Celebrating 18 Years on the Web
TODAY IN SCIENCE HISTORY ®
Find science on or your birthday

Today in Science History - Quickie Quiz
Who said: “Dangerous... to take shelter under a tree, during a thunder-gust. It has been fatal to many, both men and beasts.”
more quiz questions >>
Home > Category Index for Science Quotations > Category Index E > Category: Exact

Exact Quotes (38 quotes)

Die Politik ist keine Wissenschaft, wie viele der Herren Professoren sich einbilden, sondern eine Kunst, sie ist ebensowenig.
Politics is not a science, as many of the professors imagine, but an art, it is just like that.
Original German in Otto von Bismarck, ‎Horst Kohl, Bismarckreden: 1847-1895 (1899), 255. As quoted in translation in William Roscoe Thayer 'Cavour and Bismarck', The Atlantic (Mar 1909), 103, 343.
Science quotes on:  |  Science And Politics (13)

La determination de la relation & de la dépendance mutuelle de ces données dans certains cas particuliers, doit être le premier but du Physicien; & pour cet effet, il falloit one mesure exacte qui indiquât d’une manière invariable & égale dans tous les lieux de la terre, le degré de l'électricité au moyen duquel les expéiences ont été faites… Aussi, l'histoire de l'électricité prouve une vérité suffisamment reconnue; c'est que le Physicien sans mesure ne fait que jouer, & qu'il ne diffère en cela des enfans, que par la nature de son jeu & la construction de ses jouets.
The determination of the relationship and mutual dependence of the facts in particular cases must be the first goal of the Physicist; and for this purpose he requires that an exact measurement may be taken in an equally invariable manner anywhere in the world… Also, the history of electricity yields a well-known truth—that the physicist shirking measurement only plays, different from children only in the nature of his game and the construction of his toys.
'Mémoire sur la mesure de force de l'électricité', Journal de Physique (1782), 21, 191. English version by Google Translate tweaked by Webmaster.
Science quotes on:  |  Case (64)  |  Child (189)  |  Construction (69)  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Dependence (32)  |  Determination (53)  |  Difference (208)  |  Fact (609)  |  Game (45)  |  Goal (81)  |  History Of Science (53)  |  Instrument (73)  |  Invariable (4)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Mutual (22)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Particular (54)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Physics (301)  |  Play (60)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Requirement (45)  |  Toy (14)  |  Truth (750)  |  World (667)

Analogy is a wonderful, useful and most important form of thinking, and biology is saturated with it. Nothing is worse than a horrible mass of undigested facts, and facts are indigestible unless there is some rhyme or reason to them. The physicist, with his facts, seeks reason; the biologist seeks something very much like rhyme, and rhyme is a kind of analogy.... This analogizing, this fine sweeping ability to see likenesses in the midst of differences is the great glory of biology, but biologists don't know it.... They have always been so fascinated and overawed by the superior prestige of exact physical science that they feel they have to imitate it.... In its central content, biology is not accurate thinking, but accurate observation and imaginative thinking, with great sweeping generalizations.
In Science is a Sacred Cow (1950), 98-100.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Analogy (46)  |  Awe (24)  |  Biologist (31)  |  Biology (150)  |  Content (39)  |  Difference (208)  |  Fact (609)  |  Fascination (26)  |  Generalization (26)  |  Glory (44)  |  Horrible (7)  |  Imagination (209)  |  Imitation (17)  |  Importance (183)  |  Likeness (7)  |  Observation (418)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Physicist (130)  |  Prestige (9)  |  Reason (330)  |  Saturation (5)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Undigested (2)  |  Usefulness (70)  |  Wonder (134)

Descriptive geometry has two objects: the first is to establish methods to represent on drawing paper which has only two dimensions,—namely, length and width,—all solids of nature which have three dimensions,—length, width, and depth,—provided, however, that these solids are capable of rigorous definition.
The second object is to furnish means to recognize accordingly an exact description of the forms of solids and to derive thereby all truths which result from their forms and their respective positions.
From On the Purpose of Descriptive Geometry as translated by Arnold Emch in David Eugene Smith, A Source Book in Mathematics (1929), 426.
Science quotes on:  |  Definition (152)  |  Depth (32)  |  Derive (18)  |  Description (72)  |  Dimension (26)  |  Drawing (18)  |  Form (210)  |  Length (13)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Object (110)  |  Paper (52)  |  Recognize (41)  |  Represent (27)  |  Result (250)  |  Rigorous (10)  |  Solid (34)  |  Truth (750)  |  Width (4)

