Celebrating 19 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Environmental extremists ... wouldn’t let you build a house unless it looked like a bird’s nest.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index R > Category: Recollection

Recollection Quotes (12 quotes)

All that concerns the Mediterranean is of the deepest interest to civilized man, for the history of its progress is the history of the development of the world; the memory of the great men who have lived and died around its banks; the recollection of the undying works that have come thence to delight us for ever; the story of patient research and brilliant discoveries connected with every physical phenomenon presented by its waves and currents, and with every order of creatures dwelling in and around its waters.
From Literary Papers (1855), 106. As quoted in On Early Explorations in the Mediterranean.In George Wilson and Archibald Geikie, Memoir of Edward Forbes F.R.S. (1861), 279. Geike introduces the Forbes quote as “the recollection of these, his earliest explorations in the Mediterranean,” as written down years later.
Science quotes on:  |  All (4108)  |  Bank (31)  |  Brilliant (53)  |  Concern (228)  |  Connect (125)  |  Creature (233)  |  Current (118)  |  Delight (108)  |  Development (422)  |  Discovery (780)  |  Great (1574)  |  History (673)  |  Interest (386)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mediterranean (9)  |  Mediterranean Sea (6)  |  Memory (134)  |  Order (632)  |  Patient (199)  |  Phenomenon (318)  |  Physical (508)  |  Present (619)  |  Progress (465)  |  Research (664)  |  Story (118)  |  Water (481)  |  Wave (107)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)

Before a complex of sensations becomes a recollection placeable in time, it has ceased to be actual. We must lose our awareness of its infinite complexity, or it is still actual ... It is only after a memory has lost all life that it can be classed in time, just as only dissected flowers find their way into the herbarium of a botanist.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Actual (117)  |  All (4108)  |  Awareness (36)  |  Become (815)  |  Botanist (23)  |  Cease (79)  |  Class (164)  |  Complex (188)  |  Complexity (111)  |  Dissection (32)  |  Find (998)  |  Flower (106)  |  Herbarium (2)  |  Infinite (231)  |  Life (1795)  |  Lose (159)  |  Memory (134)  |  Must (1526)  |  Sensation (57)  |  Still (613)  |  Time (1877)  |  Way (1217)

Better far off to leave half the ruins and nine-tenths of the churches unseen and to see well the rest; to see them not once, but again and often again; to watch them, to learn them, to live with them, to love them, till they have become a part of life and life’s recollections.
…...
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Become (815)  |  Better (486)  |  Church (56)  |  Far (154)  |  Half (56)  |  Learn (629)  |  Leave (130)  |  Life (1795)  |  Live (628)  |  Love (309)  |  Nine-Tenths (3)  |  Often (106)  |  Part (222)  |  Rest (280)  |  Ruin (42)  |  See (1081)  |  Unseen (22)  |  Watch (109)

Doubtless many can recall certain books which have greatly influenced their lives, and in my own case one stands out especially—a translation of Hofmeister's epoch-making treatise on the comparative morphology of plants. This book, studied while an undergraduate at the University of Michigan, was undoubtedly the most important factor in determining the trend of my botanical investigation for many years.
D.H. Campbell, 'The Centenary of Wilhelm Hofmeister', Science (1925), 62, No. 1597, 127-128. Cited in William C. Steere, Obituary, 'Douglas Houghton Campbell', American Bryological and Lichenological Society, The Bryologist (1953), 127. The book to which Cambell refers is W. Hofmeister, On the Germination, Development, and Fructification of the Higher Cryptogamia, and on the Fructification of the Coniferae, trans. by Frederick Currey (1862).
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Book (392)  |  Botany (57)  |  Certain (550)  |  Epoch (45)  |  Wilhelm Hofmeister (2)  |  Importance (286)  |  Influence (222)  |  Investigation (230)  |  Live (628)  |  Making (300)  |  Morphology (22)  |  Most (1731)  |  Plant (294)  |  Stand (274)  |  Study (653)  |  Translation (21)  |  Treatise (44)  |  Trend (22)  |  Undergraduate (15)  |  University (121)  |  Year (933)

More about the selection theory: Jerne meant that the Socratic idea of learning was a fitting analogy for 'the logical basis of the selective theories of antibody formation': Can the truth (the capability to synthesize an antibody) be learned? If so, it must be assumed not to pre-exist; to be learned, it must be acquired. We are thus confronted with the difficulty to which Socrates calls attention in Meno [ ... ] namely, that it makes as little sense to search for what one does not know as to search for what one knows; what one knows, one cannot search for, since one knows it already, and what one does not know, one cannot search for, since one does not even know what to search for. Socrates resolves this difficulty by postulating that learning is nothing but recollection. The truth (the capability to synthesize an antibody) cannot be brought in, but was already inherent.
'The Natural Selection Theory', in John Cairns, Gunther S. Stent, and James D. Watson (eds.) Phage and the Origins of Molecular Biology (1966), 301.
Science quotes on:  |  Acquired (78)  |  Already (222)  |  Analogy (71)  |  Antibody (6)  |  Attention (190)  |  Basis (173)  |  Call (769)  |  Capability (41)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Exist (443)  |  Formation (96)  |  Idea (843)  |  Inherent (42)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowledge (1529)  |  Learn (629)  |  Learned (235)  |  Learning (274)  |  Little (707)  |  More (2559)  |  Must (1526)  |  Nothing (966)  |  Resolve (40)  |  Search (162)  |  Selection (128)  |  Selective (19)  |  Sense (770)  |  Socrates (16)  |  Synthesis (57)  |  Theory (970)  |  Truth (1057)

