withey Gull (1896), xxvi.
Science quotes on:  |  Accomplishment (57)  |  Bed (20)  |  Cure (88)  |  Disease (257)  |  Divine (42)  |  Sir William Withey Gull (39)  |  Healing (16)  |  Operation (96)  |  Pen (9)  |  Remedy (46)  |  Student (131)  |  Teach (102)  |  Tendency (40)  |  Tongue (16)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.