Detection is, or ought to be, an exact science, and should be treated in the same cold unemotional manner. You have attempted to tinge it with romanticism, which produces the same effect as if you worked a love-story into the fifth proposition of Euclid.
By Sherlock Holmes to Dr. Watson, fictional characters in The Sign of Four (1890), 6.
Science quotes on:  |  Attempt (94)  |  Cold (38)  |  Detection (12)  |  Effect (133)  |  Euclid (28)  |  Manner (35)  |  Production (105)  |  Proposition (47)  |  Romanticism (5)  |  Science (1699)  |  Tinge (2)  |  Treatment (88)

Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings—much harder than to say something fine about them which is not the exact truth.
In Adam Bede (1859, 1860), 151.
Science quotes on:  |  Examine (24)  |  False (79)  |  Feeling (79)  |  Find (248)  |  Fine (24)  |  Hard (70)  |  Harder (5)  |  Immediate (27)  |  Motive (26)  |  Say (126)  |  Truth (750)  |  Word (221)

Far better an approximate answer to the right question, which is often vague, than an exact answer to the wrong question, which can always be made precise.
In 'The Future of Data Analysis', Annals of Mathematical Statistics (1962), 33, No. 1, 13-14.
Science quotes on:  |  Answer (201)  |  Approximate (3)  |  Better (131)  |  Precise (17)  |  Question (315)  |  Right (144)  |  Vague (10)  |  Wrong (116)

Hurrah for positive science! long live exact demonstration!
In Leaves of Grass (1867), 49.
Science quotes on:  |  Demonstration (51)  |  Positive (28)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)

If the actual order of the bases on one of the pair of chains were given, one could write down the exact order of the bases on the other one, because of the specific pairing. Thus one chain is, as it were, the complement of the other, and it is this feature which suggests how the deoxyribonucleic acid molecule might duplicate itself.
[Co-author with Francis Crick]
In 'Genetic Implications of the Structure of Deoxyribonucleic Acid', Nature (1958), 171, 965-966.
Science quotes on:  |  Base (43)  |  Chain (38)  |  Complement (3)  |  Deoxyribonucleic Acid (2)  |  Duplicate (4)  |  Molecule (125)  |  Order (167)  |  Pair (10)  |  Specific (30)  |  Suggest (15)  |  Writing (72)

If you ask ... the man in the street ... the human significance of mathematics, the answer of the world will be, that mathematics has given mankind a metrical and computatory art essential to the effective conduct of daily life, that mathematics admits of countless applications in engineering and the natural sciences, and finally that mathematics is a most excellent instrumentality for giving mental discipline... [A mathematician will add] that mathematics is the exact science, the science of exact thought or of rigorous thinking.
Address (28 Mar 1912), Michigan School Masters' Club, Ann Arbor, 'The Humanization of the Teaching of Mathematics. Printed in Science (26 Apr 1912). Collected in The Human Worth of Rigorous Thinking: Essays and Addresses (1916), 65-66.
Science quotes on:  |  Application (117)  |  Computation (11)  |  Conduct (23)  |  Daily Life (5)  |  Definition (152)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Effective (20)  |  Engineering (115)  |  Essential (87)  |  Exact Science (4)  |  Mankind (196)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Mental (57)  |  Metrical (3)  |  Natural Science (62)  |  Rigorous (10)  |  Significance (60)  |  Thinking (222)  |  Thought (374)

In all that has to do with the relations between man and the supernatural, we have to seek for a more than mathematical precision; this should be more exact than science.
In Gravity and Grace, (1947, 1952), 186.
Science quotes on:  |  Man (345)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Precision (38)  |  Relation (96)  |  Science And Religion (267)  |  Supernatural (19)

In order that the facts obtained by observation and experiment may be capable of being used in furtherance of our exact and solid knowledge, they must be apprehended and analysed according to some Conceptions which, applied for this purpose, give distinct and definite results, such as can be steadily taken hold of and reasoned from.
Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1840), Vol. 2, 205.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Capability (35)  |  Conception (63)  |  Definite (27)  |  Distinct (29)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Fact (609)  |  Furtherance (2)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Observation (418)  |  Purpose (138)  |  Reason (330)  |  Result (250)