Recollections [his autobiographical work] might possibly interest my children or their children. I know that it would have interested me greatly to have read even so short and dull a sketch of the mind of my grandfather, written by himself, and what he thought and did, and how he worked. I have attempted to write the following account of myself as if I were a dead man in another world looking back at my own life. Nor have I found this difficult, for life is nearly over with me.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (192)  |  Attempt (251)  |  Autobiography (56)  |  Back (390)  |  Child (307)  |  Children (200)  |  Dead (59)  |  Difficult (246)  |  Dull (54)  |  Grandfather (14)  |  Himself (461)  |  Interest (386)  |  Know (1518)  |  Life (1795)  |  Looking (189)  |  Man (2251)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Myself (212)  |  Nearly (137)  |  Possibly (111)  |  Read (287)  |  Short (197)  |  Sketch (8)  |  Thought (953)  |  Work (1351)  |  World (1774)  |  Write (230)

The actuality of us being cognizant and accepting of the fact we are but a speck of sand in a universe sized desert, whose existence is irrelevant to any facet of universal function is a hard pill to swallow. Knowing the world will go on for another billion years after death and you will have no recollection of anything, just as you have no recollection of the billion years before your birth is a mind-boggling intuition.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Accept (191)  |  Accepting (22)  |  Actuality (6)  |  Being (1278)  |  Billion (95)  |  Birth (147)  |  Death (388)  |  Desert (56)  |  Existence (456)  |  Facet (8)  |  Fact (1210)  |  Function (228)  |  Hard (243)  |  Intuition (75)  |  Irrelevant (9)  |  Know (1518)  |  Knowing (137)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mind-Boggling (2)  |  Pill (6)  |  Sand (62)  |  Size (60)  |  Speck (23)  |  Swallow (29)  |  Universal (189)  |  Universe (857)  |  Will (2355)  |  World (1774)  |  Year (933)

The advancement of science is slow; it is effected only by virtue of hard work and perseverance. And when a result is attained, should we not in recognition connect it with the efforts of those who have preceded us, who have struggled and suffered in advance? Is it not truly a duty to recall the difficulties which they vanquished, the thoughts which guided them; and how men of different nations, ideas, positions, and characters, moved solely by the love of science, have bequeathed to us the unsolved problem? Should not the last comer recall the researches of his predecessors while adding in his turn his contribution of intelligence and of labor? Here is an intellectual collaboration consecrated entirely to the search for truth, and which continues from century to century.
[Respecting how the work of prior researchers had enabled his isolation of fluorine.]
Proceedings of the Royal Institution (1897). In Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution to July 1897 (1898), 262.
Science quotes on:  |  Advance (280)  |  Advancement (62)  |  Attain (125)  |  Attainment (47)  |  Century (310)  |  Character (243)  |  Collaboration (15)  |  Connect (125)  |  Consecration (3)  |  Continuation (20)  |  Continue (165)  |  Contribution (89)  |  Different (577)  |  Difficulty (196)  |  Duty (68)  |  Effect (393)  |  Effort (227)  |  Fluorine (5)  |  Guide (97)  |  Hard (243)  |  Hard Work (20)  |  Idea (843)  |  Intellect (233)  |  Intellectual (255)  |  Intelligence (211)  |  Isolation (31)  |  Labor (107)  |  Labour (98)  |  Last (426)  |  Love (309)  |  Nation (193)  |  Perseverance (23)  |  Position (77)  |  Predecessor (29)  |  Problem (676)  |  Recognition (88)  |  Research (664)  |  Researcher (33)  |  Result (677)  |  Science (3879)  |  Search (162)  |  Slow (101)  |  Struggle (105)  |  Thought (953)  |  Truly (116)  |  Truth (1057)  |  Turn (447)  |  Unsolved (15)  |  Virtue (109)  |  Work (1351)