In science one tries to tell people, in such a way as to be understood by everyone, something that no one ever knew before. But in poetry, it’s the exact opposite.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Everyone (20)  |  Know (321)  |  Opposite (39)  |  People (269)  |  Poetry (96)  |  Science (1699)  |  Tell (67)  |  Try (103)  |  Understand (189)

It hath been an old remark, that Geometry is an excellent Logic. And it must be owned that when the definitions are clear; when the postulata cannot be refused, nor the axioms denied; when from the distinct contemplation and comparison of figures, their properties are derived, by a perpetual well-connected chain of consequences, the objects being still kept in view, and the attention ever fixed upon them; there is acquired a habit of reasoning, close and exact and methodical; which habit strengthens and sharpens the mind, and being transferred to other subjects is of general use in the inquiry after truth.
'The Analyst', in The Works of George Berkeley (1898), Vol. 3, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Axiom (26)  |  Consequence (76)  |  Definition (152)  |  Deny (29)  |  Excellent (15)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Habit (78)  |  Logic (187)  |  Methodical (2)  |  Mind (544)  |  Postulate (23)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Refuse (14)  |  Sharpen (7)  |  Strengthen (13)  |  Truth (750)  |  Value Of Mathematics (2)

It is hard to describe the exact route to scientific achievement, but a good scientist doesn’t get lost as he travels it.
Epigraph in Isaac Asimov’s Book of Science and Nature Quotations (1988), 290.
Science quotes on:  |  Achievement (128)  |  Describe (38)  |  Hard (70)  |  Lost (28)  |  Route (11)  |  Scientific Method (155)  |  Travel (40)

It is mathematics that offers the exact natural sciences a certain measure of security which, without mathematics, they could not attain.
…...
Science quotes on:  |  Attain (21)  |  Certain (84)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Measure (70)  |  Natural Sciences (3)  |  Offer (16)  |  Security (27)

Life is not an exact science; it is an art.
In Samuel Butler and Henry Festing Jones (ed.), 'Reconciliation', The Note-books of Samuel Butler (1912, 1917), 351.
Science quotes on:  |  Art (205)  |  Life (917)  |  Science (1699)

Mathematics is an obscure field, an abstruse science, complicated and exact; yet so many have attained perfection in it that we might conclude almost anyone who seriously applied himself would achieve a measure of success.
In George Edward Martin, The Foundations of Geometry and the Non-Euclidean Plane (1982), 82.
Science quotes on:  |  Abstruse (2)  |  Anyone (26)  |  Attain (21)  |  Complicated (38)  |  Conclude (9)  |  Field (119)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Obscure (19)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Science (1699)  |  Success (202)

Mathematics is the most exact science, and its conclusions are capable of absolute proof. But this is so only because mathematics does not attempt to draw absolute conclusions. All mathematical truths are relative, conditional.
(1923). Quoted, without source, in E.T. Bell, Men of Mathematics (1937), Vol. 1, li.
Science quotes on:  |  Absolute (65)  |  Attempt (94)  |  Capable (26)  |  Conclusion (120)  |  Draw (25)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Proof (192)  |  Relative (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Truth (750)

Natural powers, principally those of steam and falling water, are subsidized and taken into human employment Spinning-machines, power-looms, and all the mechanical devices, acting, among other operatives, in the factories and work-shops, are but so many laborers. They are usually denominated labor-saving machines, but it would be more just to call them labor-doing machines. They are made to be active agents; to have motion, and to produce effect; and though without intelligence, they are guided by laws of science, which are exact and perfect, and they produce results, therefore, in general, more accurate than the human hand is capable of producing.
Speech in Senate (12 Mar 1838). In The Writings and Speeches of Daniel Webster (1903), Vol. 8, 177.
Science quotes on:  |  Accuracy (52)  |  Active (17)  |  Agent (27)  |  Capability (35)  |  Device (24)  |  Effect (133)  |  Employment (22)  |  Factory (13)  |  Falling (6)  |  Hand (103)  |  Human (445)  |  Intelligence (138)  |  Labor-Saving (2)  |  Laborer (6)  |  Law (418)  |  Machine (133)  |  Mechanical (31)  |  Motion (127)  |  Natural (128)  |  Perfect (46)  |  Power (273)  |  Power Loom (2)  |  Principal (15)  |  Production (105)  |  Result (250)  |  Science (1699)  |  Spinning Machine (2)  |  Steam (24)  |  Water (244)  |  Workshop (7)

Nature! … She is the only artist; working-up the most uniform material into utter opposites; arriving, without a trace of effort, at perfection, at the most exact precision, though always veiled under a certain softness.
As quoted by T.H. Huxley, in Norman Lockyer (ed.), 'Nature: Aphorisms by Goethe', Nature (1870), 1, 10.
Science quotes on:  |  Arrive (17)  |  Artist (46)  |  Effort (94)  |  Forming (6)  |  Material (124)  |  Nature (1029)  |  Opposite (39)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Precision (38)  |  Softness (2)  |  Trace (39)  |  Uniform (14)  |  Utter (3)  |  Veil (12)

One aim of physical sciences had been to give an exact picture the material world. One achievement of physics in the twentieth century has been to prove that that aim is unattainable.
From The Ascent of Man (1973), 353.
Science quotes on:  |  20th Century (25)  |  Achievement (128)  |  Aim (58)  |  Material (124)  |  Physical Science (54)  |  Physics (301)  |  Picture (55)  |  Proof (192)  |  Unattainable (6)  |  World (667)

Only science, exact science about human nature itself, and the most sincere approach to it by the aid of the omnipotent scientific method, will deliver man from his present gloom and will purge him from his contemporary share in the sphere of interhuman relations.
In Ivan Pavlov and William Horsley Gantt (trans.), Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928, 1941), Preface, 41.
Science quotes on:  |  Gloom (9)  |  Human Nature (51)  |  Purge (8)  |  Science (1699)  |  Scientific Method (155)

Science enhances the moral value of life, because it furthers a love of truth and reverence—love of truth displaying itself in the constant endeavor to arrive at a more exact knowledge of the world of mind and matter around us, and reverence, because every advance in knowledge brings us face to face with the mystery of our own being.
In Where is Science Going? (1932), 169.
Science quotes on:  |  Advancement (36)  |  Arrival (7)  |  Being (39)  |  Display (22)  |  Endeavor (33)  |  Face To Face (2)  |  Further (6)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Love (164)  |  Matter (270)  |  Mind (544)  |  Moral (100)  |  Mystery (125)  |  Reverence (24)  |  Science (1699)  |  Truth (750)  |  Value (180)

That the fundamental aspects of heredity should have turned out to be so extraordinarily simple supports us in the hope that nature may, after all, be entirely approachable. Her much-advertised inscrutability has once more been found to be an illusion due to our ignorance. This is encouraging, for, if the world in which we live were as complicated as some of our friends would have us believe we might well despair that biology could ever become an exact science.
The Physical Basis of Heredity (1919), 15.
Science quotes on:  |  Biology (150)  |  Complication (20)  |  Despair (25)  |  Heredity (51)  |  Ignorance (190)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Inscrutability (2)  |  Simplicity (126)

The application of algebra to geometry ... has immortalized the name of Descartes, and constitutes the greatest single step ever made in the progress of the exact sciences.
In An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy (1865), 531.
Science quotes on:  |  Algebra (36)  |  Application (117)  |  Constitute (19)  |  Geometry (99)  |  Greatest (53)  |  Immortalize (2)  |  Name (118)  |  Progress (317)  |  Science (1699)

The electrical engineer has an enormous advantage over other engineers; everything lends itself to exact calculation, and a completed machine or any of its parts may he submitted to the most searching electrical and magnetic tests, since these tests, unlike those applied by other engineers, do not destroy the body tested.
From Opening Address, Engineering Section, British Association meeting, Belfast. ,In Norman Lockyer (ed.), Nature (25 Sep 1902), 66, No. 1717, 536.
Science quotes on:  |  Advantage (42)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Destroy (63)  |  Electrical Engineering (9)  |  Engineer (72)  |  Machine (133)  |  Testing (4)