The earliest of my childhood recollections is being taken by my grandfather when he set out in the first warm days of early spring with a grubbing hoe (we called it a mattock) on his shoulder to seek the plants, the barks and roots from which the spring medicine for the household was prepared. If I could but remember all that went into that mysterious decoction and the exact method of preparation, and with judicious advertisement put the product upon the market, I would shortly be possessed of wealth which might be made to serve the useful purpose of increasing the salaries of all pathologists. … But, alas! I remember only that the basic ingredients were dogwood bark and sassafras root, and to these were added q.s. bloodroot, poke and yellow dock. That the medicine benefited my grandfather I have every reason to believe, for he was a hale, strong old man, firm in body and mind until the infection came against which even spring medicine was of no avail. That the medicine did me good I well know, for I can see before me even now the green on the south hillside of the old pasture, the sunlight in the strip of wood where the dogwood grew, the bright blossoms and the delicate pale green of the leaf of the sanguinaria, and the even lighter green of the tender buds of the sassafras in the hedgerow, and it is good to have such pictures deeply engraved in the memory.
From address, 'A Medical Retrospect'. Published in Yale Medical Journal (Oct 1910), 17, No. 2, 57. [Note: q.s. in an abbreviation for quantum sufficit meaning “as much as is sufficient,” when used as a quantity specification in medicine and pharmacology. -Webmaster]
Science quotes on:  |   (2863)  |  Against (332)  |  All (4108)  |  Bark (18)  |  Basic (138)  |  Being (1278)  |  Benefit (114)  |  Blossom (21)  |  Body (537)  |  Body And Mind (3)  |  Bright (79)  |  Call (769)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Delicate (43)  |  Early (185)  |  Exact (68)  |  Firm (47)  |  First (1283)  |  Good (889)  |  Grandfather (14)  |  Green (63)  |  Hedgerow (2)  |  Hillside (4)  |  Household (8)  |  Infection (27)  |  Ingredient (15)  |  Know (1518)  |  Leaf (66)  |  Man (2251)  |  Market (20)  |  Medicine (378)  |  Memory (134)  |  Method (505)  |  Mind (1338)  |  Mysterious (79)  |  Old (481)  |  Old Man (4)  |  Pasture (13)  |  Pathologist (5)  |  Picture (143)  |  Plant (294)  |  Poke (5)  |  Possess (156)  |  Preparation (58)  |  Product (160)  |  Purpose (317)  |  Reason (744)  |  Remember (179)  |  Root (120)  |  Salary (7)  |  See (1081)  |  Seek (213)  |  Set (394)  |  Shoulder (33)  |  South (38)  |  Spring (133)  |  Strong (174)  |  Sunlight (23)  |  Useful (250)  |  Warm (69)  |  Wealth (94)  |  Wood (92)  |  Yellow (30)

This speaker reminds me of my childhood in Budapest. There were gypsy magicians who came to town to entertain us children. But as I recollect, there was one important difference: the gypsy only seemed to violate the laws of nature, he never really violated them!
As quoted by William R. Sears in 'Some Recollections of Theodore von Kármán', Address to the Symposium in Memory of Theodore von Kármán, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, National Meeting (13-14 May 1964), Washington, D.C. Printed in Journal of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (Mar 1965), 13>, No. 1, 178. These are likely not verbatim words of Karman, but as recollected by Sears giving an example of von Kármán’s biting anecdotes at public meetings when criticizing a paper he thought really misleading “pseudoscience.”
Science quotes on:  |  Child (307)  |  Childhood (38)  |  Children (200)  |  Criticism (78)  |  Difference (337)  |  Entertain (24)  |  Entertainment (18)  |  Gypsy (2)  |  Important (209)  |  Law (894)  |  Law Of Nature (72)  |  Magician (14)  |  Nature (1926)  |  Never (1087)  |  Reality (261)  |  Reminder (13)  |  Speaker (6)  |  Town (27)  |  Violation (7)

We are made wise not by the recollection of our past, but by the responsibility for our future.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Future (429)  |  Past (337)  |  Responsibility (66)  |  Wise (131)

“Talent is a long patience.” We must look on what we wish to express long enough and with enough attention to discover an aspect that has not been seen and portrayed by another. There is, in everything, something unexplored, because we always use our eyes only with the recollection of what has been thought before on the subject we are contemplating.
From Pierre et Jean (1888), as translated by Alexina Loranger in 'Introduction', Pierre et Jean (Peter and John) (1890), 38-39. The opening words are quoted from Gustave Flaubert. From the original French, “Le talent est une longue patience. — Il s’agit de regarder tout ce qu’on veut exprimer assez longtemps et avec assez d’attention pour en découvrir un aspect qui n’ait été vu et dit par personne. Il y a, dans tout, de l’inexploré, parce que nous sommes habitués à ne nous servir de nos yeux qu’avec le souvenir de ce qu’on a pensé avant nous sur ce que nous contemplons.”
Science quotes on:  |  Aspect (124)  |  Attention (190)  |  Contemplate (18)  |  Contemplating (11)  |  Discover (553)  |  Enough (340)  |  Everything (476)  |  Express (186)  |  Eye (419)  |  Long (790)  |  Look (582)  |  Must (1526)  |  Patience (56)  |  Portray (4)  |  See (1081)  |  Something (719)  |  Subject (521)  |  Talent (94)  |  Thought (953)  |  Unexplored (14)  |  Use (766)  |  Wish (212)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.