The end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century were remarkable for the small amount of scientific movement going on in this country, especially in its more exact departments. ... Mathematics were at the last gasp, and Astronomy nearly so—I mean in those members of its frame which depend upon precise measurement and systematic calculation. The chilling torpor of routine had begun to spread itself over all those branches of Science which wanted the excitement of experimental research.
Quoted in Sophia Elizabeth De Morgan, Memoir of Augustus De Morgan (1882), 41
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  19th Century (22)  |  Amount (20)  |  Astronomy (175)  |  Calculation (67)  |  Chill (7)  |  Department (33)  |  Excitement (33)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Last (19)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Measurement (148)  |  Movement (65)  |  Precision (38)  |  Remarkable (34)  |  Research (517)  |  Routine (11)  |  Science (1699)  |  Small (97)  |  Spread (19)  |  Systematic (25)  |  Want (120)

The external world of physics has … become a world of shadows. In removing our illusions we have removed the substance, for indeed we have seen that substance is one of the greatest of our illusions. Later perhaps we may inquire whether in our zeal to cut out all that is unreal we may not have used the knife too ruthlessly. Perhaps, indeed, reality is a child which cannot survive without its nurse illusion. But if so, that is of little concern to the scientist, who has good and sufficient reasons for pursuing his investigations in the world of shadows and is content to leave to the philosopher the determination of its exact status in regard to reality.
In Introduction to The Nature of the Physical World (1928), xiv.
Science quotes on:  |  Child (189)  |  Concern (76)  |  Determination (53)  |  External (45)  |  Illusion (38)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Nurse (19)  |  Philosopher (132)  |  Physics (301)  |  Reality (140)  |  Scientist (447)  |  Shadow (35)  |  Status (18)  |  Substance (73)  |  Survive (28)  |  Unreal (2)  |  World (667)  |  Zeal (7)

The great masters of modern analysis are Lagrange, Laplace, and Gauss, who were contemporaries. It is interesting to note the marked contrast in their styles. Lagrange is perfect both in form and matter, he is careful to explain his procedure, and though his arguments are general they are easy to follow. Laplace on the other hand explains nothing, is indifferent to style, and, if satisfied that his results are correct, is content to leave them either with no proof or with a faulty one. Gauss is as exact and elegant as Lagrange, but even more difficult to follow than Laplace, for he removes every trace of the analysis by which he reached his results, and studies to give a proof which while rigorous shall be as concise and synthetical as possible.
History of Mathematics (3rd Ed., 1901), 468.
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Anecdote (17)  |  Concise (4)  |  Contemporary (22)  |  Content (39)  |  Contrast (16)  |  Correct (53)  |  Difficult (62)  |  Easy (56)  |  Elegant (8)  |  Explanation (161)  |  Faulty (2)  |  Carl Friedrich Gauss (55)  |  Count Joseph-Louis de Lagrange (11)  |  Pierre-Simon Laplace (50)  |  Leave (63)  |  Perfection (71)  |  Procedure (16)  |  Proof (192)  |  Reasoning (79)  |  Remove (18)  |  Result (250)  |  Rigor (12)  |  Satisfy (14)  |  Style (15)  |  Synthetic (12)

The growing complexity of civilized life demands with each age broader and more exact knowledge as to the material surroundings and greater precision in our recognition of the invisible forces or tendencies about us.
From Presidential Address (5 Dec 1896) to the Biological Society of Washington, 'The Malarial Parasite and Other Pathogenic Protozoa', Popular Science Monthly (Mar 1897), 642.
Science quotes on:  |  Age (137)  |  Broader (3)  |  Civilized (13)  |  Complexity (80)  |  Demand (52)  |  Force (194)  |  Greater (36)  |  Grow (66)  |  Invisible (30)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Life (917)  |  Material (124)  |  Precision (38)  |  Recognition (62)  |  Surrounding (11)  |  Tendency (40)

The method of scientific investigation is nothing but the expression of the necessary mode of working of the human mind. It is simply the mode at which all phenomena are reasoned about, rendered precise and exact.
In 'Method of Discovery', On Our Knowledge of the Causes of the Phenomena of Organic Nature (1863), 56.
Science quotes on:  |  Expression (82)  |  Human Mind (51)  |  Investigation (123)  |  Mode (29)  |  Necessary (89)  |  Phenomenon (218)  |  Precise (17)  |  Reason (330)  |  Scientific Method (155)

The only way in which to treat the elements of an exact and rigorous science is to apply to them all the rigor and exactness possible.
Quoted in De Morgan, Trigonometry and Double Algebra (1849), Title page.
Science quotes on:  |  Apply (38)  |  Rigor (12)  |  Science (1699)  |  Teaching (99)  |  Treat (17)

The whole art of making experiments in chemistry is founded on the principle: we must always suppose an exact equality or equation between the principles of the body examined and those of the products of its analysis.
From Traité Élémentaire de Chimie (1789), 140. Translation as given in James Riddick Partington, A Short History of Chemistry (1960), 124. This is an alternate translation of part of the same passage on this page that begins “We may lay it down as an incontestible axiom…”
Science quotes on:  |  Analysis (123)  |  Body (193)  |  Chemistry (239)  |  Conservation Of Matter (7)  |  Equality (21)  |  Equation (69)  |  Examined (3)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Principle (228)  |  Product (72)  |  Reactant (2)

There is plenty of room left for exact experiment in art, and the gate has been opened for some time. What had been accomplished in music by the end of the eighteenth century has only begun in the fine arts. Mathematics and physics have given us a clue in the form of rules to be strictly observed or departed from, as the case may be. Here salutary discipline is come to grips first of all with the function of forms, and not with form as the final result … in this way we learn how to look beyond the surface and get to the root of things.
Paul Klee
Quoted in The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (Feb 1959), 59, citing Bauhaus-Zeitschrijt (1928).
Science quotes on:  |  18th Century (17)  |  Art (205)  |  Beyond (65)  |  Century (94)  |  Clue (14)  |  Discipline (38)  |  Experiment (543)  |  Final (33)  |  Function (90)  |  Learn (160)  |  Looking (25)  |  Mathematics (587)  |  Music (66)  |  Observed (5)  |  Physics (301)  |  Result (250)  |  Root (48)  |  Rule (135)  |  Salutary (5)  |  Science And Art (157)  |  Strictly (6)  |  Surface (74)

We have very strong physical and chemical evidence for a large impact; this is the most firmly established part of the whole story. There is an unquestionable mass extinction at this time, and in the fossil groups for which we have the best record, the extinction coincides with the impact to a precision of a centimeter or better in the stratigraphic record. This exact coincidence in timing strongly argues for a causal relationship.
Referring to the theory that he, and his father (physicist Luis W. Alvarez), held that dinosaurs abruptly went extinct as a result of a 6-mile-wide asteroid or comet struck the earth. In American Geophysical Union, EOS (2 Sep 1986), as quoted and cited in John Noble Wilford, 'New Data Extend Era of Dinosaurs' New York Times (9 Nov 1986), A41.
Science quotes on:  |  Argue (17)  |  Causal (6)  |  Chemical (72)  |  Coincide (4)  |  Coincidence (12)  |  Dinosaur (23)  |  Establish (30)  |  Evidence (157)  |  Fossil (107)  |  Impact (21)  |  Large (82)  |  Physical (94)  |  Precision (38)  |  Relationship (59)  |  Unquestionable (6)

[Edison] definitely ended the distinction between the theoretical man of science and the practical man of science, so that today we think of scientific discoveries in connection with their possible present or future application to the needs of man. He took the old rule-of-thumb methods out of industry and substituted exact scientific knowledge, while, on the other hand, he directed scientific research into useful channels.
In My Friend Mr. Edison (1930). Quoted in Dyson Carter, If You Want to Invent (1939), 110.
Science quotes on:  |  Connection (86)  |  Discovery (591)  |  Distinction (37)  |  Thomas Edison (74)  |  Industry (91)  |  Knowledge (1128)  |  Man Of Science (27)  |  Practical (93)  |  Research (517)  |  Technology (199)  |  Theoretical (10)

[The] subjective [historical] element in geologic studies accounts for two characteristic types that can be distinguished among geologists: one considering geology as a creative art, the other regarding geology as an exact science.
In 'The Scientific Character of Geology', The Journal of Geology (Jul 1961), 69, No. 4, 453.
Science quotes on:  |  Account (45)  |  Art (205)  |  Characteristic (66)  |  Considering (6)  |  Creative (41)  |  Distinguish (32)  |  Geologic (2)  |  Geologist (42)  |  Geology (187)  |  Historical (10)  |  Regarding (4)  |  Science (1699)  |  Study (331)  |  Subjective (9)  |  Type (34)


Carl Sagan Thumbnail In science it often happens that scientists say, 'You know that's a really good argument; my position is mistaken,' and then they would actually change their minds and you never hear that old view from them again. They really do it. It doesn't happen as often as it should, because scientists are human and change is sometimes painful. But it happens every day. I cannot recall the last time something like that happened in politics or religion. (1987) -- Carl Sagan
Quotations by:Albert EinsteinIsaac NewtonLord KelvinCharles DarwinSrinivasa RamanujanCarl SaganFlorence NightingaleThomas EdisonAristotleMarie CurieBenjamin FranklinWinston ChurchillGalileo GalileiSigmund FreudRobert BunsenLouis PasteurTheodore RooseveltAbraham LincolnRonald ReaganLeonardo DaVinciMichio KakuKarl PopperJohann GoetheRobert OppenheimerCharles Kettering  ... (more people)

Quotations about:Atomic  BombBiologyChemistryDeforestationEngineeringAnatomyAstronomyBacteriaBiochemistryBotanyConservationDinosaurEnvironmentFractalGeneticsGeologyHistory of ScienceInventionJupiterKnowledgeLoveMathematicsMeasurementMedicineNatural ResourceOrganic ChemistryPhysicsPhysicianQuantum TheoryResearchScience and ArtTeacherTechnologyUniverseVolcanoVirusWind PowerWomen ScientistsX-RaysYouthZoology  ... (more topics)
Sitewide search within all Today In Science History pages:
Visit our Science and Scientist Quotations index for more Science Quotes from archaeologists, biologists, chemists, geologists, inventors and inventions, mathematicians, physicists, pioneers in medicine, science events and technology.

Names index: | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

Categories index: | 1 | 2 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |

- 100 -
Sophie Germain
Gertrude Elion
Ernest Rutherford
James Chadwick
Marcel Proust
William Harvey
Johann Goethe
John Keynes
Carl Gauss
Paul Feyerabend
- 90 -
Antoine Lavoisier
Lise Meitner
Charles Babbage
Ibn Khaldun
Euclid
Ralph Emerson
Robert Bunsen
Frederick Banting
Andre Ampere
Winston Churchill
- 80 -
John Locke
Bronislaw Malinowski
Bible
Thomas Huxley
Alessandro Volta
Erwin Schrodinger
Wilhelm Roentgen
Louis Pasteur
Bertrand Russell
Jean Lamarck
- 70 -
Samuel Morse
John Wheeler
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Fulton
Pierre Laplace
Humphry Davy
Thomas Edison
Lord Kelvin
Theodore Roosevelt
Carolus Linnaeus
- 60 -
Francis Galton
Linus Pauling
Immanuel Kant
Martin Fischer
Robert Boyle
Karl Popper
Paul Dirac
Avicenna
James Watson
William Shakespeare
- 50 -
Stephen Hawking
Niels Bohr
Nikola Tesla
Rachel Carson
Max Planck
Henry Adams
Richard Dawkins
Werner Heisenberg
Alfred Wegener
John Dalton
- 40 -
Pierre Fermat
Edward Wilson
Johannes Kepler
Gustave Eiffel
Giordano Bruno
JJ Thomson
Thomas Kuhn
Leonardo DaVinci
Archimedes
David Hume
- 30 -
Andreas Vesalius
Rudolf Virchow
Richard Feynman
James Hutton
Alexander Fleming
Emile Durkheim
Benjamin Franklin
Robert Oppenheimer
Robert Hooke
Charles Kettering
- 20 -
Carl Sagan
James Maxwell
Marie Curie
Rene Descartes
Francis Crick
Hippocrates
Michael Faraday
Srinivasa Ramanujan
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
- 10 -
Aristotle
John Watson
Rosalind Franklin
Michio Kaku
Isaac Asimov
Charles Darwin
Sigmund Freud
Albert Einstein
Florence Nightingale
Isaac Newton



who invites your feedback
Thank you for sharing.
Today in Science History
Sign up for Newsletter
with quiz, quotes and more.